Barbara Brody – Life by Daily Burn http://dailyburn.com/life Wed, 24 Jan 2018 03:12:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.2 5 Healthier Ways to Detox (That Aren’t Juice Cleanses) http://dailyburn.com/life/health/no-juice-cleanse-healthy-detox-tips/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/no-juice-cleanse-healthy-detox-tips/#respond Sat, 05 Aug 2017 13:15:38 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=24538 5 Healthier Ways to Detox (That Aren't Juice Cleanses)

[caption id="attachment_60814" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Healthier Ways to Detox (That Aren't Juice Cleanses) Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Forget colonics and ultra-low-calorie juice fasts. If you want to clear out toxins and boost your overall health, there are smarter and safer ways to do it. Here are five expert-approved tactics that are guaranteed to make you feel like a better, fresher version of yourself.

RELATED: Is Your Juice Cleanse Doing More Harm Than Good?

5 Smarter Ways to Detox Your Body

1. Eat Clean

"View each meal as a chance to heal."

Cruciferous veggies such as broccoli, cauliflower, kale, cabbage and bok choy contain phytonutrients that also help your body produce more glutathione, says Mark Hyman, MD, founder of The UltraWellness Center in Lenox, MA and author of the 10-Day Detox Diet. Other detox-friendly foods include dandelion greens, which improve the flow of bile in the liver; celery, which increases urine output; and cilantro, which Hyman says can help remove heavy metals such as mercury and lead from the body. Wash down whatever you're munching on with a cup of decaf green tea to give your metabolism a kick and further aid in the eradication of unwanted toxins.

"View each meal as a chance to heal," says Hyman. "If you eat the right foods, the body knows what to do so you can regain your health by eliminating problems such as fatigue, bloating and brain fog.”

2. Take a Breather

Deep breathing — especially a technique called ujjayi breathing — may help get rid of toxins. This technique builds can help eliminate excess carbon dioxide each time you exhale, says Sinda Anzovino, a Westchester, New York-based yoga instructor at Yoga by Sinda, New York Sports Clubs, and Life Time Athletic. To begin the process, sit in a comfortable position and breathe in and out deeply through your nose. "While inhaling, imagine that your throat is opening as if you were yawning," says Anzovino. "While exhaling, try to constrict the back of the throat and make a soft 'ha' sound as if you're mimicking the sound of the ocean." Silently count to five on each inhale and exhale; continue for five to 15 minutes. Afterward you should feel relaxed and energized.

RELATED: Stressed? These GIFs Will Help You Relax, Stat

3. Snooze to Lose

While you're asleep your brain's waste-removal team, called the glymphatic system, is working overtime, according to research from the University of Rochester Medical Center. Toxic proteins linked to Alzheimer's disease build up while you're awake, and getting adequate shut-eye is key to making sure they're cleared out as quickly and efficiently as possible. In fact, scientists discovered that the glymphatic system is nearly 10 times more active during sleep than while you’re up and about. Most adults need seven to nine hours a night, so set your DVR instead of staying up late to catch your favorite talk show or TV series.

4. Soak in Good Health

Whether you're really sick or just run-down, chances are you're low on glutathione, says HymanYour body naturally makes this protective antioxidant, which zaps free radicals and helps your liver filter out toxins. However, things like stress, illness, and environmental pollution all deplete your levels. One easy way to build them back up is to take a bath with Epsom salts, which contain sulfur. Sulfur boosts glutathione because glutathione is, in part, made up of sulfur molecules, explains Hyman. "Epsom salt also has magnesium, so it will help you relax and sleep." Simply add two cups the next time you draw a hot bath.

RELATED: 5 Blissful Meditation Studios to Stop and Feel the Zen

5. Drink More Water, Less Alcohol

We know, it sounds difficult but it's totally doable. The body's natural detoxification process occurs in the liver and for your liver to function properly, you need to stay hydrated (as well as get good sleep and exercise), says Kate Geagan, RD and author of Go Green Get Lean. What's more: Some toxins in the body are water soluble. “Usually if they’re water soluble, you will naturally urinate them out within 24 to 48 hours," says Dr. Bobby Pourziaee, foot and ankle surgeon and owner of the Spa on Rodeo. To make that happen more frequently, you have to fill up on water. (Need some ideas for how to drink more? Try these fruit-infused H2O recipes.)

On the flip side, alcohol consumption creates metabolic by-products that can mess with liver function, as well as cause inflammation. So if you're looking to flush out your system, booze could do quite the opposite.

Originally published February 2014. Updated August 2017. 

Read More
How to Do a Sugar Detox (Without Going Crazy)
7 Easy Kitchen Hacks for Clean Eating
Could Eating Charcoal Help You Detox?

The post 5 Healthier Ways to Detox (That Aren’t Juice Cleanses) appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
5 Healthier Ways to Detox (That Aren't Juice Cleanses)

[caption id="attachment_60814" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Healthier Ways to Detox (That Aren't Juice Cleanses) Photo: Pond5[/caption] Forget colonics and ultra-low-calorie juice fasts. If you want to clear out toxins and boost your overall health, there are smarter and safer ways to do it. Here are five expert-approved tactics that are guaranteed to make you feel like a better, fresher version of yourself. RELATED: Is Your Juice Cleanse Doing More Harm Than Good?

5 Smarter Ways to Detox Your Body

1. Eat Clean

"View each meal as a chance to heal."
Cruciferous veggies such as broccoli, cauliflower, kale, cabbage and bok choy contain phytonutrients that also help your body produce more glutathione, says Mark Hyman, MD, founder of The UltraWellness Center in Lenox, MA and author of the 10-Day Detox Diet. Other detox-friendly foods include dandelion greens, which improve the flow of bile in the liver; celery, which increases urine output; and cilantro, which Hyman says can help remove heavy metals such as mercury and lead from the body. Wash down whatever you're munching on with a cup of decaf green tea to give your metabolism a kick and further aid in the eradication of unwanted toxins. "View each meal as a chance to heal," says Hyman. "If you eat the right foods, the body knows what to do so you can regain your health by eliminating problems such as fatigue, bloating and brain fog.”

2. Take a Breather

Deep breathing — especially a technique called ujjayi breathing — may help get rid of toxins. This technique builds can help eliminate excess carbon dioxide each time you exhale, says Sinda Anzovino, a Westchester, New York-based yoga instructor at Yoga by Sinda, New York Sports Clubs, and Life Time Athletic. To begin the process, sit in a comfortable position and breathe in and out deeply through your nose. "While inhaling, imagine that your throat is opening as if you were yawning," says Anzovino. "While exhaling, try to constrict the back of the throat and make a soft 'ha' sound as if you're mimicking the sound of the ocean." Silently count to five on each inhale and exhale; continue for five to 15 minutes. Afterward you should feel relaxed and energized. RELATED: Stressed? These GIFs Will Help You Relax, Stat

3. Snooze to Lose

While you're asleep your brain's waste-removal team, called the glymphatic system, is working overtime, according to research from the University of Rochester Medical Center. Toxic proteins linked to Alzheimer's disease build up while you're awake, and getting adequate shut-eye is key to making sure they're cleared out as quickly and efficiently as possible. In fact, scientists discovered that the glymphatic system is nearly 10 times more active during sleep than while you’re up and about. Most adults need seven to nine hours a night, so set your DVR instead of staying up late to catch your favorite talk show or TV series.

4. Soak in Good Health

Whether you're really sick or just run-down, chances are you're low on glutathione, says HymanYour body naturally makes this protective antioxidant, which zaps free radicals and helps your liver filter out toxins. However, things like stress, illness, and environmental pollution all deplete your levels. One easy way to build them back up is to take a bath with Epsom salts, which contain sulfur. Sulfur boosts glutathione because glutathione is, in part, made up of sulfur molecules, explains Hyman. "Epsom salt also has magnesium, so it will help you relax and sleep." Simply add two cups the next time you draw a hot bath. RELATED: 5 Blissful Meditation Studios to Stop and Feel the Zen

5. Drink More Water, Less Alcohol

We know, it sounds difficult but it's totally doable. The body's natural detoxification process occurs in the liver and for your liver to function properly, you need to stay hydrated (as well as get good sleep and exercise), says Kate Geagan, RD and author of Go Green Get Lean. What's more: Some toxins in the body are water soluble. “Usually if they’re water soluble, you will naturally urinate them out within 24 to 48 hours," says Dr. Bobby Pourziaee, foot and ankle surgeon and owner of the Spa on Rodeo. To make that happen more frequently, you have to fill up on water. (Need some ideas for how to drink more? Try these fruit-infused H2O recipes.) On the flip side, alcohol consumption creates metabolic by-products that can mess with liver function, as well as cause inflammation. So if you're looking to flush out your system, booze could do quite the opposite. Originally published February 2014. Updated August 2017.  Read More How to Do a Sugar Detox (Without Going Crazy) 7 Easy Kitchen Hacks for Clean Eating Could Eating Charcoal Help You Detox?

The post 5 Healthier Ways to Detox (That Aren’t Juice Cleanses) appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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What No One Tells You About Indoor Tanning http://dailyburn.com/life/lifestyle/is-indoor-tanning-dangerous/ http://dailyburn.com/life/lifestyle/is-indoor-tanning-dangerous/#comments Tue, 28 Jun 2016 14:15:45 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=26346

[caption id="attachment_50563" align="alignnone" width="620"]What No One Tells You About Indoor Tanning Photo: Pond5[/caption]

You rounded up your friends, booked the flights, and packed your new swimsuit. Now you just need to hit the salon so you don't show up at the beach looking pasty... right? Well, wait a second: Even though more than a million Americans per day partake in indoor tanning, joining their ranks is a risky move. Surely you've heard that fake baking causes skin cancer, but maybe you're not totally convinced — or you could be buying into some common misconceptions about the practice. Read on for the facts so you can safeguard your health — and your looks.

RELATED: 10 Ways You're Using Sunscreen All Wrong

5 Big-Time Indoor Tanning Myths

You've heard: "A base tan protects against burning."

Reality: The idea that getting a little color now will stop you from burning later is one of those myths that just won't go away. "A tan — whether it comes from a UV lamp or natural sunlight — only confers an SPF of 4," which isn't high enough to prevent a sunburn, says Kavita Mariwalla, M.D., assistant clinical professor of dermatology at SUNY at Stony Brook. The best way to avoid turning the color of a lobster is, you guessed it, to skip the intentional tanning and wear sunscreen. Pick a broad-spectrum product with an SPF of at least 30. A wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses are musts as well, says Mariwalla.

You've heard: "Indoor tanning beds are safer than the sun's rays."

Reality: UV light that's strong enough to cause pigment changes in your skin is dangerous, period. Plus some sunlamps deliver a dose of radiation that's substantially stronger than what you'd get from natural light. It's also worth noting that people do get burned at tanning salons — and each year 1,800 of them are injured badly enough to end up in the emergency room, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

RELATED: Vitamin D Deficiency: What You Need to Know

You've heard: "Tanning is only a problem if you do it often."

Reality: "Just one indoor tanning session increases the risk of developing melanoma by 20 percent," says Mariwalla. Even more frightening: "If you're younger than 35 and have been going to tanning beds, your lifetime risk of developing melanoma increases by as much as 90 percent," she says. The trouble stems from a concentrated dose of UV radiation, which damages the DNA of skin cells.

You've heard: "Skin cancer is easily cured."

Reality: It's true that there are different types of skin cancer, and they're not equally deadly. But melanoma — which can be fatal— is the most common form of cancer diagnosed in young adults age 25 to 29. While several factors (including genetics) may play a role, about 86 percent of melanomas are directly linked to UV exposure. One person dies of melanoma every hour, according to the American Cancer Society.

RELATED: 5 Reasons to Invest in New Shades

You've heard: "Everyone looks better tan."

Reality: A recent study from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine found that many college-age women are continuing to visit tanning salons despite knowing the risks, mainly because they like how it makes them look. Whether darker skin is more attractive is a matter of opinion, but one thing is certain: No one wants premature wrinkles, age spots and fine lines — and UVA rays (which come from the sun as well as from tanning beds) are responsible for these signs of aging. If you're determined to sport a golden glow, reach for a bottle of bronzer or get a professional spray tan. "Even though I tell patients 'pale is the new tan,' I love self-tanners," says Mariwalla.

To find more information about the dangers and risks of indoor tanning head to The Skin Cancer Foundation and the American Academy of Dermatology.

Originally posted on March 26, 2014. Updated June 2016. 

The post What No One Tells You About Indoor Tanning appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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[caption id="attachment_50563" align="alignnone" width="620"]What No One Tells You About Indoor Tanning Photo: Pond5[/caption] You rounded up your friends, booked the flights, and packed your new swimsuit. Now you just need to hit the salon so you don't show up at the beach looking pasty... right? Well, wait a second: Even though more than a million Americans per day partake in indoor tanning, joining their ranks is a risky move. Surely you've heard that fake baking causes skin cancer, but maybe you're not totally convinced — or you could be buying into some common misconceptions about the practice. Read on for the facts so you can safeguard your health — and your looks. RELATED: 10 Ways You're Using Sunscreen All Wrong

5 Big-Time Indoor Tanning Myths

You've heard: "A base tan protects against burning." Reality: The idea that getting a little color now will stop you from burning later is one of those myths that just won't go away. "A tan — whether it comes from a UV lamp or natural sunlight — only confers an SPF of 4," which isn't high enough to prevent a sunburn, says Kavita Mariwalla, M.D., assistant clinical professor of dermatology at SUNY at Stony Brook. The best way to avoid turning the color of a lobster is, you guessed it, to skip the intentional tanning and wear sunscreen. Pick a broad-spectrum product with an SPF of at least 30. A wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses are musts as well, says Mariwalla. You've heard: "Indoor tanning beds are safer than the sun's rays." Reality: UV light that's strong enough to cause pigment changes in your skin is dangerous, period. Plus some sunlamps deliver a dose of radiation that's substantially stronger than what you'd get from natural light. It's also worth noting that people do get burned at tanning salons — and each year 1,800 of them are injured badly enough to end up in the emergency room, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. RELATED: Vitamin D Deficiency: What You Need to Know You've heard: "Tanning is only a problem if you do it often." Reality: "Just one indoor tanning session increases the risk of developing melanoma by 20 percent," says Mariwalla. Even more frightening: "If you're younger than 35 and have been going to tanning beds, your lifetime risk of developing melanoma increases by as much as 90 percent," she says. The trouble stems from a concentrated dose of UV radiation, which damages the DNA of skin cells. You've heard: "Skin cancer is easily cured." Reality: It's true that there are different types of skin cancer, and they're not equally deadly. But melanoma — which can be fatal— is the most common form of cancer diagnosed in young adults age 25 to 29. While several factors (including genetics) may play a role, about 86 percent of melanomas are directly linked to UV exposure. One person dies of melanoma every hour, according to the American Cancer Society. RELATED: 5 Reasons to Invest in New Shades You've heard: "Everyone looks better tan." Reality: A recent study from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine found that many college-age women are continuing to visit tanning salons despite knowing the risks, mainly because they like how it makes them look. Whether darker skin is more attractive is a matter of opinion, but one thing is certain: No one wants premature wrinkles, age spots and fine lines — and UVA rays (which come from the sun as well as from tanning beds) are responsible for these signs of aging. If you're determined to sport a golden glow, reach for a bottle of bronzer or get a professional spray tan. "Even though I tell patients 'pale is the new tan,' I love self-tanners," says Mariwalla. To find more information about the dangers and risks of indoor tanning head to The Skin Cancer Foundation and the American Academy of Dermatology. Originally posted on March 26, 2014. Updated June 2016. 

The post What No One Tells You About Indoor Tanning appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
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Is 10,000 Steps a Day Really the Secret to Better Health? http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/10000-steps-a-day-health-benefits/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/10000-steps-a-day-health-benefits/#respond Mon, 07 Dec 2015 16:15:17 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=46021 Is 10,000 Steps a Day Really the Secret to Better Health?

[caption id="attachment_46026" align="alignnone" width="620"]Is 10,000 Steps a Day Really the Secret to Better Health? Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Your best friend is sporting the newest FitBit, your boss just announced a zombie-inspired walking challenge, and your mom is suddenly more interested in counting steps than Weight Watchers points. Meanwhile, all of them want to know if you're managing to rack up 10,000 steps a day. So are you? And if you're not, should you be?

First, a quick history lesson: While manufacturers of fitness trackers such as FitBit and Garmin might very well be responsible for the current 10,000-step fixation, the hype actually started in Japan back in the 1960s. While the Tokyo Olympics was happening, locals started thinking about their own fitness prowess. Soon after, the first commercial pedometer — called the manpo-meter — was introduced.

RELATED: 15 Races for People Who’d Rather Walk Than Run

Manpo means 10,000 steps in Japanese, and the number was selected after research revealed that men who burn at least 2,000 calories per week by exercising have a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. That breaks down to about 300 calories per day, which most people can torch by taking 10,000 steps, explains David R. Bassett, Jr., professor of kinesiology, recreation, and sport studies at the University of Tennessee.

Since then, there's been plenty of other research proving that 10,000 steps a day — which equals about five miles — can help your health. "There are over 300 peer-reviewed articles with a focus on the 10,000 steps per day protocol," says Jinger S. Gottschall, associate professor of kinesiology at Penn State. One study, for example, found that people who take more than 10,000 steps a day have lower blood pressure levels and better cardiovascular fitness. Another determined that getting close to 10,000 steps helps lower blood glucose levels and cuts the risk of developing diabetes. Experts also say that this amount of activity can help you maintain your weight.

RELATED: The Easiest 5K and 10K Training Plan Ever (Walking, Allowed)

When 10,000 Steps a Day Is Too Much

"You'll need to move more if your goal is weight loss."

Of course, there's no such thing as a one-size-fits-all prescription for fitness, and for some people, 10,000 steps might be overkill. If you're new to exercise, you'll want to aim for a slightly less ambitious target, says Gottschall. Try shooting for 3,000 steps per day, three to five days a week. Each week, tack on another 500 steps per day. You should end up hitting the 10,000-per-day mark in a few months.

People over 65 might also be OK with getting a little less, says Bassett. "I'm my opinion, 10,000 steps a day is a good goal for young- to- middle-aged adults," but it might be too much for some seniors.

RELATED: Why the U.S. Surgeon General Wants You to Walk More

Should You Aim Higher?

Although 10,000 steps might sound like a lot, you'll need to move more if your goal is weight loss. While this amount of activity can help keep your weight steady, it isn't usually enough to make the scale go down.

People who are already pretty active should also aim higher; that's the only way you'll see your fitness level continue to rise. (Here’s why your fitness tracker isn’t making you thinner — yet.) Try extending the duration of your workouts by 10 percent each week. Or up the intensity by jogging or running that same number of steps instead of walking, says Gottschall.

Mixing things up is also ideal, so it's best to engage in a variety of activities — say, swimming or biking, in addition to walking or running. Be sure to add some strength training to your routine as well.

Got kids? Children ages 6 to 12 definitely need extra activity; the President's Council on Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition suggests that they get at least 12,000 steps.

RELATED: The 15 Most Underrated Exercises, According to Trainers

How to Up Your Count, One Step at a Time

Simply strapping on a fitness tracker — whether it's a $9 drugstore pedometer or a fancier gadget that measures your heart rate and the number of calories you burn — can get you motivated, at least initially. You've probably heard that little things, like taking the stairs instead of the elevator or parking further from a building's entrance, can help, too. That's true, but you'll probably have to make a bigger effort if you're serious about meeting your daily step goal, says Bassett. Here are a few tricks to try:

  • Instead of "park and ride," do the "park and walk," says Bassett. Drive until you're a mile or two from your office, then hoof it the rest of the way.
  • Take your kids on a treasure hunt, complete with a map and prizes. Or get in on a real-life treasure hunt by joining the geocaching craze. All you need is a GPS-enabled device (such as your smartphone).
  • Host a walking meeting instead of joining your team at the conference table.
  • Get a treadmill desk. Some models cost thousands of dollars, but if you're crafty and you already own a treadmill (or can score a used one) you can DIY one for next to nothing.

Don’t own a wearable? No worries. Here’s why apps might be just as good at tracking steps.

The post Is 10,000 Steps a Day Really the Secret to Better Health? appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
Is 10,000 Steps a Day Really the Secret to Better Health?

[caption id="attachment_46026" align="alignnone" width="620"]Is 10,000 Steps a Day Really the Secret to Better Health? Photo: Pond5[/caption] Your best friend is sporting the newest FitBit, your boss just announced a zombie-inspired walking challenge, and your mom is suddenly more interested in counting steps than Weight Watchers points. Meanwhile, all of them want to know if you're managing to rack up 10,000 steps a day. So are you? And if you're not, should you be? First, a quick history lesson: While manufacturers of fitness trackers such as FitBit and Garmin might very well be responsible for the current 10,000-step fixation, the hype actually started in Japan back in the 1960s. While the Tokyo Olympics was happening, locals started thinking about their own fitness prowess. Soon after, the first commercial pedometer — called the manpo-meter — was introduced. RELATED: 15 Races for People Who’d Rather Walk Than Run Manpo means 10,000 steps in Japanese, and the number was selected after research revealed that men who burn at least 2,000 calories per week by exercising have a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. That breaks down to about 300 calories per day, which most people can torch by taking 10,000 steps, explains David R. Bassett, Jr., professor of kinesiology, recreation, and sport studies at the University of Tennessee. Since then, there's been plenty of other research proving that 10,000 steps a day — which equals about five miles — can help your health. "There are over 300 peer-reviewed articles with a focus on the 10,000 steps per day protocol," says Jinger S. Gottschall, associate professor of kinesiology at Penn State. One study, for example, found that people who take more than 10,000 steps a day have lower blood pressure levels and better cardiovascular fitness. Another determined that getting close to 10,000 steps helps lower blood glucose levels and cuts the risk of developing diabetes. Experts also say that this amount of activity can help you maintain your weight. RELATED: The Easiest 5K and 10K Training Plan Ever (Walking, Allowed)

When 10,000 Steps a Day Is Too Much

"You'll need to move more if your goal is weight loss."
Of course, there's no such thing as a one-size-fits-all prescription for fitness, and for some people, 10,000 steps might be overkill. If you're new to exercise, you'll want to aim for a slightly less ambitious target, says Gottschall. Try shooting for 3,000 steps per day, three to five days a week. Each week, tack on another 500 steps per day. You should end up hitting the 10,000-per-day mark in a few months. People over 65 might also be OK with getting a little less, says Bassett. "I'm my opinion, 10,000 steps a day is a good goal for young- to- middle-aged adults," but it might be too much for some seniors. RELATED: Why the U.S. Surgeon General Wants You to Walk More

Should You Aim Higher?

Although 10,000 steps might sound like a lot, you'll need to move more if your goal is weight loss. While this amount of activity can help keep your weight steady, it isn't usually enough to make the scale go down. People who are already pretty active should also aim higher; that's the only way you'll see your fitness level continue to rise. (Here’s why your fitness tracker isn’t making you thinner — yet.) Try extending the duration of your workouts by 10 percent each week. Or up the intensity by jogging or running that same number of steps instead of walking, says Gottschall. Mixing things up is also ideal, so it's best to engage in a variety of activities — say, swimming or biking, in addition to walking or running. Be sure to add some strength training to your routine as well. Got kids? Children ages 6 to 12 definitely need extra activity; the President's Council on Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition suggests that they get at least 12,000 steps. RELATED: The 15 Most Underrated Exercises, According to Trainers

How to Up Your Count, One Step at a Time

Simply strapping on a fitness tracker — whether it's a $9 drugstore pedometer or a fancier gadget that measures your heart rate and the number of calories you burn — can get you motivated, at least initially. You've probably heard that little things, like taking the stairs instead of the elevator or parking further from a building's entrance, can help, too. That's true, but you'll probably have to make a bigger effort if you're serious about meeting your daily step goal, says Bassett. Here are a few tricks to try:
  • Instead of "park and ride," do the "park and walk," says Bassett. Drive until you're a mile or two from your office, then hoof it the rest of the way.
  • Take your kids on a treasure hunt, complete with a map and prizes. Or get in on a real-life treasure hunt by joining the geocaching craze. All you need is a GPS-enabled device (such as your smartphone).
  • Host a walking meeting instead of joining your team at the conference table.
  • Get a treadmill desk. Some models cost thousands of dollars, but if you're crafty and you already own a treadmill (or can score a used one) you can DIY one for next to nothing.
Don’t own a wearable? No worries. Here’s why apps might be just as good at tracking steps.

The post Is 10,000 Steps a Day Really the Secret to Better Health? appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
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12 Ways to Survive Thanksgiving, Minus the Food Coma http://dailyburn.com/life/health/healthy-thanksgiving-weight-loss-tips/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/healthy-thanksgiving-weight-loss-tips/#respond Thu, 26 Nov 2015 14:15:58 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=34565 Thanksgiving Weight Loss Tips

[caption id="attachment_34566" align="alignnone" width="620"]12 Thanksgiving Weight Loss Tips Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Gravy-drenched drumsticks, buttery mashed potatoes, and gooey pecan pie all sound scrumptious — until you think about what they'll do to your waistline. While you shouldn’t deprive yourself of all your favorite Thanksgiving staples, cutting back just a little and making some smart swaps can go a long way in maintaining the physique you’ve worked hard to build. Try these 12 expert-backed tips to make it through turkey day without feeling like a stuffed, well, you know.

RELATED: I'm Exercising More — So Why Am I Gaining Weight?

12 Genius Tips for a Thanksgiving You Won't Regret

1. Eat before the big meal.
Yes, you read that correctly! Showing up for the feast with a rumbling tummy is a recipe for over-eating, so be sure to pre-game by having a nutritious, low-cal snack. A bowl of vegetable soup about one hour before mealtime should help tame your hunger, says Sonya Angelone, R.D., a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Picking at an appetizer veggie platter is a good option as well.

RELATED: Low Calorie Foods That Will Actually Fill You Up

2. Dress to impress.
Save your baggy, comfy clothes for another occasion. Instead, break out a form-fitting garment — think skinny jeans or a curve-hugging dress. "You'll be less likely to overeat if you're wearing something a little snug, because you'll start feeling uncomfortable more quickly," says Keri Gans, R.D., author of The Small Change Diet. If you can make it through the meal without having to undo the top button of your pants, you’re in good shape.

3. Make single-size versions of decadent dishes.
Want to be the perfect host? Add flair to the table and stop everyone, including yourself, from overdoing it by offering individual portions of the fattiest items on the menu, suggests Jackie Newgent, R.D., culinary nutritionist and author of The With or Without Meat Cookbook. "For instance, bake stuffing in cups of a muffin pan; make sweet potato or green bean casserole in individual ramekins; ladle creamy soups into espresso cups; or serve gravy or rich salad dressing in shot glasses." Pre-sizing eliminates the opportunity to pile those taters too high.

RELATED: 15 Healthy Thanksgiving Side Dishes

4. Don’t worry, be picky.
Before sitting down at the dinner table, have a few favorites foods in mind that you plan to indulge in   — and don't be afraid to change course if the first taste proves to be more "meh" than marvelous. "If it isn't everything you'd hoped it would be, don't waste calories by having another bite," says Elisa Zied, R.D., author of Younger Next Week. "Try something different." Wouldn’t you rather fill up on yummy fare rather than an average dish?

5. Make faux mashed potatoes.
Can't limit yourself to a small scoop of these buttery spuds? Then bypass them entirely in favor of cauliflower. "For a delicious stand-in, boil cauliflower, mash it, and add a little skim milk, lemon and garlic," say Tammy Lakatos Shames, R.D., and Lyssie Lakatos, R.D., aka "The Nutrition Twins." The similar texture and color will trick you into thinking you’re getting the real thing.

6. Choose booze or sugar.
Cocktails and dessert are usually both laden with sugar and calories, so pick a singular indulgence — but still be mindful of serving sizes. Think one small piece of pie or a half-cup of eggnog, says Zied, will do the trick.

RELATED: 12 Drinks That Aren’t Worth the Calories

7. Mix up a 45-calorie cocktail.
If liquor and dessert are equally essential to you enjoying the holiday, at least choose your libation wisely. For a mere 45 calories you can have a "Fruity Tooty Spritzer," say Lakatos and Lakatos Shames:  Simply combine 1 cup sparkling water, 2 ounces vodka, 1 tablespoon grapefruit juice and 6 raspberries. Garnish with fresh mint leaves. For more better-for-you beverages, check out these 10 Healthy Holiday Cocktail Recipes.

8. Eat off colorful plates.
Leave the fancy white china in the cabinet. "You’ll likely eat more when light-colored foods, such as turkey and mashed potatoes, are served on white or cream plates," says Newgent. "Research has found that the more contrast between your food and plate color, the less you’ll likely eat — or overeat." Bring on the bolds!

9. Go to the back of the line.
Heading to a holiday buffet? Let others get their fill first. "Once the cheese platter and desserts have been picked over they won’t seem nearly as enticing," says Karen Ansel, R.D., a New York-based nutritionist. As hard as it may be, fight the urge to be number one.

RELATED: 5 Grocery Store Health Traps to Avoid This Thanksgiving

10. Choose appetizers that provide visual clues.
If you tend to inhale your food without realizing how much you consumed, opt for nibbles like in-shell pistachio nuts. "Their empty shells are a helpful visual cue about how much you’ve eaten, potentially encouraging you to eat less," says Ansel. Chicken satay and shrimp cocktail are also good options, as you can watch the skewers and tails stack up.

11. Draw a clear finish line.
Once you've had your fair share, reach for a "meal ender" to prevent you from picking at whatever's in front of you. Zied suggests popping a breath strip, sucking on a strong mint, or reapplying your lip gloss. Another trick: Pour some water on your plate so you won’t want to use it anymore — just make sure no one’s watching.

12. Join the cleanup crew.
"One hour spent clearing the table and washing dishes while you’re standing can whittle off about 100 calories," says Newgent. Plus your host will be grateful!

The post 12 Ways to Survive Thanksgiving, Minus the Food Coma appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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Thanksgiving Weight Loss Tips

[caption id="attachment_34566" align="alignnone" width="620"]12 Thanksgiving Weight Loss Tips Photo: Pond5[/caption] Gravy-drenched drumsticks, buttery mashed potatoes, and gooey pecan pie all sound scrumptious — until you think about what they'll do to your waistline. While you shouldn’t deprive yourself of all your favorite Thanksgiving staples, cutting back just a little and making some smart swaps can go a long way in maintaining the physique you’ve worked hard to build. Try these 12 expert-backed tips to make it through turkey day without feeling like a stuffed, well, you know. RELATED: I'm Exercising More — So Why Am I Gaining Weight?

12 Genius Tips for a Thanksgiving You Won't Regret

1. Eat before the big meal. Yes, you read that correctly! Showing up for the feast with a rumbling tummy is a recipe for over-eating, so be sure to pre-game by having a nutritious, low-cal snack. A bowl of vegetable soup about one hour before mealtime should help tame your hunger, says Sonya Angelone, R.D., a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Picking at an appetizer veggie platter is a good option as well. RELATED: Low Calorie Foods That Will Actually Fill You Up 2. Dress to impress. Save your baggy, comfy clothes for another occasion. Instead, break out a form-fitting garment — think skinny jeans or a curve-hugging dress. "You'll be less likely to overeat if you're wearing something a little snug, because you'll start feeling uncomfortable more quickly," says Keri Gans, R.D., author of The Small Change Diet. If you can make it through the meal without having to undo the top button of your pants, you’re in good shape. 3. Make single-size versions of decadent dishes. Want to be the perfect host? Add flair to the table and stop everyone, including yourself, from overdoing it by offering individual portions of the fattiest items on the menu, suggests Jackie Newgent, R.D., culinary nutritionist and author of The With or Without Meat Cookbook. "For instance, bake stuffing in cups of a muffin pan; make sweet potato or green bean casserole in individual ramekins; ladle creamy soups into espresso cups; or serve gravy or rich salad dressing in shot glasses." Pre-sizing eliminates the opportunity to pile those taters too high. RELATED: 15 Healthy Thanksgiving Side Dishes 4. Don’t worry, be picky. Before sitting down at the dinner table, have a few favorites foods in mind that you plan to indulge in   — and don't be afraid to change course if the first taste proves to be more "meh" than marvelous. "If it isn't everything you'd hoped it would be, don't waste calories by having another bite," says Elisa Zied, R.D., author of Younger Next Week. "Try something different." Wouldn’t you rather fill up on yummy fare rather than an average dish? 5. Make faux mashed potatoes. Can't limit yourself to a small scoop of these buttery spuds? Then bypass them entirely in favor of cauliflower. "For a delicious stand-in, boil cauliflower, mash it, and add a little skim milk, lemon and garlic," say Tammy Lakatos Shames, R.D., and Lyssie Lakatos, R.D., aka "The Nutrition Twins." The similar texture and color will trick you into thinking you’re getting the real thing. 6. Choose booze or sugar. Cocktails and dessert are usually both laden with sugar and calories, so pick a singular indulgence — but still be mindful of serving sizes. Think one small piece of pie or a half-cup of eggnog, says Zied, will do the trick. RELATED: 12 Drinks That Aren’t Worth the Calories 7. Mix up a 45-calorie cocktail. If liquor and dessert are equally essential to you enjoying the holiday, at least choose your libation wisely. For a mere 45 calories you can have a "Fruity Tooty Spritzer," say Lakatos and Lakatos Shames:  Simply combine 1 cup sparkling water, 2 ounces vodka, 1 tablespoon grapefruit juice and 6 raspberries. Garnish with fresh mint leaves. For more better-for-you beverages, check out these 10 Healthy Holiday Cocktail Recipes. 8. Eat off colorful plates. Leave the fancy white china in the cabinet. "You’ll likely eat more when light-colored foods, such as turkey and mashed potatoes, are served on white or cream plates," says Newgent. "Research has found that the more contrast between your food and plate color, the less you’ll likely eat — or overeat." Bring on the bolds! 9. Go to the back of the line. Heading to a holiday buffet? Let others get their fill first. "Once the cheese platter and desserts have been picked over they won’t seem nearly as enticing," says Karen Ansel, R.D., a New York-based nutritionist. As hard as it may be, fight the urge to be number one. RELATED: 5 Grocery Store Health Traps to Avoid This Thanksgiving 10. Choose appetizers that provide visual clues. If you tend to inhale your food without realizing how much you consumed, opt for nibbles like in-shell pistachio nuts. "Their empty shells are a helpful visual cue about how much you’ve eaten, potentially encouraging you to eat less," says Ansel. Chicken satay and shrimp cocktail are also good options, as you can watch the skewers and tails stack up. 11. Draw a clear finish line. Once you've had your fair share, reach for a "meal ender" to prevent you from picking at whatever's in front of you. Zied suggests popping a breath strip, sucking on a strong mint, or reapplying your lip gloss. Another trick: Pour some water on your plate so you won’t want to use it anymore — just make sure no one’s watching. 12. Join the cleanup crew. "One hour spent clearing the table and washing dishes while you’re standing can whittle off about 100 calories," says Newgent. Plus your host will be grateful!

The post 12 Ways to Survive Thanksgiving, Minus the Food Coma appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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5 Ways to Lose Weight Without Dieting http://dailyburn.com/life/health/lose-weight-without-dieting/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/lose-weight-without-dieting/#comments Sun, 26 Jul 2015 13:15:02 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=26794

[caption id="attachment_41899" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Easy Weight Loss Hacks Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Maybe your button-down shirts are starting to feel a little too snug or you're stressing out about putting on your bathing suit this weekend. Whatever your motivation, you're convinced that it's time to make a change — but the thought of overhauling your diet makes you cringe. While losing weight ultimately comes down to eating less and moving more, you don't necessarily have to deprive yourself when it comes to the diet part. Follow these five tips and the only thing you'll be missing is that muffin top.

RELATED: 6 Weight Loss Success Stories to Motivate Your Right Now

5 Weight Loss Hacks, No Dieting Required

[caption id="attachment_41904" align="alignnone" width="620"]Happiness Weight Loss Hack Photo: Pond5[/caption]

1. Cheer up.

Anyone who's ever dived into a pint of ice cream after a late night at work knows a rough day can ruin the best intentions to eat healthfully.  Now, a new study from the Journal of Consumer Psychology proves what many of us already suspected: Researchers found that people in good spirits were more apt to choose nutritious foods than those who were feeling down. "When we're in a good mood, we tend to step back and see the big picture, so it's easier to do something that's in our long-term best interest," says study co-author Meryl Gardner, Ph.D., an associate professor of marketing at the University of Delaware. "Being in a bad mood triggers a focus on what's going on right around you, which means seeking immediate gratification — so it becomes all 'hello, doughnut!'"

Can't convince yourself to see the sunny side of life at the moment? Gardner suggests gazing toward the future, and you don't necessarily have to focus on a health goal. "In the supermarket, let your mind wander and think about what the store may look like in five years,” she says. “Or, as you're considering what snack to have, think about what kind of junk foods may be the next big trend." Looking ahead might help you put those immediate wants into perspective.

[caption id="attachment_41903" align="alignnone" width="620"]Eat Slower for Weight Loss Photo: Pond5[/caption]

2. Slow your pace.

Nutrition experts have long advised against wolfing down your food, because the brain needs some time to process that "I'm full" message. If you've tried eating slowly but the contents of your plate still seem to disappear in a flash, you may need a little extra help. Enter the HAPIfork, a utensil that's equipped with an electronic sensor. It measures how long it takes you to eat a meal and lights up and vibrates whenever you're chowing down too quickly.

[caption id="attachment_41902" align="alignnone" width="620"]Eat Berries for Weight Loss Photo: Pond5[/caption]

3. Nibble on filling fruits.

While this food group is healthy, it can still give you your sugar fix. Try snacking on lingonberries, Scandinavian berries, which are similar to cranberries and just might be the next "superfruit." Recent research published in the Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism found that eating lingonberries almost completely blocked the effects of a high-fat diet by preventing weight gain and keeping blood sugar levels down. Admittedly, there is a catch: The scientists made this discovery by studying mice, so it's too early to definitively say if humans will reap the same benefits. But it is known that the berries are a healthy snack, thanks to their high content of polyphenols (a type of antioxidant). Try sprinkling a handful of frozen ones — you can order them online — into your cereal or smoothies. Or pick up some lingonberry juice at a local retailer.

RELATED: How 15-Minute Workouts Jumpstarted My Weight Loss

[caption id="attachment_41906" align="alignnone" width="620"]Text Progress to Lose Weight Photo: Pond5[/caption]

4.  Text your progress.

Keeping a food diary is a tried-and-true weight loss technique, as recording every morsel forces you to be more conscious of what you're putting into your mouth. But it can also be tedious, making it tough for people to stick with it. Replying to a quick daily text message, on the other hand, is much easier. In a study from Duke University, overweight women shed a few pounds by simply reporting (via text) some basic info, such as the number of steps they walked daily and whether or not they consumed fast food.

"Most people have difficulty sticking with detailed monitoring of how much they eat and how much they exercise," says lead author Dori Steinberg, Ph.D. "We tried to keep the tracking via text messaging simple, which is likely why it was effective." To make this work for you, ask a friend, family member or even your trainer to text you a daily question about your diet or exercise goals. "Having that accountability can be incredibly helpful," says Steinberg.

[caption id="attachment_41905" align="alignnone" width="620"]Sleep More Lose Weight Photo: Pond5[/caption]

5. Go to bed.

Numerous studies have found a connection between insufficient sleep and obesity, but a recent study from the University of Colorado, Boulder found that you could do serious damage to your waistline in just five nights. "People who had five-hour sleep opportunities per night across a simulated workweek gained nearly two pounds," says study co-author Kenneth Wright, Ph.D., director of the University's Sleep and Chronobiology Laboratory. Lack of shuteye can interfere with your metabolism and prompt you to eat more — especially mindlessly in the evening while watching TV or surfing the web. The takeaway: Make getting a good night's rest a priority. "Sleep is as important for your health as a good diet and physical activity," says Wright.

Instead of dreading the start of a diet as summer approaches, try making these healthy changes in order to lose weight without depriving yourself.

Originally posted April 2014. Updated July 2015.

The post 5 Ways to Lose Weight Without Dieting appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>

[caption id="attachment_41899" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Easy Weight Loss Hacks Photo: Pond5[/caption] Maybe your button-down shirts are starting to feel a little too snug or you're stressing out about putting on your bathing suit this weekend. Whatever your motivation, you're convinced that it's time to make a change — but the thought of overhauling your diet makes you cringe. While losing weight ultimately comes down to eating less and moving more, you don't necessarily have to deprive yourself when it comes to the diet part. Follow these five tips and the only thing you'll be missing is that muffin top. RELATED: 6 Weight Loss Success Stories to Motivate Your Right Now

5 Weight Loss Hacks, No Dieting Required

[caption id="attachment_41904" align="alignnone" width="620"]Happiness Weight Loss Hack Photo: Pond5[/caption]

1. Cheer up.

Anyone who's ever dived into a pint of ice cream after a late night at work knows a rough day can ruin the best intentions to eat healthfully.  Now, a new study from the Journal of Consumer Psychology proves what many of us already suspected: Researchers found that people in good spirits were more apt to choose nutritious foods than those who were feeling down. "When we're in a good mood, we tend to step back and see the big picture, so it's easier to do something that's in our long-term best interest," says study co-author Meryl Gardner, Ph.D., an associate professor of marketing at the University of Delaware. "Being in a bad mood triggers a focus on what's going on right around you, which means seeking immediate gratification — so it becomes all 'hello, doughnut!'" Can't convince yourself to see the sunny side of life at the moment? Gardner suggests gazing toward the future, and you don't necessarily have to focus on a health goal. "In the supermarket, let your mind wander and think about what the store may look like in five years,” she says. “Or, as you're considering what snack to have, think about what kind of junk foods may be the next big trend." Looking ahead might help you put those immediate wants into perspective. [caption id="attachment_41903" align="alignnone" width="620"]Eat Slower for Weight Loss Photo: Pond5[/caption]

2. Slow your pace.

Nutrition experts have long advised against wolfing down your food, because the brain needs some time to process that "I'm full" message. If you've tried eating slowly but the contents of your plate still seem to disappear in a flash, you may need a little extra help. Enter the HAPIfork, a utensil that's equipped with an electronic sensor. It measures how long it takes you to eat a meal and lights up and vibrates whenever you're chowing down too quickly. [caption id="attachment_41902" align="alignnone" width="620"]Eat Berries for Weight Loss Photo: Pond5[/caption]

3. Nibble on filling fruits.

While this food group is healthy, it can still give you your sugar fix. Try snacking on lingonberries, Scandinavian berries, which are similar to cranberries and just might be the next "superfruit." Recent research published in the Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism found that eating lingonberries almost completely blocked the effects of a high-fat diet by preventing weight gain and keeping blood sugar levels down. Admittedly, there is a catch: The scientists made this discovery by studying mice, so it's too early to definitively say if humans will reap the same benefits. But it is known that the berries are a healthy snack, thanks to their high content of polyphenols (a type of antioxidant). Try sprinkling a handful of frozen ones — you can order them online — into your cereal or smoothies. Or pick up some lingonberry juice at a local retailer. RELATED: How 15-Minute Workouts Jumpstarted My Weight Loss [caption id="attachment_41906" align="alignnone" width="620"]Text Progress to Lose Weight Photo: Pond5[/caption]

4.  Text your progress.

Keeping a food diary is a tried-and-true weight loss technique, as recording every morsel forces you to be more conscious of what you're putting into your mouth. But it can also be tedious, making it tough for people to stick with it. Replying to a quick daily text message, on the other hand, is much easier. In a study from Duke University, overweight women shed a few pounds by simply reporting (via text) some basic info, such as the number of steps they walked daily and whether or not they consumed fast food. "Most people have difficulty sticking with detailed monitoring of how much they eat and how much they exercise," says lead author Dori Steinberg, Ph.D. "We tried to keep the tracking via text messaging simple, which is likely why it was effective." To make this work for you, ask a friend, family member or even your trainer to text you a daily question about your diet or exercise goals. "Having that accountability can be incredibly helpful," says Steinberg. [caption id="attachment_41905" align="alignnone" width="620"]Sleep More Lose Weight Photo: Pond5[/caption]

5. Go to bed.

Numerous studies have found a connection between insufficient sleep and obesity, but a recent study from the University of Colorado, Boulder found that you could do serious damage to your waistline in just five nights. "People who had five-hour sleep opportunities per night across a simulated workweek gained nearly two pounds," says study co-author Kenneth Wright, Ph.D., director of the University's Sleep and Chronobiology Laboratory. Lack of shuteye can interfere with your metabolism and prompt you to eat more — especially mindlessly in the evening while watching TV or surfing the web. The takeaway: Make getting a good night's rest a priority. "Sleep is as important for your health as a good diet and physical activity," says Wright. Instead of dreading the start of a diet as summer approaches, try making these healthy changes in order to lose weight without depriving yourself. Originally posted April 2014. Updated July 2015.

The post 5 Ways to Lose Weight Without Dieting appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
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Eat These 10 Foods, Get More Calcium http://dailyburn.com/life/health/calcium-rich-foods-dairy-free/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/calcium-rich-foods-dairy-free/#comments Wed, 08 Jul 2015 15:15:12 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=34443 Blueberry Parfait

top 10 foods with calcium

Calcium does more than help build strong bones: This mineral is also crucial for controlling muscle and nerve function and maintaining the acid/base balance in your bloodstream, says Rebecca Solomon, R.D., director of clinical nutrition at Mount Sinai Beth Israel in New York. Not getting enough means you’ll be more prone to broken bones as well as muscle spasms.

But don’t beeline straight to the pharmacy: Most health experts agree that it’s best to get your nutrients from food rather than pills whenever possible. Here, 10 foods to up your calcium intake — plus suggestions on exactly what to eat with them.

RELATED: The 10 Nutrients Athletes Need Most

The 10 Best Calcium Rich Foods

[caption id="attachment_41337" align="alignnone" width="620"]Calcium Blueberry Parfait Photo and Recipe: Perry Santanachote[/caption]

1. Yogurt 

Pair It With: 1 cup of fresh berries, which adds a solid hit of antioxidants. Blueberry yogurt parfait, anyone?

[caption id="attachment_25741" align="alignnone" width="620"]Calcium Cheddar Cheese and Apple Photo: Pond5[/caption]

2. Cheddar Cheese

Pair It With: 1 apple for a fibrous boost that will keep you satiated well past the afternoon slump. —and well-complemented flavors.

3. Milk 

Pair It With: A dash of chocolate syrup for the perfect post-run recovery snack. Delicious, nutritious, and miles ahead any of these fast-food calorie bombs nutrition-wise.

[caption id="attachment_36369" align="alignnone" width="620"]Calcium Vegan Tofu Scramble Photo and Recipe: Perry Santanachote[/caption]

4. Tofu 

Pair It With: Grilled veggies. It’s the perfect simple summer dish to go with whichever healthy sides make an appearance at your next BBQ. Or go the breakfast route with this easy tofu scramble recipe.

RELATED: Healthy Fiesta Poblano Peppers

5. Collard Greens 

Pair It With: Black-eyed peas. Be careful, though: Beans, legumes and grains all contain phytic acid, which can bind to calcium and inhibit absorption. To neutralize, Solomon recommends pre-soaking these foods before cooking.

[caption id="attachment_23596" align="alignnone" width="620"]calcium spinach chips the lovely bits Photo and Recipe: The Lovely Bits[/caption]

6. Spinach

Pair It With: Salmon, which is rich in naturally occurring vitamin D. Not quite Top Chef material? Any of these salmon dinners can be ready in 30 minutes or less.

7. Turnip Greens

Pair It With: A cooked tuna steak or any other fatty fish. Despite tasting a bit bitter, these greens are a serious source of calcium, offering nearly double the amount of its leafy counterpart, mustard greens.

[caption id="attachment_31857" align="alignnone" width="620"]Kale Caesar Salad Photo and Recipe: Perry Santanachote[/caption]

8. Sardines 

Pair It With: A kale Caesar salad: Chop a few pieces of fish into the dressing and yours will taste as good as the tableside version as your favorite steakhouse version does.

9. Calcium-Fortified Cereals

Pair it With: Vitamin D-enriched cow’s milk (most are these days) or fortified soy or almond milk (see below).

10. Calcium-Fortified Almond or Soy Milk 

Pair It With: Fortified cereals, but not coffee. The a.m. staple may in fact hinder calcium intake, along with sugar and alcohol, too.

RELATED: 5 Ways to Eat Healthy When Your Family Doesn’t

Having trouble getting in enough calcium, or wondering if your levels are low? Talk to your doctor, who may recommend a supplement option.

Originally posted November 2014. Updated July 2015. 

The post Eat These 10 Foods, Get More Calcium appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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Blueberry Parfait

top 10 foods with calcium Calcium does more than help build strong bones: This mineral is also crucial for controlling muscle and nerve function and maintaining the acid/base balance in your bloodstream, says Rebecca Solomon, R.D., director of clinical nutrition at Mount Sinai Beth Israel in New York. Not getting enough means you’ll be more prone to broken bones as well as muscle spasms. But don’t beeline straight to the pharmacy: Most health experts agree that it’s best to get your nutrients from food rather than pills whenever possible. Here, 10 foods to up your calcium intake — plus suggestions on exactly what to eat with them. RELATED: The 10 Nutrients Athletes Need Most

The 10 Best Calcium Rich Foods

[caption id="attachment_41337" align="alignnone" width="620"]Calcium Blueberry Parfait Photo and Recipe: Perry Santanachote[/caption]

1. Yogurt 

Pair It With: 1 cup of fresh berries, which adds a solid hit of antioxidants. Blueberry yogurt parfait, anyone? [caption id="attachment_25741" align="alignnone" width="620"]Calcium Cheddar Cheese and Apple Photo: Pond5[/caption]

2. Cheddar Cheese

Pair It With: 1 apple for a fibrous boost that will keep you satiated well past the afternoon slump. —and well-complemented flavors.

3. Milk 

Pair It With: A dash of chocolate syrup for the perfect post-run recovery snack. Delicious, nutritious, and miles ahead any of these fast-food calorie bombs nutrition-wise. [caption id="attachment_36369" align="alignnone" width="620"]Calcium Vegan Tofu Scramble Photo and Recipe: Perry Santanachote[/caption]

4. Tofu 

Pair It With: Grilled veggies. It’s the perfect simple summer dish to go with whichever healthy sides make an appearance at your next BBQ. Or go the breakfast route with this easy tofu scramble recipe. RELATED: Healthy Fiesta Poblano Peppers

5. Collard Greens 

Pair It With: Black-eyed peas. Be careful, though: Beans, legumes and grains all contain phytic acid, which can bind to calcium and inhibit absorption. To neutralize, Solomon recommends pre-soaking these foods before cooking. [caption id="attachment_23596" align="alignnone" width="620"]calcium spinach chips the lovely bits Photo and Recipe: The Lovely Bits[/caption]

6. Spinach

Pair It With: Salmon, which is rich in naturally occurring vitamin D. Not quite Top Chef material? Any of these salmon dinners can be ready in 30 minutes or less.

7. Turnip Greens

Pair It With: A cooked tuna steak or any other fatty fish. Despite tasting a bit bitter, these greens are a serious source of calcium, offering nearly double the amount of its leafy counterpart, mustard greens. [caption id="attachment_31857" align="alignnone" width="620"]Kale Caesar Salad Photo and Recipe: Perry Santanachote[/caption]

8. Sardines 

Pair It With: A kale Caesar salad: Chop a few pieces of fish into the dressing and yours will taste as good as the tableside version as your favorite steakhouse version does.

9. Calcium-Fortified Cereals

Pair it With: Vitamin D-enriched cow’s milk (most are these days) or fortified soy or almond milk (see below).

10. Calcium-Fortified Almond or Soy Milk 

Pair It With: Fortified cereals, but not coffee. The a.m. staple may in fact hinder calcium intake, along with sugar and alcohol, too. RELATED: 5 Ways to Eat Healthy When Your Family Doesn’t Having trouble getting in enough calcium, or wondering if your levels are low? Talk to your doctor, who may recommend a supplement option. Originally posted November 2014. Updated July 2015. 

The post Eat These 10 Foods, Get More Calcium appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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Throw Shade: 5 Reasons to Rock Sunglasses This Summer http://dailyburn.com/life/health/sun-safety-protect-your-eyes/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/sun-safety-protect-your-eyes/#respond Sat, 04 Jul 2015 12:15:29 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=28406

[caption id="attachment_28415" align="alignnone" width="620"]SPF Your Eyes Sun Damage Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Looking for an excuse to spend some money? You need a great pair of shades. More than a fashion statement, the right sunglasses can protect your eyes from some pretty serious consequences.

While everyone ought to take eye protection seriously, you should be especially careful if you have blue or green eyes, says Anne Sumers, M.D., a clinical spokesperson for the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) and a practicing ophthalmologist in Ridgewood, N.J. "Light eyes have less melanin, which is protective because it absorbs UV rays," she explains.

You may also be vulnerable if you take medications including oral contraceptives, certain antibiotics (like Cipro), and some over-the-counter pain relievers (like Advil and Aleve), Sumers adds. These drugs cause changes in your skin that make it extra sensitive to the damaging effects of sunlight.

The potential for damage heats up this time of year as the days get longer and the sun's rays get more intense — plus you'll probably be spending more time outside. Wondering what could go wrong with those baby blues? These five truths will make you think twice about how you care for your eyes.

1 . Your eyes can get sunburned.

It's called photokeratitis, and it's about as fun as it sounds. "Just like when your skin gets sunburned, it doesn't hurt while it's happening," says Sumers. But four to five hours later it's a different story: You can expect severe pain for 24 to 48 hours, as well as redness, swelling, a gritty, scratchy feeling and "frighteningly blurry" vision, says Sumers. Pain meds, lubricants and cold compresses can help, and you might need to wear an eye patch. Spending time near reflective surfaces, like water or snow, ups the risk, as does using a tanning booth without goggles. When it happens in wintry settings it's often called snow blindness; when it happens in a tanning booth, Sumers calls it Jersey Shore blindness. Whatever you name it, luckily the damage is rarely permanent — but you won't forget it how it felt.

2. You could go blind.

You’re unlikely to return from the beach with a complete loss of vision, but over the years those rays really take a toll. Research shows that UV light exposure increases the risk of cataracts — the leading cause of blindness — and also contributes to macular degeneration, a deterioration of the retina that becomes more common with age.

3. You can develop growths. On your eyeball.

They're called pterygium — also known as surfer's eye — and they're not attractive. Essentially, fleshy tissue crops up on the white of your eye and can become red and irritated. If these growths get large enough to interfere with your vision they'll have to be surgically removed.

4. You'll get wrinkles.

Fine lines around your eyes aren't necessarily dangerous, but who wants to prematurely age oneself? And while you might think that wrinkles are inevitable, they're not: About 90 percent of the visible signs of aging are caused by UV light, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation.

5. You could get cancer. 

We're talking skin cancer — on the eyelids and around the eyes — as well as ocular melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer that's usually found in the eye itself.

The good news is that it's easy to lower your risk of all these problems just by wearing sunglasses. Look for "100 percent UV blocking" or "UV 400" on the label, as both indicate maximum protection from rays. Sumers also recommends choosing a pair with large lenses and wraparound frames, which provide more coverage. Add a broad-brimmed hat, cover any exposed skin with sunscreen, and you're ready for some (safer) fun in the sun.

Originally posted on May 26, 2014. Updated July 2015.

 

The post Throw Shade: 5 Reasons to Rock Sunglasses This Summer appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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[caption id="attachment_28415" align="alignnone" width="620"]SPF Your Eyes Sun Damage Photo: Pond5[/caption] Looking for an excuse to spend some money? You need a great pair of shades. More than a fashion statement, the right sunglasses can protect your eyes from some pretty serious consequences. While everyone ought to take eye protection seriously, you should be especially careful if you have blue or green eyes, says Anne Sumers, M.D., a clinical spokesperson for the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) and a practicing ophthalmologist in Ridgewood, N.J. "Light eyes have less melanin, which is protective because it absorbs UV rays," she explains. You may also be vulnerable if you take medications including oral contraceptives, certain antibiotics (like Cipro), and some over-the-counter pain relievers (like Advil and Aleve), Sumers adds. These drugs cause changes in your skin that make it extra sensitive to the damaging effects of sunlight. The potential for damage heats up this time of year as the days get longer and the sun's rays get more intense — plus you'll probably be spending more time outside. Wondering what could go wrong with those baby blues? These five truths will make you think twice about how you care for your eyes.

1 . Your eyes can get sunburned.

It's called photokeratitis, and it's about as fun as it sounds. "Just like when your skin gets sunburned, it doesn't hurt while it's happening," says Sumers. But four to five hours later it's a different story: You can expect severe pain for 24 to 48 hours, as well as redness, swelling, a gritty, scratchy feeling and "frighteningly blurry" vision, says Sumers. Pain meds, lubricants and cold compresses can help, and you might need to wear an eye patch. Spending time near reflective surfaces, like water or snow, ups the risk, as does using a tanning booth without goggles. When it happens in wintry settings it's often called snow blindness; when it happens in a tanning booth, Sumers calls it Jersey Shore blindness. Whatever you name it, luckily the damage is rarely permanent — but you won't forget it how it felt.

2. You could go blind.

You’re unlikely to return from the beach with a complete loss of vision, but over the years those rays really take a toll. Research shows that UV light exposure increases the risk of cataracts — the leading cause of blindness — and also contributes to macular degeneration, a deterioration of the retina that becomes more common with age.

3. You can develop growths. On your eyeball.

They're called pterygium — also known as surfer's eye — and they're not attractive. Essentially, fleshy tissue crops up on the white of your eye and can become red and irritated. If these growths get large enough to interfere with your vision they'll have to be surgically removed.

4. You'll get wrinkles.

Fine lines around your eyes aren't necessarily dangerous, but who wants to prematurely age oneself? And while you might think that wrinkles are inevitable, they're not: About 90 percent of the visible signs of aging are caused by UV light, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation.

5. You could get cancer. 

We're talking skin cancer — on the eyelids and around the eyes — as well as ocular melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer that's usually found in the eye itself. The good news is that it's easy to lower your risk of all these problems just by wearing sunglasses. Look for "100 percent UV blocking" or "UV 400" on the label, as both indicate maximum protection from rays. Sumers also recommends choosing a pair with large lenses and wraparound frames, which provide more coverage. Add a broad-brimmed hat, cover any exposed skin with sunscreen, and you're ready for some (safer) fun in the sun. Originally posted on May 26, 2014. Updated July 2015.  

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9 Tricks to Stick to Your Diet (Even on Weekends) http://dailyburn.com/life/health/healthy-eating-tips-weekend-diet/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/healthy-eating-tips-weekend-diet/#respond Fri, 10 Apr 2015 11:15:47 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=39037 Healthy Weekend Diet Tips

[caption id="attachment_39048" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthy Weekend Diet Tips Photo: Pond5[/caption]

During the workweek you're pretty good about sticking with healthy habits. You order oatmeal for breakfast, hit the gym during your lunch break and whip up simple, light dinners after work. But Friday night through Sunday, something changes: Weekends mean time to let lose and that translates into eating and drinking too much paired with moving too little. Even when you can anticipate the challenge ahead and mentally prepare, the sabotage keeps happening.

RELATED: 12 DIY Kitchen Projects to Clean Up Your Eating Habits

Ready to stop this hurtful cycle and nix the Monday morning remorse? Follow these nine expert-backed fresh tips to make your time off a bit healthier so you can begin each week a lot happier.

Diet Tricks for a Healthier Weekend

1. Get the mimosa, Bloody Mary or the pancakes.
There's nothing wrong with indulging in a little something extra on a lazy weekend morning, says Jessica Fishman Levinson, R.D., a New York-based nutrition communications consultant and founder of Nutrioulicious. The key here isn't to deprive yourself but rather to make smart choices so you treat yourself without going completely overboard. If you'd love a mimosa or Bloody Mary, order one — but then skip the pancakes in favor of egg whites with veggies. If you're craving fluffy carbs, fine, but skip the morning booze (and go easy on the syrup!).

RELATED: When Is It OK to Cheat? The Pros and Cons of Cheat Days

2. Eat breakfast before brunch.
This might sound like a mistake — why double-down on calories? But if you're brunching at noon (or later) yet waking up at 9 a.m. (or earlier), it's the best way to make sure you don't overeat. The goal isn't to eat two full meals, but rather to chow down on something so that you're not famished by the time you join friends at the table. Plus, since you’ll be preparing the food yourself, you’ll know exactly what you’re consuming — calories, fat and all. Some fruit with a half-cup of Greek yogurt should be sufficient to tide you over until the main event, says Julie Upton, R.D., co-founder of Appetite for Health.

3. Sit at a table whenever you eat.
Being home all day often means non-stop munching instead of eating real meals. That sounds harmless enough, but those little nibbles can add up quickly. "Grazing trips up the body's natural hunger and appetite regulation system so you never feel completely full," says Upton. "People who graze often eat more calories than individuals who eat three meals and two snacks per day." So no more eating in front of the refrigerator. Instead, take a few minutes to prepare a real meal (even if it's just a sandwich) and sit down in the kitchen or dining room while you enjoy it.

RELATED: 7 Ways to Stop Unhealthy Food Cravings

4. Order two appetizers.
When you're dining out you might feel tempted to try multiple dishes on the menu, and that's normal. Simply satisfy your curiosity and save calories by ordering two appetizers instead of an app plus an entree, says Levinson. Many restaurants will let you turn an "entree" (such as pasta) into an "appetizer" by ordering a half portion, so don't be afraid to ask for that either.

RELATED: 9 Simple Tricks to Eat More Mindfully — Starting Now

[caption id="attachment_39051" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthier Weekend Tips Photo: Pond5[/caption]

5. Be picky about the unlimited freebies.
Maybe you've heard that you should never touch the bread basket, but is that realistic? Forget perfection and strike a balance. Ask yourself if that bread really looks amazing, and if so, have a piece and don't feel bad about it, says Levinson. But does it look only OK? Don't waste the calories then. Same goes for those tortilla chips at Mexican restaurants. (If you're ordering guacamole, wait for it to arrive before you start nibbling.) When the waiter comes around and asks if you want a refill on chips or bread, make "no thanks" your mantra.

6. Eat healthy foods first.
Weekends tend to be packed with special events like weddings and cocktail parties, which means you'll likely be presented with an array of tasty (and free!) food. But before you start piling items on your plate, do a lap around the buffet table to check out the offerings. Research has shown that people who do so tend to be thinner than those who just dive right in. Next, start by loading up on the healthiest items first — crudités, shrimp cocktail, fruit — so you fill up a little before you sample the higher-cal treats like quiche and baked brie, says Upton.

7. Order vodka and soda instead of a vodka tonic.
You already know that alcoholic drinks can be calorie bombs, especially if you opt for fruity mixed cocktails. A vodka tonic isn't a terrible choice, says Levinson, but you might be surprised that tonic water isn't the same thing as seltzer. Seltzer is just plain water with some bubbles added, so it's zero calories. But tonic water contains corn syrup — along with about 120 calories per 12-ounce bottle. That isn't such a big deal if you can stop at one, but if you're going to be having several throughout the evening it's worth making the swap. Of course, it's also smart to alternate between alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks and to eat something (ideally something semi-healthy) before you start boozing.

RELATED: How Many Calories Are in Your Cocktail? [INFOGRAPHIC]

8. Blab about your efforts.
When you're gathered with friends around the TV watching sports or a Netflix movie, it's all too easy to keep noshing on the finger foods in front of you. So speak up beforehand: "Ask the host if you can bring a healthier option," says Levinson. She also suggests telling close friends how hard you've been trying to eat well and being straightforward about asking for their support. "Say, 'I've been working really hard on maintaining my weight loss, or I'm really trying to lose five pounds, so if you see me overdoing it don't be afraid to give me a little nudge.'"

9. Plan ahead!
"
The number one tip I can offer is to plan in advance," says Levinson. She recommends taking a moment on Friday afternoon to ponder your weekend plans so you can make some choices before you get caught up in the moment. "Allow yourself room to have one special thing that you wouldn't typically have during the week at each event," she says. If you're headed to a birthday dinner, for example, there's no need to skip the cake...but you might want to forgo the fried calamari app. Going to be watching a big game? Leave room for beer by taking a pass on the chips. Knowing what’s in store and planning for it can make for a more positive outcome.

The post 9 Tricks to Stick to Your Diet (Even on Weekends) appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
Healthy Weekend Diet Tips

[caption id="attachment_39048" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthy Weekend Diet Tips Photo: Pond5[/caption] During the workweek you're pretty good about sticking with healthy habits. You order oatmeal for breakfast, hit the gym during your lunch break and whip up simple, light dinners after work. But Friday night through Sunday, something changes: Weekends mean time to let lose and that translates into eating and drinking too much paired with moving too little. Even when you can anticipate the challenge ahead and mentally prepare, the sabotage keeps happening. RELATED: 12 DIY Kitchen Projects to Clean Up Your Eating Habits Ready to stop this hurtful cycle and nix the Monday morning remorse? Follow these nine expert-backed fresh tips to make your time off a bit healthier so you can begin each week a lot happier.

Diet Tricks for a Healthier Weekend

1. Get the mimosa, Bloody Mary or the pancakes. There's nothing wrong with indulging in a little something extra on a lazy weekend morning, says Jessica Fishman Levinson, R.D., a New York-based nutrition communications consultant and founder of Nutrioulicious. The key here isn't to deprive yourself but rather to make smart choices so you treat yourself without going completely overboard. If you'd love a mimosa or Bloody Mary, order one — but then skip the pancakes in favor of egg whites with veggies. If you're craving fluffy carbs, fine, but skip the morning booze (and go easy on the syrup!). RELATED: When Is It OK to Cheat? The Pros and Cons of Cheat Days 2. Eat breakfast before brunch. This might sound like a mistake — why double-down on calories? But if you're brunching at noon (or later) yet waking up at 9 a.m. (or earlier), it's the best way to make sure you don't overeat. The goal isn't to eat two full meals, but rather to chow down on something so that you're not famished by the time you join friends at the table. Plus, since you’ll be preparing the food yourself, you’ll know exactly what you’re consuming — calories, fat and all. Some fruit with a half-cup of Greek yogurt should be sufficient to tide you over until the main event, says Julie Upton, R.D., co-founder of Appetite for Health. 3. Sit at a table whenever you eat. Being home all day often means non-stop munching instead of eating real meals. That sounds harmless enough, but those little nibbles can add up quickly. "Grazing trips up the body's natural hunger and appetite regulation system so you never feel completely full," says Upton. "People who graze often eat more calories than individuals who eat three meals and two snacks per day." So no more eating in front of the refrigerator. Instead, take a few minutes to prepare a real meal (even if it's just a sandwich) and sit down in the kitchen or dining room while you enjoy it. RELATED: 7 Ways to Stop Unhealthy Food Cravings 4. Order two appetizers. When you're dining out you might feel tempted to try multiple dishes on the menu, and that's normal. Simply satisfy your curiosity and save calories by ordering two appetizers instead of an app plus an entree, says Levinson. Many restaurants will let you turn an "entree" (such as pasta) into an "appetizer" by ordering a half portion, so don't be afraid to ask for that either. RELATED: 9 Simple Tricks to Eat More Mindfully — Starting Now [caption id="attachment_39051" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthier Weekend Tips Photo: Pond5[/caption] 5. Be picky about the unlimited freebies. Maybe you've heard that you should never touch the bread basket, but is that realistic? Forget perfection and strike a balance. Ask yourself if that bread really looks amazing, and if so, have a piece and don't feel bad about it, says Levinson. But does it look only OK? Don't waste the calories then. Same goes for those tortilla chips at Mexican restaurants. (If you're ordering guacamole, wait for it to arrive before you start nibbling.) When the waiter comes around and asks if you want a refill on chips or bread, make "no thanks" your mantra. 6. Eat healthy foods first. Weekends tend to be packed with special events like weddings and cocktail parties, which means you'll likely be presented with an array of tasty (and free!) food. But before you start piling items on your plate, do a lap around the buffet table to check out the offerings. Research has shown that people who do so tend to be thinner than those who just dive right in. Next, start by loading up on the healthiest items first — crudités, shrimp cocktail, fruit — so you fill up a little before you sample the higher-cal treats like quiche and baked brie, says Upton. 7. Order vodka and soda instead of a vodka tonic. You already know that alcoholic drinks can be calorie bombs, especially if you opt for fruity mixed cocktails. A vodka tonic isn't a terrible choice, says Levinson, but you might be surprised that tonic water isn't the same thing as seltzer. Seltzer is just plain water with some bubbles added, so it's zero calories. But tonic water contains corn syrup — along with about 120 calories per 12-ounce bottle. That isn't such a big deal if you can stop at one, but if you're going to be having several throughout the evening it's worth making the swap. Of course, it's also smart to alternate between alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks and to eat something (ideally something semi-healthy) before you start boozing. RELATED: How Many Calories Are in Your Cocktail? [INFOGRAPHIC] 8. Blab about your efforts. When you're gathered with friends around the TV watching sports or a Netflix movie, it's all too easy to keep noshing on the finger foods in front of you. So speak up beforehand: "Ask the host if you can bring a healthier option," says Levinson. She also suggests telling close friends how hard you've been trying to eat well and being straightforward about asking for their support. "Say, 'I've been working really hard on maintaining my weight loss, or I'm really trying to lose five pounds, so if you see me overdoing it don't be afraid to give me a little nudge.'" 9. Plan ahead! "The number one tip I can offer is to plan in advance," says Levinson. She recommends taking a moment on Friday afternoon to ponder your weekend plans so you can make some choices before you get caught up in the moment. "Allow yourself room to have one special thing that you wouldn't typically have during the week at each event," she says. If you're headed to a birthday dinner, for example, there's no need to skip the cake...but you might want to forgo the fried calamari app. Going to be watching a big game? Leave room for beer by taking a pass on the chips. Knowing what’s in store and planning for it can make for a more positive outcome.

The post 9 Tricks to Stick to Your Diet (Even on Weekends) appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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Is Alcohol Killing Your Workout? http://dailyburn.com/life/health/alcohol-effects-on-exercise/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/alcohol-effects-on-exercise/#respond Thu, 28 Aug 2014 11:15:41 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=31425 Alcohol Killing Workout

[caption id="attachment_31429" align="alignnone" width="620"]Alcohol Killing Workout Photo: Pond5[/caption]

You're smart enough to know that regularly downing a six-pack of beer will mess with your efforts to carve out six-pack abs. But how bad is a little booze, really?

 

Imbibing can impact your athletic performance even if you haven't had a sip for days.

 

While moderate alcohol consumption — usually defined as no more than one drink per day for women and two for men — has been linked to a reduced risk of heart disease, it has also been tied to a number of health problems. Women who have a mere three adult beverages per week, for example, are more likely to develop breast cancer than those who abstain.

Disease risks aside, there are other reasons to be cautious — especially if you're an avid exerciser.

Sip on This

You may have heard that alcohol is packed with empty calories, which is true. You might also understand that it slows your reflexes and reaction time, which is why jogging while tipsy (a specialty of the Hash House Harriers, "a drinking club with a running problem") isn't the smartest idea. But you probably don't realize that imbibing can impact your athletic performance even if you haven't had a sip for days.

Although it takes the average person about 90 minutes to metabolize one standard libation (12 ounces of beer, five ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of hard liquor), the effects can linger in your system for much longer, says David Spinner, D.O., a physical rehabilitation specialist at The Mount Sinai Hospital. In fact, research has shown that athletes who consume alcohol at least once a week are more than twice as likely as non-drinkers to get injured. Researchers attribute this in part to the "hangover effect," which has been shown to reduce sports performance by up to 11 percent. 

Frequently raising a glass also makes it harder to tone your body. "When you work out, you damage muscle and then rebuild it so it becomes bigger and stronger, but alcohol inhibits that process," says Spinner. Plus it disrupts normal sleep, and snooze time is when your body produces human growth hormone (HGH), which is needed for building and maintaining muscle mass, says Barbara Lewin, R.D., a Florida-based sports nutritionist who counsels Olympic and professional athletes.

Another issue is that alcohol is a diuretic and being dehydrated will certainly interfere with your speed and endurance. "If you go out drinking on a Saturday night and then wake up Sunday and go for a long run, you can expect about a 10 to 12 percent decrease in aerobic performance," says Spinner.

Lewin also points to dehydration, and says marathoners would be wise to avoid the post-race cocktail tents, despite the recent study stating that beer could be beneficial post-workout and can be a good source for hydration. Lewin notes that in the study light beer was the healthier option over the regular beer and adding salt was always better than having no salt at all. She believes that no matter what, alcohol will compromise recovery — it just depends how much and what’s at risk. "That's the time when you want to rehydrate and replace your muscle glycogen stores by consuming carbohydrates and beer isn't the best source," she explains.

Here’s the Chaser

So does being serious about your workouts mean you have to completely swear off the liquor cabinet? In a perfect world that would be ideal, but Spinner admits it's not realistic for most people. In general, he suggests limiting consumption as much as possible and taking in plenty of water, as well as waiting several days between the occasional night of partying and resuming any intense exercise.

When prepping for a competitive event (like a marathon or triathlon), however, Spinner says it's best to cut out all alcohol two weeks beforehand. And if you can't resist grabbing a beer after crossing that finish line, Lewin will give you a pass — as long as you also drink lots of H20 or sports drinks and eat some high-carb snacks so you can start to refuel properly.

The post Is Alcohol Killing Your Workout? appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
Alcohol Killing Workout

[caption id="attachment_31429" align="alignnone" width="620"]Alcohol Killing Workout Photo: Pond5[/caption]

You're smart enough to know that regularly downing a six-pack of beer will mess with your efforts to carve out six-pack abs. But how bad is a little booze, really?

 

Imbibing can impact your athletic performance even if you haven't had a sip for days.

 

While moderate alcohol consumption — usually defined as no more than one drink per day for women and two for men — has been linked to a reduced risk of heart disease, it has also been tied to a number of health problems. Women who have a mere three adult beverages per week, for example, are more likely to develop breast cancer than those who abstain.

Disease risks aside, there are other reasons to be cautious — especially if you're an avid exerciser.

Sip on This

You may have heard that alcohol is packed with empty calories, which is true. You might also understand that it slows your reflexes and reaction time, which is why jogging while tipsy (a specialty of the Hash House Harriers, "a drinking club with a running problem") isn't the smartest idea. But you probably don't realize that imbibing can impact your athletic performance even if you haven't had a sip for days.

Although it takes the average person about 90 minutes to metabolize one standard libation (12 ounces of beer, five ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of hard liquor), the effects can linger in your system for much longer, says David Spinner, D.O., a physical rehabilitation specialist at The Mount Sinai Hospital. In fact, research has shown that athletes who consume alcohol at least once a week are more than twice as likely as non-drinkers to get injured. Researchers attribute this in part to the "hangover effect," which has been shown to reduce sports performance by up to 11 percent. 

Frequently raising a glass also makes it harder to tone your body. "When you work out, you damage muscle and then rebuild it so it becomes bigger and stronger, but alcohol inhibits that process," says Spinner. Plus it disrupts normal sleep, and snooze time is when your body produces human growth hormone (HGH), which is needed for building and maintaining muscle mass, says Barbara Lewin, R.D., a Florida-based sports nutritionist who counsels Olympic and professional athletes.

Another issue is that alcohol is a diuretic and being dehydrated will certainly interfere with your speed and endurance. "If you go out drinking on a Saturday night and then wake up Sunday and go for a long run, you can expect about a 10 to 12 percent decrease in aerobic performance," says Spinner.

Lewin also points to dehydration, and says marathoners would be wise to avoid the post-race cocktail tents, despite the recent study stating that beer could be beneficial post-workout and can be a good source for hydration. Lewin notes that in the study light beer was the healthier option over the regular beer and adding salt was always better than having no salt at all. She believes that no matter what, alcohol will compromise recovery — it just depends how much and what’s at risk. "That's the time when you want to rehydrate and replace your muscle glycogen stores by consuming carbohydrates and beer isn't the best source," she explains.

Here’s the Chaser

So does being serious about your workouts mean you have to completely swear off the liquor cabinet? In a perfect world that would be ideal, but Spinner admits it's not realistic for most people. In general, he suggests limiting consumption as much as possible and taking in plenty of water, as well as waiting several days between the occasional night of partying and resuming any intense exercise.

When prepping for a competitive event (like a marathon or triathlon), however, Spinner says it's best to cut out all alcohol two weeks beforehand. And if you can't resist grabbing a beer after crossing that finish line, Lewin will give you a pass — as long as you also drink lots of H20 or sports drinks and eat some high-carb snacks so you can start to refuel properly.

The post Is Alcohol Killing Your Workout? appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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Can Changing Time Zones Affect Your Health? http://dailyburn.com/life/health/time-zones-affect-health/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/time-zones-affect-health/#respond Tue, 10 Jun 2014 11:15:47 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=28903 Time Zones

[caption id="attachment_28904" align="alignnone" width="620"]Time Zones Photo: Pond5[/caption]

The security lines are endless, the airplane food is terrible (or non-existent), and you're lucky if your luggage arrives on time and intact. Yet the worst part of traveling might very well be the groggy, out-of-sorts feeling that can stick with you for days after a long flight. Frequent fliers know it well, and no one enjoys it — but is it actually unhealthy? 

Unfortunately, it can be, says Joseph Ojile, M.D., founder of the Clayton Sleep Institute in St. Louis, MO. "Jet lag occurs when the time of day doesn't line up with your body's internal clock," he explains. If you crossed two time zones, it should take you about a day to readjust; if you crossed six, it could be three days or longer before you feel like yourself again. Doing this once in a while, say, a few times a year, shouldn't cause any serious problems. But more frequent changes can spell trouble.

“If done chronically, it can lead to a suppressed immune system, chronic fatigue and memory issues.”

Ojile likens it to chronic sleep deprivation: An occasional all-nighter is rough, but you bounce back. Skimp on shut-eye regularly, however, and you're putting your health at risk. Same goes with time zone jumping. "If done chronically, it can lead to a suppressed immune system, chronic fatigue and memory issues," he says. In fact, research from the U.K. found that airline cabin crew members (who experience repeated bouts of jet lag) performed worse on memory tasks than those who worked only on the ground (and do not shift time zones). The cabin crew also had elevated levels of cortisol, a stress hormone that, in excess, can lead to high blood pressure and high blood sugar (pre-diabetes or diabetes). It can also cause you to pack on unwanted pounds.

It’s clear — jetsetters should take heed. While there's no perfect cure for jet lag, following these steps can lessen the toll on your body, and make you feel a lot better. 

Healthy Tips for Changing Time Zones 

1. Plan ahead. "In the days prior to departure, try to move your body's time clock toward the destination time zone," says Ojile. If you're heading east, start getting up and going to bed earlier than usual; if you're flying west, shift your wake and bedtime later. (For the record, "west is best"— meaning it's typically easier on your system to go west than it is to go east.)

2. Drink up. That means water, not alcohol. Staying hydrated is important, so sip frequently while you're in transit and upon arrival.

3. Get on schedule. Try to choose a flight that gets to your destination in the early evening and stay up until 10 p.m. local time. If you arrive earlier and are absolutely exhausted, take a nap in the early afternoon but limiting it to two hours, suggests the National Sleep Foundation.  

4. Let light in. Exposing yourself to the sun's rays can help your circadian rhythms sync up with a new time zone and clear away that foggy feeling. For personalized advice on how to do this properly, check out British Airways jet lag advisor.

5. Consult an expert. If you travel very often (perhaps for work), it pays to sit down with a specialist. He or she can work with you to map out an individualized plan, which may entail taking the hormone melatonin. Although melatonin supplements are available without a prescription, it's crucial to get the dosage and timing right — so it's not a good idea to start popping pills without professional guidance. Find a sleep doc near you at sleepfoundation.org.

Happy travels!

The post Can Changing Time Zones Affect Your Health? appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
Time Zones

[caption id="attachment_28904" align="alignnone" width="620"]Time Zones Photo: Pond5[/caption]

The security lines are endless, the airplane food is terrible (or non-existent), and you're lucky if your luggage arrives on time and intact. Yet the worst part of traveling might very well be the groggy, out-of-sorts feeling that can stick with you for days after a long flight. Frequent fliers know it well, and no one enjoys it — but is it actually unhealthy? 

Unfortunately, it can be, says Joseph Ojile, M.D., founder of the Clayton Sleep Institute in St. Louis, MO. "Jet lag occurs when the time of day doesn't line up with your body's internal clock," he explains. If you crossed two time zones, it should take you about a day to readjust; if you crossed six, it could be three days or longer before you feel like yourself again. Doing this once in a while, say, a few times a year, shouldn't cause any serious problems. But more frequent changes can spell trouble.

“If done chronically, it can lead to a suppressed immune system, chronic fatigue and memory issues.”

Ojile likens it to chronic sleep deprivation: An occasional all-nighter is rough, but you bounce back. Skimp on shut-eye regularly, however, and you're putting your health at risk. Same goes with time zone jumping. "If done chronically, it can lead to a suppressed immune system, chronic fatigue and memory issues," he says. In fact, research from the U.K. found that airline cabin crew members (who experience repeated bouts of jet lag) performed worse on memory tasks than those who worked only on the ground (and do not shift time zones). The cabin crew also had elevated levels of cortisol, a stress hormone that, in excess, can lead to high blood pressure and high blood sugar (pre-diabetes or diabetes). It can also cause you to pack on unwanted pounds.

It’s clear — jetsetters should take heed. While there's no perfect cure for jet lag, following these steps can lessen the toll on your body, and make you feel a lot better. 

Healthy Tips for Changing Time Zones 

1. Plan ahead. "In the days prior to departure, try to move your body's time clock toward the destination time zone," says Ojile. If you're heading east, start getting up and going to bed earlier than usual; if you're flying west, shift your wake and bedtime later. (For the record, "west is best"— meaning it's typically easier on your system to go west than it is to go east.)

2. Drink up. That means water, not alcohol. Staying hydrated is important, so sip frequently while you're in transit and upon arrival.

3. Get on schedule. Try to choose a flight that gets to your destination in the early evening and stay up until 10 p.m. local time. If you arrive earlier and are absolutely exhausted, take a nap in the early afternoon but limiting it to two hours, suggests the National Sleep Foundation.  

4. Let light in. Exposing yourself to the sun's rays can help your circadian rhythms sync up with a new time zone and clear away that foggy feeling. For personalized advice on how to do this properly, check out British Airways jet lag advisor.

5. Consult an expert. If you travel very often (perhaps for work), it pays to sit down with a specialist. He or she can work with you to map out an individualized plan, which may entail taking the hormone melatonin. Although melatonin supplements are available without a prescription, it's crucial to get the dosage and timing right — so it's not a good idea to start popping pills without professional guidance. Find a sleep doc near you at sleepfoundation.org.

Happy travels!

The post Can Changing Time Zones Affect Your Health? appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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Saturated Fat: Is It Really That Bad for You? http://dailyburn.com/life/health/saturated-fat-good-or-bad/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/saturated-fat-good-or-bad/#respond Fri, 16 May 2014 11:15:17 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=28071 Saturated Fat

[caption id="attachment_28096" align="alignnone" width="620"]Saturated Fat Photo: Pond5[/caption]

For decades, health experts have urged us to step away from the butter, cheese and meat. The saturated fat in these foods, they warned, would clog our arteries and raise our risk for heart disease and stroke. In fact, the American Heart Association now advises limiting saturated fat intake to no more than five to six percent of total calories, meaning if you top your sandwich with two slices of cheddar, you'll probably max out for the day. But is it really as dangerous as we've been led to believe?

The short answer: It's complicated. A recent meta-analysis (which examines many previous studies and tries to draw broader conclusions), published in the prestigious Annals of Internal Medicine, found that people who ate more saturated fat did not develop heart disease more often than those who ate less. Although some foodies have interpreted this to mean "butter is back," many health experts say it's still smart to be cautious.

The Stats on Fat

"Right now we have more questions than answers," says Marisa Moore, R.D., a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and an adjust professor at Georgia State University. She says that although the authors looked at numerous studies, the American Heart Association considers "thousands" before issuing guidelines. "Polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fat have been shown to lower cholesterol levels," says Moore. "There's no evidence that saturated fat helps us in any way."

Cardiologist Stacey Rosen, M.D., vice president of the Katz Institute for Women's Health at North Shore-LIJ Health System, agrees. "This report does not in any way suggest that you can eat red meat, butter, and cheese in excess without consequences," she says. Rosen explains that while a quick glance at the headlines might make it seem like cutting back on saturated fat isn't important, you have to consider what people are eating in place of it. Many Americans, she says, simply load up on carbs — which is also dangerous. "Increased intake of carbohydrates can have a negative effect on heart health by increasing 'bad' LDL cholesterol levels,” warns Rosen. “It can also lead to weight gain and pre-diabetes."

Finding Balance

So what’s the takeaway? Forget an all-or-nothing approach when it comes to specific nutrients and just aim for a balance of mostly healthy food. "A taste of butter is fine on occasion, but don't put it on your toast every morning," says Moore. Both she and Rosen are fans of the Mediterranean diet, which emphasizes fruit, vegetables, fish, whole grains and olive oil. "Healthy eating can decrease your risk for heart disease and many forms of cancer," says Rosen. "It's never too early to start making good choices."

The post Saturated Fat: Is It Really That Bad for You? appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
Saturated Fat

[caption id="attachment_28096" align="alignnone" width="620"]Saturated Fat Photo: Pond5[/caption]

For decades, health experts have urged us to step away from the butter, cheese and meat. The saturated fat in these foods, they warned, would clog our arteries and raise our risk for heart disease and stroke. In fact, the American Heart Association now advises limiting saturated fat intake to no more than five to six percent of total calories, meaning if you top your sandwich with two slices of cheddar, you'll probably max out for the day. But is it really as dangerous as we've been led to believe?

The short answer: It's complicated. A recent meta-analysis (which examines many previous studies and tries to draw broader conclusions), published in the prestigious Annals of Internal Medicine, found that people who ate more saturated fat did not develop heart disease more often than those who ate less. Although some foodies have interpreted this to mean "butter is back," many health experts say it's still smart to be cautious.

The Stats on Fat

"Right now we have more questions than answers," says Marisa Moore, R.D., a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and an adjust professor at Georgia State University. She says that although the authors looked at numerous studies, the American Heart Association considers "thousands" before issuing guidelines. "Polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fat have been shown to lower cholesterol levels," says Moore. "There's no evidence that saturated fat helps us in any way."

Cardiologist Stacey Rosen, M.D., vice president of the Katz Institute for Women's Health at North Shore-LIJ Health System, agrees. "This report does not in any way suggest that you can eat red meat, butter, and cheese in excess without consequences," she says. Rosen explains that while a quick glance at the headlines might make it seem like cutting back on saturated fat isn't important, you have to consider what people are eating in place of it. Many Americans, she says, simply load up on carbs — which is also dangerous. "Increased intake of carbohydrates can have a negative effect on heart health by increasing 'bad' LDL cholesterol levels,” warns Rosen. “It can also lead to weight gain and pre-diabetes."

Finding Balance

So what’s the takeaway? Forget an all-or-nothing approach when it comes to specific nutrients and just aim for a balance of mostly healthy food. "A taste of butter is fine on occasion, but don't put it on your toast every morning," says Moore. Both she and Rosen are fans of the Mediterranean diet, which emphasizes fruit, vegetables, fish, whole grains and olive oil. "Healthy eating can decrease your risk for heart disease and many forms of cancer," says Rosen. "It's never too early to start making good choices."

The post Saturated Fat: Is It Really That Bad for You? appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
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Detox, Burn Fat and Lose Weight with Dr. Mark Hyman http://dailyburn.com/life/health/detox-interview-dr-mark-hyman/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/detox-interview-dr-mark-hyman/#respond Wed, 16 Apr 2014 11:15:27 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=26932 Kale Salad

Dr. Mark Hyman Book Mark Hyman, M.D., is a man on a mission. His goal: to empower people to take care of their bodies so they remain healthy, rather than simply treating symptoms as they crop up. A family physician by training, Hyman sees patients at The UltraWellness Center in Lenox, Massachusetts. But he reaches a broader audience by making frequent media appearances on TV programs like The Doctor Oz Show), writing for The Huffington Post and advocating for change in healthcare policy. He is also the author of eight New York Times bestsellers. His latest book, The Blood Sugar Solution 10-Day Detox Diet: Activate Your Body's Natural Ability to Burn Fat and Lose Weight Fast, promises to quickly put readers on the path to wellness. We picked his brain to learn how.

What does "detoxing" have to do with losing weight?

Most overweight people are addicted to food. If you want to lose weight, you need to cleanse your body of addictive foods and replace them with healthy ones. Over the last decade we've learned that sugar and refined carbs are essentially as addictive as heroin and cocaine. MRIs show that the same areas in the brain light up like a Christmas tree when any of these substances are consumed. In fact, in animal studies, rats prefer sugar over IV cocaine; they'll continue to drink sugar water despite getting electrical shocks.

Can you be a food addict if you're not overweight?

Absolutely. About 25 percent of adults are what some call "skinny fat," meaning they're thin on the outside but metabolically sick. They have high blood sugar, high triglycerides, high LDL cholesterol (the “bad” kind), and low HDL cholesterol (the "good" kind) and they often have a little extra belly fat despite being slim overall.

Are there other signs you might need to detox from unhealthy foods?

Yes. I call it FLC — feel like crap — syndrome. It's characterized by symptoms such as sugar cravings, sluggishness, moodiness, frequent headaches, sinus trouble and digestive issues like bloating, gas and constipation.

What would you say is the biggest misconception about obesity?

That it's all determined by genetics. I think we blame our parents for our current health or weight status, when in fact we inherit more of our habits from our parents than our genes. Your social environment plays the biggest role; studies show you're more likely to be overweight if your friends are overweight. You're also more likely to be overweight if you happen to live in an area with many fast food restaurants.

[caption id="attachment_18790" align="alignnone" width="620"]Kale Salad Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

You recommend eliminating numerous foods, including those containing gluten and dairy. Why?

There's evidence that these are very inflammatory and that they disrupt the good or healthy bacteria in the digestive tract, which can lead to problems such as uncomfortable bloating. Many gluten-containing foods — mainly grains, including whole grains — also spike your blood sugar too quickly, which contributes to cravings.

What's the worst thing that someone can eat or drink?

I think liquid calories — meaning soda as well as sugar-sweetened iced tea, coffee drinks, etc. — aren’t good because they're correlated to obesity more than anything else. They're even worse than sweet foods because they don't make you feel as full and the sugar gets absorbed very quickly. That causes a rapid spike in insulin, so you get hungry faster and store more fat.

Is diet soda any better?

No. It might even be worse, as it's been linked to a higher risk of diabetes. Artificial sweeteners activate all the sweet receptors in the brain and trigger hormones that make you store fat and slow your metabolism.

 

Over the last decade we've learned that sugar and refined carbs are essentially as addictive as heroin and cocaine.

 

So what should we be consuming?

Whole, fresh foods, including many that are plant based like seeds, nuts, fruits and vegetables. I also recommend good quality protein such as eggs, organic chicken, grass-fed beef and low-mercury fish such as salmon. And I like olive oil as well as coconut butter. Coconut butter, which is often called coconut oil, actually has properties that help with sports performance and boost brainpower.

Your new book claims to do a lot in a short time. Why 10 days?

I think it takes 10 days to reset and start to heal your body. The plan is desired to rewire the brain chemistry that's causing food addiction and shutoff the hormones that are making you hungry and store belly fat. We proved that it works by doing a trial on 600 people; they lost a total of 4,000 pounds in 10 days, their blood pressure and blood sugar dropped, and they reported feeling much better overall.

So what happens after day 10?

The first 10 days are designed as a jump-start. After that, I hope people continue with a modified version of the plan based on their goals and needs. The biggest mistake would be to think, "I feel better now, so I can go back to doing what I was doing before." Consider the 10 days a chance to reconnect with your body and make a decision about how you want to live and how you want to feel. You have a choice.

To start the day strong, Dr. Hyman recommends having one of his Detox Shakes. Here's one to try today.

[caption id="attachment_15662" align="alignnone" width="620"]Peachy Green Smoothie Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Kiwi and Chia Seed Smoothie

Serves 1

[skinnybox]

Ingredients

1 firm kiwi, peeled and sliced in half
1/4 avocado
4 tablespoons chia seeds (soak them in water first for at least 30 minutes)
1/2 lime, juiced
1/4 cup packed fresh mint leaves
1/2 cup ice (optional)
1 cup water
1 cup packed spinach or 1 medium kale leaf, stem removed

Preparation

1. Combine all the ingredients in a blender and blend on high speed until smooth. Serves one.

For more recipes from Dr. Hyman, pick up a copy of The Blood Sugar Solution 10-Day Detox Diet: Activate Your Body's Natural Ability to Burn Fat and Lose Weight Fast.

The post Detox, Burn Fat and Lose Weight with Dr. Mark Hyman appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
Kale Salad

Dr. Mark Hyman Book Mark Hyman, M.D., is a man on a mission. His goal: to empower people to take care of their bodies so they remain healthy, rather than simply treating symptoms as they crop up. A family physician by training, Hyman sees patients at The UltraWellness Center in Lenox, Massachusetts. But he reaches a broader audience by making frequent media appearances on TV programs like The Doctor Oz Show), writing for The Huffington Post and advocating for change in healthcare policy. He is also the author of eight New York Times bestsellers. His latest book, The Blood Sugar Solution 10-Day Detox Diet: Activate Your Body's Natural Ability to Burn Fat and Lose Weight Fast, promises to quickly put readers on the path to wellness. We picked his brain to learn how.

What does "detoxing" have to do with losing weight?

Most overweight people are addicted to food. If you want to lose weight, you need to cleanse your body of addictive foods and replace them with healthy ones. Over the last decade we've learned that sugar and refined carbs are essentially as addictive as heroin and cocaine. MRIs show that the same areas in the brain light up like a Christmas tree when any of these substances are consumed. In fact, in animal studies, rats prefer sugar over IV cocaine; they'll continue to drink sugar water despite getting electrical shocks.

Can you be a food addict if you're not overweight?

Absolutely. About 25 percent of adults are what some call "skinny fat," meaning they're thin on the outside but metabolically sick. They have high blood sugar, high triglycerides, high LDL cholesterol (the “bad” kind), and low HDL cholesterol (the "good" kind) and they often have a little extra belly fat despite being slim overall.

Are there other signs you might need to detox from unhealthy foods?

Yes. I call it FLC — feel like crap — syndrome. It's characterized by symptoms such as sugar cravings, sluggishness, moodiness, frequent headaches, sinus trouble and digestive issues like bloating, gas and constipation.

What would you say is the biggest misconception about obesity?

That it's all determined by genetics. I think we blame our parents for our current health or weight status, when in fact we inherit more of our habits from our parents than our genes. Your social environment plays the biggest role; studies show you're more likely to be overweight if your friends are overweight. You're also more likely to be overweight if you happen to live in an area with many fast food restaurants.

[caption id="attachment_18790" align="alignnone" width="620"]Kale Salad Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

You recommend eliminating numerous foods, including those containing gluten and dairy. Why?

There's evidence that these are very inflammatory and that they disrupt the good or healthy bacteria in the digestive tract, which can lead to problems such as uncomfortable bloating. Many gluten-containing foods — mainly grains, including whole grains — also spike your blood sugar too quickly, which contributes to cravings.

What's the worst thing that someone can eat or drink?

I think liquid calories — meaning soda as well as sugar-sweetened iced tea, coffee drinks, etc. — aren’t good because they're correlated to obesity more than anything else. They're even worse than sweet foods because they don't make you feel as full and the sugar gets absorbed very quickly. That causes a rapid spike in insulin, so you get hungry faster and store more fat.

Is diet soda any better?

No. It might even be worse, as it's been linked to a higher risk of diabetes. Artificial sweeteners activate all the sweet receptors in the brain and trigger hormones that make you store fat and slow your metabolism.

 

Over the last decade we've learned that sugar and refined carbs are essentially as addictive as heroin and cocaine.

 

So what should we be consuming?

Whole, fresh foods, including many that are plant based like seeds, nuts, fruits and vegetables. I also recommend good quality protein such as eggs, organic chicken, grass-fed beef and low-mercury fish such as salmon. And I like olive oil as well as coconut butter. Coconut butter, which is often called coconut oil, actually has properties that help with sports performance and boost brainpower.

Your new book claims to do a lot in a short time. Why 10 days?

I think it takes 10 days to reset and start to heal your body. The plan is desired to rewire the brain chemistry that's causing food addiction and shutoff the hormones that are making you hungry and store belly fat. We proved that it works by doing a trial on 600 people; they lost a total of 4,000 pounds in 10 days, their blood pressure and blood sugar dropped, and they reported feeling much better overall.

So what happens after day 10?

The first 10 days are designed as a jump-start. After that, I hope people continue with a modified version of the plan based on their goals and needs. The biggest mistake would be to think, "I feel better now, so I can go back to doing what I was doing before." Consider the 10 days a chance to reconnect with your body and make a decision about how you want to live and how you want to feel. You have a choice.

To start the day strong, Dr. Hyman recommends having one of his Detox Shakes. Here's one to try today.

[caption id="attachment_15662" align="alignnone" width="620"]Peachy Green Smoothie Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Kiwi and Chia Seed Smoothie

Serves 1

[skinnybox]

Ingredients

1 firm kiwi, peeled and sliced in half
1/4 avocado
4 tablespoons chia seeds (soak them in water first for at least 30 minutes)
1/2 lime, juiced
1/4 cup packed fresh mint leaves
1/2 cup ice (optional)
1 cup water
1 cup packed spinach or 1 medium kale leaf, stem removed

Preparation

1. Combine all the ingredients in a blender and blend on high speed until smooth. Serves one.

For more recipes from Dr. Hyman, pick up a copy of The Blood Sugar Solution 10-Day Detox Diet: Activate Your Body's Natural Ability to Burn Fat and Lose Weight Fast.

The post Detox, Burn Fat and Lose Weight with Dr. Mark Hyman appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
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Omega-3 and Omega-6: Can You Get Too Much? http://dailyburn.com/life/health/omega-6-omega-3-foods/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/omega-6-omega-3-foods/#respond Wed, 12 Mar 2014 15:15:11 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=25812 Omega-3s and Omega-6s

[caption id="attachment_25814" align="alignnone" width="620"]Omega-3s and Omega-6s Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Do you hear "omega" and think "healthy?" That's not exactly wrong, but the facts are a little more complicated. There are actually two types of omegas: omega-3s and omega-6s. Both have "essential" fatty acids that your body needs but can't manufacture on its own. That means it's crucial to consume some of each — but most Americans get far too many omega-6s, which can be dangerous. Here's what you need to know so you can correctly fuel and protect your body.

Omega-3s                                                                              

Most of the buzz around omegas is focused on omega-3s, which contain an essential fatty acid called alpha-linolenic acid. Found in fish like salmon, sardines and tuna — as well as in walnuts, flaxseed and chia seeds — omega-3s have powerful anti-inflammatory capabilities. Research has linked them to a variety of health benefits — most specifically a reduced risk of heart disease. Studies have also found that they may help people who suffer from rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, asthma and inflammatory bowel disorders. Omega-3s can lower triglycerides (a type of blood fat) and blood pressure, too, says Sonya Angelone, R.D., a consulting nutritionist and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Omega-6s

Omega-6s don't get nearly as much hype, but certainly deserve some attention. They contain an essential fatty acid called linoleic acid, and you'll find them in seeds, nuts and vegetable oils like safflower, corn and sunflower oil. According to Kelly Hogan, R.D., a clinical dietician at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, omega-6s are much healthier than trans fats (oils that have been modified so they'll stay solid at room temperature and won't spoil). They are also generally better for you than saturated fats that come from animal products, Hogan says.

But here's where it gets a bit tricky. In addition to healthy linoleic acid, omega-6s also have arachidonic acid, which causes inflammation. Over time, an excess of arachidonic acid can lead to problems such as blood clots, arthritis, and heart disease, says Hogan. It might even increase your risk of cancer.

"The typical American diet has an omega-6 to omega-3 ratio of about 15 to one," says Angelone. "Many experts recommend a ratio of four to one or even two to one," which is similar to the Mediterranean diet — a way of eating that's been associated with heart health and a longer lifespan.

Making Smarter Choices

Finding the right balance may seem complex, but it all boils down to a few key facts. You need both omega-3s and omega-6s, but you're probably getting too many omega-6s. Shifting your intake might help reduce inflammation and possibly ward off a variety of ailments as well.

 To reduce omega-6s:

  • Cut back on packaged foods. They're often high in omega-6s, as well as trans fats, says Hogan. Instead, opt for whole foods whenever possible.
  • Use less oil. Many vegetable oils contain a combination of omega-6s and omega-3s, but most — including olive — are much higher in omega-6s than 3s. The exception is flaxseed oil, says Angelone, but it has to be refrigerated and it can't be heated. Canola oil is another good choice (those steering clear of genetically engineered foods can opt for “certified organic”).

To get more omega-3s:

  • Eat fatty fish a few times per week. It's the hands-down best source.
  • If you're not a fish fan, ask your doctor about taking an omega-3 supplement. Be sure to check the label to confirm that it has at least 400 to 600 milligrams of DHA (a component that's especially important for brain health), says Hogan. Vegetarians and vegans can choose supplements that are derived from algae instead of fish.
  • Use flaxseed, chia seeds and hemp seeds in food. Sprinkle them into salads and stir-fries, and snack on walnuts — in moderation. "Too much of any fat can contribute to weight gain," says Angelone.

The post Omega-3 and Omega-6: Can You Get Too Much? appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
Omega-3s and Omega-6s

[caption id="attachment_25814" align="alignnone" width="620"]Omega-3s and Omega-6s Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Do you hear "omega" and think "healthy?" That's not exactly wrong, but the facts are a little more complicated. There are actually two types of omegas: omega-3s and omega-6s. Both have "essential" fatty acids that your body needs but can't manufacture on its own. That means it's crucial to consume some of each — but most Americans get far too many omega-6s, which can be dangerous. Here's what you need to know so you can correctly fuel and protect your body.

Omega-3s                                                                              

Most of the buzz around omegas is focused on omega-3s, which contain an essential fatty acid called alpha-linolenic acid. Found in fish like salmon, sardines and tuna — as well as in walnuts, flaxseed and chia seeds — omega-3s have powerful anti-inflammatory capabilities. Research has linked them to a variety of health benefits — most specifically a reduced risk of heart disease. Studies have also found that they may help people who suffer from rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, asthma and inflammatory bowel disorders. Omega-3s can lower triglycerides (a type of blood fat) and blood pressure, too, says Sonya Angelone, R.D., a consulting nutritionist and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Omega-6s

Omega-6s don't get nearly as much hype, but certainly deserve some attention. They contain an essential fatty acid called linoleic acid, and you'll find them in seeds, nuts and vegetable oils like safflower, corn and sunflower oil. According to Kelly Hogan, R.D., a clinical dietician at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, omega-6s are much healthier than trans fats (oils that have been modified so they'll stay solid at room temperature and won't spoil). They are also generally better for you than saturated fats that come from animal products, Hogan says.

But here's where it gets a bit tricky. In addition to healthy linoleic acid, omega-6s also have arachidonic acid, which causes inflammation. Over time, an excess of arachidonic acid can lead to problems such as blood clots, arthritis, and heart disease, says Hogan. It might even increase your risk of cancer.

"The typical American diet has an omega-6 to omega-3 ratio of about 15 to one," says Angelone. "Many experts recommend a ratio of four to one or even two to one," which is similar to the Mediterranean diet — a way of eating that's been associated with heart health and a longer lifespan.

Making Smarter Choices

Finding the right balance may seem complex, but it all boils down to a few key facts. You need both omega-3s and omega-6s, but you're probably getting too many omega-6s. Shifting your intake might help reduce inflammation and possibly ward off a variety of ailments as well.

 To reduce omega-6s:

  • Cut back on packaged foods. They're often high in omega-6s, as well as trans fats, says Hogan. Instead, opt for whole foods whenever possible.
  • Use less oil. Many vegetable oils contain a combination of omega-6s and omega-3s, but most — including olive — are much higher in omega-6s than 3s. The exception is flaxseed oil, says Angelone, but it has to be refrigerated and it can't be heated. Canola oil is another good choice (those steering clear of genetically engineered foods can opt for “certified organic”).

To get more omega-3s:

  • Eat fatty fish a few times per week. It's the hands-down best source.
  • If you're not a fish fan, ask your doctor about taking an omega-3 supplement. Be sure to check the label to confirm that it has at least 400 to 600 milligrams of DHA (a component that's especially important for brain health), says Hogan. Vegetarians and vegans can choose supplements that are derived from algae instead of fish.
  • Use flaxseed, chia seeds and hemp seeds in food. Sprinkle them into salads and stir-fries, and snack on walnuts — in moderation. "Too much of any fat can contribute to weight gain," says Angelone.

The post Omega-3 and Omega-6: Can You Get Too Much? appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
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How to Rehab Your Resolutions to Avoid “Fail Friday” http://dailyburn.com/life/health/how-to-avoid-fail-friday-012414/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/how-to-avoid-fail-friday-012414/#respond Fri, 24 Jan 2014 12:15:20 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=23923 Fail Friday

[caption id="attachment_23930" align="alignnone" width="620"]Fail Friday Photo: Pond5[/caption]

On January 1st you were determined to make a fresh start. Whether you vowed to lose 10 pounds, quit smoking, or watch less television, you were confident and committed. Now? You're not so sure — and you're not alone. In fact, a U.K. survey revealed that Friday, January 23rd (also known as "fail Friday") is the day that people are most apt to abandon their New Year's resolutions. The upside is that it's not too late to get back on track. Boost the odds in your favor by following these four tips.

1. Tweak your intentions.

You swore you'd run 10 miles every single day no matter the weather, but then the polar vortex hit and you ended up hibernating on your couch for a few days. Research shows that about 40 to 50 percent of Americans make New Year's resolutions, but they often don't stick to them because the targets are too extreme, says psychologist Jephtha Tausig-Edwards, Ph.D. (aka Dr. Jeph), a clinical instructor at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City. "When people can't execute their initial goals, they feel frustrated and may drop them altogether," she explains. Instead of scrapping your plan, consider revising it. Think about the sentiment behind your resolution and pick a more realistic way to accomplish it. For example, if you wanted to improve your endurance, try running a half-mile more each week.

2. Break it down.

Losing weight is the most popular New Year's resolution, but people who aim to lose one to two pounds a week are more likely to succeed than those who say they're going to lose 30 pounds. Setting mini-goals keeps you motivated because you can relish in your achievements along the way. When it comes to slimming down, keep in mind that focusing on the number on the scale is just one way to go about it. You might do just as well by planning to have a piece of fruit whenever you crave dessert or committing to hit the gym twice a week, says Dr. Jeph.

3. Rally your support system.

"Having others acknowledge our accomplishments goes a long way in making us feel good about the process we're engaged in," says Dr. Jeph. Share your goals with loved ones, and let them know when you hit big milestones. Supportive family and friends can help prevent you from slacking as well, especially if a few of them share similar goals. If your usual crew isn't up to the task, head to Facebook or Twitter to see if any other friends are in the same boat and use them as a support group.

4. Reap the rewards.

Trying to quit smoking? Every time you do something healthy (like take a walk or call a friend) instead of buying cigarettes, set aside the cost of a pack until you have enough money for a massage or that pair of shoes you've been eyeing. "Positive feedback can significantly increase the likelihood that you'll stick with a new behavior," says Dr. Jeph, so figure out a way to treat yourself when you deserve it.

Originally posted January 24, 2014. Updated January 2015. 

The post How to Rehab Your Resolutions to Avoid “Fail Friday” appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
Fail Friday

[caption id="attachment_23930" align="alignnone" width="620"]Fail Friday Photo: Pond5[/caption] On January 1st you were determined to make a fresh start. Whether you vowed to lose 10 pounds, quit smoking, or watch less television, you were confident and committed. Now? You're not so sure — and you're not alone. In fact, a U.K. survey revealed that Friday, January 23rd (also known as "fail Friday") is the day that people are most apt to abandon their New Year's resolutions. The upside is that it's not too late to get back on track. Boost the odds in your favor by following these four tips.

1. Tweak your intentions.

You swore you'd run 10 miles every single day no matter the weather, but then the polar vortex hit and you ended up hibernating on your couch for a few days. Research shows that about 40 to 50 percent of Americans make New Year's resolutions, but they often don't stick to them because the targets are too extreme, says psychologist Jephtha Tausig-Edwards, Ph.D. (aka Dr. Jeph), a clinical instructor at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City. "When people can't execute their initial goals, they feel frustrated and may drop them altogether," she explains. Instead of scrapping your plan, consider revising it. Think about the sentiment behind your resolution and pick a more realistic way to accomplish it. For example, if you wanted to improve your endurance, try running a half-mile more each week.

2. Break it down.

Losing weight is the most popular New Year's resolution, but people who aim to lose one to two pounds a week are more likely to succeed than those who say they're going to lose 30 pounds. Setting mini-goals keeps you motivated because you can relish in your achievements along the way. When it comes to slimming down, keep in mind that focusing on the number on the scale is just one way to go about it. You might do just as well by planning to have a piece of fruit whenever you crave dessert or committing to hit the gym twice a week, says Dr. Jeph.

3. Rally your support system.

"Having others acknowledge our accomplishments goes a long way in making us feel good about the process we're engaged in," says Dr. Jeph. Share your goals with loved ones, and let them know when you hit big milestones. Supportive family and friends can help prevent you from slacking as well, especially if a few of them share similar goals. If your usual crew isn't up to the task, head to Facebook or Twitter to see if any other friends are in the same boat and use them as a support group.

4. Reap the rewards.

Trying to quit smoking? Every time you do something healthy (like take a walk or call a friend) instead of buying cigarettes, set aside the cost of a pack until you have enough money for a massage or that pair of shoes you've been eyeing. "Positive feedback can significantly increase the likelihood that you'll stick with a new behavior," says Dr. Jeph, so figure out a way to treat yourself when you deserve it. Originally posted January 24, 2014. Updated January 2015. 

The post How to Rehab Your Resolutions to Avoid “Fail Friday” appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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6 Healthy Foods to Fight the Flu, Beat Stress and More http://dailyburn.com/life/health/healthy-foods-fight-stress-flu/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/healthy-foods-fight-stress-flu/#respond Thu, 23 Jan 2014 16:15:50 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=23767 Beets

Sometimes the best medicine can be found at the end of a fork. Of course, you already know that vegging out — that is, loading up on produce — is crucial for good health. And while there's really no such thing as a bad choice when it comes to vegetables, some options are better than others if you have a specific concern in mind. "Fine-tuning your intake can actually help you meet your health goals," says Tammy Lakatos Shames, R.D., co-author with sister Lyssie Lakatos, R.D. of The Nutrition Twins' Veggie Cure: Expert Advice and Tantalizing Recipes for Health, Energy, and Beauty. Read on for their expert advice and dietary "prescriptions" to help you do just that.

[caption id="attachment_23808" align="alignnone" width="620"]Mushrooms Photo: Pond5[/caption]

You want to: Keep colds and the flu at bay

Veggie Rx: Mushrooms
"Many people think mushrooms aren't as healthy as other vegetables because they're white," says Tammy Lakatos Shames. But they're packed with disease-fighting nutrients, and some are even great sources of vitamin D. Studies have shown that this fat-soluble vitamin may play a role in keeping the immune system strong and there are very few good dietary sources of it. One important note: only certain mushrooms provide this benefit, thanks to being grown under ultraviolet light. Check the package label, or seek out Dole Portobello Mushrooms and Monterey Mushrooms.

[caption id="attachment_18790" align="alignnone" width="620"]Kale Salad Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

You want to:  Bounce back from a hangover

Veggie Rx: Kale
This trendy green is popular for good reason. Not only is it high in water content — so it will rehydrate you while flushing out your system — it also contains specific nutrients (including sulfur compounds) that help to power your liver's natural detoxification process. "It's also rich in potassium, which helps beat bloat by restoring normal fluid balance in the body," explains Lyssie Lakatos.

[caption id="attachment_23809" align="alignnone" width="620"]Summer Squash Photo: Pond5[/caption]

You want to: Kick stress to the curb

Veggie Rx: Summer squash
Despite the name, summer squash (which includes zucchini) is available year-round in most grocery stores. "It gives you what I like to call an 'internal massage,'" says Lyssie. Summer squash loaded with vitamin C, which reduces levels of the stress hormone cortisol in your bloodstream, as well as B vitamins, which help your body handle stress better. It is also a great source of magnesium and potassium; these minerals work together to relax blood vessels and lower your blood pressure.

[caption id="attachment_20053" align="alignnone" width="620"]Sweet Potato Fries Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

You want to: Feel more energized

Veggie Rx: Potatoes
When you're feeling sluggish it's tempting to reach for a quick fix like a candy bar, which is bound to spike your blood sugar and then send it crashing back down. But potatoes — both the white and sweet variety — are a much better option. These complex carbs are digested slowly, so they provide a sustained energy boost. Potatoes also contain B6, says Tammy, which is essential for breaking down glycogen in the muscle and liver when your body needs some extra power.

[caption id="attachment_20568" align="alignnone" width="620"]Spaghetti Squash Photo by Renee Blair[/caption]

You want to: Lift yourself out of a funk

Veggie Rx: Spaghetti squash
Its delicious strands (just bake, cut it open and shred it with a fork) are reminiscent of angel hair pasta, but the best part is that it has tryptophan, an amino acid that promotes the release of mood-boosting serotonin in your brain. Spaghetti squash also contains specific nutrients that help convert the tryptophan in other foods you eat into serotonin. Plus, it's one of very few vegetables that provide some omega-3s and research has linked low levels of these healthy fatty acids to depression.

[caption id="attachment_23812" align="alignnone" width="620"]Beets Photo: Pond5[/caption]

You want to: Get the most out of your workout

Veggie Rx: Beets
These ruby-red superstars increase nitric oxide in your body, which benefits your heart and your athletic performance, says Tammy. Nitric oxide helps to promote the flow of oxygen, so it may improve your endurance and fight fatigue during your sweat session. Bonus: Eating beets (or drinking beet juice) helps fight bloating, so you'll look your best even before your new routine has a chance to really tighten and tone those muscles.

The post 6 Healthy Foods to Fight the Flu, Beat Stress and More appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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Beets

Sometimes the best medicine can be found at the end of a fork. Of course, you already know that vegging out — that is, loading up on produce — is crucial for good health. And while there's really no such thing as a bad choice when it comes to vegetables, some options are better than others if you have a specific concern in mind. "Fine-tuning your intake can actually help you meet your health goals," says Tammy Lakatos Shames, R.D., co-author with sister Lyssie Lakatos, R.D. of The Nutrition Twins' Veggie Cure: Expert Advice and Tantalizing Recipes for Health, Energy, and Beauty. Read on for their expert advice and dietary "prescriptions" to help you do just that. [caption id="attachment_23808" align="alignnone" width="620"]Mushrooms Photo: Pond5[/caption]

You want to: Keep colds and the flu at bay

Veggie Rx: Mushrooms "Many people think mushrooms aren't as healthy as other vegetables because they're white," says Tammy Lakatos Shames. But they're packed with disease-fighting nutrients, and some are even great sources of vitamin D. Studies have shown that this fat-soluble vitamin may play a role in keeping the immune system strong and there are very few good dietary sources of it. One important note: only certain mushrooms provide this benefit, thanks to being grown under ultraviolet light. Check the package label, or seek out Dole Portobello Mushrooms and Monterey Mushrooms. [caption id="attachment_18790" align="alignnone" width="620"]Kale Salad Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

You want to:  Bounce back from a hangover

Veggie Rx: Kale This trendy green is popular for good reason. Not only is it high in water content — so it will rehydrate you while flushing out your system — it also contains specific nutrients (including sulfur compounds) that help to power your liver's natural detoxification process. "It's also rich in potassium, which helps beat bloat by restoring normal fluid balance in the body," explains Lyssie Lakatos. [caption id="attachment_23809" align="alignnone" width="620"]Summer Squash Photo: Pond5[/caption]

You want to: Kick stress to the curb

Veggie Rx: Summer squash Despite the name, summer squash (which includes zucchini) is available year-round in most grocery stores. "It gives you what I like to call an 'internal massage,'" says Lyssie. Summer squash loaded with vitamin C, which reduces levels of the stress hormone cortisol in your bloodstream, as well as B vitamins, which help your body handle stress better. It is also a great source of magnesium and potassium; these minerals work together to relax blood vessels and lower your blood pressure. [caption id="attachment_20053" align="alignnone" width="620"]Sweet Potato Fries Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

You want to: Feel more energized

Veggie Rx: Potatoes When you're feeling sluggish it's tempting to reach for a quick fix like a candy bar, which is bound to spike your blood sugar and then send it crashing back down. But potatoes — both the white and sweet variety — are a much better option. These complex carbs are digested slowly, so they provide a sustained energy boost. Potatoes also contain B6, says Tammy, which is essential for breaking down glycogen in the muscle and liver when your body needs some extra power. [caption id="attachment_20568" align="alignnone" width="620"]Spaghetti Squash Photo by Renee Blair[/caption]

You want to: Lift yourself out of a funk

Veggie Rx: Spaghetti squash Its delicious strands (just bake, cut it open and shred it with a fork) are reminiscent of angel hair pasta, but the best part is that it has tryptophan, an amino acid that promotes the release of mood-boosting serotonin in your brain. Spaghetti squash also contains specific nutrients that help convert the tryptophan in other foods you eat into serotonin. Plus, it's one of very few vegetables that provide some omega-3s and research has linked low levels of these healthy fatty acids to depression. [caption id="attachment_23812" align="alignnone" width="620"]Beets Photo: Pond5[/caption]

You want to: Get the most out of your workout

Veggie Rx: Beets These ruby-red superstars increase nitric oxide in your body, which benefits your heart and your athletic performance, says Tammy. Nitric oxide helps to promote the flow of oxygen, so it may improve your endurance and fight fatigue during your sweat session. Bonus: Eating beets (or drinking beet juice) helps fight bloating, so you'll look your best even before your new routine has a chance to really tighten and tone those muscles.

The post 6 Healthy Foods to Fight the Flu, Beat Stress and More appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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