Karen Borsari – Life by Daily Burn https://dailyburn.com/life Sat, 31 Mar 2018 00:21:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.5 The 10 Most Common Sunscreen Slip-Ups https://dailyburn.com/life/lifestyle/sunscreen-common-mistakes/ https://dailyburn.com/life/lifestyle/sunscreen-common-mistakes/#respond Mon, 23 Jun 2014 15:15:38 +0000 http://daily-burn.sta.oomphcloud.com/?p=15450 Sunscreen

[caption id="attachment_29364" align="alignnone" width="620"]Top 10 SPF Mistakes Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Despite everything we know about the risks of sun exposure, skin cancer is still on the rise — big time. In fact, in the last 35 years, rates of deadly melanoma have tripled. And those applying sunscreen are not immune. Improper application, the wrong product, and even a few of your other summertime activities can render sunscreen virtually useless. Avoid these common culprits and get the most out of your SPF for risk-free fun in the sun!

Sun Safety: 10 Sunscreen Mistakes

1. OTC Interference
If you’ve been slathering on the SPF but still come home from a day in the sun looking like a lobster, check your medicine cabinet. Common over the counter medications like ibuprofen, Aleve, Motrin, and Advil decrease the efficacy of sunscreen. Other culprits include Benadryl and other antihistamines, antibiotics such as Tetracycline and doxycycline and many acne treatments containing benzoyl peroxide. If skipping a dose when headed outdoors isn’t an option, be sure to wear UPF attire (the clothing version of SPF) and a wide brimmed hat. And stick to the safety of the shade!

2. It’s Not Enough
Even if you’re diligent about applying sunscreen you’re probably not using enough. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, at least one ounce of sunscreen should be applied every two hours for adequate coverage. Unfortunately, studies show most people use just one quarter to one half the amount they should, greatly decreasing the effectiveness of their sunscreen. To give you a better idea of how much you should be using, imagine a golf ball-sized amount or fill a shot glass with sunscreen and start slathering!

3. Getting Too Hands On
You say you’re using plenty of sunscreen and still getting burned? Could be the way you’re putting it on. Studies show that sunscreen is most effective when applied in a thin film and decreases when it is rubbed in. Next time you’re headed outdoors, leave a little greasy goodness on your skin and let your sunscreen sink in.

4. You’re Late to the Party
If pulling out the sunscreen and lotioning up is the first thing you do at the beach, it may be time to rethink your order of operations. Sunscreen needs about half an hour to bind with skin so you’re absorbing rays for 30 minutes if you haven’t pre-applied. Always put on your first coat of sunscreen before you leave home so it will be in full effect by the time you get outside.

5. Playing the Numbers
There’s no way you can get burned using SPF 100, right? Wrong! There are several reasons your high SPF sunscreen may be to blame for sun damage. Not only does a high SPF give a false sense of UV invincibility (SPF 100 does not provide twice the protection of SPF 50), it actually has a less optimal chemical balance. SPF is based primarily on defense against UVB — not UVA — rays. Because UVB rays are the main cause of most burns, a higher SPF signifies more UVB protection, not UVA despite these ray’s harmful effects. As SPF goes up so does the disparity between UVB and UVA protection. To safeguard yourself from both UVB and UVA rays stick to frequent applications of a sunscreen with an SPF between 15 and 50.

6. Not Watching the Clock
Many of us have made sunscreen part of the morning routine and may even reapply midday, but it’s not enough — no matter the SPF. Both the FDA and the Skin Cancer Foundation recommend reapplying at least every two hours. Sunscreen simply isn’t effective after that amount of time. If remembering to reapply proves difficult, try setting an alarm on your phone if you’ll be in the sun for hours on end.

7. Sipping in the Sun
If you suffer from blotchy burns, it may be time to reevaluate your poolside beverage. Citrus juices and peels, most commonly lime juice — ahem margarita — make skin photosensitive, meaning you may be more likely to burn or blister in the sun. The good news is, the plant compound must come in contact with your skin in order for it to become sensitized. As long as you’re not squeezing your own limes you should be okay. But don’t start sipping and spilling, “margarita dermatitis” as doctors call it, is a common condition.

8. You Sweat It Off
Sorry sweaty friends, pit stains aren’t your only problem on a hot summer day. Just like water, sweat can wash away sunscreen making you more susceptible to burns. If you sweat heavily, even if you’re just taking a summertime stroll, consider a sport or water-resistant sunscreen and be sure to reapply every time you wipe sweat from your brow — or anywhere else!

9. It’s Past Its Prime
Christmas lights and pool supplies are great things to buy at an end-of-season sale. Sunscreen is not. Buying SPF in bulk last September may have seemed like an investment in your skin’s health but it may have been a poorly laid plan. Most sunscreens have an expiration date but, unlike Twinkies, are not good beyond that point. Over time, sunscreens lose strength. Even if the lotion looks good, toss it out if its past due. If the bottle doesn’t have a date, toss after three years or you see any changes in color or texture.

10. You Missed the Fine Print
SPF, UVA, UVB, broad spectrum, water-resistant versus waterproof, hypoallergenic, oil-free… With all the jargon it’s no wonder many consumers aren’t bringing home the right stuff. And without the proper product your more susceptible to burns. According to research conducted by the Environmental Working Group, only one quarter of the sunscreens available in 2013 offer “strong and broad UV protection,” meaning 75 percent of the products out there just won’t cut it.  Look for broad-spectrum sunscreens with an SPF of 50 or lower. Unless you’ll be in the water or sweating profusely, avoid water-resistant sunscreens as they can be less effective. Skip the insect repellent sunscreen combo as well. DEET, the most common chemical in bug repellent can reduce the effectiveness of SPF by more than 30 percent. To find a brand that meets your needs, check out the EWG’s sunscreen guide.

 

Originally posted August 25, 2013. 

The post The 10 Most Common Sunscreen Slip-Ups appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
Sunscreen

[caption id="attachment_29364" align="alignnone" width="620"]Top 10 SPF Mistakes Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Despite everything we know about the risks of sun exposure, skin cancer is still on the rise — big time. In fact, in the last 35 years, rates of deadly melanoma have tripled. And those applying sunscreen are not immune. Improper application, the wrong product, and even a few of your other summertime activities can render sunscreen virtually useless. Avoid these common culprits and get the most out of your SPF for risk-free fun in the sun!

Sun Safety: 10 Sunscreen Mistakes

1. OTC Interference
If you’ve been slathering on the SPF but still come home from a day in the sun looking like a lobster, check your medicine cabinet. Common over the counter medications like ibuprofen, Aleve, Motrin, and Advil decrease the efficacy of sunscreen. Other culprits include Benadryl and other antihistamines, antibiotics such as Tetracycline and doxycycline and many acne treatments containing benzoyl peroxide. If skipping a dose when headed outdoors isn’t an option, be sure to wear UPF attire (the clothing version of SPF) and a wide brimmed hat. And stick to the safety of the shade!

2. It’s Not Enough
Even if you’re diligent about applying sunscreen you’re probably not using enough. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, at least one ounce of sunscreen should be applied every two hours for adequate coverage. Unfortunately, studies show most people use just one quarter to one half the amount they should, greatly decreasing the effectiveness of their sunscreen. To give you a better idea of how much you should be using, imagine a golf ball-sized amount or fill a shot glass with sunscreen and start slathering!

3. Getting Too Hands On
You say you’re using plenty of sunscreen and still getting burned? Could be the way you’re putting it on. Studies show that sunscreen is most effective when applied in a thin film and decreases when it is rubbed in. Next time you’re headed outdoors, leave a little greasy goodness on your skin and let your sunscreen sink in.

4. You’re Late to the Party
If pulling out the sunscreen and lotioning up is the first thing you do at the beach, it may be time to rethink your order of operations. Sunscreen needs about half an hour to bind with skin so you’re absorbing rays for 30 minutes if you haven’t pre-applied. Always put on your first coat of sunscreen before you leave home so it will be in full effect by the time you get outside.

5. Playing the Numbers
There’s no way you can get burned using SPF 100, right? Wrong! There are several reasons your high SPF sunscreen may be to blame for sun damage. Not only does a high SPF give a false sense of UV invincibility (SPF 100 does not provide twice the protection of SPF 50), it actually has a less optimal chemical balance. SPF is based primarily on defense against UVB — not UVA — rays. Because UVB rays are the main cause of most burns, a higher SPF signifies more UVB protection, not UVA despite these ray’s harmful effects. As SPF goes up so does the disparity between UVB and UVA protection. To safeguard yourself from both UVB and UVA rays stick to frequent applications of a sunscreen with an SPF between 15 and 50.

6. Not Watching the Clock
Many of us have made sunscreen part of the morning routine and may even reapply midday, but it’s not enough — no matter the SPF. Both the FDA and the Skin Cancer Foundation recommend reapplying at least every two hours. Sunscreen simply isn’t effective after that amount of time. If remembering to reapply proves difficult, try setting an alarm on your phone if you’ll be in the sun for hours on end.

7. Sipping in the Sun
If you suffer from blotchy burns, it may be time to reevaluate your poolside beverage. Citrus juices and peels, most commonly lime juice — ahem margarita — make skin photosensitive, meaning you may be more likely to burn or blister in the sun. The good news is, the plant compound must come in contact with your skin in order for it to become sensitized. As long as you’re not squeezing your own limes you should be okay. But don’t start sipping and spilling, “margarita dermatitis” as doctors call it, is a common condition.

8. You Sweat It Off
Sorry sweaty friends, pit stains aren’t your only problem on a hot summer day. Just like water, sweat can wash away sunscreen making you more susceptible to burns. If you sweat heavily, even if you’re just taking a summertime stroll, consider a sport or water-resistant sunscreen and be sure to reapply every time you wipe sweat from your brow — or anywhere else!

9. It’s Past Its Prime
Christmas lights and pool supplies are great things to buy at an end-of-season sale. Sunscreen is not. Buying SPF in bulk last September may have seemed like an investment in your skin’s health but it may have been a poorly laid plan. Most sunscreens have an expiration date but, unlike Twinkies, are not good beyond that point. Over time, sunscreens lose strength. Even if the lotion looks good, toss it out if its past due. If the bottle doesn’t have a date, toss after three years or you see any changes in color or texture.

10. You Missed the Fine Print
SPF, UVA, UVB, broad spectrum, water-resistant versus waterproof, hypoallergenic, oil-free… With all the jargon it’s no wonder many consumers aren’t bringing home the right stuff. And without the proper product your more susceptible to burns. According to research conducted by the Environmental Working Group, only one quarter of the sunscreens available in 2013 offer “strong and broad UV protection,” meaning 75 percent of the products out there just won’t cut it.  Look for broad-spectrum sunscreens with an SPF of 50 or lower. Unless you’ll be in the water or sweating profusely, avoid water-resistant sunscreens as they can be less effective. Skip the insect repellent sunscreen combo as well. DEET, the most common chemical in bug repellent can reduce the effectiveness of SPF by more than 30 percent. To find a brand that meets your needs, check out the EWG’s sunscreen guide.

 

Originally posted August 25, 2013. 

The post The 10 Most Common Sunscreen Slip-Ups appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
https://dailyburn.com/life/lifestyle/sunscreen-common-mistakes/feed/ 0
Should You Eat Before a Workout? https://dailyburn.com/life/health/pre-workout-fuel/ https://dailyburn.com/life/health/pre-workout-fuel/#respond Wed, 19 Feb 2014 12:15:31 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=19476 Preworkout Meal

[caption id="attachment_19478" align="alignnone" width="620"]Preworkout Meal Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Anyone who makes fitness a priority has experienced that moment when a slight tummy rumble comes along just as you head out to the gym. But do you grab a snack to get more out of your workout? Or skip the food to avoid stomach cramps and potentially “undo” everything you’re about to accomplish? And if you do choose to fuel, should that be with a protein shake, an energy bar, a handful of nuts or a piece of fruit?

Pre-workout snacks shouldn’t make you feel stuffed but it is important to eat up, says Cynthia Sass, MPH, RD, CSSD. “Exercising on an empty stomach can lead to the breakdown of muscle tissue,” cautions Sass. Without food to fuel your workout, muscle tissue is instead converted into glucose to provide the energy you need, which isn’t ideal — whether you’re trying to build muscle or lose weight. This breakdown can negatively impact your metabolism and might even lead to injury.

Food for Thought

In order fuel up properly pre-workout, it’s important to understand how the body uses energy. Chris Mohr, RD, PhD in exercise physiology, says the first source of energy, lasting just a few seconds, comes from the breakdown of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which is naturally found in the body. Next, the body uses glucose (sugar) for immediate but longer lasting energy. Finally, during endurance training, the body starts to break down stored carbohydrates, called glycogen, to provide sustained energy. “The type of workout itself, and the duration, will affect the different processes taking place in your body,” says Mohr. So the duration and intensity of your workout will determine your energy needs.

Knowing how to best fuel your body can help you get the most out of every sweat session and get you one step closer to achieving your goals. Here are the fundamentals to fuel for success.

1. Time It Right

As a general rule of thumb, when it comes to pre-workout eating, “you can time it any way you like, but the closer you get to a workout, the more simple the meal should be,” says Sass. If you eat two to three hours before, you’ll have time for your food to digest and be absorb from your GI tract into your blood. Therefore, you can eat a more complex meal containing protein, fat and fiber, which take longer to break down. “Within an hour of a workout, however, you should eat something that will be digested and absorbed more quickly,” says Sass (like a small bowl of cereal or a piece of fruit). Not only is undigested food useless as fuel, it can feel heavy in your stomach, leading to cramps and sluggishness, she says.

2. Assess Intensity

Now don’t go thinking simply lacing up your sneakers justifies a big, hearty snack! The amount of effort you put into your workout will dictate what you should be consuming prior to exercising. “The higher the intensity, the smaller the meal or the further out you want to eat,” advises Mohr. You don’t want your body to be expending any extra energy on digestion when you need it to perform. “If you’re going out for a 30-minute morning walk, you don’t have to shove food in your mouth to fuel up,” says Mohr. A lower intensity workout doesn’t require as much energy as a demanding one. For example, if you’re planning on burning only 350 calories on the elliptical, a 200-calorie snack isn’t needed. And, as a general rule, if you’re going to exercise within a few hours of a meal, those are the times you may be better off skipping your pre-workout fare, says Sass.

3. Fuel Up

So how should you pre-game for maximum performance? Two or three hours before a moderate intensity workout, a somewhat complex meal like a sandwich on whole grain bread with lean protein, roasted vegetables and avocado is a good option because “you’ll have time for your food to get digested and absorbed from your GI tract into your blood,” says Sass. On the contrary, if you plan to do the same workout within one to two hours, a small bowl of low-fiber, whole-grain cereal like puffed brown rice or corn flakes with organic skim milk or a plant-based milk is ideal. The cereal will provide easy to digest calories for quick energy while the milk provides sustaining protein. Oatmeal with a banana will provide the same benefits, according to Mohr, for individuals looking for a simpler meal option.

Want something even easier? A quality nutrition bar (with ingredients you can pronounce) or homemade protein shake works wonders. For workouts with an hour or less lead-time, smaller snacks like Greek yogurt or low-fat chocolate milk are good options. And, if you do happen to find yourself heading out the door as your stomach starts to rumble, you can't go wrong with a small piece of fruit, like an easy-to-digest banana.

Now that you know the perfect fuel formula, consider these delicious pre-workout snacks

The post Should You Eat Before a Workout? appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
Preworkout Meal

[caption id="attachment_19478" align="alignnone" width="620"]Preworkout Meal Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Anyone who makes fitness a priority has experienced that moment when a slight tummy rumble comes along just as you head out to the gym. But do you grab a snack to get more out of your workout? Or skip the food to avoid stomach cramps and potentially “undo” everything you’re about to accomplish? And if you do choose to fuel, should that be with a protein shake, an energy bar, a handful of nuts or a piece of fruit?

Pre-workout snacks shouldn’t make you feel stuffed but it is important to eat up, says Cynthia Sass, MPH, RD, CSSD. “Exercising on an empty stomach can lead to the breakdown of muscle tissue,” cautions Sass. Without food to fuel your workout, muscle tissue is instead converted into glucose to provide the energy you need, which isn’t ideal — whether you’re trying to build muscle or lose weight. This breakdown can negatively impact your metabolism and might even lead to injury.

Food for Thought

In order fuel up properly pre-workout, it’s important to understand how the body uses energy. Chris Mohr, RD, PhD in exercise physiology, says the first source of energy, lasting just a few seconds, comes from the breakdown of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which is naturally found in the body. Next, the body uses glucose (sugar) for immediate but longer lasting energy. Finally, during endurance training, the body starts to break down stored carbohydrates, called glycogen, to provide sustained energy. “The type of workout itself, and the duration, will affect the different processes taking place in your body,” says Mohr. So the duration and intensity of your workout will determine your energy needs.

Knowing how to best fuel your body can help you get the most out of every sweat session and get you one step closer to achieving your goals. Here are the fundamentals to fuel for success.

1. Time It Right

As a general rule of thumb, when it comes to pre-workout eating, “you can time it any way you like, but the closer you get to a workout, the more simple the meal should be,” says Sass. If you eat two to three hours before, you’ll have time for your food to digest and be absorb from your GI tract into your blood. Therefore, you can eat a more complex meal containing protein, fat and fiber, which take longer to break down. “Within an hour of a workout, however, you should eat something that will be digested and absorbed more quickly,” says Sass (like a small bowl of cereal or a piece of fruit). Not only is undigested food useless as fuel, it can feel heavy in your stomach, leading to cramps and sluggishness, she says.

2. Assess Intensity

Now don’t go thinking simply lacing up your sneakers justifies a big, hearty snack! The amount of effort you put into your workout will dictate what you should be consuming prior to exercising. “The higher the intensity, the smaller the meal or the further out you want to eat,” advises Mohr. You don’t want your body to be expending any extra energy on digestion when you need it to perform. “If you’re going out for a 30-minute morning walk, you don’t have to shove food in your mouth to fuel up,” says Mohr. A lower intensity workout doesn’t require as much energy as a demanding one. For example, if you’re planning on burning only 350 calories on the elliptical, a 200-calorie snack isn’t needed. And, as a general rule, if you’re going to exercise within a few hours of a meal, those are the times you may be better off skipping your pre-workout fare, says Sass.

3. Fuel Up

So how should you pre-game for maximum performance? Two or three hours before a moderate intensity workout, a somewhat complex meal like a sandwich on whole grain bread with lean protein, roasted vegetables and avocado is a good option because “you’ll have time for your food to get digested and absorbed from your GI tract into your blood,” says Sass. On the contrary, if you plan to do the same workout within one to two hours, a small bowl of low-fiber, whole-grain cereal like puffed brown rice or corn flakes with organic skim milk or a plant-based milk is ideal. The cereal will provide easy to digest calories for quick energy while the milk provides sustaining protein. Oatmeal with a banana will provide the same benefits, according to Mohr, for individuals looking for a simpler meal option.

Want something even easier? A quality nutrition bar (with ingredients you can pronounce) or homemade protein shake works wonders. For workouts with an hour or less lead-time, smaller snacks like Greek yogurt or low-fat chocolate milk are good options. And, if you do happen to find yourself heading out the door as your stomach starts to rumble, you can't go wrong with a small piece of fruit, like an easy-to-digest banana.

Now that you know the perfect fuel formula, consider these delicious pre-workout snacks

The post Should You Eat Before a Workout? appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
https://dailyburn.com/life/health/pre-workout-fuel/feed/ 0
10 Tips for Lower-Calorie Cocktails https://dailyburn.com/life/health/healthy-cocktail-tips/ https://dailyburn.com/life/health/healthy-cocktail-tips/#comments Fri, 14 Feb 2014 15:00:12 +0000 http://daily-burn.sta.oomphcloud.com/?p=15905 Gin Tonic Cocktail

If you think light beer, vodka-sodas and white wine spritzers are the only way to go when counting calories, think again. With a few simple swaps almost any cocktail can go from diet disaster to totally doable. Apply these simple tricks to your favorite drinks to make them a little lighter but just as delicious!

[caption id="attachment_15922" align="alignnone" width="620"]Gin Tonic Cocktail Photo: Pond5[/caption]

1. Choose a smarter sweetener.
A lot of the tastiest — and most caloric — cocktails call for simple syrup, which is made by combining equal parts sugar and water. To avoid added calories and the inevitable spike in blood-glucose level, make your own calorie-free simple syrup using all-natural stevia. Simply dissolve one part stevia in four parts boiling water, cool, and use as you would regular simple syrup.

2. Let the (store-bought) juice loose.
Freshly squeeze juice whenever possible to avoid added sugars, colors and preservatives found in many store-bought varieties. Squeezing fruit close to cocktail time preserves more of the nutrients.

3. Heal a hangover.
Electrolyte-packed coconut water has become a hangover staple for many a partygoer, so why not get a jumpstart on the rehydration process? At just six calories an ounce and available in a variety of fun flavors, there’s no reason not to. Just be sure it’s the all-natural kind with no artificial additives.

4. Support the soda ban.
You don’t have to say sayonara to soda entirely. Just choose wisely. Skip sugary sodas and chemical-packed diet drinks and look for all natural, organic, sugar-free sodas like Q Drinks, which derive their sweetness from agave or Zevia, a line of soda naturally sweetened by stevia.

5. Go for the garnish.
Follow the lead of crowd favorite, sangria, and pack all your fruity cocktails with nutritious produce. By naturally adding flavor and sweetness you can skip artificially flavored alcohols and mixers. Plus, the fruit’s fiber may help you resist an extra order of French fries.

6. Mix with the right crowd.
Often, the sugar found in cocktails comes from the juice, but not all varieties are created equal. Per ounce, grapefruit, orange, cranberry and pineapple juice contain 11, 15, 16 and 17 calories respectively. Doesn’t sound like much, but considering the average screwdriver contains six ounces of OJ (90 calories), choosing grapefruit juice saves 24 calories per cocktail. Grapefruit also boasts 4.8 grams fewer carbohydrates and no sodium.

7. Add a the right type of sparkle.
When it comes to carbonation, zero-calorie sparkling water (aka seltzer) is the way to go. Not only will you slash calories, you’ll avoid the added sodium found in club soda, or the high-fructose corn syrup and artificial colors that give tonic and ginger ale their distinctive taste.

8. Give your booze a boost.
Cutting calories and eliminating sugar aren’t the only ways to make happy hour healthier. Use good-for-you ingredients like antioxidant-packed green, mint or oolong tea as a smart mixer. Low-sodium tomato juice is chock-full of cancer-fighting lycopene and fresh lemon juice aids digestion — particularly helpful when you make that late night burrito run!

9. Say yes to soju.
With a neutral flavor similar to vodka, clear and colorless soju, a Korean distilled spirit, is becoming widely available in the U.S. — and for good reason. Packing less than 70 calories per shot (versus vodka’s almost 100), soju can save serious calories during a long night at the bar.

10. Go green.
There’s nothing like fresh herbs to take a drink up a notch — and they’re not limited to just the mojito. Add herbs whenever possible to up the your drink’s nutrition stats and flavor. Upgrade a gimlet with blood-sugar stabilizing basil or pour yourself a mint julep (whose star ingredient is known to soothe the stomach). Muddling greens releases even more good-for-you compounds so be sure to give them a good smash.

The post 10 Tips for Lower-Calorie Cocktails appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
Gin Tonic Cocktail

If you think light beer, vodka-sodas and white wine spritzers are the only way to go when counting calories, think again. With a few simple swaps almost any cocktail can go from diet disaster to totally doable. Apply these simple tricks to your favorite drinks to make them a little lighter but just as delicious! [caption id="attachment_15922" align="alignnone" width="620"]Gin Tonic Cocktail Photo: Pond5[/caption] 1. Choose a smarter sweetener. A lot of the tastiest — and most caloric — cocktails call for simple syrup, which is made by combining equal parts sugar and water. To avoid added calories and the inevitable spike in blood-glucose level, make your own calorie-free simple syrup using all-natural stevia. Simply dissolve one part stevia in four parts boiling water, cool, and use as you would regular simple syrup. 2. Let the (store-bought) juice loose. Freshly squeeze juice whenever possible to avoid added sugars, colors and preservatives found in many store-bought varieties. Squeezing fruit close to cocktail time preserves more of the nutrients. 3. Heal a hangover. Electrolyte-packed coconut water has become a hangover staple for many a partygoer, so why not get a jumpstart on the rehydration process? At just six calories an ounce and available in a variety of fun flavors, there’s no reason not to. Just be sure it’s the all-natural kind with no artificial additives. 4. Support the soda ban. You don’t have to say sayonara to soda entirely. Just choose wisely. Skip sugary sodas and chemical-packed diet drinks and look for all natural, organic, sugar-free sodas like Q Drinks, which derive their sweetness from agave or Zevia, a line of soda naturally sweetened by stevia. 5. Go for the garnish. Follow the lead of crowd favorite, sangria, and pack all your fruity cocktails with nutritious produce. By naturally adding flavor and sweetness you can skip artificially flavored alcohols and mixers. Plus, the fruit’s fiber may help you resist an extra order of French fries. 6. Mix with the right crowd. Often, the sugar found in cocktails comes from the juice, but not all varieties are created equal. Per ounce, grapefruit, orange, cranberry and pineapple juice contain 11, 15, 16 and 17 calories respectively. Doesn’t sound like much, but considering the average screwdriver contains six ounces of OJ (90 calories), choosing grapefruit juice saves 24 calories per cocktail. Grapefruit also boasts 4.8 grams fewer carbohydrates and no sodium. 7. Add a the right type of sparkle. When it comes to carbonation, zero-calorie sparkling water (aka seltzer) is the way to go. Not only will you slash calories, you’ll avoid the added sodium found in club soda, or the high-fructose corn syrup and artificial colors that give tonic and ginger ale their distinctive taste. 8. Give your booze a boost. Cutting calories and eliminating sugar aren’t the only ways to make happy hour healthier. Use good-for-you ingredients like antioxidant-packed green, mint or oolong tea as a smart mixer. Low-sodium tomato juice is chock-full of cancer-fighting lycopene and fresh lemon juice aids digestion — particularly helpful when you make that late night burrito run! 9. Say yes to soju. With a neutral flavor similar to vodka, clear and colorless soju, a Korean distilled spirit, is becoming widely available in the U.S. — and for good reason. Packing less than 70 calories per shot (versus vodka’s almost 100), soju can save serious calories during a long night at the bar. 10. Go green. There’s nothing like fresh herbs to take a drink up a notch — and they’re not limited to just the mojito. Add herbs whenever possible to up the your drink’s nutrition stats and flavor. Upgrade a gimlet with blood-sugar stabilizing basil or pour yourself a mint julep (whose star ingredient is known to soothe the stomach). Muddling greens releases even more good-for-you compounds so be sure to give them a good smash.

The post 10 Tips for Lower-Calorie Cocktails appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
https://dailyburn.com/life/health/healthy-cocktail-tips/feed/ 3
10 Unexpected Things That Can Ruin Your Sleep https://dailyburn.com/life/lifestyle/reasons-you-cant-sleep/ https://dailyburn.com/life/lifestyle/reasons-you-cant-sleep/#respond Mon, 14 Oct 2013 11:23:41 +0000 http://daily-burn.sta.oomphcloud.com/?p=15852

[caption id="attachment_15929" align="alignnone" width="620"]Young Man with Laptop Photo: Pond5[/caption]

You’ve heard it all before: Don’t watch TV or use the computer in bed. Have your last cup of coffee at noon.  Don’t work out in the evening… and yet you’re still not sleeping! If you struggle with snoozing check out this list of unexpected sleep snatchers. Some of your healthiest habits may be keeping you from drifting off to dreamland.

1. You’re an inconsistent eater.
If you eat a balanced dinner most nights but indulge in happy hour and late night burritos a couple days a week you could be damaging more than your diet. Studies show inconsistent eating habits later in the day can negatively affect sleep. If you have dinner later in the evening, that’s OK — as long as you stick with it, every day. If not, skip the unexpected dessert and hit the hay. Consistency is key.

2. Your mouth is minty fresh.
We’d never tell you not to brush your teeth before bed but you may want to try a new toothpaste! Research suggests the scent of peppermint stimulates the brain, making you feel more awake. Try an alternative flavor like strawberry or bubblegum instead.

3. You love a good book.
You may have traded in late-night TV for a little in-bed reading in hopes of a better night’s rest. Survey says, this may not be the best bet. Exciting, emotional and intellectually demanding activities before bed can result in poor quality sleep. Skip the tearjerkers and history tomes and try a sports or entertainment magazine, or other light reading instead.

4. You smoke before bed.
You may think an evening cigarette calms the nerves, helping you get you ready for bed. Unfortunately, nicotine is not just a depressant but a stimulant, making it harder for you to fall asleep. If you can’t give up cigarettes altogether, start by saying no to before-bed smoking.

5. You splash cold.
Sure, washing your face with cold water helps close pores — but it also stimulates the body, releasing energy to keep warm and stay awake. Try washing your face with warm water in the evening and save the cold stuff for that early morning wake-up call.

6. You charge up at night.
You’ve stopped late-night emailing and no longer take your cell phone to bed but chances are, you’re charging your electronics at night. Even the handy light that indicates your items are charging is bright enough to disrupt sleep — especially if they happen to glow blue (blue wavelengths have the greatest impact on circadian rhythm). Try charging your tech in the morning while you get ready for the day or set up a charging station in your home office or living room.

7. You get warm and cozy.
Cuddling up in a nice warm bed may seem like a good start to a restful night, but an increase in body temperature can disrupt sleep. If you snooze with a partner, pet or even a pile of blankets, it may be time to lighten the load and lower your sleep temperature. Just don’t go too low; being uncomfortably cold is another surefire way to keep you from snoozing.

8. You love lemons.
Tea with lemon might sound like a great alternative to an after-dinner espresso, but it might keep you up just the same. Why? The scent of lemon (and other citrus fruits) can boost mental stimulation and increase energy levels — not what you need when trying to drift off to dreamland. To catch some Zzz’s quickly, skip the lemon-flavored drinks and avoid washing your sheets with lemony fresh detergent

9. You pop meds before bed.
It may be easiest to remember to take pills before bed but some vitamins, such as B6 and B12, and certain medications, including steroids, have been shown to affect sleep. Talk to your doctor about current prescriptions to find out if mornings might be better. Plus, those pills will be easier to remember once you’ve had a good night’s sleep!

10. You don’t DVR.
Because TV watching is one of the few things on the schedule we can control, more nighttime television means less sleep for many Americans. In fact, in one study, more than 68 percent of participants watched TV for more than 55 minutes in the two hours leading up to bedtime — precious minutes that could be spent sleeping. To minimize TV interference, DVR your must-see shows and tune in earlier in the evening or on weekends.

The post 10 Unexpected Things That Can Ruin Your Sleep appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>

[caption id="attachment_15929" align="alignnone" width="620"]Young Man with Laptop Photo: Pond5[/caption] You’ve heard it all before: Don’t watch TV or use the computer in bed. Have your last cup of coffee at noon.  Don’t work out in the evening… and yet you’re still not sleeping! If you struggle with snoozing check out this list of unexpected sleep snatchers. Some of your healthiest habits may be keeping you from drifting off to dreamland. 1. You’re an inconsistent eater. If you eat a balanced dinner most nights but indulge in happy hour and late night burritos a couple days a week you could be damaging more than your diet. Studies show inconsistent eating habits later in the day can negatively affect sleep. If you have dinner later in the evening, that’s OK — as long as you stick with it, every day. If not, skip the unexpected dessert and hit the hay. Consistency is key. 2. Your mouth is minty fresh. We’d never tell you not to brush your teeth before bed but you may want to try a new toothpaste! Research suggests the scent of peppermint stimulates the brain, making you feel more awake. Try an alternative flavor like strawberry or bubblegum instead. 3. You love a good book. You may have traded in late-night TV for a little in-bed reading in hopes of a better night’s rest. Survey says, this may not be the best bet. Exciting, emotional and intellectually demanding activities before bed can result in poor quality sleep. Skip the tearjerkers and history tomes and try a sports or entertainment magazine, or other light reading instead. 4. You smoke before bed. You may think an evening cigarette calms the nerves, helping you get you ready for bed. Unfortunately, nicotine is not just a depressant but a stimulant, making it harder for you to fall asleep. If you can’t give up cigarettes altogether, start by saying no to before-bed smoking. 5. You splash cold. Sure, washing your face with cold water helps close pores — but it also stimulates the body, releasing energy to keep warm and stay awake. Try washing your face with warm water in the evening and save the cold stuff for that early morning wake-up call. 6. You charge up at night. You’ve stopped late-night emailing and no longer take your cell phone to bed but chances are, you’re charging your electronics at night. Even the handy light that indicates your items are charging is bright enough to disrupt sleep — especially if they happen to glow blue (blue wavelengths have the greatest impact on circadian rhythm). Try charging your tech in the morning while you get ready for the day or set up a charging station in your home office or living room. 7. You get warm and cozy. Cuddling up in a nice warm bed may seem like a good start to a restful night, but an increase in body temperature can disrupt sleep. If you snooze with a partner, pet or even a pile of blankets, it may be time to lighten the load and lower your sleep temperature. Just don’t go too low; being uncomfortably cold is another surefire way to keep you from snoozing. 8. You love lemons. Tea with lemon might sound like a great alternative to an after-dinner espresso, but it might keep you up just the same. Why? The scent of lemon (and other citrus fruits) can boost mental stimulation and increase energy levels — not what you need when trying to drift off to dreamland. To catch some Zzz’s quickly, skip the lemon-flavored drinks and avoid washing your sheets with lemony fresh detergent 9. You pop meds before bed. It may be easiest to remember to take pills before bed but some vitamins, such as B6 and B12, and certain medications, including steroids, have been shown to affect sleep. Talk to your doctor about current prescriptions to find out if mornings might be better. Plus, those pills will be easier to remember once you’ve had a good night’s sleep! 10. You don’t DVR. Because TV watching is one of the few things on the schedule we can control, more nighttime television means less sleep for many Americans. In fact, in one study, more than 68 percent of participants watched TV for more than 55 minutes in the two hours leading up to bedtime — precious minutes that could be spent sleeping. To minimize TV interference, DVR your must-see shows and tune in earlier in the evening or on weekends.

The post 10 Unexpected Things That Can Ruin Your Sleep appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
https://dailyburn.com/life/lifestyle/reasons-you-cant-sleep/feed/ 0
10 Creative Recipes With Kale https://dailyburn.com/life/recipes/healthy-kale-recipes/ https://dailyburn.com/life/recipes/healthy-kale-recipes/#respond Wed, 02 Oct 2013 11:15:14 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=19139

10 Creative Recipes With Kale

No matter what way you take your kale, just be sure you’re eating it. One cup of the steamed cruciferous vegetable provides 1,328 percent of your daily needs of vitamin K and 354 percent of your vitamin A, kicking carrots to the curb in the eyesight department. The vitamin-packed plant even provides a few key omega-3s, such as alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), which has been shown to help reduce inflammation. Whether you’re intimidated by kale’s tough texture or blending up green drinks by the gallon, there are plenty of ways to sneak in more of this good-for-you ingredient. And because it’s so nutrient dense, a little bit goes a long way. Here are 10 creative ways to make kale work for you in honor of National Kale Day!

Kale Guac_620

1. Kale Guacamole
Guacamole has become the dip of choice for the health-conscious crowd thanks to heart-healthy monounsaturated fats found in naturally creamy avocados. Combine that with the superfood kale, and you've got a guaranteed hit. Try this recipe as an appetizer or a topping on everything from eggs, sandwiches and salads. Photo and Recipe: Healthy Recipe Ecstasy

Crispy Kale and Mushroom Fried Rice_620

2. Crispy Kale and Mushroom Fried Rice
When it comes to kale, the idea is usually to soften the leafy greens but this recipe embraces it. A quick lap around the wok creates tasty kale crisps in just minutes. In addition to the added crunch, the stir-fried kale gives usually nutrient-light fried rice a boost. Photo and Recipe: Diana Quan / Appetite for China

Kale and Black Bean Brownies_620

3. Kale and Black Bean Brownies
This recipe may sound too healthy to be good (it uses whole wheat flour and plain yogurt, in addition to kale and beans) but just look at those brownies! Both cakey and fudgy, these may be the most fiber-packed, vitamin-heavy brownies you'll ever meet. Photo and Recipe: Tiffany Haugen / Tiffany Haugen

BEst Lasagna_620

4. Chef AJ's Disappearing Lasagna
Normally a calorie-bomb with few vitamins and nutrients, this vegan lasagna recipe gets a healthy makeover with numerous good-for-you additions. Nuts and nutritional yeast combine to make "Parmesan," while your choice of tofu or white beans create the creamy "cheese" filling. With strong flavors like basil, pine nuts, red pepper flakes and red onion complemented by hints of miso and tamari, we guarantee you won’t notice the lack of actual dairy. Photo: Wendy / Healthy Girl's Kitchen; Recipe: Chef AJ / Unprocessed

Kale Pesto Roasted Cauliflower_620

5. Kale Pesto Roasted Cauliflower
Two superfoods join forces in this veg-heavy side dish. Rather than rely on fat and calorie-laden dips or sauces to spice up plain cauliflower, this recipe turns to kale. Just a small serving, less than a quarter cup, satisfies the recommended daily intake for vitamin C. But feel free to eat more — this flavorful healthy snack is addictive! Photo and Recipe: Heather Jennings / Poppy Haus

Loaded Raw Kale Salad_620

6. Loaded Raw Kale Salad
This recipe may be the gold standard in healthy eating. It's a salad, it’s raw, it's made with kale, and it's just plain good! Just be sure to thoroughly massage the kale to break down the hearty greens' tough fibers. Golden beets balance the bitter greens’ flavor in this low-calorie masterpiece. Photo and Recipe: Lindsey Johnson / Cafe Johnsonia

Sweet Potato Enchiladas_620

7. Sweet Potato, Black Bean and Kale Enchiladas
Enchiladas don't have to be a guilty pleasure when they're filled with all sorts of fresh ingredients. Fiber-packed black beans give the meal protein and help keep you full. The potatoes add a hint of sweetness without a spike in blood sugar. Low-calorie kale rounds out the filling. And don’t feel too bad about that cheesy topping — it provides the fat needed to best absorb nutrients like the beta-carotene found in those sweet potatoes. Photo and Recipe: Jill / Foodtastic Mom

White Bean Stew_620

8. Garlicky White Bean and Kale Stew
Move over chicken soup, this recipe is good for the soul — and the body! In addition to kale, this soup serves up a hearty does of tomatoes, both rich sources of cancer-fighting carotenoids. Pair these protective ingredients with flavorful garlic, paprika and chili flakes and you've got yourself a bowl of goodness. Photo and Recipe: Sarah Britton / My New Roots

Kale and Leek Strata_620

9. Kale and Leek Strata
Start your day off right! This produce — and protein — packed egg dish includes kale, tomato and leeks, the often-forgotten cousin of garlic and onions. Like its more pungent relatives, leeks contain compounds that lower blood pressure and cholesterol as well quercetin, an antioxidant that heals with issues like high cholesterol and heart disease. Photo and Recipe: Melanie / A Beautiful Bite

Kale, Garlic and Caramelized Onion Panini_620

10. Kale, Garlic and Caramelized Onion Panini
Kale, garlic, caramelized red onion and crushed red pepper bring a flavorful update to the comfort food class, grilled cheese. And thanks to the extra ingredients, just one ounce of cheese is used per sandwich, keeping the calorie count in check. Recipe and Photo: Anjali / The Picky Eater

The post 10 Creative Recipes With Kale appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>

10 Creative Recipes With Kale

No matter what way you take your kale, just be sure you’re eating it. One cup of the steamed cruciferous vegetable provides 1,328 percent of your daily needs of vitamin K and 354 percent of your vitamin A, kicking carrots to the curb in the eyesight department. The vitamin-packed plant even provides a few key omega-3s, such as alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), which has been shown to help reduce inflammation. Whether you’re intimidated by kale’s tough texture or blending up green drinks by the gallon, there are plenty of ways to sneak in more of this good-for-you ingredient. And because it’s so nutrient dense, a little bit goes a long way. Here are 10 creative ways to make kale work for you in honor of National Kale Day!

Kale Guac_620

1. Kale Guacamole
Guacamole has become the dip of choice for the health-conscious crowd thanks to heart-healthy monounsaturated fats found in naturally creamy avocados. Combine that with the superfood kale, and you've got a guaranteed hit. Try this recipe as an appetizer or a topping on everything from eggs, sandwiches and salads. Photo and Recipe: Healthy Recipe Ecstasy

Crispy Kale and Mushroom Fried Rice_620

2. Crispy Kale and Mushroom Fried Rice
When it comes to kale, the idea is usually to soften the leafy greens but this recipe embraces it. A quick lap around the wok creates tasty kale crisps in just minutes. In addition to the added crunch, the stir-fried kale gives usually nutrient-light fried rice a boost. Photo and Recipe: Diana Quan / Appetite for China

Kale and Black Bean Brownies_620

3. Kale and Black Bean Brownies
This recipe may sound too healthy to be good (it uses whole wheat flour and plain yogurt, in addition to kale and beans) but just look at those brownies! Both cakey and fudgy, these may be the most fiber-packed, vitamin-heavy brownies you'll ever meet. Photo and Recipe: Tiffany Haugen / Tiffany Haugen

BEst Lasagna_620

4. Chef AJ's Disappearing Lasagna
Normally a calorie-bomb with few vitamins and nutrients, this vegan lasagna recipe gets a healthy makeover with numerous good-for-you additions. Nuts and nutritional yeast combine to make "Parmesan," while your choice of tofu or white beans create the creamy "cheese" filling. With strong flavors like basil, pine nuts, red pepper flakes and red onion complemented by hints of miso and tamari, we guarantee you won’t notice the lack of actual dairy. Photo: Wendy / Healthy Girl's Kitchen; Recipe: Chef AJ / Unprocessed

Kale Pesto Roasted Cauliflower_620

5. Kale Pesto Roasted Cauliflower
Two superfoods join forces in this veg-heavy side dish. Rather than rely on fat and calorie-laden dips or sauces to spice up plain cauliflower, this recipe turns to kale. Just a small serving, less than a quarter cup, satisfies the recommended daily intake for vitamin C. But feel free to eat more — this flavorful healthy snack is addictive! Photo and Recipe: Heather Jennings / Poppy Haus

Loaded Raw Kale Salad_620

6. Loaded Raw Kale Salad
This recipe may be the gold standard in healthy eating. It's a salad, it’s raw, it's made with kale, and it's just plain good! Just be sure to thoroughly massage the kale to break down the hearty greens' tough fibers. Golden beets balance the bitter greens’ flavor in this low-calorie masterpiece. Photo and Recipe: Lindsey Johnson / Cafe Johnsonia

Sweet Potato Enchiladas_620

7. Sweet Potato, Black Bean and Kale Enchiladas
Enchiladas don't have to be a guilty pleasure when they're filled with all sorts of fresh ingredients. Fiber-packed black beans give the meal protein and help keep you full. The potatoes add a hint of sweetness without a spike in blood sugar. Low-calorie kale rounds out the filling. And don’t feel too bad about that cheesy topping — it provides the fat needed to best absorb nutrients like the beta-carotene found in those sweet potatoes. Photo and Recipe: Jill / Foodtastic Mom

White Bean Stew_620

8. Garlicky White Bean and Kale Stew
Move over chicken soup, this recipe is good for the soul — and the body! In addition to kale, this soup serves up a hearty does of tomatoes, both rich sources of cancer-fighting carotenoids. Pair these protective ingredients with flavorful garlic, paprika and chili flakes and you've got yourself a bowl of goodness. Photo and Recipe: Sarah Britton / My New Roots

Kale and Leek Strata_620

9. Kale and Leek Strata
Start your day off right! This produce — and protein — packed egg dish includes kale, tomato and leeks, the often-forgotten cousin of garlic and onions. Like its more pungent relatives, leeks contain compounds that lower blood pressure and cholesterol as well quercetin, an antioxidant that heals with issues like high cholesterol and heart disease. Photo and Recipe: Melanie / A Beautiful Bite

Kale, Garlic and Caramelized Onion Panini_620

10. Kale, Garlic and Caramelized Onion Panini
Kale, garlic, caramelized red onion and crushed red pepper bring a flavorful update to the comfort food class, grilled cheese. And thanks to the extra ingredients, just one ounce of cheese is used per sandwich, keeping the calorie count in check. Recipe and Photo: Anjali / The Picky Eater

The post 10 Creative Recipes With Kale appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
https://dailyburn.com/life/recipes/healthy-kale-recipes/feed/ 0
10 Creative Fruit-Filled Salad Recipes https://dailyburn.com/life/recipes/creative-fruit-salad-recipes/ https://dailyburn.com/life/recipes/creative-fruit-salad-recipes/#respond Mon, 02 Sep 2013 15:15:35 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=17771 Fruit Salad

10 Creative Fruit-Filled Salad Recipes

If fruit salad evokes the image of a boring bowl of cantaloupe and honeydew with a token piece of pineapple it’s time to shake things up. Take the fruits you really love, like mangoes, strawberries, blueberries, figs and peaches, and serve them over a variety of good-for-you greens for a nutrient-packed meal or side dish. With an endless combination of fruits and leafy greens, fruit salad will never be boring again!

Exotic Fruit Salad

1. Exotic Fruit Salad

Talk about getting out of your fruit salad rut. This recipe from Karen Massey, Registered Dietitian for INTEGRIS Health, calls for two ugli fruit. Don’t know what that is? No worries. It’s a tangelo grown exclusively in Jamaica. Not entirely clear what a tangelo is? It’s a juicy hybrid of tangerines and grapefruit. This out of the box fruit combines with oranges and pineapple over romaine lettuce, Belgian endive, and mint leaves to make one unique flavor-packed salad. Photo: Pond5

Serves 6

What You’ll Need

1 head Romaine lettuce
, chopped
1 head Belgian endive, chopped
1 cup fresh mint leaves, chopped
2 large oranges
2 ugli fruit
or tangelo
1/2 cup pineapple juice
3 tablespoons fresh squeezed lemon juice
3 tablespoons sugar
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
3 tablespoons walnut oil
1/2 cup golden raisins
1/3 cup chopped walnuts or macadamia nuts, toasted

What to Do

  1. Wash and dry lettuce, endive and mint; set aside in a large bowl.
  2. Peel oranges and ugli fruit, removing pith.
Divide into segments and set aside.
  3. In a small bowl, combine pineapple juice, lemon juice, sugar, salt, cinnamon and walnut oil. Mix well.
  4. Pour dressing over greens and toss.
Place dressed greens on a large platter and top with fruit, raisins and nuts.

Strawberry Mango Salad

2. Strawberry-Mango Spinach Salad

Strawberry spinach salad gets an exotic twist with the addition of vitamin C-rich mango in this recipe from The Bombshell Diet. The heat from the spicy red pepper flakes and the crunch from pumpkin and hemp seeds guarantee this salad is anything but boring. Photo: The Bombshell Diet

Serves 2

What You’ll Need

For the dressing:

2 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil
2 teaspoons fresh squeezed lime juice
Salt, to taste
Crushed red pepper flakes, to taste

For the salad:

3-4 cups baby spinach
5 strawberries, sliced
1/2 cup cubed mango
1/4 cup chopped red onion
2 tablespoons pumpkin seeds
3 tablespoons hemp seeds

What to Do

  1. In a small bowl, whisk together oil and lime juice. Season to taste and set aside.
  2. In a medium bowl, combine salad ingredients, top with dressing and toss.

Fig Salad

3. Fig, Avocado and Sunflower Sprout Salad

If you hear the word “fig” and immediately think “Newton,” it’s time to expand your horizons. The almost jam-like fruit tastes so decadent, yet sets you back no more than 40 calories per medium-sized fig. Combine that with the creamy rich flavor of avocado (another fruit!) and you’ve got yourself a rich yet healthy fruit salad from A Grateful Life. Photo: Meredith Gnau / A Grateful Life

Serves 1

What You’ll Need

1
 large handful sunflower sprouts
1 black mission fig, sliced
1/2 avocado, chopped
1 lemon
Sea salt, to taste

What to Do

  1. Place sprouts on a plate, top with fig and avocado. Squeeze lemon over greens and sprinkle with
salt.

Grilled Watermelon Salad

4. Grilled Watermelon Salad

Move watermelon from the side of your plate to center stage — stat! Not only is the summer treat packed with vitamins A, B and C, it’s a better source of the antioxidant, lycopene, than tomatoes. Bonus: the fruit caramelizes when grilled, intensifying its natural sweetness, as in this recipe from Chef Patrick Simon, director of
 culinary operations at the Culinary Academy of Las Vegas. Photo: Culinary Academy of Las Vegas

Serves 2

What You’ll Need

1 pound watermelon
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
2 cups arugula
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 cup crumbled goat cheese
Cracked black pepper, to taste

What to Do

  1. Preheat grill to medium-high. Slice watermelon into 2-inch by 3-inch by 3-inch portions. Brush watermelon with olive oil and grill on one side until marks appear. Rotate once at a 45-degree angle to create diamond grill marks. Set to the side.
  2. In a small saucepan, reduce vinegar by half over low heat and reserve.
  3. Place arugula in a small mixing bowl and season with half the salt and remaining olive oil.
  4.  Assemble salad by placing half the arugula on a plate. Top with grilled melon slice and half the goat cheese. Repeat creating two layers. Drizzle reduced vinegar on top. Season with remaining salt and pepper.

Arugula Mint Apricot Salad

5. Arugula, Mint and Apricot Salad

Add often-overlooked apricots to this flavorful arugula and mint salad from Cooking with CSA for a boost in fiber and vitamin A. Finish the refreshing salad off with a zesty two-fruit dressing made of immune-boosting lime and orange juices. Photo: www.cookingwithcsa.com

Serves 2-4

What You’ll Need

For the salad:

4 cups arugula
1/2 cup mint
4 apricots
1 cup almonds
2 cups cherry tomatoes

For the dressing:

2 limes
1 orange

What to Do

  1. Thinly chop arugula and mint and place in a large bowl. Slice apricots and add to bowl. Slice almonds lengthwise and add to bowl. Add cherry tomatoes and mix salad well.
  2. When ready to serve, cut limes and orange in half and juice over salad. Mix well and serve.

White Peach Salad

6. White Peach Spinach Salad with Crunchy Honey Dressing

In the words of recipe creator Kim Kushne, author or The Modern Menu, “Crunchy, salty, sweet, and sharp — this salad has it all!” Crisp sunflower and sesame seeds perfectly compliment the sweet juicy peaches and creamy avocado in this recipe. Photo: Andrew Zuckerman

Serves 6-8

What You’ll Need

8 cups baby spinach
Handful haricots verts, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces
1 avocado, cubed
1 white peach, skin on, thinly sliced
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup honey
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1/4 cup cider vinegar
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 garlic clove, minced
1/4 cup salted shelled sunflower seeds
2 tablespoons sesame seeds

What to Do:

  1. Place spinach, haricots verts, avocado and peach in a large bowl or on a large platter.
  2. Combine sugar, honey, vegetable oil, vinegar, mustard, garlic, sunflower seeds and sesame seeds in a jar with tight-fitting lid. Shake to thoroughly combine. Drizzle dressing over salad and toss to coat.

Strawberry Coleslaw

7. Red Grape and Strawberry Coleslaw

Although a “coleslaw,” this recipe from Healthful Pursuit makes the list because it includes fruit: grapes and strawberries, and is served with cabbage as the greens. Whip up a batch for your next barbecue in lieu of regular coleslaw or less-than-good-for-you potato salad. It’s full of flavor: rich, creamy and satisfying. You can make the coleslaw ahead; this recipe will keep in the refrigerator up to three days. Photo: Leanne Vogel / Healthful Pursuit

Serves 4

What You’ll Need

For the coleslaw:

1 large head savoy cabbage, sliced thin
1/3 cup raisins
1 cup red grapes, halved
5 strawberries, sliced thin
2 red shallots, sliced thin
1/4 cup slivered almonds
1/2 cup flat leaf parsley, roughly chopped

For the dressing:

2 tablespoons mayonnaise
2 teaspoons gluten-free Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons raw apple cider vinegar
1 teaspoon honey
1 small clove garlic
Freshly ground pepper
1 tablespoon poppy seeds

What to Do

  1. Place all coleslaw ingredients to a large bowl. Toss to combine well.
  2. In a blender, add first seven dressing ingredients. Blend until smooth. Stir in poppy seeds and pour dressing over salad.
  3. Toss to coat and allow to sit in the refrigerator, covered, for 1 hour.

Blueberry Butternut Squash Salad-1

8. Blueberry and Butternut Squash Salad

Don’t limit blueberries to your morning muffins, pancakes, or yogurt n’ honey parfait. A great source of vitamins K and C, high in antioxidants, and low on the glycemic index, this berry deserves a place at the lunch and dinner table! Toss together this hearty salad from the U.S. Highbush Blueberry Council to up your blueberry consumption any time of the day. Photo: The U.S. Highbush Blueberry Council

Serves 6

What You’ll Need

1 pound butternut squash, peeled, seeded and cubed
5 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1 1/4 cups chicken broth
1 cup uncooked couscous
3 tablespoons lemon juice
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
4 scallions, thinly sliced
1 1/2 cups blueberries
3/4 cup crumbled feta cheese
3 cups baby arugula

What to Do

  1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees. In a large bowl, toss squash with 1 tablespoon oil. Spread on a rimmed baking sheet; bake until tender, about 22 minutes. Let cool.
  2. Meanwhile, in a medium saucepan bring broth to a boil. Stir in couscous, remove from heat and cover; let stand 5 minutes. Fluff with a fork; cool.
  3. In a small bowl whisk together remaining olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Set aside.
  4. In a large bowl combine squash, scallions, blueberries, cheese and couscous. Spread arugula on a serving platter. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon dressing. Add remaining dressing to couscous mixture; toss to combine. Serve over arugula.

Kale Pomegranate Salad

9. Kale, Beet, Carrot and Pomegranate Salad

Don’t be afraid to get your hands dirty mixing up this colorful salad from CubitsOragnics.com. Massaging avocado into the kale helps break down the leaves, taking away their naturally tough texture. Plus, it’s a great hand moisturizer too. Talk about a salad that is good for you inside and out! Photo: Laura Watts / Cubit’s Organic Living

Serves 6-8

What You’ll Need

For the salad:

2 carrots
3 beets
1 bunch kale
2 avocados
Seeds from 1/2 pomegranate

For the dressing:

1/2 cup olive oil
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 scant teaspoon salt

What to Do

  1. Grate carrots and beets by hand or in a food processor.
  2. Tear kale into bite-size pieces. Remove avocado skin and pit. With clean hands, massage avocado flesh into kale being sure to cover each piece.
  3. Combine kale, carrots, beets and pomegranate seeds. Toss as evenly as possible and set aside.
  4. In a small bowl whisk together dressing ingredients. Drizzle dressing over salad and toss again.

Pear Salad

10. Pear-Zucchini Salad

Pear topped salads are nothing new, but this one from A Grateful Life leaves the arugula and blue cheese at home. The “green” in this salad comes from less-expected collard greens and the rich and creamy ingredient is good-for-you avocado. To prevent this salad from being overly bitter, remove the stems from the collard greens. Photo: Meredith Gnau / A Grateful Life

Serves 1-2

What You’ll Need

2 handfuls collard greens
1 handful spinach
1 zucchini
1/8 cup sliced red onion
1 Bartlett pear
Juice from 1 lemon
Sea salt, to taste
1/2 avocado
Seasoned rice vinegar, optional

What to Do

  1. Devein collard greens by running your knife along both sides of the
thick center stem of each leaf. Discard stems. Chop
remaining collards and spinach and add to a large bowl.
  2. Cut zucchini in half lengthwise. Using a mandolin or knife, uniformly slice
 zucchini into half moons. Next, thinly slice red onion. Cut the pear into quarters removing the core. Thinly slice each
quarter making pieces approximately 1/8 to 1/4-inch thick. Chop avocado into cubes. Add chopped produce to
greens.
  3. Pour lemon juice over salad and salt to taste. Toss well so leaves are coated. Add a small splash
of vinegar if desired, plate, and dig in.

The post 10 Creative Fruit-Filled Salad Recipes appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
Fruit Salad

10 Creative Fruit-Filled Salad Recipes

If fruit salad evokes the image of a boring bowl of cantaloupe and honeydew with a token piece of pineapple it’s time to shake things up. Take the fruits you really love, like mangoes, strawberries, blueberries, figs and peaches, and serve them over a variety of good-for-you greens for a nutrient-packed meal or side dish. With an endless combination of fruits and leafy greens, fruit salad will never be boring again!

Exotic Fruit Salad

1. Exotic Fruit Salad

Talk about getting out of your fruit salad rut. This recipe from Karen Massey, Registered Dietitian for INTEGRIS Health, calls for two ugli fruit. Don’t know what that is? No worries. It’s a tangelo grown exclusively in Jamaica. Not entirely clear what a tangelo is? It’s a juicy hybrid of tangerines and grapefruit. This out of the box fruit combines with oranges and pineapple over romaine lettuce, Belgian endive, and mint leaves to make one unique flavor-packed salad. Photo: Pond5

Serves 6

What You’ll Need

1 head Romaine lettuce
, chopped
1 head Belgian endive, chopped
1 cup fresh mint leaves, chopped
2 large oranges
2 ugli fruit
or tangelo
1/2 cup pineapple juice
3 tablespoons fresh squeezed lemon juice
3 tablespoons sugar
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
3 tablespoons walnut oil
1/2 cup golden raisins
1/3 cup chopped walnuts or macadamia nuts, toasted

What to Do

  1. Wash and dry lettuce, endive and mint; set aside in a large bowl.
  2. Peel oranges and ugli fruit, removing pith.
Divide into segments and set aside.
  3. In a small bowl, combine pineapple juice, lemon juice, sugar, salt, cinnamon and walnut oil. Mix well.
  4. Pour dressing over greens and toss.
Place dressed greens on a large platter and top with fruit, raisins and nuts.

Strawberry Mango Salad

2. Strawberry-Mango Spinach Salad

Strawberry spinach salad gets an exotic twist with the addition of vitamin C-rich mango in this recipe from The Bombshell Diet. The heat from the spicy red pepper flakes and the crunch from pumpkin and hemp seeds guarantee this salad is anything but boring. Photo: The Bombshell Diet

Serves 2

What You’ll Need

For the dressing:

2 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil
2 teaspoons fresh squeezed lime juice
Salt, to taste
Crushed red pepper flakes, to taste

For the salad:

3-4 cups baby spinach
5 strawberries, sliced
1/2 cup cubed mango
1/4 cup chopped red onion
2 tablespoons pumpkin seeds
3 tablespoons hemp seeds

What to Do

  1. In a small bowl, whisk together oil and lime juice. Season to taste and set aside.
  2. In a medium bowl, combine salad ingredients, top with dressing and toss.

Fig Salad

3. Fig, Avocado and Sunflower Sprout Salad

If you hear the word “fig” and immediately think “Newton,” it’s time to expand your horizons. The almost jam-like fruit tastes so decadent, yet sets you back no more than 40 calories per medium-sized fig. Combine that with the creamy rich flavor of avocado (another fruit!) and you’ve got yourself a rich yet healthy fruit salad from A Grateful Life. Photo: Meredith Gnau / A Grateful Life

Serves 1

What You’ll Need

1
 large handful sunflower sprouts
1 black mission fig, sliced
1/2 avocado, chopped
1 lemon
Sea salt, to taste

What to Do

  1. Place sprouts on a plate, top with fig and avocado. Squeeze lemon over greens and sprinkle with
salt.

Grilled Watermelon Salad

4. Grilled Watermelon Salad

Move watermelon from the side of your plate to center stage — stat! Not only is the summer treat packed with vitamins A, B and C, it’s a better source of the antioxidant, lycopene, than tomatoes. Bonus: the fruit caramelizes when grilled, intensifying its natural sweetness, as in this recipe from Chef Patrick Simon, director of
 culinary operations at the Culinary Academy of Las Vegas. Photo: Culinary Academy of Las Vegas

Serves 2

What You’ll Need

1 pound watermelon
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
2 cups arugula
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 cup crumbled goat cheese
Cracked black pepper, to taste

What to Do

  1. Preheat grill to medium-high. Slice watermelon into 2-inch by 3-inch by 3-inch portions. Brush watermelon with olive oil and grill on one side until marks appear. Rotate once at a 45-degree angle to create diamond grill marks. Set to the side.
  2. In a small saucepan, reduce vinegar by half over low heat and reserve.
  3. Place arugula in a small mixing bowl and season with half the salt and remaining olive oil.
  4.  Assemble salad by placing half the arugula on a plate. Top with grilled melon slice and half the goat cheese. Repeat creating two layers. Drizzle reduced vinegar on top. Season with remaining salt and pepper.

Arugula Mint Apricot Salad

5. Arugula, Mint and Apricot Salad

Add often-overlooked apricots to this flavorful arugula and mint salad from Cooking with CSA for a boost in fiber and vitamin A. Finish the refreshing salad off with a zesty two-fruit dressing made of immune-boosting lime and orange juices. Photo: www.cookingwithcsa.com

Serves 2-4

What You’ll Need

For the salad:

4 cups arugula
1/2 cup mint
4 apricots
1 cup almonds
2 cups cherry tomatoes

For the dressing:

2 limes
1 orange

What to Do

  1. Thinly chop arugula and mint and place in a large bowl. Slice apricots and add to bowl. Slice almonds lengthwise and add to bowl. Add cherry tomatoes and mix salad well.
  2. When ready to serve, cut limes and orange in half and juice over salad. Mix well and serve.

White Peach Salad

6. White Peach Spinach Salad with Crunchy Honey Dressing

In the words of recipe creator Kim Kushne, author or The Modern Menu, “Crunchy, salty, sweet, and sharp — this salad has it all!” Crisp sunflower and sesame seeds perfectly compliment the sweet juicy peaches and creamy avocado in this recipe. Photo: Andrew Zuckerman

Serves 6-8

What You’ll Need

8 cups baby spinach
Handful haricots verts, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces
1 avocado, cubed
1 white peach, skin on, thinly sliced
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup honey
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1/4 cup cider vinegar
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 garlic clove, minced
1/4 cup salted shelled sunflower seeds
2 tablespoons sesame seeds

What to Do:

  1. Place spinach, haricots verts, avocado and peach in a large bowl or on a large platter.
  2. Combine sugar, honey, vegetable oil, vinegar, mustard, garlic, sunflower seeds and sesame seeds in a jar with tight-fitting lid. Shake to thoroughly combine. Drizzle dressing over salad and toss to coat.

Strawberry Coleslaw

7. Red Grape and Strawberry Coleslaw

Although a “coleslaw,” this recipe from Healthful Pursuit makes the list because it includes fruit: grapes and strawberries, and is served with cabbage as the greens. Whip up a batch for your next barbecue in lieu of regular coleslaw or less-than-good-for-you potato salad. It’s full of flavor: rich, creamy and satisfying. You can make the coleslaw ahead; this recipe will keep in the refrigerator up to three days. Photo: Leanne Vogel / Healthful Pursuit

Serves 4

What You’ll Need

For the coleslaw:

1 large head savoy cabbage, sliced thin
1/3 cup raisins
1 cup red grapes, halved
5 strawberries, sliced thin
2 red shallots, sliced thin
1/4 cup slivered almonds
1/2 cup flat leaf parsley, roughly chopped

For the dressing:

2 tablespoons mayonnaise
2 teaspoons gluten-free Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons raw apple cider vinegar
1 teaspoon honey
1 small clove garlic
Freshly ground pepper
1 tablespoon poppy seeds

What to Do

  1. Place all coleslaw ingredients to a large bowl. Toss to combine well.
  2. In a blender, add first seven dressing ingredients. Blend until smooth. Stir in poppy seeds and pour dressing over salad.
  3. Toss to coat and allow to sit in the refrigerator, covered, for 1 hour.

Blueberry Butternut Squash Salad-1

8. Blueberry and Butternut Squash Salad

Don’t limit blueberries to your morning muffins, pancakes, or yogurt n’ honey parfait. A great source of vitamins K and C, high in antioxidants, and low on the glycemic index, this berry deserves a place at the lunch and dinner table! Toss together this hearty salad from the U.S. Highbush Blueberry Council to up your blueberry consumption any time of the day. Photo: The U.S. Highbush Blueberry Council

Serves 6

What You’ll Need

1 pound butternut squash, peeled, seeded and cubed
5 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1 1/4 cups chicken broth
1 cup uncooked couscous
3 tablespoons lemon juice
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
4 scallions, thinly sliced
1 1/2 cups blueberries
3/4 cup crumbled feta cheese
3 cups baby arugula

What to Do

  1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees. In a large bowl, toss squash with 1 tablespoon oil. Spread on a rimmed baking sheet; bake until tender, about 22 minutes. Let cool.
  2. Meanwhile, in a medium saucepan bring broth to a boil. Stir in couscous, remove from heat and cover; let stand 5 minutes. Fluff with a fork; cool.
  3. In a small bowl whisk together remaining olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Set aside.
  4. In a large bowl combine squash, scallions, blueberries, cheese and couscous. Spread arugula on a serving platter. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon dressing. Add remaining dressing to couscous mixture; toss to combine. Serve over arugula.

Kale Pomegranate Salad

9. Kale, Beet, Carrot and Pomegranate Salad

Don’t be afraid to get your hands dirty mixing up this colorful salad from CubitsOragnics.com. Massaging avocado into the kale helps break down the leaves, taking away their naturally tough texture. Plus, it’s a great hand moisturizer too. Talk about a salad that is good for you inside and out! Photo: Laura Watts / Cubit’s Organic Living

Serves 6-8

What You’ll Need

For the salad:

2 carrots
3 beets
1 bunch kale
2 avocados
Seeds from 1/2 pomegranate

For the dressing:

1/2 cup olive oil
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 scant teaspoon salt

What to Do

  1. Grate carrots and beets by hand or in a food processor.
  2. Tear kale into bite-size pieces. Remove avocado skin and pit. With clean hands, massage avocado flesh into kale being sure to cover each piece.
  3. Combine kale, carrots, beets and pomegranate seeds. Toss as evenly as possible and set aside.
  4. In a small bowl whisk together dressing ingredients. Drizzle dressing over salad and toss again.

Pear Salad

10. Pear-Zucchini Salad

Pear topped salads are nothing new, but this one from A Grateful Life leaves the arugula and blue cheese at home. The “green” in this salad comes from less-expected collard greens and the rich and creamy ingredient is good-for-you avocado. To prevent this salad from being overly bitter, remove the stems from the collard greens. Photo: Meredith Gnau / A Grateful Life

Serves 1-2

What You’ll Need

2 handfuls collard greens
1 handful spinach
1 zucchini
1/8 cup sliced red onion
1 Bartlett pear
Juice from 1 lemon
Sea salt, to taste
1/2 avocado
Seasoned rice vinegar, optional

What to Do

  1. Devein collard greens by running your knife along both sides of the
thick center stem of each leaf. Discard stems. Chop
remaining collards and spinach and add to a large bowl.
  2. Cut zucchini in half lengthwise. Using a mandolin or knife, uniformly slice
 zucchini into half moons. Next, thinly slice red onion. Cut the pear into quarters removing the core. Thinly slice each
quarter making pieces approximately 1/8 to 1/4-inch thick. Chop avocado into cubes. Add chopped produce to
greens.
  3. Pour lemon juice over salad and salt to taste. Toss well so leaves are coated. Add a small splash
of vinegar if desired, plate, and dig in.

The post 10 Creative Fruit-Filled Salad Recipes appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
https://dailyburn.com/life/recipes/creative-fruit-salad-recipes/feed/ 0
10 Simple Snacks for Better Sleep https://dailyburn.com/life/lifestyle/simple-snacks-better-sleep/ https://dailyburn.com/life/lifestyle/simple-snacks-better-sleep/#comments Thu, 22 Aug 2013 17:35:13 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=17211 Popcorn

10 Simple Snacks for Better Sleep

If you’ve ever had trouble drifting off to dreamland, you know you’d do anything to fall asleep faster. What if we told you all you need is a snack? It’s true; certain foods contain vitamins, minerals and amino acids that help the body and brain get ready for sleep. Plus, hunger can disrupt slumber so a well-chosen snack can actually help you fall and stay asleep. Nighttime nibbles should be limited to around 200 hundred calories so your body isn’t up all night digesting. That’s why this list of sleep-inducing snacks is also low in calories. Go ahead, grab a snack and hit the sack!

Hummus

1. Hummus and Veggies
The chickpeas in hummus are packed with vitamin B6, a necessary component in the production of melatonin, which helps control the sleep-wake cycle. Try digging in with raw vegetables such as cucumber, broccoli and carrots to keep calories down and provides complex carbohydrates that also aid in deep sleep.

2. Sweet Potato Fries
Giving in to your late night French fry cravings may be just the ticket to sending the sandman your way — if you rely on the healthier homemade sweet potato variety. The complex carb primes your brain to absorb tryptophan. Plus, they’re packed with potassium, a natural muscle-relaxant. If you prefer sweet to savory in the evening, top your fries with cinnamon and nutmeg to give your fries a “desserty” vibe. Roasting the sweet spuds in the oven will also bring out their natural sugars.

3. Cereal and Milk
Most of us start the day with a bowl of cereal, but it may be time to have breakfast after dinner. For a good night’s sleep, skip the sugary cereals that can keep you awake in favor of the whole-grain kind packed with sleep-inducing complex carbohydrates. Fill your bowl with tryptophan-full milk for sweet dreams even sooner.

Popcorn

4. Parmesan Cheese Popcorn
Snuggling up on the couch with a bowl of cheesy popcorn may be just what you need for a good night’s sleep. A small dose (about two tablespoons) of grated Parmesan doesn’t just give this snack flavor, it contains sleep-inducing tryptophan. And, with about 30 calories in one cup popped, this light snack is easy to digest while the popcorn’s whole grains help your body absorb the cheese’s tryptophan.

5. Kale Chips
If salty snacks call your name at night, we’ve got you covered. With 82 fewer calories per cup than traditional potato chips, the kale variety are easier for your body to digest, making it easier for you to get some shuteye. Plus, these and other leafy greens are packed with calcium, a key nutrient when it comes to sleep. Research has shown that calcium deficiency is a major culprit in insomnia.

6. Oatmeal with Bananas and Almond Butter
This comforting treat is a magnesium triple-threat. And that’s a good thing since this mineral helps the brain regulate sleep. Oatmeal also packs complex carbohydrates while bananas provide potassium, a natural muscle-relaxant. Almonds are yet another good source of sleep-inducing magnesium, but if you don’t have any on hand peanut butter is a solid substitute with about half the magnesium of almond butter. Just be sure to watch portions. Half a cup of oatmeal with one tablespoon of almond butter and half a banana is around 230 calories — more than enough for an evening snack!

Yogurt With Berries

7. Yogurt with Berries
If you just can’t catch a wink, try yogurt with berries. The calcium found in plain yogurt can help kick insomnia to the curb while the B6 found in both raspberries and strawberries kicks sleep-regulating melatonin production into high gear.

8. Applesauce with Cinnamon and Raisins
Think of this snack as apple pie for better shuteye. The quick boost in glucose levels from these naturally sweet foods reduces orexin, a neurotransmitter that triggers the brain to wake you up and get more food! Research has shown lower orexin levels can contribute to drowsiness and inactivity, the first step to a good night’s sleep.

9. Cherry and Pistachio Rice Pudding
Made the right way, creamy, comforting rice pudding is a ticket straight to dreamland — if you eat it early enough. One study found that consuming jasmine rice four hours before bed had participants sleeping twice as fast as those eating a low-glycemic meal at the same time. Mix in melatonin-producing tart cherries and pistachios, a great source of sleep-promoting vitamin B6 and you’ve got a killer combination. Don’t forget to make the pudding with tryptophan-packed skim milk.

Turkey Sandwich

10. Turkey on Whole-Grain Bread
For those in need of a larger meal, try a sandwich made with the food most famous for its sleep-inducing tryptophan: turkey. Top that with a calcium-packed piece of cheese and two slices of whole-grain bread for the complex carbs and you’ve got yourself a sleep sandwich.

Photos: Pond5

The post 10 Simple Snacks for Better Sleep appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
Popcorn

10 Simple Snacks for Better Sleep If you’ve ever had trouble drifting off to dreamland, you know you’d do anything to fall asleep faster. What if we told you all you need is a snack? It’s true; certain foods contain vitamins, minerals and amino acids that help the body and brain get ready for sleep. Plus, hunger can disrupt slumber so a well-chosen snack can actually help you fall and stay asleep. Nighttime nibbles should be limited to around 200 hundred calories so your body isn’t up all night digesting. That’s why this list of sleep-inducing snacks is also low in calories. Go ahead, grab a snack and hit the sack! Hummus 1. Hummus and Veggies The chickpeas in hummus are packed with vitamin B6, a necessary component in the production of melatonin, which helps control the sleep-wake cycle. Try digging in with raw vegetables such as cucumber, broccoli and carrots to keep calories down and provides complex carbohydrates that also aid in deep sleep. 2. Sweet Potato Fries Giving in to your late night French fry cravings may be just the ticket to sending the sandman your way — if you rely on the healthier homemade sweet potato variety. The complex carb primes your brain to absorb tryptophan. Plus, they’re packed with potassium, a natural muscle-relaxant. If you prefer sweet to savory in the evening, top your fries with cinnamon and nutmeg to give your fries a “desserty” vibe. Roasting the sweet spuds in the oven will also bring out their natural sugars. 3. Cereal and Milk Most of us start the day with a bowl of cereal, but it may be time to have breakfast after dinner. For a good night’s sleep, skip the sugary cereals that can keep you awake in favor of the whole-grain kind packed with sleep-inducing complex carbohydrates. Fill your bowl with tryptophan-full milk for sweet dreams even sooner. Popcorn 4. Parmesan Cheese Popcorn Snuggling up on the couch with a bowl of cheesy popcorn may be just what you need for a good night’s sleep. A small dose (about two tablespoons) of grated Parmesan doesn’t just give this snack flavor, it contains sleep-inducing tryptophan. And, with about 30 calories in one cup popped, this light snack is easy to digest while the popcorn’s whole grains help your body absorb the cheese’s tryptophan. 5. Kale Chips If salty snacks call your name at night, we’ve got you covered. With 82 fewer calories per cup than traditional potato chips, the kale variety are easier for your body to digest, making it easier for you to get some shuteye. Plus, these and other leafy greens are packed with calcium, a key nutrient when it comes to sleep. Research has shown that calcium deficiency is a major culprit in insomnia. 6. Oatmeal with Bananas and Almond Butter This comforting treat is a magnesium triple-threat. And that’s a good thing since this mineral helps the brain regulate sleep. Oatmeal also packs complex carbohydrates while bananas provide potassium, a natural muscle-relaxant. Almonds are yet another good source of sleep-inducing magnesium, but if you don’t have any on hand peanut butter is a solid substitute with about half the magnesium of almond butter. Just be sure to watch portions. Half a cup of oatmeal with one tablespoon of almond butter and half a banana is around 230 calories — more than enough for an evening snack! Yogurt With Berries 7. Yogurt with Berries If you just can’t catch a wink, try yogurt with berries. The calcium found in plain yogurt can help kick insomnia to the curb while the B6 found in both raspberries and strawberries kicks sleep-regulating melatonin production into high gear. 8. Applesauce with Cinnamon and Raisins Think of this snack as apple pie for better shuteye. The quick boost in glucose levels from these naturally sweet foods reduces orexin, a neurotransmitter that triggers the brain to wake you up and get more food! Research has shown lower orexin levels can contribute to drowsiness and inactivity, the first step to a good night’s sleep. 9. Cherry and Pistachio Rice Pudding Made the right way, creamy, comforting rice pudding is a ticket straight to dreamland — if you eat it early enough. One study found that consuming jasmine rice four hours before bed had participants sleeping twice as fast as those eating a low-glycemic meal at the same time. Mix in melatonin-producing tart cherries and pistachios, a great source of sleep-promoting vitamin B6 and you’ve got a killer combination. Don’t forget to make the pudding with tryptophan-packed skim milk. Turkey Sandwich 10. Turkey on Whole-Grain Bread For those in need of a larger meal, try a sandwich made with the food most famous for its sleep-inducing tryptophan: turkey. Top that with a calcium-packed piece of cheese and two slices of whole-grain bread for the complex carbs and you’ve got yourself a sleep sandwich. Photos: Pond5

The post 10 Simple Snacks for Better Sleep appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
https://dailyburn.com/life/lifestyle/simple-snacks-better-sleep/feed/ 1
11 Simple Ways to Relieve Stress Now https://dailyburn.com/life/lifestyle/how-to-relieve-stress/ https://dailyburn.com/life/lifestyle/how-to-relieve-stress/#comments Sun, 18 Aug 2013 13:15:26 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=17057 Take a Deep Breath

11 Simple Ways to Relieve Stress Now

No one ever plans on feeling stressed (8 a.m. breakfast; 10 a.m. meeting; 11 a.m. stress out), but it happens to all of us. And since stress usually hits when there’s a whole lot going on — including looming deadlines, wedding weekends and visits from the in-laws — we can’t always bust out the yoga mat or slip into a candlelit bubble bath. That’s why we rounded up this list of quick and simple strategies to ease anxiety anytime, anywhere. Try one or try them all the next time you’re feeling tense to start feeling better now!

Your Stress RX

1. Let Pandora soothe you.
When your blood starts to boil, pump up the beats. In stressful environments, music has been proven to decrease anxiety. Even better, create your own relaxation station on Pandora or iTunes. Soothing songs like Pachelbel’s Canon in D have been shown to encourage relaxation.

Take Deep Breath

2. Take a deep breath.
No matter when or where stress finds you, this old standby can ease the pain. All you need are a few deliberate deep breaths to lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol. Simply inhale for a count of four, then exhale for another count of four (all through the nose). Continue in this pattern until feelings of calm set in.

3. Get off track.
If meeting a deadline is stressing you out, losing focus may be just what you need to calm down and move on. Studies show that distraction can effectively alleviate anxiety. So pick up a book, surf YouTube, research a healthy meal to make for dinner — anything to keep your mind off the stressor at hand.

[caption id="attachment_17061" align="alignnone" width="620"]Cat Photo: Pond5[/caption]

4. LOL with cats.
Need we say more? Merely being around animals can improve mood. But if you don’t happen to have access to a dog or cat when the anxiety hits, try looking at cute animal photos. One Japanese study found that looking at adorable images is enough to focus attention and produce positive feelings.

5. Let’s get physical.
Another “natural reward” that works? Sex. While this, better-for-your-body alternative may not be a viable option at all times, sex can be a way to reduce feelings of stress without raiding the kitchen cabinets.

[caption id="attachment_17062" align="alignnone" width="620"]Take a Deep Breath Photo: Pond5[/caption]

6. Find the sweet spot.
We admit it; there is a reason you reach for calorie-heavy sweets when feeling anxious. These foods actually do reduce the body’s stress responses. The key here is just not to overdo it. Try keeping a healthy stash of fresh fruit on hand — watermelon can be more versatile than you’d think!

7. Fake it ‘til you make it.
Just like feigning confidence at an interview, simply imagining yourself calm can help do the trick. If conjuring up the image of a relaxed you seems daunting, try downloading a guided relaxation app on your phone. We love Relax with Andrew Johnson Lite and Take a Break! Guided Meditations for Stress Relief (both free, available for Android and iPhone).

[caption id="attachment_17063" align="alignnone" width="620"]Walk in Garden Photo: Pond5[/caption]

8. Get some green.
If a windowless office or a day organizing the dark, dank basement has you feeling blue, step outside. Exposure to green spaces is good for you health and has been shown to reduce stress. Don’t have immediate access to a backyard or public park? It might be time to get a houseplant or two. Even small doses of nature might help boost your mood.

9. Laugh a little.
Whether you chuckle, snort or snicker, laughter has been shown to reduce the psychological effects of stress. And if letting out even a little laugh is hard when under pressure, these misguided fitness videos are sure to get the giggles going.

10. Chew on this.
Gum isn’t just for fresh breath anymore; it actually reduces levels of cortisol in the body. Next time you’re tempted to reach for some comforting carbs, opt for a stick of gum instead. Not only does it ease negative feelings, you won’t be ridden with guilt from breaking your diet, too.

11. Let your inbox fill up.
Allowing emails to pile up may seem counterintuitive to reducing stress, but avoiding your inbox may be just what you need in times of unrest. In one study, workers not only stressed less but were more productive when deprived of email. For a quick fix, log out and be sure to turn off any alerts on you mobile devices to reap the benefits of going e-free.

The post 11 Simple Ways to Relieve Stress Now appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
Take a Deep Breath

11 Simple Ways to Relieve Stress Now No one ever plans on feeling stressed (8 a.m. breakfast; 10 a.m. meeting; 11 a.m. stress out), but it happens to all of us. And since stress usually hits when there’s a whole lot going on — including looming deadlines, wedding weekends and visits from the in-laws — we can’t always bust out the yoga mat or slip into a candlelit bubble bath. That’s why we rounded up this list of quick and simple strategies to ease anxiety anytime, anywhere. Try one or try them all the next time you’re feeling tense to start feeling better now!

Your Stress RX

1. Let Pandora soothe you. When your blood starts to boil, pump up the beats. In stressful environments, music has been proven to decrease anxiety. Even better, create your own relaxation station on Pandora or iTunes. Soothing songs like Pachelbel’s Canon in D have been shown to encourage relaxation. Take Deep Breath 2. Take a deep breath. No matter when or where stress finds you, this old standby can ease the pain. All you need are a few deliberate deep breaths to lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol. Simply inhale for a count of four, then exhale for another count of four (all through the nose). Continue in this pattern until feelings of calm set in. 3. Get off track. If meeting a deadline is stressing you out, losing focus may be just what you need to calm down and move on. Studies show that distraction can effectively alleviate anxiety. So pick up a book, surf YouTube, research a healthy meal to make for dinner — anything to keep your mind off the stressor at hand. [caption id="attachment_17061" align="alignnone" width="620"]Cat Photo: Pond5[/caption] 4. LOL with cats. Need we say more? Merely being around animals can improve mood. But if you don’t happen to have access to a dog or cat when the anxiety hits, try looking at cute animal photos. One Japanese study found that looking at adorable images is enough to focus attention and produce positive feelings. 5. Let’s get physical. Another “natural reward” that works? Sex. While this, better-for-your-body alternative may not be a viable option at all times, sex can be a way to reduce feelings of stress without raiding the kitchen cabinets. [caption id="attachment_17062" align="alignnone" width="620"]Take a Deep Breath Photo: Pond5[/caption] 6. Find the sweet spot. We admit it; there is a reason you reach for calorie-heavy sweets when feeling anxious. These foods actually do reduce the body’s stress responses. The key here is just not to overdo it. Try keeping a healthy stash of fresh fruit on hand — watermelon can be more versatile than you’d think! 7. Fake it ‘til you make it. Just like feigning confidence at an interview, simply imagining yourself calm can help do the trick. If conjuring up the image of a relaxed you seems daunting, try downloading a guided relaxation app on your phone. We love Relax with Andrew Johnson Lite and Take a Break! Guided Meditations for Stress Relief (both free, available for Android and iPhone). [caption id="attachment_17063" align="alignnone" width="620"]Walk in Garden Photo: Pond5[/caption] 8. Get some green. If a windowless office or a day organizing the dark, dank basement has you feeling blue, step outside. Exposure to green spaces is good for you health and has been shown to reduce stress. Don’t have immediate access to a backyard or public park? It might be time to get a houseplant or two. Even small doses of nature might help boost your mood. 9. Laugh a little. Whether you chuckle, snort or snicker, laughter has been shown to reduce the psychological effects of stress. And if letting out even a little laugh is hard when under pressure, these misguided fitness videos are sure to get the giggles going. 10. Chew on this. Gum isn’t just for fresh breath anymore; it actually reduces levels of cortisol in the body. Next time you’re tempted to reach for some comforting carbs, opt for a stick of gum instead. Not only does it ease negative feelings, you won’t be ridden with guilt from breaking your diet, too. 11. Let your inbox fill up. Allowing emails to pile up may seem counterintuitive to reducing stress, but avoiding your inbox may be just what you need in times of unrest. In one study, workers not only stressed less but were more productive when deprived of email. For a quick fix, log out and be sure to turn off any alerts on you mobile devices to reap the benefits of going e-free.

The post 11 Simple Ways to Relieve Stress Now appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
https://dailyburn.com/life/lifestyle/how-to-relieve-stress/feed/ 1