Life by DailyBurn » Cardio http://dailyburn.com/life A better you, for life. Tue, 01 Sep 2015 11:45:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.4 3 Insanely Inspiring Moments from the 2015 World Track and Field Championships http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/news-monday-motivation-running-world-track-and-field-championships-083115/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/news-monday-motivation-running-world-track-and-field-championships-083115/#comments Mon, 31 Aug 2015 13:15:35 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=43073 Are You a Runner? Here’s Your Monday Motivation

[caption id="attachment_43085" align="alignnone" width="620"]Are You a Runner? Here’s Your Monday Motivation Photos: Instagram (left); Instagram (right)[/caption]

There’s nothing like witnessing a breathtaking feat of athleticism to rev you up for your next workout (a DailyBurn workout, of course!) — especially at the beginning of the week. That's why we’re looking back at the World Track and Field Championships, which wrapped up yesterday in Beijing. The exciting races and relays offered up some seriously inspiring moments that went way beyond just the thrill of cheering on a winner. (Though that is, of course, awesome in itself.)

RELATED: Hate Running? 25 Ways to Learn to Love It

So whether you’re training for your first 5K or are a total gym rat, you’ll relate to these hard-to-believe, but totally inspiring incidents. (Spoiler alert: One runner was forced to go shoeless!) The way these athletes reacted to the challenges at hand might just inspire you to recommit to dominating whatever workout you’ve got scheduled for this week. Check them out below.

3 Crazy Moments from the World Track Championships


1. Usain Bolt Rolls With the Punches
Did your heart stop for a second when watching the video above? Same. Mere moments after Jamaican track superstar Usain Bolt won the gold medal in the 200-meter race, a photographer on an out-of-control Segway scooter literally plowed him down on the track. Though it could have been a career-threatening moment, Bolt almost popped back to his feet. Later, he laughed at a press conference, saying, “The rumor I’m trying to start right now is that [American rival] Justin Gatlin paid him off.” He followed up with a Facebook post that said it all: “Unshakeable, Unbreakable, Unstoppable.” Carry that mantra with you — we’ve already put it in our pockets.

RELATED: 19 Reasons to Work Out (Beyond the Perfect Body)

 


2. Jenny Simpson Goes (Unexpectedly) Shoeless
American runner Jenny Simpson didn’t let the fact that she was only wearing only one shoe stop her from finishing her 1500-meter race at the World Championships. Her wayward cleat slipped off her left foot after another runner stepped on her shoe mid-course. Simpson, who came in first place in the event in 2011 and second in 2013, was a contender to medal in 2015 again. Despite her relatively disappointing finish in 11th place this time around, Simpson kept her cool and demonstrated what it truly means to tough it out. Next time you complain, think of Simpson and how she crushed her race in just one shoe.

RELATED: The 25 Craziest Workout Excuses Trainers Have Ever Heard


3. Emily Infield Claims the Bronze
Talk about an inspiring finish to kick-start your week! On Tuesday, August 25, American runner Emily Infield nabbed a bronze medal in the 10,000-meter race, overtaking fellow U.S. teammate Molly Huddle in the final seconds of the competition, after Huddle started celebrating early. Infield’s training partner, the elite marathoner Shalene Flanagan, told Runner’s World that Infield had been specifically practicing pushing herself at the end of her races. “I’m always telling Emily to run through the line and to pace herself so she has one extra gear in the last 100, so I’m taking partial credit,” Flanagan said. We’d say it paid off.

How’s all that for some #MondayMotivation?

Now we want to hear from you! Tell us how you get pumped up for the week and tweet us @dailyburn using #MondayMotivation.

The post 3 Insanely Inspiring Moments from the 2015 World Track and Field Championships appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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Are You a Runner? Here’s Your Monday Motivation

[caption id="attachment_43085" align="alignnone" width="620"]Are You a Runner? Here’s Your Monday Motivation Photos: Instagram (left); Instagram (right)[/caption] There’s nothing like witnessing a breathtaking feat of athleticism to rev you up for your next workout (a DailyBurn workout, of course!) — especially at the beginning of the week. That's why we’re looking back at the World Track and Field Championships, which wrapped up yesterday in Beijing. The exciting races and relays offered up some seriously inspiring moments that went way beyond just the thrill of cheering on a winner. (Though that is, of course, awesome in itself.) RELATED: Hate Running? 25 Ways to Learn to Love It So whether you’re training for your first 5K or are a total gym rat, you’ll relate to these hard-to-believe, but totally inspiring incidents. (Spoiler alert: One runner was forced to go shoeless!) The way these athletes reacted to the challenges at hand might just inspire you to recommit to dominating whatever workout you’ve got scheduled for this week. Check them out below.

3 Crazy Moments from the World Track Championships

1. Usain Bolt Rolls With the Punches Did your heart stop for a second when watching the video above? Same. Mere moments after Jamaican track superstar Usain Bolt won the gold medal in the 200-meter race, a photographer on an out-of-control Segway scooter literally plowed him down on the track. Though it could have been a career-threatening moment, Bolt almost popped back to his feet. Later, he laughed at a press conference, saying, “The rumor I’m trying to start right now is that [American rival] Justin Gatlin paid him off.” He followed up with a Facebook post that said it all: “Unshakeable, Unbreakable, Unstoppable.” Carry that mantra with you — we’ve already put it in our pockets. RELATED: 19 Reasons to Work Out (Beyond the Perfect Body)   2. Jenny Simpson Goes (Unexpectedly) Shoeless American runner Jenny Simpson didn’t let the fact that she was only wearing only one shoe stop her from finishing her 1500-meter race at the World Championships. Her wayward cleat slipped off her left foot after another runner stepped on her shoe mid-course. Simpson, who came in first place in the event in 2011 and second in 2013, was a contender to medal in 2015 again. Despite her relatively disappointing finish in 11th place this time around, Simpson kept her cool and demonstrated what it truly means to tough it out. Next time you complain, think of Simpson and how she crushed her race in just one shoe. RELATED: The 25 Craziest Workout Excuses Trainers Have Ever Heard 3. Emily Infield Claims the Bronze Talk about an inspiring finish to kick-start your week! On Tuesday, August 25, American runner Emily Infield nabbed a bronze medal in the 10,000-meter race, overtaking fellow U.S. teammate Molly Huddle in the final seconds of the competition, after Huddle started celebrating early. Infield’s training partner, the elite marathoner Shalene Flanagan, told Runner’s World that Infield had been specifically practicing pushing herself at the end of her races. “I’m always telling Emily to run through the line and to pace herself so she has one extra gear in the last 100, so I’m taking partial credit,” Flanagan said. We’d say it paid off. How’s all that for some #MondayMotivation? Now we want to hear from you! Tell us how you get pumped up for the week and tweet us @dailyburn using #MondayMotivation.

The post 3 Insanely Inspiring Moments from the 2015 World Track and Field Championships appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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5 Ways to Feel More Like Beyoncé in Cardio Dance Class http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/cardio-dance-beginner-workout-tips/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/cardio-dance-beginner-workout-tips/#comments Thu, 27 Aug 2015 15:15:49 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=42744 5 Ways to Feel More Like Beyoncé in Cardio Dance Class

[caption id="attachment_42748" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Ways to Feel More Like Beyoncé in Cardio Dance Class Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Tabata this, bootcamp that. Lately, high-intensity intervals have been getting all of the group fitness love. But a good old-fashioned cardio dance class can still give you a crazy good burn — and it generally won’t involve endless rounds of burpees.

“High-intensity classes are great for people who are into that whole drill sergeant routine, but a lot of people have gone down that route and are now realizing they prefer something that isn’t quite as driven and intense,” says Kimberly Glick, national senior director of group fitness at Life Time Fitness. “They want to work out, sweat and smile. Not smile through the tears.”

RELATED: 6 Things I Wish I Knew Before My First Fitness Class

Plus, unlike many HIIT classes, you can walk into a session with pretty much no experience. “You don’t feel like you need to get in shape just to sign up,” she laughs. Here’s what you need to know to walk into any cardio dance class with the confidence of Beyoncé (or at least one of her back-up dancers).

5 Ways to Feel Cooler in Your Cardio Dance Class

A photo posted by Beyoncé (@beyonce) on

1. Arrive Early
Hiding your newbie status won’t get you anywhere. Show up a few minutes early so you can introduce yourself to the instructor. “Many instructors will give you an idea what to expect in class, and some will even go out of their way to teach you a few moves that will pop up throughout the class,” Glick says. That way, you won’t feel like you’re playing catch-up when the class launches into their usual routine. If, after class, you have some questions about that hip roll, just ask. That’s what instructors are there for.

RELATED: The 15 Most Underrated Exercises, According to Trainers

2. Stand in the Middle of the Pack
No, not at the back of the room. Many dance classes involve directional changes (like in the Cupid Shuffle). So if you start the class at the back or far side of the group, when everyone turns around, you could wind up at the front (without any idea what you’re doing), Glick says. If you set up camp in the middle of class, you’ll always be able to follow along, no matter which direction the class might turn.

3. Don’t Stop Moving
It’s tempting to try to perform every move perfectly on the first go, but that’s not the point of cardio dance classes. The goal is to get your heart rate up and burn some fat. “If what you’re doing doesn’t look like what the instructor [is doing], who cares? As long as you move, you win,” Glick says. If you stand there scratching your head and trying to study the instructor’s dance combo, you might as well be sitting on the couch. While form and technique are super-important in some higher-intensity workouts, helping to protect you from injury, they’re not as crucial in a fun dance class. No matter how bad your twerking skills, you’ll probably still be OK.

RELATED: The 5 Best Cardio Workouts That Don’t Involve Running

4. Bring a Friend
Not only will it be more fun to bust out your most ridiculous moves alongside your BFF, but it might also push you to work harder. “It just makes people more at ease and less afraid to look foolish,” Glick says. “Think about it: When you are walking through the mall alone, you aren’t going to skip. But if you’re with your friend and she starts skipping, you’re going to join in.” Plus, the two of you can practice that pop, lock and roll in between classes.

5. Put on Your Dancing Shoes
Ready to leave it all on the dance floor? It might help to get the right kicks. There are running shoes, cross-training shoes, and then there are dancing shoes. The latter come with less tread and traction, Glick says. By keeping your feet from catching on the floor, these slick-bottomed shoes a) Make moves easier, and b) Prevent you from twisting a knee or ankle mid-turn. Look for sneakers with “studio” or “dance” in the title (Zumba also has its own dance-worthy line).

Want to try cardio dance in the comfort of your own home? Head to DailyBurn.com for a free 30-day trial.

The post 5 Ways to Feel More Like Beyoncé in Cardio Dance Class appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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5 Ways to Feel More Like Beyoncé in Cardio Dance Class

[caption id="attachment_42748" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Ways to Feel More Like Beyoncé in Cardio Dance Class Photo: Pond5[/caption] Tabata this, bootcamp that. Lately, high-intensity intervals have been getting all of the group fitness love. But a good old-fashioned cardio dance class can still give you a crazy good burn — and it generally won’t involve endless rounds of burpees. “High-intensity classes are great for people who are into that whole drill sergeant routine, but a lot of people have gone down that route and are now realizing they prefer something that isn’t quite as driven and intense,” says Kimberly Glick, national senior director of group fitness at Life Time Fitness. “They want to work out, sweat and smile. Not smile through the tears.” RELATED: 6 Things I Wish I Knew Before My First Fitness Class Plus, unlike many HIIT classes, you can walk into a session with pretty much no experience. “You don’t feel like you need to get in shape just to sign up,” she laughs. Here’s what you need to know to walk into any cardio dance class with the confidence of Beyoncé (or at least one of her back-up dancers).

5 Ways to Feel Cooler in Your Cardio Dance Class

A photo posted by Beyoncé (@beyonce) on

1. Arrive Early Hiding your newbie status won’t get you anywhere. Show up a few minutes early so you can introduce yourself to the instructor. “Many instructors will give you an idea what to expect in class, and some will even go out of their way to teach you a few moves that will pop up throughout the class,” Glick says. That way, you won’t feel like you’re playing catch-up when the class launches into their usual routine. If, after class, you have some questions about that hip roll, just ask. That’s what instructors are there for. RELATED: The 15 Most Underrated Exercises, According to Trainers 2. Stand in the Middle of the Pack No, not at the back of the room. Many dance classes involve directional changes (like in the Cupid Shuffle). So if you start the class at the back or far side of the group, when everyone turns around, you could wind up at the front (without any idea what you’re doing), Glick says. If you set up camp in the middle of class, you’ll always be able to follow along, no matter which direction the class might turn. 3. Don’t Stop Moving It’s tempting to try to perform every move perfectly on the first go, but that’s not the point of cardio dance classes. The goal is to get your heart rate up and burn some fat. “If what you’re doing doesn’t look like what the instructor [is doing], who cares? As long as you move, you win,” Glick says. If you stand there scratching your head and trying to study the instructor’s dance combo, you might as well be sitting on the couch. While form and technique are super-important in some higher-intensity workouts, helping to protect you from injury, they’re not as crucial in a fun dance class. No matter how bad your twerking skills, you’ll probably still be OK. RELATED: The 5 Best Cardio Workouts That Don’t Involve Running 4. Bring a Friend Not only will it be more fun to bust out your most ridiculous moves alongside your BFF, but it might also push you to work harder. “It just makes people more at ease and less afraid to look foolish,” Glick says. “Think about it: When you are walking through the mall alone, you aren’t going to skip. But if you’re with your friend and she starts skipping, you’re going to join in.” Plus, the two of you can practice that pop, lock and roll in between classes. 5. Put on Your Dancing Shoes Ready to leave it all on the dance floor? It might help to get the right kicks. There are running shoes, cross-training shoes, and then there are dancing shoes. The latter come with less tread and traction, Glick says. By keeping your feet from catching on the floor, these slick-bottomed shoes a) Make moves easier, and b) Prevent you from twisting a knee or ankle mid-turn. Look for sneakers with “studio” or “dance” in the title (Zumba also has its own dance-worthy line). Want to try cardio dance in the comfort of your own home? Head to DailyBurn.com for a free 30-day trial.

The post 5 Ways to Feel More Like Beyoncé in Cardio Dance Class appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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25 Athletes Redefining “Extreme” on Instagram http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/best-instagram-accounts-gopro-videos/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/best-instagram-accounts-gopro-videos/#comments Wed, 26 Aug 2015 15:05:07 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=31745 25 Epic GoPro Instagrams You Must See

25 Athletes Redefining "Extreme" on Instagram

Adrenaline junkie? Head to Instagram and you’ll find real-life action heroes jumping out of planes and throwing down big tricks on the slopes. From epic, gravity-defying videos to barrel-of-the-wave POV pics and underwater shots, these definitely aren’t your average sweaty selfies! To honor the fearless individuals who inspire us to live on the edge, we present 25 of our favorite extreme athletes on Instagram. Let these 25 daredevil ‘grammers motivate you to take your fitness to new heights. Did we miss any of your favorite GoPro 'grammers? Let us know in the comments below.

RELATED: The Foodstagrammies: 25 Best Instagram Accounts to Follow

http://instagram.com/p/ru_QBkjLQg/

1. Ninja SUP

@kacycatanzaro
Paddleboard push-ups are no sweat for “Mighty Kacy,” the first woman to qualify for the finals of the hit TV show American Ninja Warrior.  Drop down and give us 10 more! For more exercise ideas from Kacy, check out her favorite bodyweight moves here.

http://instagram.com/p/rZkOXYsXwz/

2. Kite Rite

@leyroydamo
Accomplished kiteboarder Damian Leroy gets some airtime in this sick POV shot. When you see kite racing in the 2020 Summer Olympics, you’ll have this athlete to thank! He showcased the sport in front of the International Olympic Committee in 2012.

http://instagram.com/p/qzxgZQP-4C/

3. Sky High

@brent_falls
You might get vertigo watching Brent Witt cruise above the earth in a red squirrel suit. This professional skydiver’s feed is filled with breathtaking shots of his adrenaline-packed antics.

RELATED: The Fitstagrammies: The 25 Best Instagram Accounts to Follow

http://instagram.com/p/sKmhQpEkwM/

4. Wake 'N Lake

@melissa_marquardt
Want to catch a ride without getting wet? Follow pro wakeboarder Melissa Marquardt, who’s been shredding around the globe for over 10 years. She’s proof that ladies can drop big tricks!

http://instagram.com/p/qZwZN4C5md/

5. Hello Moto

@nateadams741
Pro motorcross rider Nate Adams burst onto the competitive scene at the tender age of 18, and he’s been racking up accomplishments — including gold medals at the X Games and Gravity Games — ever since. His Instagrams give you a sneak peek into this daredevil’s gravity-defying lifestyle.

http://instagram.com/p/sNb3Hbp-gB/

6. Hole in One 

@themichellewie
Swing by pro golfer Michelle Wie’s Instagram feed for some footage straight from the green. She demonstrates perfect putting form in the timelapse Instavid above.

http://instagram.com/p/sGr-3NKHS2/

7. Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah

@aaronchase
Sometimes freestyle mountain biker Aaron Chase gets air without his wheels. We wouldn’t mind zipping along with him through Whistler, British Columbia.

http://instagram.com/p/ln5Jg-s7Ne/

8. Board Bunny

@jamieanderson
From this vantage point, we feel like we’re shredding the slopes right alongside Olympic Gold Medalist Jamie Anderson! Her ‘grams of yoga poses and rad mountain runs  inspire us to get outside and push our limits.

RELATED: Bethany Hamilton: Soul Surfer and Fitness Inspiration

https://instagram.com/p/5f3B2rSZ6C/?taken-by=robbiecrawford

9. Ride the Tide 'Till Dusk

@robbiecrawford
What’s almost as beautiful as riding the perfect wave? Snapping the perfect sunset shot of the perfect wave, of course. You might have spotted some of digital artist Robbie Crawford’s work in Urban Outfitters, but you can get your fill of stunning California sunsets on his Instagram feed, too!

http://instagram.com/p/qktxo0k-c2/

10. K9 Tug of War

@harleyingleby
Champion longboarder Harley Ingleby moved his GoPro from his board to his pooch and our hearts melted. Check out a game of tug of war in the Instavid above.

http://instagram.com/p/oqk0DnRRG8/

11. Urban Skimboarding

@lucasogomes
This photo from Brazilian pro Lucas Gomes makes us want to stop scrolling IG and start skimming! And the stunning capture has the best of both worlds: Beautiful beach and the buildings of Rio in the background.

http://instagram.com/p/ru7mj8hvY1/

12. Under the Sea

@elenahight
Hold your breath — you’re going underwater in this GoPro vid. Olympic snowboarder Elena Hight trades snow for sea on her trip to Hawaii, where she filmed this majestic snorkeling adventure.

http://instagram.com/p/owOoRBOtsc/

13. Snow Kayaking

@nicktroutmankayak
Baby on board! World freestyle kayak champion Nick Troutman is all smiles when taking his son out for a ride in the snowy Loveland Pass in Colorado.

http://instagram.com/p/pRqoMoBtsr/

14. Surf's Up

@lakeypeterson
Champion surfer Lakey Peterson has taken women’s surfing to new heights since she landed the first aerial maneuver in an amateur surfing event for women when she was just 14. Peep her carving up some barrel waves in the vid above.

http://instagram.com/p/rSqX5sB_uI/

15. Slack Attack

@skies_call
Free spirit and free skydiver Kristian makes slacklining look easy, but we know better. The killer sunset is no match for this athlete's core strength and balance.

RELATED: 20 Partner Exercises from the Fittest Couples on Instagram

http://instagram.com/p/gEeJSHF4Aa/

16. Speed Flying

@marshall_miller
Soar through the air with the greatest of ease alongside world-class paragliding pilot Marshall Miller. He’s well-versed in all things airborne and adrenaline — including BASE jumping, skydiving and speed flying, a hybrid sport that combines elements from parachuting and paragliding.

http://instagram.com/p/hdsoVHQG-l/

17. The Air Up There

@gabatronix
Heights ain’t no thing for Gaby James, a rock climber who posts about her adventures on the blog Dirt Barbies. We don't doubt she’s got the skills to get to the top before the sun goes down!

http://instagram.com/p/gYu7hPvK2p/

18. Way Off BASE

@jtholmesjr
Try not to feel exhilarated looking at this ‘gram. Experienced BASE jumper and skier JT Holmes drops into the fjords of Norway.

http://instagram.com/p/pUTr9mP2qg/

19. Boarding School-ed

@sagekostenburg
Rage with Sage on his gnarly IG feed. We can’t take our eyes off this shot of the Olympic Gold medalist grinning while upside down in mid-air.

http://instagram.com/p/rPrk0xnuSI/

20. BMX Heroes

@mikeescamilla
This skydiving pro BMXer sure knows how to snap a shot. The photo above is Kris Fox warming up at the bowl at the Van Doren Invitational, a pro skateboarding competition.

http://instagram.com/p/oBzl_bx3LB/

21. Rapid Fire

@rushsturges
This isn’t your grandma’s canoe trip. Pro whitewater kayaker and filmmaker Rush Sturges blasts through the Black Mass on the Misstassibi River in Quebec in this epic pic.

http://instagram.com/p/sIZaQXL2Im/

22. High on Life

@tomashavel
Got a case of wanderlust after look at photographer Tomas Havel’s feed? Us, too. BRB, going to go plan a hiking trip to Norway!

http://instagram.com/p/qyyNQBNQP-/

23. Tricks On A String 

@jakekelsick
Hit the ocean swell in the video above. Pro kiteboarder Jake Kelsick gets airtime while kiting, and with this POV, we can pretend we’re out in the sunshine with him.

http://instagram.com/p/lqCuJ4LjSR/

24. Jump Around

@bobby_brown1
Dreaming of a white winter even though it’s only September? Peep this ‘gram from champion freeskier Bobby Brown to get your fill of powder and big jumps.

http://instagram.com/p/lvsNuLFhce/

25. Hounding the Trails

@waynedevingo
Drop onto the trail with Wayne DeVingo and his yellow labs via his adventure-packed IG feed. Looks like a tail-wagging good time to us!

http://instagram.com/p/ryxRmXNebo/?modal=true

BONUS: Surfing Pig!

@kamathesurfingpig
When pigs fly? How about when pigs surf? If you don’t believe us, check out the feed of Kama, a pig who catches waves in Hawaii. Babe’s got nothing on this hog that can hang ten.

Originally posted September 2014. Updated August 2015. 

The post 25 Athletes Redefining “Extreme” on Instagram appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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25 Epic GoPro Instagrams You Must See

25 Athletes Redefining "Extreme" on Instagram Adrenaline junkie? Head to Instagram and you’ll find real-life action heroes jumping out of planes and throwing down big tricks on the slopes. From epic, gravity-defying videos to barrel-of-the-wave POV pics and underwater shots, these definitely aren’t your average sweaty selfies! To honor the fearless individuals who inspire us to live on the edge, we present 25 of our favorite extreme athletes on Instagram. Let these 25 daredevil ‘grammers motivate you to take your fitness to new heights. Did we miss any of your favorite GoPro 'grammers? Let us know in the comments below. RELATED: The Foodstagrammies: 25 Best Instagram Accounts to Follow http://instagram.com/p/ru_QBkjLQg/

1. Ninja SUP

@kacycatanzaro Paddleboard push-ups are no sweat for “Mighty Kacy,” the first woman to qualify for the finals of the hit TV show American Ninja Warrior.  Drop down and give us 10 more! For more exercise ideas from Kacy, check out her favorite bodyweight moves here. http://instagram.com/p/rZkOXYsXwz/

2. Kite Rite

@leyroydamo Accomplished kiteboarder Damian Leroy gets some airtime in this sick POV shot. When you see kite racing in the 2020 Summer Olympics, you’ll have this athlete to thank! He showcased the sport in front of the International Olympic Committee in 2012. http://instagram.com/p/qzxgZQP-4C/

3. Sky High

@brent_falls You might get vertigo watching Brent Witt cruise above the earth in a red squirrel suit. This professional skydiver’s feed is filled with breathtaking shots of his adrenaline-packed antics. RELATED: The Fitstagrammies: The 25 Best Instagram Accounts to Follow http://instagram.com/p/sKmhQpEkwM/

4. Wake 'N Lake

@melissa_marquardt Want to catch a ride without getting wet? Follow pro wakeboarder Melissa Marquardt, who’s been shredding around the globe for over 10 years. She’s proof that ladies can drop big tricks! http://instagram.com/p/qZwZN4C5md/

5. Hello Moto

@nateadams741 Pro motorcross rider Nate Adams burst onto the competitive scene at the tender age of 18, and he’s been racking up accomplishments — including gold medals at the X Games and Gravity Games — ever since. His Instagrams give you a sneak peek into this daredevil’s gravity-defying lifestyle. http://instagram.com/p/sNb3Hbp-gB/

6. Hole in One 

@themichellewie Swing by pro golfer Michelle Wie’s Instagram feed for some footage straight from the green. She demonstrates perfect putting form in the timelapse Instavid above. http://instagram.com/p/sGr-3NKHS2/

7. Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah

@aaronchase Sometimes freestyle mountain biker Aaron Chase gets air without his wheels. We wouldn’t mind zipping along with him through Whistler, British Columbia. http://instagram.com/p/ln5Jg-s7Ne/

8. Board Bunny

@jamieanderson From this vantage point, we feel like we’re shredding the slopes right alongside Olympic Gold Medalist Jamie Anderson! Her ‘grams of yoga poses and rad mountain runs  inspire us to get outside and push our limits. RELATED: Bethany Hamilton: Soul Surfer and Fitness Inspiration https://instagram.com/p/5f3B2rSZ6C/?taken-by=robbiecrawford

9. Ride the Tide 'Till Dusk

@robbiecrawford What’s almost as beautiful as riding the perfect wave? Snapping the perfect sunset shot of the perfect wave, of course. You might have spotted some of digital artist Robbie Crawford’s work in Urban Outfitters, but you can get your fill of stunning California sunsets on his Instagram feed, too! http://instagram.com/p/qktxo0k-c2/

10. K9 Tug of War

@harleyingleby Champion longboarder Harley Ingleby moved his GoPro from his board to his pooch and our hearts melted. Check out a game of tug of war in the Instavid above. http://instagram.com/p/oqk0DnRRG8/

11. Urban Skimboarding

@lucasogomes This photo from Brazilian pro Lucas Gomes makes us want to stop scrolling IG and start skimming! And the stunning capture has the best of both worlds: Beautiful beach and the buildings of Rio in the background. http://instagram.com/p/ru7mj8hvY1/

12. Under the Sea

@elenahight Hold your breath — you’re going underwater in this GoPro vid. Olympic snowboarder Elena Hight trades snow for sea on her trip to Hawaii, where she filmed this majestic snorkeling adventure. http://instagram.com/p/owOoRBOtsc/

13. Snow Kayaking

@nicktroutmankayak Baby on board! World freestyle kayak champion Nick Troutman is all smiles when taking his son out for a ride in the snowy Loveland Pass in Colorado. http://instagram.com/p/pRqoMoBtsr/

14. Surf's Up

@lakeypeterson Champion surfer Lakey Peterson has taken women’s surfing to new heights since she landed the first aerial maneuver in an amateur surfing event for women when she was just 14. Peep her carving up some barrel waves in the vid above. http://instagram.com/p/rSqX5sB_uI/

15. Slack Attack

@skies_call Free spirit and free skydiver Kristian makes slacklining look easy, but we know better. The killer sunset is no match for this athlete's core strength and balance. RELATED: 20 Partner Exercises from the Fittest Couples on Instagram http://instagram.com/p/gEeJSHF4Aa/

16. Speed Flying

@marshall_miller Soar through the air with the greatest of ease alongside world-class paragliding pilot Marshall Miller. He’s well-versed in all things airborne and adrenaline — including BASE jumping, skydiving and speed flying, a hybrid sport that combines elements from parachuting and paragliding. http://instagram.com/p/hdsoVHQG-l/

17. The Air Up There

@gabatronix Heights ain’t no thing for Gaby James, a rock climber who posts about her adventures on the blog Dirt Barbies. We don't doubt she’s got the skills to get to the top before the sun goes down! http://instagram.com/p/gYu7hPvK2p/

18. Way Off BASE

@jtholmesjr Try not to feel exhilarated looking at this ‘gram. Experienced BASE jumper and skier JT Holmes drops into the fjords of Norway. http://instagram.com/p/pUTr9mP2qg/

19. Boarding School-ed

@sagekostenburg Rage with Sage on his gnarly IG feed. We can’t take our eyes off this shot of the Olympic Gold medalist grinning while upside down in mid-air. http://instagram.com/p/rPrk0xnuSI/

20. BMX Heroes

@mikeescamilla This skydiving pro BMXer sure knows how to snap a shot. The photo above is Kris Fox warming up at the bowl at the Van Doren Invitational, a pro skateboarding competition. http://instagram.com/p/oBzl_bx3LB/

21. Rapid Fire

@rushsturges This isn’t your grandma’s canoe trip. Pro whitewater kayaker and filmmaker Rush Sturges blasts through the Black Mass on the Misstassibi River in Quebec in this epic pic. http://instagram.com/p/sIZaQXL2Im/

22. High on Life

@tomashavel Got a case of wanderlust after look at photographer Tomas Havel’s feed? Us, too. BRB, going to go plan a hiking trip to Norway! http://instagram.com/p/qyyNQBNQP-/

23. Tricks On A String 

@jakekelsick Hit the ocean swell in the video above. Pro kiteboarder Jake Kelsick gets airtime while kiting, and with this POV, we can pretend we’re out in the sunshine with him. http://instagram.com/p/lqCuJ4LjSR/

24. Jump Around

@bobby_brown1 Dreaming of a white winter even though it’s only September? Peep this ‘gram from champion freeskier Bobby Brown to get your fill of powder and big jumps. http://instagram.com/p/lvsNuLFhce/

25. Hounding the Trails

@waynedevingo Drop onto the trail with Wayne DeVingo and his yellow labs via his adventure-packed IG feed. Looks like a tail-wagging good time to us! http://instagram.com/p/ryxRmXNebo/?modal=true

BONUS: Surfing Pig!

@kamathesurfingpig When pigs fly? How about when pigs surf? If you don’t believe us, check out the feed of Kama, a pig who catches waves in Hawaii. Babe’s got nothing on this hog that can hang ten. Originally posted September 2014. Updated August 2015. 

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#MondayMotivation: THIS Is How You Cross a Finish Line http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/monday-motivation-run-disney-finish-line-wheelchair-freewheel-082415/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/monday-motivation-run-disney-finish-line-wheelchair-freewheel-082415/#comments Mon, 24 Aug 2015 13:15:00 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=42836 RunDisney Finish Line MondayMotivation-Featured

[caption id="attachment_42838" align="alignnone" width="620"]MondayMotivation RunDisney Wheelchair Finish Line Photo: Courtesy of RunDisney[/caption]

When you train for a long-distance race, it’s easy to forget the real goal of the run: That sweet, sweet feeling of crossing the finish line. After all, you likely spent weeks prepping your body, improving your diet and religiously following a training plan, all in an effort to feel your best on race day. And there’s no greater reminder of that exact accomplishment than that epic finish line photo.

RELATED: #MondayMotivation: 60 Seconds to Greatness

Which is precisely why the above shot, shared by our friends at RunDisney, is our #MondayMotivation for the week. This finisher photo is the embodiment of what it feels like to achieve greatness — and that's just what this wheelchair participant did.

Even more exciting: Now wheelchair athletes can follow their training progress thanks to the launch of FreeWheel, a new tracker designed by Chaotic Moon Studios. Unlike other fitness trackers, the FreeWheel takes into account factors unique to wheelchairs, like the muscles needed to move the chair and the condition of the road or path. More specifically, FreeWheel has a barometer, a gyroscope and an accelerometer to measure speed, acceleration, distance, altitude, incline and decline. Bluetooth transmits the data to a corresponding app and can sync with data from other devices, such as heart-rate monitoring wearables like the FitBit Charge HR.

RELATED: Try DailyBurn’s Heart-Rate Workout, Inferno HR, Right Now!

Although there’s no official release date, expect to see FreeWheel launch in the next few months, and for now, get pumped by watching the video below. Inspired to sign up for a race? Check out our favorite 30 marathons across the globe, 50 favorite half-marathons in the U.S., or peruse the upcoming races RunDisney has on the calendar. Now that’s some #MondayMotivation, right?

Now we want to hear from you! Tell us how you get pumped up for the week and tweet us @dailyburn using #MondayMotivation.

The post #MondayMotivation: THIS Is How You Cross a Finish Line appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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RunDisney Finish Line MondayMotivation-Featured

[caption id="attachment_42838" align="alignnone" width="620"]MondayMotivation RunDisney Wheelchair Finish Line Photo: Courtesy of RunDisney[/caption] When you train for a long-distance race, it’s easy to forget the real goal of the run: That sweet, sweet feeling of crossing the finish line. After all, you likely spent weeks prepping your body, improving your diet and religiously following a training plan, all in an effort to feel your best on race day. And there’s no greater reminder of that exact accomplishment than that epic finish line photo. RELATED: #MondayMotivation: 60 Seconds to Greatness Which is precisely why the above shot, shared by our friends at RunDisney, is our #MondayMotivation for the week. This finisher photo is the embodiment of what it feels like to achieve greatness — and that's just what this wheelchair participant did. Even more exciting: Now wheelchair athletes can follow their training progress thanks to the launch of FreeWheel, a new tracker designed by Chaotic Moon Studios. Unlike other fitness trackers, the FreeWheel takes into account factors unique to wheelchairs, like the muscles needed to move the chair and the condition of the road or path. More specifically, FreeWheel has a barometer, a gyroscope and an accelerometer to measure speed, acceleration, distance, altitude, incline and decline. Bluetooth transmits the data to a corresponding app and can sync with data from other devices, such as heart-rate monitoring wearables like the FitBit Charge HR. RELATED: Try DailyBurn’s Heart-Rate Workout, Inferno HR, Right Now! Although there’s no official release date, expect to see FreeWheel launch in the next few months, and for now, get pumped by watching the video below. Inspired to sign up for a race? Check out our favorite 30 marathons across the globe, 50 favorite half-marathons in the U.S., or peruse the upcoming races RunDisney has on the calendar. Now that’s some #MondayMotivation, right? Now we want to hear from you! Tell us how you get pumped up for the week and tweet us @dailyburn using #MondayMotivation.

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Inside the Brain of 93-Year-Old Athlete Olga Kotelko http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/news-olga-kotelko-brain-study-081815/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/news-olga-kotelko-brain-study-081815/#comments Tue, 18 Aug 2015 20:15:17 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=42702 Inside the Brain of a 93-Year-Old Athlete

[caption id="attachment_42704" align="alignnone" width="620"]Inside the Brain of a 93-Year-Old Athlete Photo: YouTube[/caption]

When you think about track and field athletes, you might envision young, muscled (and highly decorated) competitors like Usain Bolt or Lolo Jones. That is, until you learn about the legendary Olga Kotelko, who passed away in 2014.

The former teacher and mother of two was a record-holding competitor in World Masters Athletics events well into her 90s. And don’t think she was just moseying along a track either. Kotelko competed in the high jump, long jump, javelin, discus, shotput and hammer events — amassing 750 gold medals.

Yet, the most remarkable thing about Olga wasn’t her body — it was her brain.

RELATED: #MondayMotivation: Meet This 77-Year-Old Bodybuilder

In 2012, at age 93, Kotelko participated in a study comparing her brain to the brains of 58 other active women, ages 60 to 78 years old. Conducted by researchers at the University of Illinois, participants underwent a battery of MRI brain scans and cognitive tests, in addition to a treadmill fitness test. The goal of these was to determine whether Kotelko’s late-life athletic feats (she didn’t get involved in sports until her 60s) had helped delay the effects of aging in her brain.

"During dinner after the long day of testing, I asked Olga if she was tired, and she replied, 'I rarely get tired,'" study author Art Kramer, director of the Beckman Institute at the University of Illinois, said in a press release. "The decades-younger graduate students who tested her, however, looked exhausted."

RELATED: 10 Athletes Over 60 Who Can Kick Your Butt

In a study published this week in the journal Neurocases, researchers showed that Kotelko’s time at the track paid off in a big way. Compared to the younger women, Kotelko’s white matter tracts (areas of the brain that help with reasoning, planning and self-control) were “remarkably intact,” according to researchers. Her brain also didn’t appear shrunken (a typical sign of aging), and she performed better on tests of cognition and memory than other women her own age.

“I think it's very exciting to see someone who is highly functioning at 93, possessing numerous world records in the athletic field and actually having very high integrity in a brain region that is very sensitive to aging,” lead researcher Agnieszka Burzynska said.

In case you needed evidence, check out this video of Kotelko crushing it at her track workouts (and prepare to be seriously inspired).

Inside the Brain of 93-Year-Old Athlete Olga Kotelko

The post Inside the Brain of 93-Year-Old Athlete Olga Kotelko appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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Inside the Brain of a 93-Year-Old Athlete

[caption id="attachment_42704" align="alignnone" width="620"]Inside the Brain of a 93-Year-Old Athlete Photo: YouTube[/caption] When you think about track and field athletes, you might envision young, muscled (and highly decorated) competitors like Usain Bolt or Lolo Jones. That is, until you learn about the legendary Olga Kotelko, who passed away in 2014. The former teacher and mother of two was a record-holding competitor in World Masters Athletics events well into her 90s. And don’t think she was just moseying along a track either. Kotelko competed in the high jump, long jump, javelin, discus, shotput and hammer events — amassing 750 gold medals. Yet, the most remarkable thing about Olga wasn’t her body — it was her brain. RELATED: #MondayMotivation: Meet This 77-Year-Old Bodybuilder In 2012, at age 93, Kotelko participated in a study comparing her brain to the brains of 58 other active women, ages 60 to 78 years old. Conducted by researchers at the University of Illinois, participants underwent a battery of MRI brain scans and cognitive tests, in addition to a treadmill fitness test. The goal of these was to determine whether Kotelko’s late-life athletic feats (she didn’t get involved in sports until her 60s) had helped delay the effects of aging in her brain. "During dinner after the long day of testing, I asked Olga if she was tired, and she replied, 'I rarely get tired,'" study author Art Kramer, director of the Beckman Institute at the University of Illinois, said in a press release. "The decades-younger graduate students who tested her, however, looked exhausted." RELATED: 10 Athletes Over 60 Who Can Kick Your Butt In a study published this week in the journal Neurocases, researchers showed that Kotelko’s time at the track paid off in a big way. Compared to the younger women, Kotelko’s white matter tracts (areas of the brain that help with reasoning, planning and self-control) were “remarkably intact,” according to researchers. Her brain also didn’t appear shrunken (a typical sign of aging), and she performed better on tests of cognition and memory than other women her own age. “I think it's very exciting to see someone who is highly functioning at 93, possessing numerous world records in the athletic field and actually having very high integrity in a brain region that is very sensitive to aging,” lead researcher Agnieszka Burzynska said. In case you needed evidence, check out this video of Kotelko crushing it at her track workouts (and prepare to be seriously inspired).

Inside the Brain of 93-Year-Old Athlete Olga Kotelko

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The Easiest 5K and 10K Training Plan Ever (Walking, Allowed) http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/run-walk-5k-10k-training-plan/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/run-walk-5k-10k-training-plan/#comments Tue, 18 Aug 2015 11:15:39 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=42491 The Easiest 5K and 10K Training Plan Ever (Walking, Allowed)

[caption id="attachment_42495" align="alignnone" width="620"]The Easiest 5K and 10K Training Plan Ever (Walking, Allowed) Photo: Pond5[/caption]

If you’ve got zero running experience, the thought of tackling a 5K or 10K can be pretty nerve-wracking. But even if you haven’t logged a mile since middle school, you can still cross the finish line happy and injury-free. Just try adopting a run-walk training strategy, says Denise Sauriol, owner and founder of Run for Change in Chicago.

Run-walk plans are just what you’d expect: They break down the miles into intervals of walking, followed by running.“[A run-walk plan] is not as intimidating and is more maintainable in the long run,” says Sauriol, who’s run 59 marathons and specializes in coaching newbie runners to their first race. “If you train this way you won’t hurt as much near the end of training or as much after the race.”

Plus, by choosing a plan that isn’t too intense, you might make running a habit that actually sticks. “My goal for runners is not just to help them do a 5K but make running part of their lifestyle,” says Sauriol.

RELATED: Hate Running? 25 Ways to Learn to Love It

How to Run-Walk Your First 5K or 10K

If you’re a newbie, it’s all about easing into your training runs. That’s why you’ll start both your 5K and 10K training plans with nine minutes of walking and one minute of running per interval. Sounds crazy easy, right? That’s the whole point. Someone who doesn’t have a running base can follow this plan comfortably. And building up slowly while increasing the total number of minutes you’re training will boost your confidence, while reducing risk of injury, says Sauriol.

RELATED: 5 Expert Tips for Proper Running Form

If you’re slightly more experienced or find the 60-second run interval too easy, you can start out with seven minutes of walking and three minutes of running, or five and five. “Runners usually get a sense of excitement that they can run more. That’s your cue that you’re ready to run longer intervals and cut down on walking,” Sauriol says.

You’ll focus on 10-minute intervals because Sauriol finds that longer stretches allow you to get into a nice groove without having to constantly switch back and forth between running and walking. (Besides, they’re easier mathematically and you don’t have to plot out mile markers or wear a GPS watch.)

RELATED: Running 15 Miles a Week Could Slash Alzheimer’s Risk

To make your training as effective as possible, make sure you’re walking with a purpose. Think: Hustling to a sale at Best Buy, but not quite booking it at a Black Friday speed. When you’re running, remember: Sprinting will only wear you down. Maintain a pace at which you can easily hold a conversation. Lace up your sneakers and prepare to hit the roads with two totally doable training plans from Sauriol.

Your Run-Walk 5K Training Plan

The Easiest 5K Training Plan Ever (Walking, Allowed)

After you've conquered your first 5K, you might be ready to tackle something more challenging! If that's the case, check out the 10K plan below (don't worry, walking is still totally encouraged).

Your Run-Walk 10K Training Plan

The Easiest 10K Training Plan Ever (Walking, Allowed)

3 Race Day Survival Strategies

You’ve made it through weeks of training — congrats! These simple tips will help you run-walk your way through any race.

First mile: “It’s easy to get pulled into the excitement of your first race and sprint out of the gate. Hold that energy back and run at the pace you’ve been training at,” says Sauriol. “Consciously let people pass you and run your own race,” she says.

RELATED: 13 Race Day Tips for Newbie Runners

Middle miles: Remember to stick to your run-walk plan because that’s what you’ve been training at this whole time. To avoid frustration (your legs are tired, so-and-so is passing you) remember why you came here: to enjoy the experience. “Thank a volunteer, high-five a kid. We’re not getting paid to do this, it’s all for fun!” says Sauriol.

Last mile: The last quarter of the race is the most mentally challenging, says Sauriol. “Think about how far you’ve come, and remember that everyone else is hurting, too!” Just as you think the race won’t end, the finish line appears, giving you a sudden burst of jet fuel energy. If you want to leave everyone else in the dust and run through the finish line, do it!

The post The Easiest 5K and 10K Training Plan Ever (Walking, Allowed) appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
The Easiest 5K and 10K Training Plan Ever (Walking, Allowed)

[caption id="attachment_42495" align="alignnone" width="620"]The Easiest 5K and 10K Training Plan Ever (Walking, Allowed) Photo: Pond5[/caption] If you’ve got zero running experience, the thought of tackling a 5K or 10K can be pretty nerve-wracking. But even if you haven’t logged a mile since middle school, you can still cross the finish line happy and injury-free. Just try adopting a run-walk training strategy, says Denise Sauriol, owner and founder of Run for Change in Chicago. Run-walk plans are just what you’d expect: They break down the miles into intervals of walking, followed by running.“[A run-walk plan] is not as intimidating and is more maintainable in the long run,” says Sauriol, who’s run 59 marathons and specializes in coaching newbie runners to their first race. “If you train this way you won’t hurt as much near the end of training or as much after the race.” Plus, by choosing a plan that isn’t too intense, you might make running a habit that actually sticks. “My goal for runners is not just to help them do a 5K but make running part of their lifestyle,” says Sauriol. RELATED: Hate Running? 25 Ways to Learn to Love It

How to Run-Walk Your First 5K or 10K

If you’re a newbie, it’s all about easing into your training runs. That’s why you’ll start both your 5K and 10K training plans with nine minutes of walking and one minute of running per interval. Sounds crazy easy, right? That’s the whole point. Someone who doesn’t have a running base can follow this plan comfortably. And building up slowly while increasing the total number of minutes you’re training will boost your confidence, while reducing risk of injury, says Sauriol. RELATED: 5 Expert Tips for Proper Running Form If you’re slightly more experienced or find the 60-second run interval too easy, you can start out with seven minutes of walking and three minutes of running, or five and five. “Runners usually get a sense of excitement that they can run more. That’s your cue that you’re ready to run longer intervals and cut down on walking,” Sauriol says. You’ll focus on 10-minute intervals because Sauriol finds that longer stretches allow you to get into a nice groove without having to constantly switch back and forth between running and walking. (Besides, they’re easier mathematically and you don’t have to plot out mile markers or wear a GPS watch.) RELATED: Running 15 Miles a Week Could Slash Alzheimer’s Risk To make your training as effective as possible, make sure you’re walking with a purpose. Think: Hustling to a sale at Best Buy, but not quite booking it at a Black Friday speed. When you’re running, remember: Sprinting will only wear you down. Maintain a pace at which you can easily hold a conversation. Lace up your sneakers and prepare to hit the roads with two totally doable training plans from Sauriol.

Your Run-Walk 5K Training Plan

The Easiest 5K Training Plan Ever (Walking, Allowed) After you've conquered your first 5K, you might be ready to tackle something more challenging! If that's the case, check out the 10K plan below (don't worry, walking is still totally encouraged).

Your Run-Walk 10K Training Plan

The Easiest 10K Training Plan Ever (Walking, Allowed)

3 Race Day Survival Strategies

You’ve made it through weeks of training — congrats! These simple tips will help you run-walk your way through any race. First mile: “It’s easy to get pulled into the excitement of your first race and sprint out of the gate. Hold that energy back and run at the pace you’ve been training at,” says Sauriol. “Consciously let people pass you and run your own race,” she says. RELATED: 13 Race Day Tips for Newbie Runners Middle miles: Remember to stick to your run-walk plan because that’s what you’ve been training at this whole time. To avoid frustration (your legs are tired, so-and-so is passing you) remember why you came here: to enjoy the experience. “Thank a volunteer, high-five a kid. We’re not getting paid to do this, it’s all for fun!” says Sauriol. Last mile: The last quarter of the race is the most mentally challenging, says Sauriol. “Think about how far you’ve come, and remember that everyone else is hurting, too!” Just as you think the race won’t end, the finish line appears, giving you a sudden burst of jet fuel energy. If you want to leave everyone else in the dust and run through the finish line, do it!

The post The Easiest 5K and 10K Training Plan Ever (Walking, Allowed) appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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#MondayMotivation: 60 Seconds to Greatness http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/monday-motivation-60-second-inspiration/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/monday-motivation-60-second-inspiration/#comments Mon, 17 Aug 2015 13:15:27 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=42454 Monday Motivation 60 Seconds to Greatness

#MondayMotivation: 60 Seconds to Greatness

“It’s never too late to be what you might have been.” That’s what the great Victorian novelist George Eliot once said, but we’re feeling the sentiment on days when the struggle to motivate is all too real. (Read: Mondays.) In the 60-second video above from our friends at BuzzFeed, you’ll be reminded to start the week off with positivity, ambition and maybe a hit of bravery, too. With motivational words from Eliot as well as other great thinkers, you’ll be inspired to get moving. It’s a brand-new week — and besides, you should really never miss a Monday, right? It’ll set the tone for days to come. (Trust.)

RELATED: 19 Reasons to Work Out (Beyond the Perfect Body) 

So whether it’s that trail run you’ve been eyeing, that mountain you’ve been thinking of climbing, or the DailyBurn workout you know will take you out of your comfort zone (we’re currently obsessed with LTF at DB HQ), get after it. And even though there will be obstacles, as the above clip reminds us, be confident that you’ll overcome them. Because remember: You. Can. Do. Anything.

RELATED: 6 Weight Loss Success Stories to Motivate You Right Now

Now we want to hear from you! Tell us how you get pumped up for the week and tweet us @dailyburn using #MondayMotivation.

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Monday Motivation 60 Seconds to Greatness

#MondayMotivation: 60 Seconds to Greatness

“It’s never too late to be what you might have been.” That’s what the great Victorian novelist George Eliot once said, but we’re feeling the sentiment on days when the struggle to motivate is all too real. (Read: Mondays.) In the 60-second video above from our friends at BuzzFeed, you’ll be reminded to start the week off with positivity, ambition and maybe a hit of bravery, too. With motivational words from Eliot as well as other great thinkers, you’ll be inspired to get moving. It’s a brand-new week — and besides, you should really never miss a Monday, right? It’ll set the tone for days to come. (Trust.) RELATED: 19 Reasons to Work Out (Beyond the Perfect Body)  So whether it’s that trail run you’ve been eyeing, that mountain you’ve been thinking of climbing, or the DailyBurn workout you know will take you out of your comfort zone (we’re currently obsessed with LTF at DB HQ), get after it. And even though there will be obstacles, as the above clip reminds us, be confident that you’ll overcome them. Because remember: You. Can. Do. Anything. RELATED: 6 Weight Loss Success Stories to Motivate You Right Now Now we want to hear from you! Tell us how you get pumped up for the week and tweet us @dailyburn using #MondayMotivation.

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6 Things I Wish I Knew Before My First Fitness Class http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/tips-for-your-first-fitness-class/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/tips-for-your-first-fitness-class/#comments Thu, 13 Aug 2015 15:15:27 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=42424 What I Wish I Knew Before My First Group Fitness Class

[caption id="attachment_42434" align="alignnone" width="620"]What I Wish I Knew Before First Group Fitness Class Photo: Pond5[/caption]

The bright lights, wall-to-wall mirrors and spandex-clad regulars might leave you too intimidated to even step foot inside a boutique fitness studio. Which is totally understandable. (And why we love our DailyBurn workouts that much more.) It’s natural to feel like an outsider looking in: “There are so many unspoken rules, unfamiliar machines and potentially hard-to-navigate areas,” says Lisa Niren, head coach at Peloton Cycle. But don’t let your anxiety stop you from checking out that new HIIT class or stepping on a VersaClimber. Here, a few things you should know before you attend, plus tips from top boutique trainers on how to handle it all.

RELATED: 9 Trainer Tips to Get More From Your Fitness Class

6 Things to Know Before Your First Fitness Class

“Be patient, keep trying and know it will get less frustrating the more you practice.”

1. It’s OK to ask for help.
“When you first walk into a class, find your instructor or facilities staff and have them get you set up properly,” says Niren. She recommends arriving at least 10 minutes early — we’d even say 15 if you want to get comfortably situated before the sweat session begins. And your instructor is there precisely to help you, especially in terms of your positioning. “Proper form is everything [when it comes to avoiding injury],” says Marcy Modica, instructor at SLT NYC, a Pilates studio in New York City. “It is the instructor’s job to set you up for success; tell you where to put your hands, feet and body, where you should be feeling the exercise, or how to modify it for any injuries or sensitive spots,” she adds. Bottom line? If you need something, speak up.

2. Comparing yourself to others won’t make you feel better or worse about yourself.
While you may feel insecure, keep in mind that everyone is there for his or her own good, not to judge your performance. “No one cares how you look or what you’re wearing,” or, in the case of Pilates, how high your leg extension is. “Everyone is too busy focusing on their own form,” says Modica. So chill out and don’t worry if you can’t get into Crow Pose (most of us still struggle after years of regular yoga practice). We’re all at different levels, and the guy in a handstand next to you isn’t bothered by your newb status. If you’re still feeling unsure of yourself, Niren suggests bringing a workout pal along or first trying the class at non-peak hours.

RELATED: 7 Beginner Yoga Poses to Get You Through Your First Class

3. Getting frustrated is part of the process.
Remember: These pro-designed workouts are designed to be tough, not unlike our Inferno HR or Pilates: Phase 2 both are. Attending a new class is supposed to be challenging, explains Modica. In fact, it’s almost “like learning a new language," she says. "Be patient, keep trying and know it will get less frustrating the more you practice.” Whatever you do though, “just don’t quit,” says Niren. Frustration can sometimes be the ignition of true passion, even if you don’t recognize that at first. The key, says Niren, is to look for signs of change, soreness being the most obvious, and generally first, sign.

4. You’ll want to eat something before. Seriously.
“It makes me crazy when someone shows up to class and has to stop multiple times because they’re feeling faint. It signals to me that they are not taking care of themselves,” says Modica. “You can’t move nonstop for an hour without fueling your body.” Niren’s favorite pre (and post!) workout snack is a medium size banana. “They’re essentially nature’s Power Bar,” she says, “and are packed with digestible carbohydrates and loaded with potassium, which helps maintain muscle function.” Not a fruit fan? Try a slice of whole-wheat toast with peanut butter.

RELATED: The Ultimate Guide to Pre and Post-Workout Carbohydrates

5. Dehydration can happen to anyone. And it ain’t pretty.
Drinking water is critical to a great workout: after all, it does make up about two-thirds of your body. (And forget those fancy flavors you’re seeing in the market — plain H20 is always best, says Modica, not to mention calorie-free.) Bring your own bottle, since each studio’s water supply may vary. And don’t worry about overhydrating, also known as hyponatremia. It’s unlikely you’ll drink too much group fitness setting, Modica says. It’s more commonly associated with endurance sports, she adds.

RELATED: 8 Cool New Fit Gear Finds on Kickstarter

6. There are good days, and then there are bad days.
It’s important to remind yourself that progress isn’t necessarily (and in fact, often not) linear. There will be classes when you can nail a resistance you hadn’t hit before or get into a new pose, and likewise, there will be classes that follow where you can’t get those same power numbers or move your limbs the same way. That's totally fine. Remember, there will be peaks and valleys. Enjoy the ride — and both the mental and physical rewards you’ll reap.

The post 6 Things I Wish I Knew Before My First Fitness Class appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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What I Wish I Knew Before My First Group Fitness Class

[caption id="attachment_42434" align="alignnone" width="620"]What I Wish I Knew Before First Group Fitness Class Photo: Pond5[/caption]

The bright lights, wall-to-wall mirrors and spandex-clad regulars might leave you too intimidated to even step foot inside a boutique fitness studio. Which is totally understandable. (And why we love our DailyBurn workouts that much more.) It’s natural to feel like an outsider looking in: “There are so many unspoken rules, unfamiliar machines and potentially hard-to-navigate areas,” says Lisa Niren, head coach at Peloton Cycle. But don’t let your anxiety stop you from checking out that new HIIT class or stepping on a VersaClimber. Here, a few things you should know before you attend, plus tips from top boutique trainers on how to handle it all.

RELATED: 9 Trainer Tips to Get More From Your Fitness Class

6 Things to Know Before Your First Fitness Class

“Be patient, keep trying and know it will get less frustrating the more you practice.”
1. It’s OK to ask for help. “When you first walk into a class, find your instructor or facilities staff and have them get you set up properly,” says Niren. She recommends arriving at least 10 minutes early — we’d even say 15 if you want to get comfortably situated before the sweat session begins. And your instructor is there precisely to help you, especially in terms of your positioning. “Proper form is everything [when it comes to avoiding injury],” says Marcy Modica, instructor at SLT NYC, a Pilates studio in New York City. “It is the instructor’s job to set you up for success; tell you where to put your hands, feet and body, where you should be feeling the exercise, or how to modify it for any injuries or sensitive spots,” she adds. Bottom line? If you need something, speak up. 2. Comparing yourself to others won’t make you feel better or worse about yourself. While you may feel insecure, keep in mind that everyone is there for his or her own good, not to judge your performance. “No one cares how you look or what you’re wearing,” or, in the case of Pilates, how high your leg extension is. “Everyone is too busy focusing on their own form,” says Modica. So chill out and don’t worry if you can’t get into Crow Pose (most of us still struggle after years of regular yoga practice). We’re all at different levels, and the guy in a handstand next to you isn’t bothered by your newb status. If you’re still feeling unsure of yourself, Niren suggests bringing a workout pal along or first trying the class at non-peak hours. RELATED: 7 Beginner Yoga Poses to Get You Through Your First Class 3. Getting frustrated is part of the process. Remember: These pro-designed workouts are designed to be tough, not unlike our Inferno HR or Pilates: Phase 2 both are. Attending a new class is supposed to be challenging, explains Modica. In fact, it’s almost “like learning a new language," she says. "Be patient, keep trying and know it will get less frustrating the more you practice.” Whatever you do though, “just don’t quit,” says Niren. Frustration can sometimes be the ignition of true passion, even if you don’t recognize that at first. The key, says Niren, is to look for signs of change, soreness being the most obvious, and generally first, sign. 4. You’ll want to eat something before. Seriously. “It makes me crazy when someone shows up to class and has to stop multiple times because they’re feeling faint. It signals to me that they are not taking care of themselves,” says Modica. “You can’t move nonstop for an hour without fueling your body.” Niren’s favorite pre (and post!) workout snack is a medium size banana. “They’re essentially nature’s Power Bar,” she says, “and are packed with digestible carbohydrates and loaded with potassium, which helps maintain muscle function.” Not a fruit fan? Try a slice of whole-wheat toast with peanut butter. RELATED: The Ultimate Guide to Pre and Post-Workout Carbohydrates 5. Dehydration can happen to anyone. And it ain’t pretty. Drinking water is critical to a great workout: after all, it does make up about two-thirds of your body. (And forget those fancy flavors you’re seeing in the market — plain H20 is always best, says Modica, not to mention calorie-free.) Bring your own bottle, since each studio’s water supply may vary. And don’t worry about overhydrating, also known as hyponatremia. It’s unlikely you’ll drink too much group fitness setting, Modica says. It’s more commonly associated with endurance sports, she adds. RELATED: 8 Cool New Fit Gear Finds on Kickstarter 6. There are good days, and then there are bad days. It’s important to remind yourself that progress isn’t necessarily (and in fact, often not) linear. There will be classes when you can nail a resistance you hadn’t hit before or get into a new pose, and likewise, there will be classes that follow where you can’t get those same power numbers or move your limbs the same way. That's totally fine. Remember, there will be peaks and valleys. Enjoy the ride — and both the mental and physical rewards you’ll reap.

The post 6 Things I Wish I Knew Before My First Fitness Class appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
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The 15 Most Underrated Exercises, According to Trainers http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/underrated-exercises-for-beginners/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/underrated-exercises-for-beginners/#comments Tue, 11 Aug 2015 11:15:29 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=42333 The 15 Most Underrated Exercises, According to Trainers

[caption id="attachment_42473" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Most Underrated Exercises, According to Trainers Photo: Pond5[/caption]

The best exercise might be the one you aren’t doing. Switching up your usual workout routine will challenge your muscles in new ways and battle boredom, which could make you more motivated to work out in the first place. So if you catch yourself on the elliptical for hours on end — or doing crunches ‘til your neck gives out — we’re here to intervene.

To honor the forgotten, overlooked or unappreciated movements, we asked top trainers to weigh in on the best exercises that fly under the radar. Not only will these moves build strength, improve endurance and burn calories, they’ll keep you making progress toward your goals. Whether you’ve been working out for three days or 30 years, we bet you’ll learn a tip or two from the 15 exercises below (listed in order of beginner to more advanced).

RELATED: The 5 Muscle Groups Guys Are Guilty of Ignoring

The Most Underrated Exercises You’re Not Doing

https://instagram.com/p/56vTpfS-ku/?tagged=supermans

 1. The Superman
Targets: Hamstrings, abs, lower and upper back muscles
Superheroes might have a reputation for abs of steel, but the superman exercise is all about the back. And that’s a good thing, according to Jonathan Angelilli, fitness trainer and founder of TrainDeep, a holistic fitness system. “[Supermans] are way more important than crunches,” he says, because the exercise does a better job of promoting good posture and strengthening the muscles in your back.
How to Get Started: Check out this article on back exercises to prioritize your posterior.

[caption id="attachment_42476" align="alignnone" width="620"]Brisk Walk Photo: Pond5[/caption]

2. The Brisk Walk
Targets: Cardio and endurance
Better health is literally just a few steps away. “Walking has been shown to have many of the same health benefits as running, such as reduced risk of hypertension, high cholesterol, diabetes, and improved cardiovascular health,” says Jen Sinkler, an author, personal trainer, former elite athlete and founder of Lift Weights Faster. A brisk walk won’t put undue stress on your body like running might, but taking some deep breaths while walking can help you “quiet a busy brain,” says Sinkler. “That’s a win for everyone, from newbie exerciser to veteran.”
How to Get Started: Hit the open road with this guide to urban hiking, with tips for making a walk through your hometown a little more epic.

https://instagram.com/p/4CVaaJQ_V7/

3. The Lateral Band Walk-Out
Targets: Glutes
Lateral band walks are about to become your glute go-to. “The exercise strengthens and targets the gluteus medius, or side of your butt, and does so without bulking. Instead, it helps chisel and tighten the booty and legs,” says Andrea Spier, trainer for DailyBurn Pilates. Best of all, you won’t need to spend hours hobbling around like a penguin to get results. Spier says you’ll feel the burn instantly once you start side stepping around. Keep it up for three sets of 10 reps and you’ll have a solid addition to any dynamic warm-up or lower-body routine.
How to Get Started: Check out this video for a demonstration of proper lateral band walk technique.

https://instagram.com/p/50HtL5O3zW/?tagged=deadbug

4. The Dead Bug
Targets: Core
No, there won’t be any insects harmed during this exercise. The Dead Bug is a core exercise performed on your back, where you want to engage your abs to resist extending your lumbar spine (or, arching your back) as you lower your legs to the floor. Translation: You’re keeping your back against the floor while raising and lowering your legs and arms. “There are enough variations that can challenge anyone ranging from a beginner to the most advanced trainee, yet very few people use it,” says Hunter Cook, a California-based trainer. He likes that it teaches athletes how to brace properly, a skill important for protecting the spine during heavy squats and deadlifts.
How to Get Started: Strengthen your core with the three variations in this video.

[caption id="attachment_36357" align="alignnone" width="620"]Rowing Machine Cardio Workouts_2 Photo: Pond5[/caption]

5. The Rower
Targets: Quads, glutes, arms and back
Row, row, row your way fit. Anja Garcia, trainer for DailyBurn’s Inferno program, says working out on a rowing machine has helped take her athleticism to the next level. “You can change the intensity of the exercise by playing with your stroke rate, adding in sprints to really target cardio or keeping a steady cadence to work on strength and power,” she says.
How to Get Started: Try out these three rowing machine cardio workouts to boost strength and endurance.

[caption id="attachment_42384" align="alignnone" width="620"]Deadlift Photo: Pond5[/caption]

6. The Sumo Squat with Drag
Targets: Glutes, quads and inner thighs
Level up your bodyweight squats, no equipment necessary. By adding a “drag” at the end of a sumo squat, you’ll challenge your inner thighs, says Larysa Didio, a celebrity trainer and fitness writer. “It’s really hard to target the inner thighs while standing and this exercise successfully does it,” she says. So, skip those seated adduction machines and drop it like a squat, stat.
How to Get Started: Try this 10-minute strength workout from Prevention, with tips on how to perform the sumo squat with drag.

[caption id="attachment_15787" align="alignnone" width="640"]Switch Up Cardio Routine Photo: Pond5[/caption]

7. The Stairs
Targets: Glutes, hamstring, calves and core
Waiting for a treadmill can get old, fast. So why not ditch the gym and explore a new part of town by heading to an outdoor stairwell or stadium for your next cardio fix? By running or walking up and down stairs, you’ll rev your heart rate, improve coordination and develop lower body strength. “There’s so much variety in how you can use [stairs] and they’re everywhere!” says Dyan Tsiumis, instructor at The Fhitting Room in New York City, who’s been hitting the steps to help get in shape for her first figure competition.
How to Get Started: To take your fitness level to new heights, try these stair workouts from our friends at Greatist, designed for beginner and advanced athletes.

[caption id="attachment_33302" align="alignnone" width="620"]MetCon Workout Photo: Pond5[/caption]

8. The Plyo Workout
Targets: Cardio and strength training
Harder, better, faster, stronger aren’t just song lyrics — they’re also benefits of plyometric training. “It’s all about efficiency,” says Leanne Shear, founder and head trainer at Uplift Studio in New York City. By incorporating jump squats, broad jumps or other plyo moves into your fitness routine, you’ll fire up muscle groups that you wouldn’t ordinarily work moving in just one plane of motion. Plus, developing explosive power that will make you a better all-around athlete? Priceless.
How to Get Started: Get sweating with this no-equipment ploymetric workout designed to maximize your burn.

https://instagram.com/p/5k5TudwC6O/?taken-by=kirastokesfit

9.The Single-Leg Deadlift
Targets: Core, glutes and hamstrings
While regular deadlifts are great for building strength, balancing on just one leg means your core has to stay engaged throughout the movement. Kira Stokes, an instructor at BFX Studio in New York City, is all about firing up the posterior chain with single-leg deadlifts. “Added bonus: This is a fantastic exercise for ankle and knee rehab,” says Stokes, since the movement can help strengthen and stabilize your joints. And best of all, she notes that the single-leg deadlift is a “no-excuse exercise,” meaning you can do it anytime with just your own bodyweight.
How to Get Started: Master the single-leg deadlift technique with this Girls Gone Strong guide, then try the workout at the end of the article.

[caption id="attachment_42486" align="alignnone" width="620"]Kettlebell Swing Photo: Pond5[/caption]

10. The Russian Kettlebell Swing
Targets: Glutes, lower back, hamstrings, shoulders and legs
Want to reap the benefits of kettlebell training but not sure where to start? Let us introduce you to the Russian kettlebell swing. “It has a low learning curve,” says Kellie Davis, celebrity trainer and co-founder of GetGlutes.com. “[It’s] a full-body workout wrapped into a single exercise,” she says, noting it strengthens your posterior chain while also revving your heart rate and testing your endurance.
How to Get Started: Brush up on your form by following along with DailyBurn trainer Cody Storey in this video on beginner-friendly kettlebell exercises.

[caption id="attachment_42376" align="alignnone" width="620"]Track Workout Photo: Pond5[/caption]

11. The Track Workout
Targets: Cardio and endurance
Slogging through miles on the treadmill is far from the only way to run. There are plenty of ways to mix it up — sprint drills, distance runs and nature hikes — so it’s appropriate for all levels and fitness goals. “Running never ceases to amaze and challenge me,” says Justin Rubin, trainer for DailyBurn’s True Beginner program. Lace up your sneakers and you’ll likely live longer than more sedentary people! Baby, you were born to run.
How to Get Started: Learn how to set yourself up for success with these 50 running resources for increasing speed and strength and fueling up the right way.

[caption id="attachment_29445" align="alignnone" width="620"]Photo: Pond5 Photo: Pond5[/caption]

12. The Prowler Drive
Targets: Legs, core, back, hip extension
Push it, push it real good. The Prowler is that sled-like piece of equipment you’ve seen people shoving around gyms or CrossFit boxes. But it’s not just for bros chasing gains. Anyone can get started with the Prowler since there’s a quick learning curve, says Rob Sulaver, founder and CEO of Bandana Training. Unlike barbells, there’s no risk of falling weight once you run out of steam — push until you can’t push any more and the Prowler will simply come to a halt.
How to Get Started: For a demonstration of proper prowler technique, check out this video that breaks down how it’s done.

[caption id="attachment_42479" align="alignnone" width="620"]Back Squat Photo: Pond5[/caption]

13. The Weighted Back Squat
Targets: Glutes, hamstrings, quads, calves, core, lower back and shoulders
Ladies and gentlemen of the gym, back squats are back. “A lot of women avoid this exercise in fear of growing their thighs and men skip it to focus on more vanity body parts like their chest and arms,” says Brett Hoebel, celebrity trainer and author of The 20-Minute Body. But the truth is, this full-body move can torch calories during and after your workout, while also helping you develop better mobility — which can lead to better performance for other workouts.
How to Get Started: Practice getting low with these tips on the back squat and other squat variations.

[caption id="attachment_39722" align="alignnone" width="620"]Deadlift Photo: Pond5[/caption]

14. The Deadlift
Targets: Glutes, hamstrings, quads and lower back
Think deadlifts are only for advanced lifters? Think again. “Men, women, young and old can all benefit from this move,” says Ben Booker, trainer for DailyBurn’s LTF program. The multi-joint exercise works your upper and lower body, plus it’s one of the safest lifts you can perform, since you can simply drop the weight if you can’t complete the lift. Once you learn how to hinge properly at the hips, you’ll develop strength that can carry over for picking up heavy groceries or moving furniture.
How to Get Started: Master this lift with these beginner-friendly tips from our friends at Fitocracy.

[caption id="attachment_42385" align="alignnone" width="620"]Thruster Photo: Pond5[/caption]

15: The Thruster
Targets: Quads, glutes, hamstrings, abs, shoulders, upper back, triceps
Want more bang for your buck with a barbell in hand? You get two-for-one with the thruster, which combines a front squat with a push press. “This full-body movement is very metabolically demanding and really gets the heart rate up,” says Eric Salvador, head instructor at The Fhitting Room in NYC. “The power that you generate from your legs in the squat propels the weight overhead where your abdominals, shoulders, upper back and triceps take over,” he says. This multi-joint movement isn’t for the faint of heart, though. “The thruster will literally floor you,” says Salvador, who became a believer in the exercise during “Fran,” a notoriously tough CrossFit workout.
How to Get Started: Experienced lifters can try “Jackie,” one of the CrossFit workouts you can do in under 12 minutes.

The post The 15 Most Underrated Exercises, According to Trainers appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
The 15 Most Underrated Exercises, According to Trainers

[caption id="attachment_42473" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Most Underrated Exercises, According to Trainers Photo: Pond5[/caption] The best exercise might be the one you aren’t doing. Switching up your usual workout routine will challenge your muscles in new ways and battle boredom, which could make you more motivated to work out in the first place. So if you catch yourself on the elliptical for hours on end — or doing crunches ‘til your neck gives out — we’re here to intervene. To honor the forgotten, overlooked or unappreciated movements, we asked top trainers to weigh in on the best exercises that fly under the radar. Not only will these moves build strength, improve endurance and burn calories, they’ll keep you making progress toward your goals. Whether you’ve been working out for three days or 30 years, we bet you’ll learn a tip or two from the 15 exercises below (listed in order of beginner to more advanced). RELATED: The 5 Muscle Groups Guys Are Guilty of Ignoring

The Most Underrated Exercises You’re Not Doing

https://instagram.com/p/56vTpfS-ku/?tagged=supermans  1. The Superman Targets: Hamstrings, abs, lower and upper back muscles Superheroes might have a reputation for abs of steel, but the superman exercise is all about the back. And that’s a good thing, according to Jonathan Angelilli, fitness trainer and founder of TrainDeep, a holistic fitness system. “[Supermans] are way more important than crunches,” he says, because the exercise does a better job of promoting good posture and strengthening the muscles in your back. How to Get Started: Check out this article on back exercises to prioritize your posterior. [caption id="attachment_42476" align="alignnone" width="620"]Brisk Walk Photo: Pond5[/caption] 2. The Brisk Walk Targets: Cardio and endurance Better health is literally just a few steps away. “Walking has been shown to have many of the same health benefits as running, such as reduced risk of hypertension, high cholesterol, diabetes, and improved cardiovascular health,” says Jen Sinkler, an author, personal trainer, former elite athlete and founder of Lift Weights Faster. A brisk walk won’t put undue stress on your body like running might, but taking some deep breaths while walking can help you “quiet a busy brain,” says Sinkler. “That’s a win for everyone, from newbie exerciser to veteran.” How to Get Started: Hit the open road with this guide to urban hiking, with tips for making a walk through your hometown a little more epic. https://instagram.com/p/4CVaaJQ_V7/ 3. The Lateral Band Walk-Out Targets: Glutes Lateral band walks are about to become your glute go-to. “The exercise strengthens and targets the gluteus medius, or side of your butt, and does so without bulking. Instead, it helps chisel and tighten the booty and legs,” says Andrea Spier, trainer for DailyBurn Pilates. Best of all, you won’t need to spend hours hobbling around like a penguin to get results. Spier says you’ll feel the burn instantly once you start side stepping around. Keep it up for three sets of 10 reps and you’ll have a solid addition to any dynamic warm-up or lower-body routine. How to Get Started: Check out this video for a demonstration of proper lateral band walk technique. https://instagram.com/p/50HtL5O3zW/?tagged=deadbug 4. The Dead Bug Targets: Core No, there won’t be any insects harmed during this exercise. The Dead Bug is a core exercise performed on your back, where you want to engage your abs to resist extending your lumbar spine (or, arching your back) as you lower your legs to the floor. Translation: You’re keeping your back against the floor while raising and lowering your legs and arms. “There are enough variations that can challenge anyone ranging from a beginner to the most advanced trainee, yet very few people use it,” says Hunter Cook, a California-based trainer. He likes that it teaches athletes how to brace properly, a skill important for protecting the spine during heavy squats and deadlifts. How to Get Started: Strengthen your core with the three variations in this video. [caption id="attachment_36357" align="alignnone" width="620"]Rowing Machine Cardio Workouts_2 Photo: Pond5[/caption] 5. The Rower Targets: Quads, glutes, arms and back Row, row, row your way fit. Anja Garcia, trainer for DailyBurn’s Inferno program, says working out on a rowing machine has helped take her athleticism to the next level. “You can change the intensity of the exercise by playing with your stroke rate, adding in sprints to really target cardio or keeping a steady cadence to work on strength and power,” she says. How to Get Started: Try out these three rowing machine cardio workouts to boost strength and endurance. [caption id="attachment_42384" align="alignnone" width="620"]Deadlift Photo: Pond5[/caption] 6. The Sumo Squat with Drag Targets: Glutes, quads and inner thighs Level up your bodyweight squats, no equipment necessary. By adding a “drag” at the end of a sumo squat, you’ll challenge your inner thighs, says Larysa Didio, a celebrity trainer and fitness writer. “It’s really hard to target the inner thighs while standing and this exercise successfully does it,” she says. So, skip those seated adduction machines and drop it like a squat, stat. How to Get Started: Try this 10-minute strength workout from Prevention, with tips on how to perform the sumo squat with drag. [caption id="attachment_15787" align="alignnone" width="640"]Switch Up Cardio Routine Photo: Pond5[/caption] 7. The Stairs Targets: Glutes, hamstring, calves and core Waiting for a treadmill can get old, fast. So why not ditch the gym and explore a new part of town by heading to an outdoor stairwell or stadium for your next cardio fix? By running or walking up and down stairs, you’ll rev your heart rate, improve coordination and develop lower body strength. “There’s so much variety in how you can use [stairs] and they’re everywhere!” says Dyan Tsiumis, instructor at The Fhitting Room in New York City, who’s been hitting the steps to help get in shape for her first figure competition. How to Get Started: To take your fitness level to new heights, try these stair workouts from our friends at Greatist, designed for beginner and advanced athletes. [caption id="attachment_33302" align="alignnone" width="620"]MetCon Workout Photo: Pond5[/caption] 8. The Plyo Workout Targets: Cardio and strength training Harder, better, faster, stronger aren’t just song lyrics — they’re also benefits of plyometric training. “It’s all about efficiency,” says Leanne Shear, founder and head trainer at Uplift Studio in New York City. By incorporating jump squats, broad jumps or other plyo moves into your fitness routine, you’ll fire up muscle groups that you wouldn’t ordinarily work moving in just one plane of motion. Plus, developing explosive power that will make you a better all-around athlete? Priceless. How to Get Started: Get sweating with this no-equipment ploymetric workout designed to maximize your burn. https://instagram.com/p/5k5TudwC6O/?taken-by=kirastokesfit 9.The Single-Leg Deadlift Targets: Core, glutes and hamstrings While regular deadlifts are great for building strength, balancing on just one leg means your core has to stay engaged throughout the movement. Kira Stokes, an instructor at BFX Studio in New York City, is all about firing up the posterior chain with single-leg deadlifts. “Added bonus: This is a fantastic exercise for ankle and knee rehab,” says Stokes, since the movement can help strengthen and stabilize your joints. And best of all, she notes that the single-leg deadlift is a “no-excuse exercise,” meaning you can do it anytime with just your own bodyweight. How to Get Started: Master the single-leg deadlift technique with this Girls Gone Strong guide, then try the workout at the end of the article. [caption id="attachment_42486" align="alignnone" width="620"]Kettlebell Swing Photo: Pond5[/caption] 10. The Russian Kettlebell Swing Targets: Glutes, lower back, hamstrings, shoulders and legs Want to reap the benefits of kettlebell training but not sure where to start? Let us introduce you to the Russian kettlebell swing. “It has a low learning curve,” says Kellie Davis, celebrity trainer and co-founder of GetGlutes.com. “[It’s] a full-body workout wrapped into a single exercise,” she says, noting it strengthens your posterior chain while also revving your heart rate and testing your endurance. How to Get Started: Brush up on your form by following along with DailyBurn trainer Cody Storey in this video on beginner-friendly kettlebell exercises. [caption id="attachment_42376" align="alignnone" width="620"]Track Workout Photo: Pond5[/caption] 11. The Track Workout Targets: Cardio and endurance Slogging through miles on the treadmill is far from the only way to run. There are plenty of ways to mix it up — sprint drills, distance runs and nature hikes — so it’s appropriate for all levels and fitness goals. “Running never ceases to amaze and challenge me,” says Justin Rubin, trainer for DailyBurn’s True Beginner program. Lace up your sneakers and you’ll likely live longer than more sedentary people! Baby, you were born to run. How to Get Started: Learn how to set yourself up for success with these 50 running resources for increasing speed and strength and fueling up the right way. [caption id="attachment_29445" align="alignnone" width="620"]Photo: Pond5 Photo: Pond5[/caption] 12. The Prowler Drive Targets: Legs, core, back, hip extension Push it, push it real good. The Prowler is that sled-like piece of equipment you’ve seen people shoving around gyms or CrossFit boxes. But it’s not just for bros chasing gains. Anyone can get started with the Prowler since there’s a quick learning curve, says Rob Sulaver, founder and CEO of Bandana Training. Unlike barbells, there’s no risk of falling weight once you run out of steam — push until you can’t push any more and the Prowler will simply come to a halt. How to Get Started: For a demonstration of proper prowler technique, check out this video that breaks down how it’s done. [caption id="attachment_42479" align="alignnone" width="620"]Back Squat Photo: Pond5[/caption] 13. The Weighted Back Squat Targets: Glutes, hamstrings, quads, calves, core, lower back and shoulders Ladies and gentlemen of the gym, back squats are back. “A lot of women avoid this exercise in fear of growing their thighs and men skip it to focus on more vanity body parts like their chest and arms,” says Brett Hoebel, celebrity trainer and author of The 20-Minute Body. But the truth is, this full-body move can torch calories during and after your workout, while also helping you develop better mobility — which can lead to better performance for other workouts. How to Get Started: Practice getting low with these tips on the back squat and other squat variations. [caption id="attachment_39722" align="alignnone" width="620"]Deadlift Photo: Pond5[/caption] 14. The Deadlift Targets: Glutes, hamstrings, quads and lower back Think deadlifts are only for advanced lifters? Think again. “Men, women, young and old can all benefit from this move,” says Ben Booker, trainer for DailyBurn’s LTF program. The multi-joint exercise works your upper and lower body, plus it’s one of the safest lifts you can perform, since you can simply drop the weight if you can’t complete the lift. Once you learn how to hinge properly at the hips, you’ll develop strength that can carry over for picking up heavy groceries or moving furniture. How to Get Started: Master this lift with these beginner-friendly tips from our friends at Fitocracy. [caption id="attachment_42385" align="alignnone" width="620"]Thruster Photo: Pond5[/caption] 15: The Thruster Targets: Quads, glutes, hamstrings, abs, shoulders, upper back, triceps Want more bang for your buck with a barbell in hand? You get two-for-one with the thruster, which combines a front squat with a push press. “This full-body movement is very metabolically demanding and really gets the heart rate up,” says Eric Salvador, head instructor at The Fhitting Room in NYC. “The power that you generate from your legs in the squat propels the weight overhead where your abdominals, shoulders, upper back and triceps take over,” he says. This multi-joint movement isn’t for the faint of heart, though. “The thruster will literally floor you,” says Salvador, who became a believer in the exercise during “Fran,” a notoriously tough CrossFit workout. How to Get Started: Experienced lifters can try “Jackie,” one of the CrossFit workouts you can do in under 12 minutes.

The post The 15 Most Underrated Exercises, According to Trainers appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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5 Running Tweaks That Took an Hour Off My Marathon Time http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/running-marathon-training-tips/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/running-marathon-training-tips/#comments Sat, 08 Aug 2015 12:55:15 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=21502 NYC Marathon

[caption id="attachment_42400" align="alignnone" width="620"]Marathon Training Tips Photo: bobjagendorf[/caption]

In high school, I could barely run the timed mile test, walking most of it.

Five years ago, I ran my first marathon after losing 50 pounds. I finished in 4:59, and I was happy just to have finished. But I knew I had more in me.

RELATE: 15 Fun, Fast and Beginner-Friendly Marathons

Two years ago, I ran my fourth marathon in 3:56. I took more than an hour off my time in three years, without devoting my entire life to running. I work a full-time job, volunteer and have an active social life, but I never felt like I was giving anything up for running. If anything, it added to the quality of my life.

I trained hard to get there, but there are also a few important tweaks I made that helped. Of course, the marathon is a special beast, and anything can happen on race day. But most coaches agree that training smarter physically and mentally can get you to the starting line stronger and ready to tackle 26.2. Here are five strategies that can be effective across the board, along with insights from Bart Yasso, Chief Running Officer of Runner’s World.

1. Add Speedwork

When I started training for my first marathon, I was still pretty new to running. I’d been at it for about a year, and the thought of intentionally running faster sounded terrifying. I just wanted to finish. During subsequent training cycles, I learned that speedwork (pushing harder in the middle of a workout at a specific speed for a specific amount of time) would change everything. That’s right, running faster... helps you get faster. Crazy, right? Speedwork works best when you’re running hard at a distance relative to your race distance, so tempo runs or mile repeats are best for marathoners. “I always felt like I was getting a little bit of speed but lots of endurance from mile repeats,” says Yasso.

RELATED: A Runner's Guide to Speedwork

2. Log Race Pace Miles

How are you going to run your goal pace for hours on end if you don’t know what it feels like to run at that pace? Speedwork paces and goal race paces should be fairly different. Your speedwork pace is typically your pace for a 10K or a half-marathon, or, a pace you can hold for roughly one to two hours. Your race pace is something that you’re trying to hold for three-plus hours, unless you’re an elite athlete.

RELATED: The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S.

I practiced at my goal pace for mid-distance runs and at the end of long runs, so that I knew what it felt like to hold it for a sustained amount of time, and what it felt like to hold it on tired legs. On race day, while I checked my watch obsessively, I easily could have told you if I were running faster or slower than my goal pace by how I felt the cadence in my legs. By running race pace miles, says Yasso, “I always felt that innate sense of rhythm that I can carry this pace on race day.”

3. Up Your Days and Your Mileage

The first time around, I ran between two and three times per week, supplementing that with other forms of cardio at the gym and lifting with a trainer. I finished that marathon at an 11:25 pace, hitting the wall colossally at mile 18. I knew if I wanted to get faster, though, that I would need to run more. I used to be terrified of running two days in a row, but in order to reach my goal, I typically ran five days per week, and I maxed out my mileage at 47 miles one week. I got to run on tired legs quite often, which was a huge mental boost at mile 22 of the marathon, when my legs felt like someone had strapped massive sandbags to them.

Though there are many variables to determining weekly mileage, says Yasso, the key is to listen to your body and not overtrain.

RELATED: Why the 10 Percent Rule Doesn't Always Work

4. Get Comfortable Being Uncomfortable

Running is hard. Running fast(er) is even harder. Miles 21 to 24 of the New York City Marathon were incredibly uncomfortable. Of course they were. I’d just run 20 miles! I reminded myself it was supposed to be uncomfortable and not to walk.

“The only way to advance in our sport,” says Yasso, “is to go to the uncomfortable zone. Embrace the pain, and you will be rewarded at the finish line.”

5. Never Set Limits

I took off 40 minutes between marathons 1 and 2. If I had believed that was impossible, I wouldn’t have had the guts to go for that time and make gutsier goals from there. But I thought about what I could do and shot high. I missed the mark the first time I tried, but if I hadn’t set such an audacious goal, it wouldn’t have lit the fire in my belly to chase, and achieve, the 3:56 time.

What strategies have helped you become a faster runner? Share them below! 

Originally posted November 2013. Updated August 2015.

The post 5 Running Tweaks That Took an Hour Off My Marathon Time appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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NYC Marathon

[caption id="attachment_42400" align="alignnone" width="620"]Marathon Training Tips Photo: bobjagendorf[/caption] In high school, I could barely run the timed mile test, walking most of it. Five years ago, I ran my first marathon after losing 50 pounds. I finished in 4:59, and I was happy just to have finished. But I knew I had more in me. RELATE: 15 Fun, Fast and Beginner-Friendly Marathons Two years ago, I ran my fourth marathon in 3:56. I took more than an hour off my time in three years, without devoting my entire life to running. I work a full-time job, volunteer and have an active social life, but I never felt like I was giving anything up for running. If anything, it added to the quality of my life. I trained hard to get there, but there are also a few important tweaks I made that helped. Of course, the marathon is a special beast, and anything can happen on race day. But most coaches agree that training smarter physically and mentally can get you to the starting line stronger and ready to tackle 26.2. Here are five strategies that can be effective across the board, along with insights from Bart Yasso, Chief Running Officer of Runner’s World.

1. Add Speedwork

When I started training for my first marathon, I was still pretty new to running. I’d been at it for about a year, and the thought of intentionally running faster sounded terrifying. I just wanted to finish. During subsequent training cycles, I learned that speedwork (pushing harder in the middle of a workout at a specific speed for a specific amount of time) would change everything. That’s right, running faster... helps you get faster. Crazy, right? Speedwork works best when you’re running hard at a distance relative to your race distance, so tempo runs or mile repeats are best for marathoners. “I always felt like I was getting a little bit of speed but lots of endurance from mile repeats,” says Yasso. RELATED: A Runner's Guide to Speedwork

2. Log Race Pace Miles

How are you going to run your goal pace for hours on end if you don’t know what it feels like to run at that pace? Speedwork paces and goal race paces should be fairly different. Your speedwork pace is typically your pace for a 10K or a half-marathon, or, a pace you can hold for roughly one to two hours. Your race pace is something that you’re trying to hold for three-plus hours, unless you’re an elite athlete. RELATED: The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. I practiced at my goal pace for mid-distance runs and at the end of long runs, so that I knew what it felt like to hold it for a sustained amount of time, and what it felt like to hold it on tired legs. On race day, while I checked my watch obsessively, I easily could have told you if I were running faster or slower than my goal pace by how I felt the cadence in my legs. By running race pace miles, says Yasso, “I always felt that innate sense of rhythm that I can carry this pace on race day.”

3. Up Your Days and Your Mileage

The first time around, I ran between two and three times per week, supplementing that with other forms of cardio at the gym and lifting with a trainer. I finished that marathon at an 11:25 pace, hitting the wall colossally at mile 18. I knew if I wanted to get faster, though, that I would need to run more. I used to be terrified of running two days in a row, but in order to reach my goal, I typically ran five days per week, and I maxed out my mileage at 47 miles one week. I got to run on tired legs quite often, which was a huge mental boost at mile 22 of the marathon, when my legs felt like someone had strapped massive sandbags to them. Though there are many variables to determining weekly mileage, says Yasso, the key is to listen to your body and not overtrain. RELATED: Why the 10 Percent Rule Doesn't Always Work

4. Get Comfortable Being Uncomfortable

Running is hard. Running fast(er) is even harder. Miles 21 to 24 of the New York City Marathon were incredibly uncomfortable. Of course they were. I’d just run 20 miles! I reminded myself it was supposed to be uncomfortable and not to walk. “The only way to advance in our sport,” says Yasso, “is to go to the uncomfortable zone. Embrace the pain, and you will be rewarded at the finish line.”

5. Never Set Limits

I took off 40 minutes between marathons 1 and 2. If I had believed that was impossible, I wouldn’t have had the guts to go for that time and make gutsier goals from there. But I thought about what I could do and shot high. I missed the mark the first time I tried, but if I hadn’t set such an audacious goal, it wouldn’t have lit the fire in my belly to chase, and achieve, the 3:56 time. What strategies have helped you become a faster runner? Share them below!  Originally posted November 2013. Updated August 2015.

The post 5 Running Tweaks That Took an Hour Off My Marathon Time appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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The 5 Best Cardio Workouts That Don’t Involve Running http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/cardio-workouts-cycling-rowing-hiit-plyometrics/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/cardio-workouts-cycling-rowing-hiit-plyometrics/#comments Thu, 06 Aug 2015 11:15:49 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=42157 non-running-cardio-workouts-featured

[caption id="attachment_42182" align="alignnone" width="620"]Cardio Workouts That Don't Involve Running Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Sure, running is a great workout to have as a part of your cardio repertoire — it’s not only a great way to get fitter, but it improves your mental wellbeing, too. (Read one woman’s story about how running saved her life.) But it’s not right for everyone, and more importantly, running is not the only way to stay in shape. In fact, there are many different types of dynamic cardio workouts that give you a stellar calorie burn, while sculpting muscle at the same time. Try these five workouts on for size — but, instead of going through the motions, maximize your efforts with the expert-approved tips below. Can’t make the modifications just yet? No problem. Work your way up incrementally, and bookmark this page for when you’re ready to take your sessions to the next level.

RELATED: Dread the Gym? Here’s What Might Motivate You

5 Killer Cardio Workouts — That Aren’t Running

[caption id="attachment_42169" align="alignnone" width="620"]Cardio Workouts Not Running Indoor Cycling Photo: Pond5[/caption]

The Workout: Indoor Cycling

The Burn: 714 calories per hour
How to Maximize It: After setting up properly, boost your burn by “focus[ing] on pulling your pedals up behind you,” says Holly Rillinger, Master Instructor at Flywheel Sports. “Most times [when spinning] we are only pushing down with our quads, but when you’re clipped in [to a spin bike’s pedals], you have the advantage of using the full stroke.” Focusing on the upwards motion helps target your glutes and hamstrings, so you’ll increase burn more calories while sculpting your entire lower body, too. Rillinger also suggests adding more resistance during quick sprint sessions: “When you have momentum, you can handle more resistance than at the beginning of the sprint. It’ll raise your heart rate and blast more fat,” she says. And use your core to resist that urge to collapse onto the handlebars when you’re exhausted — your abs will thank you later.

[caption id="attachment_42170" align="alignnone" width="620"]Cardio Workouts Not Running HIIT Photo: Pond5[/caption]

The Workout: High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT)

The Burn: 554 calories per hour
How to Maximize It: HIIT, which involves drills like sprints, lunges, and speed skaters with brief periods of rest in between, “keeps your engine revved after [exercising], so you burn more calories than a workout at a steady, moderate pace, ” says Yusuf Jeffers, a trainer at HIIT studio Tone House in New York City. But make sure you’re giving your body its deserved rest periods, says Jeffers. You can’t push yourself hard enough if you’re not recovering fully between rounds. “Plus, insufficient recovery results in overuse injuries and diminished results.” What’s the right amount of rest? Catch your breath for at least half as long as you just worked. A recent study in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research found that a 2:1 work to rest ratio is ideal. (Remember, even though they’re meant to be quick workouts, don’t go too fast. Here’s how to time ‘em right.)

RELATED: Try Our Heart-Rate-Based HIIT Workout, Inferno HR

[caption id="attachment_42265" align="alignnone" width="620"]VersaClimber Rise Nation Photo: Courtesy of Rise Nation[/caption]

The Workout: The VersaClimber 

The Burn: 1,000-plus calories per hour
How to Maximize It: You’ll never go back to that dusty StairMaster once you get the hang of this interval-based workout. The key to getting the most from the VersaClimber? Simply keeping up. Because you’re working your lower and upper body together into one climbing motion, expect to get fatigued fast. But even though you’ll feel tired, you’ll be building strength, endurance and coordination, according to Jason Walsh, founder of Rise Nation, an LA-based VersaClimber studio. “The act of climbing on a VersaClimber not only makes you strong, but also reinforces better moving patterns while working against gravity,” Walsh says. “The motions on the VersaClimber build a stronger core and back which gives you better posture and makes you a more deadly athlete.” Win, win.

[caption id="attachment_42172" align="alignnone" width="629"]Cardio Workouts Not Running Indoor Rowing Photo: Pond5[/caption]

The Workout: Indoor Rowing

The Burn: 578 calories per hour
How to Maximize It: Hop on an indoor rowing machine to work your entire body in ways you didn’t think were possible. Every stroke you take incorporates about 84 percent of your muscles, says Helaine Knapp, founder and CEO of CITYROW. And unlike running, it’s super-low-impact on your joints. But just as with running, proper form is essential. “The stroke can [feel] counterintuitive if you're new to rowing,” Knapp says. “Most of the power should come from your legs as you push back, hinging forward at your hips. Your arms move last, pulling in, and are also first to release as you return to starting position.” Sit up straight with your abs pulled in tight, and focus on your power — not speed. Pick up your pace and you’ll likely take short strokes that don’t work the full range of muscle and can put excess stress on your lower back, according to a study in the Journal of Sports Sciences. “The minute you prioritize speed over proper form, your stroke breaks down and you're cheating yourself out of the full benefits of the workout,” Knapp says.

[caption id="attachment_42171" align="alignnone" width="620"]Cardio Workouts Not Running Plyometrics Photo: Pond5[/caption]

The Workout: Plyometrics

The Burn: 550 calories per hour
How to Maximize It: See people cranking out jump squats, burpees, or box jumps at the gym? Those are all moves in what’s referred to as plyometrics, a method of metabolic conditioning reliant on explosive movements (think: hops, bounds and fast feet). The goal is to contract the maximum number of muscle fibers in the minimum amount of time. Plyometrics “‘trick’ your nervous into executing movements with maximum force very quickly,” says Jeffers. Channel the need for max force and quick feet by working out when you’re “fresh and ready-to-go, never tired or completing after another workout,” he warns. “Doing so trains your nervous center to react slower and weaker, which defeats the cumulative benefits of the workout.” Try doing these explosive moves on rubber flooring or grass; anything that’s too soft or too hard will diminish your power on each jump or push-off.

RELATED: 6 Plyometrics Exercises for a Shorter, More Intense Workout

All calorie counts are based on estimates from CalorieCount.com.

The post The 5 Best Cardio Workouts That Don’t Involve Running appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
non-running-cardio-workouts-featured

[caption id="attachment_42182" align="alignnone" width="620"]Cardio Workouts That Don't Involve Running Photo: Pond5[/caption] Sure, running is a great workout to have as a part of your cardio repertoire — it’s not only a great way to get fitter, but it improves your mental wellbeing, too. (Read one woman’s story about how running saved her life.) But it’s not right for everyone, and more importantly, running is not the only way to stay in shape. In fact, there are many different types of dynamic cardio workouts that give you a stellar calorie burn, while sculpting muscle at the same time. Try these five workouts on for size — but, instead of going through the motions, maximize your efforts with the expert-approved tips below. Can’t make the modifications just yet? No problem. Work your way up incrementally, and bookmark this page for when you’re ready to take your sessions to the next level. RELATED: Dread the Gym? Here’s What Might Motivate You

5 Killer Cardio Workouts — That Aren’t Running

[caption id="attachment_42169" align="alignnone" width="620"]Cardio Workouts Not Running Indoor Cycling Photo: Pond5[/caption]

The Workout: Indoor Cycling

The Burn: 714 calories per hour How to Maximize It: After setting up properly, boost your burn by “focus[ing] on pulling your pedals up behind you,” says Holly Rillinger, Master Instructor at Flywheel Sports. “Most times [when spinning] we are only pushing down with our quads, but when you’re clipped in [to a spin bike’s pedals], you have the advantage of using the full stroke.” Focusing on the upwards motion helps target your glutes and hamstrings, so you’ll increase burn more calories while sculpting your entire lower body, too. Rillinger also suggests adding more resistance during quick sprint sessions: “When you have momentum, you can handle more resistance than at the beginning of the sprint. It’ll raise your heart rate and blast more fat,” she says. And use your core to resist that urge to collapse onto the handlebars when you’re exhausted — your abs will thank you later. [caption id="attachment_42170" align="alignnone" width="620"]Cardio Workouts Not Running HIIT Photo: Pond5[/caption]

The Workout: High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT)

The Burn: 554 calories per hour How to Maximize It: HIIT, which involves drills like sprints, lunges, and speed skaters with brief periods of rest in between, “keeps your engine revved after [exercising], so you burn more calories than a workout at a steady, moderate pace, ” says Yusuf Jeffers, a trainer at HIIT studio Tone House in New York City. But make sure you’re giving your body its deserved rest periods, says Jeffers. You can’t push yourself hard enough if you’re not recovering fully between rounds. “Plus, insufficient recovery results in overuse injuries and diminished results.” What’s the right amount of rest? Catch your breath for at least half as long as you just worked. A recent study in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research found that a 2:1 work to rest ratio is ideal. (Remember, even though they’re meant to be quick workouts, don’t go too fast. Here’s how to time ‘em right.) RELATED: Try Our Heart-Rate-Based HIIT Workout, Inferno HR [caption id="attachment_42265" align="alignnone" width="620"]VersaClimber Rise Nation Photo: Courtesy of Rise Nation[/caption]

The Workout: The VersaClimber 

The Burn: 1,000-plus calories per hour How to Maximize It: You’ll never go back to that dusty StairMaster once you get the hang of this interval-based workout. The key to getting the most from the VersaClimber? Simply keeping up. Because you’re working your lower and upper body together into one climbing motion, expect to get fatigued fast. But even though you’ll feel tired, you’ll be building strength, endurance and coordination, according to Jason Walsh, founder of Rise Nation, an LA-based VersaClimber studio. “The act of climbing on a VersaClimber not only makes you strong, but also reinforces better moving patterns while working against gravity,” Walsh says. “The motions on the VersaClimber build a stronger core and back which gives you better posture and makes you a more deadly athlete.” Win, win. [caption id="attachment_42172" align="alignnone" width="629"]Cardio Workouts Not Running Indoor Rowing Photo: Pond5[/caption]

The Workout: Indoor Rowing

The Burn: 578 calories per hour How to Maximize It: Hop on an indoor rowing machine to work your entire body in ways you didn’t think were possible. Every stroke you take incorporates about 84 percent of your muscles, says Helaine Knapp, founder and CEO of CITYROW. And unlike running, it’s super-low-impact on your joints. But just as with running, proper form is essential. “The stroke can [feel] counterintuitive if you're new to rowing,” Knapp says. “Most of the power should come from your legs as you push back, hinging forward at your hips. Your arms move last, pulling in, and are also first to release as you return to starting position.” Sit up straight with your abs pulled in tight, and focus on your power — not speed. Pick up your pace and you’ll likely take short strokes that don’t work the full range of muscle and can put excess stress on your lower back, according to a study in the Journal of Sports Sciences. “The minute you prioritize speed over proper form, your stroke breaks down and you're cheating yourself out of the full benefits of the workout,” Knapp says. [caption id="attachment_42171" align="alignnone" width="620"]Cardio Workouts Not Running Plyometrics Photo: Pond5[/caption]

The Workout: Plyometrics

The Burn: 550 calories per hour How to Maximize It: See people cranking out jump squats, burpees, or box jumps at the gym? Those are all moves in what’s referred to as plyometrics, a method of metabolic conditioning reliant on explosive movements (think: hops, bounds and fast feet). The goal is to contract the maximum number of muscle fibers in the minimum amount of time. Plyometrics “‘trick’ your nervous into executing movements with maximum force very quickly,” says Jeffers. Channel the need for max force and quick feet by working out when you’re “fresh and ready-to-go, never tired or completing after another workout,” he warns. “Doing so trains your nervous center to react slower and weaker, which defeats the cumulative benefits of the workout.” Try doing these explosive moves on rubber flooring or grass; anything that’s too soft or too hard will diminish your power on each jump or push-off. RELATED: 6 Plyometrics Exercises for a Shorter, More Intense Workout All calorie counts are based on estimates from CalorieCount.com.

The post The 5 Best Cardio Workouts That Don’t Involve Running appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
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The 10 Most Incredible Hotel Gyms in the U.S. http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/best-hotel-gyms/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/best-hotel-gyms/#comments Tue, 04 Aug 2015 11:15:57 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=41981 hotel-gyms-featured

[caption id="attachment_42141" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 10 Most Incredible Hotel Gyms Photo: Courtesy of the EPIC Miami[/caption]

If the phrase “hotel gym” conjures up images of sad, dark spaces with a few dusty pieces of equipment, we’ve got some good news: that’s no longer the norm. Now you can find gorgeous, expansive spaces with top-of-the-line technology, creative new classes and alternative sporting experiences. So whether you’re on the road for work or for fun, go on and book a few days away at one of these 10 best hotels for fitness lovers (listed in no particular order). You may just end up going for the workouts alone.

RELATED: Work Out Anywhere With Your Free 30-Day DailyBurn Trial

10 Incredible Hotel Gyms

[caption id="attachment_42020" align="alignnone" width="620"]Hotel Gyms Four Seasons Hualalai Photo: Courtesy of the Four Seasons[/caption]

1. The Four Seasons Resort Hualalai

Where to Find It: The Big Island, Hawaii

Why We Love It: Experience the great outdoors while you get your cardio fix at this open-air gym featuring some of the best views of the Big Island. Boutique fitness nuts: There’s also plenty of group classes, too — including spinning, Pilates, barre fusion and Bikram yoga (we suggest grabbing an all-access pass for the duration of your stay). Oh, and did we mention the 24-foot outdoor climbing wall? An instructional clinic is required, but it’s well worth the views of the Kona-Kohala coast when you reach the top. Of course, your stay won’t be complete without some seriously epic, locally inspired pampering. Count us in for the Hualalai Island Stone massage and Polynesian Niu (coconut) scrub.

[caption id="attachment_42024" align="alignnone" width="620"]Hotel Gyms Fit W San Francisco Photo: Courtesy of W Hotels[/caption]

2. W San Francisco

Where to Find It: San Francisco, CA

Why We Love It: Guests at the W will feel like they walked into a metropolitan nightclub when they enter FIT Gym. The futuristic setting features color-changing light fixtures in the evening for a club-like atmosphere, while natural light streams in during the day from a dramatic skylight. Treadmills, bikes and other cardio machines are set up around the perimeter of the gym with modern furnishings (like a chaise to sprawl out on after a tough sprint) and a chic, self-serve juice bar in the center. Night owl? No problem. This tricked-out lounge is open 24-hours, so you can enjoy a late-night sweat session and healthy sips no matter what schedule you’re on.

[caption id="attachment_42125" align="alignnone" width="620"]Hotel Gyms Philadelphia Bellevue Hyatt Photo: Courtesy of Hyatt[/caption]

3. The Hyatt at the Bellevue

Where to Find It: Philadelphia, PA

Why We Love It: Just as The Hyatt at the Bellevue has been an iconic gem in Philly’s history, its adjacent fitness center, The Sporting Club, is a landmark, too. Measuring a whopping 93,000 sq. feet in size, the real draw is the full-sized, NBA-worthy basketball court, as well as the impeccable boxing facilities that’ll have you channeling your inner Rocky for a few minutes of glory. There’s also a running track (great for speedwork), racquetball and squash courts, and, of course, a slew of typical equipment, too. And should you have forgotten some of your gear — or just want to buy something new — there’s an on-site shop filled with tons of functional (and fashionable) options.

RELATED: How to Get the Most Out of Your PTO

[caption id="attachment_42021" align="alignnone" width="620"]Hotel Gyms The Houstonian Club & Spa Photo: Courtesy of the Houstonian[/caption]

4. The Houstonian

Where to Find It: Houston, TX

Why We Love It: The world-famous Houstonian Club & Spa is reason enough to travel to south Texas — even in the summer, when temperatures soar to daily averages over 90 degrees. The outdoor pool complies to the weather, chilled during the warmer months while heated in the winter. Indoors, you’ll find more than 300 pieces of cardio and strength training equipment, including ellipticals, recumbent bikes, step climbers, treadmills, rowers and free weights. And if you’re more of a group exerciser, never fear: There are over 200 fitness classes including Spinning, various forms of yoga, and Tai Chi, plus small, semi-private personal training sessions. Hot tip: Splurge an extra $50 per night to stay on the Concierge Floor, where you’ll then receive complimentary food, drinks and even cocktails throughout the day.

[caption id="attachment_42124" align="alignnone" width="620"]Hotel Gyms Las Vegas Canyon Ranch Palazzo Hotel Photo: Courtesy of Canyon Ranch[/caption]

5. The Palazzo Hotel and Resort

Where to Find It: Las Vegas, NV

Why We Love It: Take a break from the crazy, bustling Strip and try on this 40-foot rock climbing wall for size, located in the Palazzo. (Guests at The Venetian Hotel have access to as well — the two are sister properties.) And like the other Canyon Ranch locations, this outpost — despite being a day spa — can grant your every wellness wish. Think: healing thermal cabins, custom-concocted baths or one of 3,000 — yes, 3,000! — pieces of cardio equipment, all which have their own TV screens and pre-sanitized headphones. If you’re unsure of where to start, get a fitness assessment from an exercise physiologist who will tailor a program to meet your specific needs. Tough weekend warriors will appreciate the club’s Kinesis studio class, designed to improve balance, flexibility and stability with resistance moves using grips, cables and weights. And if you’re looking to up your spin game, take an indoor cycling class with RealRyder bikes, which lean from side to side just like a road bike does.

[caption id="attachment_42123" align="alignnone" width="620"]Exhale Spa Epic Miami Gym Photo: Courtesy of the EPIC Miami[/caption]

6. The EPIC Miami

Where to Find It: Miami, FL

Why We Love It: Despite being in the business-centric Downtown district, the EPIC has all the style of South Beach without the crowds. The gym — an Exhale spa outpost — boasts top-notch workouts with some of the best city views straight from the barre floor — not to mention some of the nicest instructors and best customer service in Miami. Located on a pool terrace off of the hotel’s sixteenth floor, this Exhale has the entire club’s signature classes for your endorphin-releasing pleasure, including Core Fusion Extreme, barre and Vinyasa Flow Fusion class. (And those top-notch facials and massages that Exhale is known for? Yup, available there too.)

RELATED: 5 Easy Tips for Healthy Travel

[caption id="attachment_42040" align="alignnone" width="620"]Hotel Gyms Park Hyatt New York Photo: Courtesy of Hyatt[/caption]

 7. The Park Hyatt New York

Where to Find It: New York City

Why We Love It: Whether you’re training for a tri or just want to unwind after a whirlwind day in Manhattan, this sun-drenched pool on the twenty-fifth story of the iconic Park Hyatt is an absolute must-see — in fact, it's our favorite swim on this list. Underwater speakers play a curated Carnegie Hall soundtrack, courtesy of the world-famous concert hall that happens to also be across the street, so be sure to catch a performance while you’re in town. If details like that don’t have you sold, make sure to check out the hotel’s 1,845 square foot state-of-the-art fitness center that overlooks the pool. Once in your guest room, unwind from New York’s busy streets with your heated floors plus dual, spa-style showerheads. Treat yourself in the morning by ordering room service: We recommend the foie gras served with mushroom and boiled egg.

[caption id="attachment_42019" align="alignnone" width="620"]Hotel Gym Fairmont Princess Aerial Yoga Photo: Courtesy of Fairmont Hotels[/caption]

8. The Fairmont Scottsdale Princess

Where to Find It: Scottsdale, AZ

Why We Love It: You’ll feel immersed in Southwestern culture upon arriving at this Hacienda-style wellness wonderland, which houses both its spa and its fitness center. Here, you’ll find trendy, innovative fitness classes like Aerial Hammock Yoga, in addition to Pilates, Spinning, body sculpting, Zumba and TRX, all regularly featured on the schedule. The space, which features Spanish Colonial touches like open plazas with fountains, also offers spa treatments with ingredients derived from the local environment. Try the Sedona Clay Mud Mask for its purifying properties and Desert Salt Scrub to reveal smooth, glowing skin. As if your post-workout glow needed it, anyway.

[caption id="attachment_42122" align="alignnone" width="620"]Hotel Gyms Boston Ritz Carlton Equinox Photo: Courtesy of Ritz Carlton[/caption]

9. The Ritz-Carlton Boston Common

Where to Find It: Boston, MA

Why We Love It: New York- and L.A.-based business travelers flock to the centrally located Ritz, which is adjacent to (and provides its guests access to) a sun-lit, sleek Equinox health club. Like its other branches, the Boston location of the high-end chain comes with with all its signature create comforts: an amazing, varied class schedule, an impeccable, modern aesthetic and those insanely refreshing eucalyptus towels. It’s also got a basketball court, an indoor, 25-yard lap pool and four squash courts. But the best part, perhaps, is heading over there at sunset to catch epic views of the Commons from a treadmill or stair climber. Then, grab a favorite book and chill on the outdoor patio — it’s almost always empty, even during the warmer months, and makes for a great hang-out spot.

RELATED: 6 Ways to Sleep Better on the Road and Eliminate Jet Lag

[caption id="attachment_42132" align="alignnone" width="620"]Hotel Gyms Los Angeles Athletic Club Pool Photo: Courtesy of the Los Angeles Athletic Club[/caption]

10. The Los Angeles Athletic Club

Where to Find It: Los Angeles, CA

The Best Feature: Yup, you read that right — the hotel itself is just one part of the state-of-the-art gym located in newly revitalized Downtown LA. Sports and fitness junkies should give this 100-plus year old athletic club, which is currently undergoing a multi-million dollar renovation, a spot on their travel bucket lists. Channel your inner LeBron James or Kerri Walsh-Jennings at the facility’s full basketball court (with an indoor track circling it), volleyball courts, squash courts, handball and racquetball courts, not to mention a pool Michael Phelps would kill to do a few laps in. Boutique fitness addicts will appreciate the wide variety of boot camp, dance and Pilates classes available. And if you need a little TLC or recovery work, meet with one of the on-site physical therapists for a form check, soft-tissue massage or a total-body refresh.

The post The 10 Most Incredible Hotel Gyms in the U.S. appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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hotel-gyms-featured

[caption id="attachment_42141" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 10 Most Incredible Hotel Gyms Photo: Courtesy of the EPIC Miami[/caption] If the phrase “hotel gym” conjures up images of sad, dark spaces with a few dusty pieces of equipment, we’ve got some good news: that’s no longer the norm. Now you can find gorgeous, expansive spaces with top-of-the-line technology, creative new classes and alternative sporting experiences. So whether you’re on the road for work or for fun, go on and book a few days away at one of these 10 best hotels for fitness lovers (listed in no particular order). You may just end up going for the workouts alone. RELATED: Work Out Anywhere With Your Free 30-Day DailyBurn Trial

10 Incredible Hotel Gyms

[caption id="attachment_42020" align="alignnone" width="620"]Hotel Gyms Four Seasons Hualalai Photo: Courtesy of the Four Seasons[/caption] 1. The Four Seasons Resort Hualalai Where to Find It: The Big Island, Hawaii Why We Love It: Experience the great outdoors while you get your cardio fix at this open-air gym featuring some of the best views of the Big Island. Boutique fitness nuts: There’s also plenty of group classes, too — including spinning, Pilates, barre fusion and Bikram yoga (we suggest grabbing an all-access pass for the duration of your stay). Oh, and did we mention the 24-foot outdoor climbing wall? An instructional clinic is required, but it’s well worth the views of the Kona-Kohala coast when you reach the top. Of course, your stay won’t be complete without some seriously epic, locally inspired pampering. Count us in for the Hualalai Island Stone massage and Polynesian Niu (coconut) scrub. [caption id="attachment_42024" align="alignnone" width="620"]Hotel Gyms Fit W San Francisco Photo: Courtesy of W Hotels[/caption] 2. W San Francisco Where to Find It: San Francisco, CA Why We Love It: Guests at the W will feel like they walked into a metropolitan nightclub when they enter FIT Gym. The futuristic setting features color-changing light fixtures in the evening for a club-like atmosphere, while natural light streams in during the day from a dramatic skylight. Treadmills, bikes and other cardio machines are set up around the perimeter of the gym with modern furnishings (like a chaise to sprawl out on after a tough sprint) and a chic, self-serve juice bar in the center. Night owl? No problem. This tricked-out lounge is open 24-hours, so you can enjoy a late-night sweat session and healthy sips no matter what schedule you’re on. [caption id="attachment_42125" align="alignnone" width="620"]Hotel Gyms Philadelphia Bellevue Hyatt Photo: Courtesy of Hyatt[/caption] 3. The Hyatt at the Bellevue Where to Find It: Philadelphia, PA Why We Love It: Just as The Hyatt at the Bellevue has been an iconic gem in Philly’s history, its adjacent fitness center, The Sporting Club, is a landmark, too. Measuring a whopping 93,000 sq. feet in size, the real draw is the full-sized, NBA-worthy basketball court, as well as the impeccable boxing facilities that’ll have you channeling your inner Rocky for a few minutes of glory. There’s also a running track (great for speedwork), racquetball and squash courts, and, of course, a slew of typical equipment, too. And should you have forgotten some of your gear — or just want to buy something new — there’s an on-site shop filled with tons of functional (and fashionable) options. RELATED: How to Get the Most Out of Your PTO [caption id="attachment_42021" align="alignnone" width="620"]Hotel Gyms The Houstonian Club & Spa Photo: Courtesy of the Houstonian[/caption] 4. The Houstonian Where to Find It: Houston, TX Why We Love It: The world-famous Houstonian Club & Spa is reason enough to travel to south Texas — even in the summer, when temperatures soar to daily averages over 90 degrees. The outdoor pool complies to the weather, chilled during the warmer months while heated in the winter. Indoors, you’ll find more than 300 pieces of cardio and strength training equipment, including ellipticals, recumbent bikes, step climbers, treadmills, rowers and free weights. And if you’re more of a group exerciser, never fear: There are over 200 fitness classes including Spinning, various forms of yoga, and Tai Chi, plus small, semi-private personal training sessions. Hot tip: Splurge an extra $50 per night to stay on the Concierge Floor, where you’ll then receive complimentary food, drinks and even cocktails throughout the day. [caption id="attachment_42124" align="alignnone" width="620"]Hotel Gyms Las Vegas Canyon Ranch Palazzo Hotel Photo: Courtesy of Canyon Ranch[/caption] 5. The Palazzo Hotel and Resort Where to Find It: Las Vegas, NV Why We Love It: Take a break from the crazy, bustling Strip and try on this 40-foot rock climbing wall for size, located in the Palazzo. (Guests at The Venetian Hotel have access to as well — the two are sister properties.) And like the other Canyon Ranch locations, this outpost — despite being a day spa — can grant your every wellness wish. Think: healing thermal cabins, custom-concocted baths or one of 3,000 — yes, 3,000! — pieces of cardio equipment, all which have their own TV screens and pre-sanitized headphones. If you’re unsure of where to start, get a fitness assessment from an exercise physiologist who will tailor a program to meet your specific needs. Tough weekend warriors will appreciate the club’s Kinesis studio class, designed to improve balance, flexibility and stability with resistance moves using grips, cables and weights. And if you’re looking to up your spin game, take an indoor cycling class with RealRyder bikes, which lean from side to side just like a road bike does. [caption id="attachment_42123" align="alignnone" width="620"]Exhale Spa Epic Miami Gym Photo: Courtesy of the EPIC Miami[/caption] 6. The EPIC Miami Where to Find It: Miami, FL Why We Love It: Despite being in the business-centric Downtown district, the EPIC has all the style of South Beach without the crowds. The gym — an Exhale spa outpost — boasts top-notch workouts with some of the best city views straight from the barre floor — not to mention some of the nicest instructors and best customer service in Miami. Located on a pool terrace off of the hotel’s sixteenth floor, this Exhale has the entire club’s signature classes for your endorphin-releasing pleasure, including Core Fusion Extreme, barre and Vinyasa Flow Fusion class. (And those top-notch facials and massages that Exhale is known for? Yup, available there too.) RELATED: 5 Easy Tips for Healthy Travel [caption id="attachment_42040" align="alignnone" width="620"]Hotel Gyms Park Hyatt New York Photo: Courtesy of Hyatt[/caption]  7. The Park Hyatt New York Where to Find It: New York City Why We Love It: Whether you’re training for a tri or just want to unwind after a whirlwind day in Manhattan, this sun-drenched pool on the twenty-fifth story of the iconic Park Hyatt is an absolute must-see — in fact, it's our favorite swim on this list. Underwater speakers play a curated Carnegie Hall soundtrack, courtesy of the world-famous concert hall that happens to also be across the street, so be sure to catch a performance while you’re in town. If details like that don’t have you sold, make sure to check out the hotel’s 1,845 square foot state-of-the-art fitness center that overlooks the pool. Once in your guest room, unwind from New York’s busy streets with your heated floors plus dual, spa-style showerheads. Treat yourself in the morning by ordering room service: We recommend the foie gras served with mushroom and boiled egg. [caption id="attachment_42019" align="alignnone" width="620"]Hotel Gym Fairmont Princess Aerial Yoga Photo: Courtesy of Fairmont Hotels[/caption] 8. The Fairmont Scottsdale Princess Where to Find It: Scottsdale, AZ Why We Love It: You’ll feel immersed in Southwestern culture upon arriving at this Hacienda-style wellness wonderland, which houses both its spa and its fitness center. Here, you’ll find trendy, innovative fitness classes like Aerial Hammock Yoga, in addition to Pilates, Spinning, body sculpting, Zumba and TRX, all regularly featured on the schedule. The space, which features Spanish Colonial touches like open plazas with fountains, also offers spa treatments with ingredients derived from the local environment. Try the Sedona Clay Mud Mask for its purifying properties and Desert Salt Scrub to reveal smooth, glowing skin. As if your post-workout glow needed it, anyway. [caption id="attachment_42122" align="alignnone" width="620"]Hotel Gyms Boston Ritz Carlton Equinox Photo: Courtesy of Ritz Carlton[/caption] 9. The Ritz-Carlton Boston Common Where to Find It: Boston, MA Why We Love It: New York- and L.A.-based business travelers flock to the centrally located Ritz, which is adjacent to (and provides its guests access to) a sun-lit, sleek Equinox health club. Like its other branches, the Boston location of the high-end chain comes with with all its signature create comforts: an amazing, varied class schedule, an impeccable, modern aesthetic and those insanely refreshing eucalyptus towels. It’s also got a basketball court, an indoor, 25-yard lap pool and four squash courts. But the best part, perhaps, is heading over there at sunset to catch epic views of the Commons from a treadmill or stair climber. Then, grab a favorite book and chill on the outdoor patio — it’s almost always empty, even during the warmer months, and makes for a great hang-out spot. RELATED: 6 Ways to Sleep Better on the Road and Eliminate Jet Lag [caption id="attachment_42132" align="alignnone" width="620"]Hotel Gyms Los Angeles Athletic Club Pool Photo: Courtesy of the Los Angeles Athletic Club[/caption] 10. The Los Angeles Athletic Club Where to Find It: Los Angeles, CA The Best Feature: Yup, you read that right — the hotel itself is just one part of the state-of-the-art gym located in newly revitalized Downtown LA. Sports and fitness junkies should give this 100-plus year old athletic club, which is currently undergoing a multi-million dollar renovation, a spot on their travel bucket lists. Channel your inner LeBron James or Kerri Walsh-Jennings at the facility’s full basketball court (with an indoor track circling it), volleyball courts, squash courts, handball and racquetball courts, not to mention a pool Michael Phelps would kill to do a few laps in. Boutique fitness addicts will appreciate the wide variety of boot camp, dance and Pilates classes available. And if you need a little TLC or recovery work, meet with one of the on-site physical therapists for a form check, soft-tissue massage or a total-body refresh.

The post The 10 Most Incredible Hotel Gyms in the U.S. appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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4 Workouts to Get You in Surfing Shape http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/summer-surfing-workouts/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/summer-surfing-workouts/#comments Sun, 02 Aug 2015 13:15:44 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=28764 Surfing Workouts

[caption id="attachment_42126" align="alignnone" width="620"]4 Surfing-Inspired Workouts You Need to Try Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Admit it — you’ve dreamt of trading in your day job for the beach, spending your days as a chillaxed surf bum or babe playing in the waves. But while surfers appear low-key, their sport is anything but a laid-back affair. It’s a physically demanding activity that requires training in order to perform well.

RELATED: Bethany Hamilton: Soul Surfer and Inspiration

The Science of Surfing

Recent studies conducted at Auckland University of Technology in New Zealand found that surfing requires a high-level of aerobic endurance as well as muscular power. Researchers followed 12 competitive surfers and learned that they spent the majority of their water time engaged in low-intensity paddling (54 percent). The remainder of their time was spent maintaining position in the water, high-intensity bouts of all-out paddling to catch a wave, riding a wave and post-ride recovery.

According to Adam Rosante, ISSA Certified Fitness Trainer, celebrity trainer, wellness expert and surfer, to perform well in the water, surfers need three things — endurance, power and core balance. But here’s the tricky part: “Training for surfing is different to other sports being as we train on land to perform in the water,” says Wes Berg, pro surf trainer and professional Ironman triathlete. That means that our dry land workouts must be designed to translate to movements in the water.

So you want to be a surfer or maybe just look the part? Luckily, surf-specific training programs are more popular than ever. Not only will these tools, apps and workouts get you ready to ride the waves, they will help your body perform better in real-life situations and improve your coordination, strength and endurance.

RELATED: 10 Amazing Summer and Fall Wellness Retreats

[caption id="attachment_42111" align="alignnone" width="620"]Joel Parkinson Pro Surf Training App Photo: Courtesy of Pro Surf Training[/caption]

1. Pro Surf Training App

If you want to be a better surfer, try training like a World Champion. Joel Parkinson, 2012 ASP World Champ and currently in the number three spot on the World Tour, and his long-time trainer Berg have created the Pro Surf Training App, available for iPhone and Android devices. The workouts are based on Parkinson’s actual training program for the 10 unique stops on the ASP World Tour, each requiring a different fitness level depending on the location and types of waves. The duo took these regimens and combined them into 30 different programs with over 150 surf-specific exercises. Some of the moves include cable reverse wood chops, medicine ball slams and tosses, and squats while standing on a stability ball.

Their goal was to create an app that would make surfers of all levels and abilities fitter and stronger. The result? Workouts that prepare you for different wave types, from big barreling waves to waves that offer uber-long rides, while improving agility, power and functionality. “All the movements we do in the gym are done the same way as you would on the board so each exercise easily transfers to performance in the water,” says Berg.

Using everything from free weights, to exercise balls, to bodyweight exercises, the workouts include a lot of cross-pattern exercises, where your arms and/or legs cross from one side of the body to the other, to help surfers maintain their flexibility, range of motion and coordination — areas that surfers often neglect in their training. For example, Parkinson replicates many of his signatures turns, from huge powerful turns at the bottom of a wave to elegant, sweeping ones that almost look like a figure-eight, using a cable cross-over machine. The 40-minute to 1-hour workouts include a balance of cardio and strength training with high-intensity sessions that build core strength, leg power and balance without creating extra bulk.

RELATED: 11 Health Gadgets Experts Wish You'd Use

[caption id="attachment_42112" align="alignnone" width="620"]WaveShape Surfing App Adam Rosante Photo Courtesy of WaveShape[/caption]

2. WaveShape

When his pro surfer friends asked him to create a workout to improve performance in the ocean, Rosante was more than happy to help. In 2013, he developed WaveShape, a free online 45-minute high-intensity, full-body workout, in collaboration with the Calavera Surf Team. Surfing involves movement in multiple dimensions — front and back, side-to-side, and pivoting — and the program is designed to boost functional strength and endurance to execute these actions. While he expected maybe 300 people to sign-up, a few thousand joined in on the workouts from around the world. Now, he’s gearing up to launch WaveShape 2.0.

Rosante developed 12 brand new workouts that fall into one of three categories — endurance, power and core balance. The program is organized as a four-week challenge; the routines get progressively harder as the weeks go on. The “endurance” workouts involve bodyweight exercises performed for 30-second intervals followed by a short rest period. Think HIIT with squat jumps and surfies — a pop-up/burpee hybrid. The “power” workouts include moves like a cross-body clean and press and the paddle out, which simulates a paddling motion using a dumbbell and while holding a push-up position. These exercises help develop arm and leg strength you need to get out in the waves. The “core balance” workouts hit every single muscle in your abs, not only to help you better balance on the board but to generate explosive turns in the water. Sample moves include butterfly sit-ups and bird-dogs.

Bonus: The workouts are fast and efficient. All workouts range in length from seven minutes to 20 minutes.

RELATED: Why Your Fitness Tracker Isn't Making You Thinner — Yet

[caption id="attachment_42113" align="alignnone" width="620"]Surfing Workout Yoga Indo Board Photo Courtesy Indo Board[/caption]

3. Indo Board

Take a wooden board, a foam roller-like tube and two inflatable air cushions and you can recreate the feeling of surfing but on land. That’s what Hunter Joslin did when he made his first Indo Board. Now, it’s a versatile cross-training tool favored by professional surfers including Courtney Conlogue, currently in the number eight spot on the Women’s World Tour. The board lets you perform exercises “that are beneficial to the types of movements that we are doing in surfing” over and over again, says Joslin.

The most important movement patterns for surfers to work on, according to Joslin, are core stabilization and torso rotation, particularly for advanced surfers who are performing moves like a carving 360 turn. Performing standard exercises like squats, lunges and planks on the Indo Board forces you to work harder than you would on solid ground. To maintain balance, you must “incorporate the stabilizers in the ankles and knees, which are rarely engaged in traditional training forms,” says Joslin.

If stand-up paddleboard yoga is more your thing, you can work on your skills with the Indo Yoga Board. Compared to the traditional Indo Board, the Yoga Board has a longer wooden deck or platform as well as an added rocker on the bottom, like you’d find on a rocking chair, to create side-to-side instability. It will challenge even the most experienced water-born yogi.

RELATED: 5 Sun Safety Apps for Monitoring UV Index

[caption id="attachment_42118" align="alignnone" width="620"]SURFSet FItness Surfing Workout Photo Courtesy of SURFSET Fitness[/caption]

4. SURFSET Fitness

If you can’t surf on a regular basis, why not create a machine that lets you surf on land? That’s what Mike Hartwick and Bill Ninteau did, two of the brains behind SURFSET Fitness. Essentially, they placed a surfboard on top of inflatable stability disks. Now, SURFSET classes are available in 200 locations across seven countries.

SURFSET is a full body workout that mimics the mechanics required for surfing. The classes allow you to practice these movement patterns on a replica of a surfboard so they become ingrained into your muscle memory. The desired result? When you pop-up on your real board, your body will remember what to do. “The instability of the board means that you’re constantly engaging your core, and everything stems from there,” says Ninteau, including your proprioception or your body’s awareness of itself in space.

With summery tunes and surf movies projected on the studio wall, SURFSET transports you to the beach while you work through plyometrics and high-intensity intervals or challenge your core with Pilates and yoga-inspired moves. SURFSET is in the process of rolling out innovative programming updates to further challenge participants and make them more fit.

These workouts will prepare you for the physical demands of surfing. Now all you have to do is watch the surf report and hit the beach!

originally published June 2014. Updated August 2015. 

The post 4 Workouts to Get You in Surfing Shape appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
Surfing Workouts

[caption id="attachment_42126" align="alignnone" width="620"]4 Surfing-Inspired Workouts You Need to Try Photo: Pond5[/caption] Admit it — you’ve dreamt of trading in your day job for the beach, spending your days as a chillaxed surf bum or babe playing in the waves. But while surfers appear low-key, their sport is anything but a laid-back affair. It’s a physically demanding activity that requires training in order to perform well. RELATED: Bethany Hamilton: Soul Surfer and Inspiration

The Science of Surfing

Recent studies conducted at Auckland University of Technology in New Zealand found that surfing requires a high-level of aerobic endurance as well as muscular power. Researchers followed 12 competitive surfers and learned that they spent the majority of their water time engaged in low-intensity paddling (54 percent). The remainder of their time was spent maintaining position in the water, high-intensity bouts of all-out paddling to catch a wave, riding a wave and post-ride recovery. According to Adam Rosante, ISSA Certified Fitness Trainer, celebrity trainer, wellness expert and surfer, to perform well in the water, surfers need three things — endurance, power and core balance. But here’s the tricky part: “Training for surfing is different to other sports being as we train on land to perform in the water,” says Wes Berg, pro surf trainer and professional Ironman triathlete. That means that our dry land workouts must be designed to translate to movements in the water. So you want to be a surfer or maybe just look the part? Luckily, surf-specific training programs are more popular than ever. Not only will these tools, apps and workouts get you ready to ride the waves, they will help your body perform better in real-life situations and improve your coordination, strength and endurance. RELATED: 10 Amazing Summer and Fall Wellness Retreats [caption id="attachment_42111" align="alignnone" width="620"]Joel Parkinson Pro Surf Training App Photo: Courtesy of Pro Surf Training[/caption]

1. Pro Surf Training App

If you want to be a better surfer, try training like a World Champion. Joel Parkinson, 2012 ASP World Champ and currently in the number three spot on the World Tour, and his long-time trainer Berg have created the Pro Surf Training App, available for iPhone and Android devices. The workouts are based on Parkinson’s actual training program for the 10 unique stops on the ASP World Tour, each requiring a different fitness level depending on the location and types of waves. The duo took these regimens and combined them into 30 different programs with over 150 surf-specific exercises. Some of the moves include cable reverse wood chops, medicine ball slams and tosses, and squats while standing on a stability ball. Their goal was to create an app that would make surfers of all levels and abilities fitter and stronger. The result? Workouts that prepare you for different wave types, from big barreling waves to waves that offer uber-long rides, while improving agility, power and functionality. “All the movements we do in the gym are done the same way as you would on the board so each exercise easily transfers to performance in the water,” says Berg. Using everything from free weights, to exercise balls, to bodyweight exercises, the workouts include a lot of cross-pattern exercises, where your arms and/or legs cross from one side of the body to the other, to help surfers maintain their flexibility, range of motion and coordination — areas that surfers often neglect in their training. For example, Parkinson replicates many of his signatures turns, from huge powerful turns at the bottom of a wave to elegant, sweeping ones that almost look like a figure-eight, using a cable cross-over machine. The 40-minute to 1-hour workouts include a balance of cardio and strength training with high-intensity sessions that build core strength, leg power and balance without creating extra bulk. RELATED: 11 Health Gadgets Experts Wish You'd Use [caption id="attachment_42112" align="alignnone" width="620"]WaveShape Surfing App Adam Rosante Photo Courtesy of WaveShape[/caption]

2. WaveShape

When his pro surfer friends asked him to create a workout to improve performance in the ocean, Rosante was more than happy to help. In 2013, he developed WaveShape, a free online 45-minute high-intensity, full-body workout, in collaboration with the Calavera Surf Team. Surfing involves movement in multiple dimensions — front and back, side-to-side, and pivoting — and the program is designed to boost functional strength and endurance to execute these actions. While he expected maybe 300 people to sign-up, a few thousand joined in on the workouts from around the world. Now, he’s gearing up to launch WaveShape 2.0. Rosante developed 12 brand new workouts that fall into one of three categories — endurance, power and core balance. The program is organized as a four-week challenge; the routines get progressively harder as the weeks go on. The “endurance” workouts involve bodyweight exercises performed for 30-second intervals followed by a short rest period. Think HIIT with squat jumps and surfies — a pop-up/burpee hybrid. The “power” workouts include moves like a cross-body clean and press and the paddle out, which simulates a paddling motion using a dumbbell and while holding a push-up position. These exercises help develop arm and leg strength you need to get out in the waves. The “core balance” workouts hit every single muscle in your abs, not only to help you better balance on the board but to generate explosive turns in the water. Sample moves include butterfly sit-ups and bird-dogs. Bonus: The workouts are fast and efficient. All workouts range in length from seven minutes to 20 minutes. RELATED: Why Your Fitness Tracker Isn't Making You Thinner — Yet [caption id="attachment_42113" align="alignnone" width="620"]Surfing Workout Yoga Indo Board Photo Courtesy Indo Board[/caption]

3. Indo Board

Take a wooden board, a foam roller-like tube and two inflatable air cushions and you can recreate the feeling of surfing but on land. That’s what Hunter Joslin did when he made his first Indo Board. Now, it’s a versatile cross-training tool favored by professional surfers including Courtney Conlogue, currently in the number eight spot on the Women’s World Tour. The board lets you perform exercises “that are beneficial to the types of movements that we are doing in surfing” over and over again, says Joslin. The most important movement patterns for surfers to work on, according to Joslin, are core stabilization and torso rotation, particularly for advanced surfers who are performing moves like a carving 360 turn. Performing standard exercises like squats, lunges and planks on the Indo Board forces you to work harder than you would on solid ground. To maintain balance, you must “incorporate the stabilizers in the ankles and knees, which are rarely engaged in traditional training forms,” says Joslin. If stand-up paddleboard yoga is more your thing, you can work on your skills with the Indo Yoga Board. Compared to the traditional Indo Board, the Yoga Board has a longer wooden deck or platform as well as an added rocker on the bottom, like you’d find on a rocking chair, to create side-to-side instability. It will challenge even the most experienced water-born yogi. RELATED: 5 Sun Safety Apps for Monitoring UV Index [caption id="attachment_42118" align="alignnone" width="620"]SURFSet FItness Surfing Workout Photo Courtesy of SURFSET Fitness[/caption]

4. SURFSET Fitness

If you can’t surf on a regular basis, why not create a machine that lets you surf on land? That’s what Mike Hartwick and Bill Ninteau did, two of the brains behind SURFSET Fitness. Essentially, they placed a surfboard on top of inflatable stability disks. Now, SURFSET classes are available in 200 locations across seven countries. SURFSET is a full body workout that mimics the mechanics required for surfing. The classes allow you to practice these movement patterns on a replica of a surfboard so they become ingrained into your muscle memory. The desired result? When you pop-up on your real board, your body will remember what to do. “The instability of the board means that you’re constantly engaging your core, and everything stems from there,” says Ninteau, including your proprioception or your body’s awareness of itself in space. With summery tunes and surf movies projected on the studio wall, SURFSET transports you to the beach while you work through plyometrics and high-intensity intervals or challenge your core with Pilates and yoga-inspired moves. SURFSET is in the process of rolling out innovative programming updates to further challenge participants and make them more fit. These workouts will prepare you for the physical demands of surfing. Now all you have to do is watch the surf report and hit the beach! originally published June 2014. Updated August 2015. 

The post 4 Workouts to Get You in Surfing Shape appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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8 Beginner Swimming Mistakes (And How to Fix Them) http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/how-to-swim-beginner-swimming-mistakes/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/how-to-swim-beginner-swimming-mistakes/#comments Wed, 29 Jul 2015 11:15:53 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=41930 Beginner Swimming Mistakes

[caption id="attachment_41933" align="alignnone" width="620"]8 Beginner Swimming Mistakes and How to Swim Like a Pro Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Heading to the pool might not be the first thing that comes to mind when it’s time to shape up — but it should be. Not only could you burn upwards of 400 calories in an hour, but you’ll also stoke your metabolism and firm up your entire body without putting tons of stress on your joints (or melting into a puddle of sweat). To reap the head-to-toe benefits, though, you’ll need to know proper form and technique. Whether you’re a total beginner or are looking to brush up on your skills, there are a few common swimming mistakes we’re all guilty of. Put these pros’ tips into practice and soon you’ll be swimming laps with the best of ‘em.

RELATED: 6 Tips to Improve Your Swimming Right Now

8 Beginner Swimming Mistakes (and How to Swim Like a Pro!)

Mistake #1: You hold your breath.
“When we’re little or first learning how to swim, a lot of us are taught to take a deep breath, hold it, and put our faces in the water,” says Scott Bay, coaches committee chair for U.S. Masters Swimming and an ASCA Level 5 certified Masters swim coach. “But you’re burning oxygen for fuel when you do that.” Think about it — if you’re out running a 5K, are you going to hold your breath and run? No, because it deprives your muscles of much-needed oxygen.

How to fix it: First, practice on dry land. Take a deep breath in through your mouth and start to slowly exhale through your nose. As you do, hum, suggests Bay. “If you hum while you breathe out of your nose, it’ll help you maintain a proper pace — you’re forced to do it slowly rather than rush through it,” he says. The next step: breathing in the water. After you take your breath and have your face in the water, work on slowly exhaling — again, through your nose — and then lift your face out of the water when it’s naturally time to do so.

Mistake #2: You take your head out of the water to breathe.
We know, it sounds counterintuitive. How are you supposed to actually breathe if you don’t lift your head out of the water? Let us clarify: It’s more about keeping your head in the water, while lifting your face out. If you pop your head up each time you need to take a breath, you throw your body’s alignment out of whack. Often that’ll mean forcing your hips lower into the water, which is the opposite of what you want, making your straight swim more of a zig-zag, says Linsey Corbin, CLIF triathlete and five-time Ironman champion.

How to fix it: Focus on keeping your head down, with the chin tucked into your neck, says Corbin. When it’s time to breathe, take a breath of air to the same side as the arm that is out of the water, keeping your head in the water (visualize rotating your head just enough so that your mouth is clear for air, but that’s it).

RELATED: 3 Swimming Workouts for Every Skill Level

[caption id="attachment_29753" align="alignnone" width="620"]Swimming for Beginners - How to Fix Your Form Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Mistake #3: You let your hips sink.
Doing this creates more drag in the water. And more drag equals more resistance, which ultimately slows you down. Corbin says the goal is to “stay flat and float on top of the water,” rather than dropping in it. Too often beginners default to movements that force their hips down, like letting their feet sink when they should be just below the water’s surface, thus forcing their body to work even harder to get from point A to point B.

How to fix it: Invest in a swim snorkel (or grab the one you packed for your last Caribbean adventure), suggests Corbin. “Putting on a snorkel allows you to not have to focus on breathing to the sides,” she says. “Instead you can focus on your arms pulling through the water, your breath being released at a steady pace, and keeping your hips as high up as you can.” Use it in practice a few times a week to hone in on your form before worrying about more advanced work, like increasing pace and speed drills.

Mistake #4: You keep your hips straight.
Another common hip problem: Not rotating them. Many swimmers rely on their upper body, or just their legs, to propel them through the water. But the majority of your power comes from the hips because they control both the upper and lower body, so depriving yourself of that movement will slow down your momentum, says Corbin.

How to fix it: “Start off with visualization. Imagine opening your belly button to the walls of the pool with each stroke, and think about rotating with your core muscles,” suggests Corbin. “Utilizing your core is going to rotate your trunk and help push you through the water faster.”

RELATED: Hate Crunches? 6 Better Core Exercises for Beginners

To practice getting into the habit, Corbin suggests kicking on your side, belly button toward the wall, with your bottom arm extended overhead, so your head rests on that arm. Do that for one lap, then switch sides. The movement will help you become familiar with how your hips feel when they’re in full rotation, which will in turn help you identify when to start rotating back the other way. For more of a challenge, hold the side position for a few seconds between every stroke, alternating back and forth all the way down the length of the pool. 

Mistake #5: You point your toes.
Bay says this is a common mistake, as it’s easy to forget about the little guys at the end of your foot. But they play a big role in determining your speed and direction, he says, and pointing them straight out, so that they’re fully flexed, “is like kicking and not going anywhere because it tightens up your ankles.” Swimmers actually want loose, flexible ankles in the water to help quicken their pace.

How to fix it: Practice curling your toes, as if you were trying to pick up a penny off of the floor, says Bay. “It keeps the ankles loose while putting your foot in the right direction.” It’s even a good practice outside of the pool — when you have some time to relax in the living room, put a pile of pennies on the floor next to a small bowl and practice transferring the pennies to the bowl with your toes to get more familiar with how your toes feel when curled.

“Swimming short and fast enforces better form than swimming long and slow.”

Mistake #6: You rely too much on your upper body.
“Keep in mind that swimming utilizes your whole body,” says Corbin. “Most people make the mistake of believing it’s just a workout for your upper body.” But when you depend on your shoulders, arms and lats to do all the work, not only will you exhaust those muscles faster than you want, you’ll risk not completing a full stroke properly — meaning you won’t slice through the water as quickly.

How to fix it: “Try to keep an even balance across your upper body, core and lower body throughout your workout, rather than over-compensating in one of those areas,” says Corbin. “Use your arms for pulling your body through the water, your core to rotate in the water, and your legs for the kick, which provides forward momentum.” If you find yourself weak in one area — say, the lower body — practice doing kick drills using a kick board a few times per week, she suggests. And don’t be afraid to hit the deck for some strength work, too. Hello, squats.

RELATED: 9 Reasons Not to Skip Leg Day

Mistake #7: You don’t finish your stroke.
“Unfortunately, a lot of people pull their hand out of the water before it reaches their hip because they’re trying to get to the start of a new stroke too quickly,” says Bay. “That’s counterintuitive though. You’re shortchanging yourself [by] not getting the most energy out of the work that you just put in.”

How to fix it: Simply put, finish the work you started. When you’re swimming, think of your forearm as a giant paddle that is going to push water backward while you move forward, says Corbin. As your hand enters the water (making sure that your arms don’t cross over to the opposite side of your body), keep your elbow high and drive the forearm through the water while rotating the elbows. Continue to push that water backward until you reach your hips, and then begin the “recovery” part of the stroke — lifting your arm out of the water and back to the beginning of a new stroke.

Mistake #8: You practice swimming for a long time at a slower pace.
There’s definitely a place for slow and steady as a beginner swimmer, but the problem occurs when you stay in the comfort zone of leisurely logging laps, says Corbin. Eventually, you can get lazy about form, since you’re just focusing on getting from point A to a really far point B.

How to fix it: Start incorporating speed drills. “Swimming short and fast enforces better form than swimming long and slow,” says Corbin. Two to three times a week, try swimming for time, rather than distance. Sites like USA Swimming and apps like Speedo Fit provide fun, fast workouts that help you focus on form. Or, check out these three workouts for every skill level. Not quite ready to jump into the fast lane? Some one-on-one or group sessions can go a long way, too.

The post 8 Beginner Swimming Mistakes (And How to Fix Them) appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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Beginner Swimming Mistakes

[caption id="attachment_41933" align="alignnone" width="620"]8 Beginner Swimming Mistakes and How to Swim Like a Pro Photo: Pond5[/caption] Heading to the pool might not be the first thing that comes to mind when it’s time to shape up — but it should be. Not only could you burn upwards of 400 calories in an hour, but you’ll also stoke your metabolism and firm up your entire body without putting tons of stress on your joints (or melting into a puddle of sweat). To reap the head-to-toe benefits, though, you’ll need to know proper form and technique. Whether you’re a total beginner or are looking to brush up on your skills, there are a few common swimming mistakes we’re all guilty of. Put these pros’ tips into practice and soon you’ll be swimming laps with the best of ‘em. RELATED: 6 Tips to Improve Your Swimming Right Now

8 Beginner Swimming Mistakes (and How to Swim Like a Pro!)

Mistake #1: You hold your breath. “When we’re little or first learning how to swim, a lot of us are taught to take a deep breath, hold it, and put our faces in the water,” says Scott Bay, coaches committee chair for U.S. Masters Swimming and an ASCA Level 5 certified Masters swim coach. “But you’re burning oxygen for fuel when you do that.” Think about it — if you’re out running a 5K, are you going to hold your breath and run? No, because it deprives your muscles of much-needed oxygen. How to fix it: First, practice on dry land. Take a deep breath in through your mouth and start to slowly exhale through your nose. As you do, hum, suggests Bay. “If you hum while you breathe out of your nose, it’ll help you maintain a proper pace — you’re forced to do it slowly rather than rush through it,” he says. The next step: breathing in the water. After you take your breath and have your face in the water, work on slowly exhaling — again, through your nose — and then lift your face out of the water when it’s naturally time to do so. Mistake #2: You take your head out of the water to breathe. We know, it sounds counterintuitive. How are you supposed to actually breathe if you don’t lift your head out of the water? Let us clarify: It’s more about keeping your head in the water, while lifting your face out. If you pop your head up each time you need to take a breath, you throw your body’s alignment out of whack. Often that’ll mean forcing your hips lower into the water, which is the opposite of what you want, making your straight swim more of a zig-zag, says Linsey Corbin, CLIF triathlete and five-time Ironman champion. How to fix it: Focus on keeping your head down, with the chin tucked into your neck, says Corbin. When it’s time to breathe, take a breath of air to the same side as the arm that is out of the water, keeping your head in the water (visualize rotating your head just enough so that your mouth is clear for air, but that’s it). RELATED: 3 Swimming Workouts for Every Skill Level [caption id="attachment_29753" align="alignnone" width="620"]Swimming for Beginners - How to Fix Your Form Photo: Pond5[/caption] Mistake #3: You let your hips sink. Doing this creates more drag in the water. And more drag equals more resistance, which ultimately slows you down. Corbin says the goal is to “stay flat and float on top of the water,” rather than dropping in it. Too often beginners default to movements that force their hips down, like letting their feet sink when they should be just below the water’s surface, thus forcing their body to work even harder to get from point A to point B. How to fix it: Invest in a swim snorkel (or grab the one you packed for your last Caribbean adventure), suggests Corbin. “Putting on a snorkel allows you to not have to focus on breathing to the sides,” she says. “Instead you can focus on your arms pulling through the water, your breath being released at a steady pace, and keeping your hips as high up as you can.” Use it in practice a few times a week to hone in on your form before worrying about more advanced work, like increasing pace and speed drills. Mistake #4: You keep your hips straight. Another common hip problem: Not rotating them. Many swimmers rely on their upper body, or just their legs, to propel them through the water. But the majority of your power comes from the hips because they control both the upper and lower body, so depriving yourself of that movement will slow down your momentum, says Corbin. How to fix it: “Start off with visualization. Imagine opening your belly button to the walls of the pool with each stroke, and think about rotating with your core muscles,” suggests Corbin. “Utilizing your core is going to rotate your trunk and help push you through the water faster.” RELATED: Hate Crunches? 6 Better Core Exercises for Beginners To practice getting into the habit, Corbin suggests kicking on your side, belly button toward the wall, with your bottom arm extended overhead, so your head rests on that arm. Do that for one lap, then switch sides. The movement will help you become familiar with how your hips feel when they’re in full rotation, which will in turn help you identify when to start rotating back the other way. For more of a challenge, hold the side position for a few seconds between every stroke, alternating back and forth all the way down the length of the pool.  Mistake #5: You point your toes. Bay says this is a common mistake, as it’s easy to forget about the little guys at the end of your foot. But they play a big role in determining your speed and direction, he says, and pointing them straight out, so that they’re fully flexed, “is like kicking and not going anywhere because it tightens up your ankles.” Swimmers actually want loose, flexible ankles in the water to help quicken their pace. How to fix it: Practice curling your toes, as if you were trying to pick up a penny off of the floor, says Bay. “It keeps the ankles loose while putting your foot in the right direction.” It’s even a good practice outside of the pool — when you have some time to relax in the living room, put a pile of pennies on the floor next to a small bowl and practice transferring the pennies to the bowl with your toes to get more familiar with how your toes feel when curled.
“Swimming short and fast enforces better form than swimming long and slow.”
Mistake #6: You rely too much on your upper body. “Keep in mind that swimming utilizes your whole body,” says Corbin. “Most people make the mistake of believing it’s just a workout for your upper body.” But when you depend on your shoulders, arms and lats to do all the work, not only will you exhaust those muscles faster than you want, you’ll risk not completing a full stroke properly — meaning you won’t slice through the water as quickly. How to fix it: “Try to keep an even balance across your upper body, core and lower body throughout your workout, rather than over-compensating in one of those areas,” says Corbin. “Use your arms for pulling your body through the water, your core to rotate in the water, and your legs for the kick, which provides forward momentum.” If you find yourself weak in one area — say, the lower body — practice doing kick drills using a kick board a few times per week, she suggests. And don’t be afraid to hit the deck for some strength work, too. Hello, squats. RELATED: 9 Reasons Not to Skip Leg Day Mistake #7: You don’t finish your stroke. “Unfortunately, a lot of people pull their hand out of the water before it reaches their hip because they’re trying to get to the start of a new stroke too quickly,” says Bay. “That’s counterintuitive though. You’re shortchanging yourself [by] not getting the most energy out of the work that you just put in.” How to fix it: Simply put, finish the work you started. When you’re swimming, think of your forearm as a giant paddle that is going to push water backward while you move forward, says Corbin. As your hand enters the water (making sure that your arms don’t cross over to the opposite side of your body), keep your elbow high and drive the forearm through the water while rotating the elbows. Continue to push that water backward until you reach your hips, and then begin the “recovery” part of the stroke — lifting your arm out of the water and back to the beginning of a new stroke. Mistake #8: You practice swimming for a long time at a slower pace. There’s definitely a place for slow and steady as a beginner swimmer, but the problem occurs when you stay in the comfort zone of leisurely logging laps, says Corbin. Eventually, you can get lazy about form, since you’re just focusing on getting from point A to a really far point B. How to fix it: Start incorporating speed drills. “Swimming short and fast enforces better form than swimming long and slow,” says Corbin. Two to three times a week, try swimming for time, rather than distance. Sites like USA Swimming and apps like Speedo Fit provide fun, fast workouts that help you focus on form. Or, check out these three workouts for every skill level. Not quite ready to jump into the fast lane? Some one-on-one or group sessions can go a long way, too.

The post 8 Beginner Swimming Mistakes (And How to Fix Them) appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
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Do You Have to Sweat to Get a Good Workout? http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/sweat-during-exercise-workout/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/sweat-during-exercise-workout/#comments Mon, 20 Jul 2015 15:15:49 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=41506 sweating-featured

[caption id="attachment_41562" align="alignnone" width="620"]Sweat and Exercise Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Your recent workout left you sweating buckets — that means it was great, right? Not necessarily. “Sweat is not always a great indicator of how good your workout was,” says Jessica Matthews, the American Council on Exercise's Senior Adviser on Health and Fitness. Then there’s the common misconception that how much you sweat determines the amount of calories you’ve burned — which is not always the case.

RELATED: Is It Better to Do Cardio or Strength Training First?

First, a lesson on why you’re dripping (or staying pretty dry): “Sweating is one way your body prevents itself from overheating,” explains Matthews. When you exercise, your body literally heats up, stimulating your sweat response. Then, as sweat evaporates off your skin into the air, you cool yourself down.

But it’s important to remember that each person is unique. “Some people can be really sweaty even if they’re not being very physically active, [whereas] someone else can go to the gym for 60 minutes and look like they barely stepped out of the house,” explains Matthews.

And how much you sweat, or what’s referred to as your rate of sweat, is determined by a slew of factors including temperature, humidity, and even how fit you are. Generally, more physically fit people sweat sooner because their bodies’ thermoregulation — aka air conditioning — system turns on faster. But that’s not always the case: So don’t sweat not sweating just yet.

RELATED: 7 No-Crunch Exercises for Six-Pack Abs

Does Sweating More Help You Burn More Calories?

Because we often associate sweat with exercise, it’s easy to assume the two are related. “The truth is, no matter how much or little you sweat, it doesn’t always correlate to calories burned or how hard you’re working,” Matthews says.

Take a hot yoga class or an outdoor run on a scorching day, for example. Odds are, after you’ve finished, if you step on the scale you’ll notice you’re a few pounds down. Keep in mind that’s water weight — not fat — and is only a temporary loss. Once you rehydrate, you’ll gain it all back.

In one study, Colorado State University researchers found that in a 90-minute Bikram class, men burned around 460 calories, while women averaged 330. Far fewer than you’d think, right? That’s because heated classes are designed to improve muscle flexibility, not increase calorie burn. So while you may be sweating a lot more than you would in your typical power yoga class, you are likely burning less cals, since it’s a less rigorous form of yoga.

RELATED: The 5 Biggest Myths About Metabolism

What Really Matters With Calorie Burn

Matthews cites that duration and intensity are the two most important factors for boosting (or measuring) caloric burn. For aerobic exercise, the American College of Sports Medicine generally recommends 150 minutes of moderate intensity per week. But they note that you need more time on top of that (150 to 250+ minutes) if you’re looking to lose weight.

For resistance workouts, Matthews says weight load is a good measure. Generally, to build muscle, you want to lift a heavy enough weight you can do eight to 15 reps — it should feel hard, but not entirely impossible.

But all this doesn’t mean you should forgo all workouts that don’t make you sweat. Take restorative yoga, for instance. You’re barely breaking a sweat, but you’re reaping quality, calming mind-body benefits. Plus, one study found restorative yoga can help you burn fat, too.

RELATED: Burn More Calories With DailyBurn’s Inferno HR Workout

So forget stressing about your sweat. Just keep moving. Remember: If you’re trying to lose weight, it’s more often about upping the intensity, not doing everything you can to sweat more.

The post Do You Have to Sweat to Get a Good Workout? appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
sweating-featured

[caption id="attachment_41562" align="alignnone" width="620"]Sweat and Exercise Photo: Pond5[/caption] Your recent workout left you sweating buckets — that means it was great, right? Not necessarily. “Sweat is not always a great indicator of how good your workout was,” says Jessica Matthews, the American Council on Exercise's Senior Adviser on Health and Fitness. Then there’s the common misconception that how much you sweat determines the amount of calories you’ve burned — which is not always the case. RELATED: Is It Better to Do Cardio or Strength Training First? First, a lesson on why you’re dripping (or staying pretty dry): “Sweating is one way your body prevents itself from overheating,” explains Matthews. When you exercise, your body literally heats up, stimulating your sweat response. Then, as sweat evaporates off your skin into the air, you cool yourself down. But it’s important to remember that each person is unique. “Some people can be really sweaty even if they’re not being very physically active, [whereas] someone else can go to the gym for 60 minutes and look like they barely stepped out of the house,” explains Matthews. And how much you sweat, or what’s referred to as your rate of sweat, is determined by a slew of factors including temperature, humidity, and even how fit you are. Generally, more physically fit people sweat sooner because their bodies’ thermoregulation — aka air conditioning — system turns on faster. But that’s not always the case: So don’t sweat not sweating just yet. RELATED: 7 No-Crunch Exercises for Six-Pack Abs

Does Sweating More Help You Burn More Calories?

Because we often associate sweat with exercise, it’s easy to assume the two are related. “The truth is, no matter how much or little you sweat, it doesn’t always correlate to calories burned or how hard you’re working,” Matthews says. Take a hot yoga class or an outdoor run on a scorching day, for example. Odds are, after you’ve finished, if you step on the scale you’ll notice you’re a few pounds down. Keep in mind that’s water weight — not fat — and is only a temporary loss. Once you rehydrate, you’ll gain it all back. In one study, Colorado State University researchers found that in a 90-minute Bikram class, men burned around 460 calories, while women averaged 330. Far fewer than you’d think, right? That’s because heated classes are designed to improve muscle flexibility, not increase calorie burn. So while you may be sweating a lot more than you would in your typical power yoga class, you are likely burning less cals, since it’s a less rigorous form of yoga. RELATED: The 5 Biggest Myths About Metabolism

What Really Matters With Calorie Burn

Matthews cites that duration and intensity are the two most important factors for boosting (or measuring) caloric burn. For aerobic exercise, the American College of Sports Medicine generally recommends 150 minutes of moderate intensity per week. But they note that you need more time on top of that (150 to 250+ minutes) if you’re looking to lose weight. For resistance workouts, Matthews says weight load is a good measure. Generally, to build muscle, you want to lift a heavy enough weight you can do eight to 15 reps — it should feel hard, but not entirely impossible. But all this doesn’t mean you should forgo all workouts that don’t make you sweat. Take restorative yoga, for instance. You’re barely breaking a sweat, but you’re reaping quality, calming mind-body benefits. Plus, one study found restorative yoga can help you burn fat, too. RELATED: Burn More Calories With DailyBurn’s Inferno HR Workout So forget stressing about your sweat. Just keep moving. Remember: If you’re trying to lose weight, it’s more often about upping the intensity, not doing everything you can to sweat more.

The post Do You Have to Sweat to Get a Good Workout? appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
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The 20-Minute Tabata Workout You Need to Try http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/high-intensity-tabata-workout/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/high-intensity-tabata-workout/#comments Sat, 11 Jul 2015 11:15:12 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=18132 Tabata-workout_1

[caption id="attachment_41117" align="alignnone" width="620"]19 Ways to Get Workout Motivation Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Tired of slogging through long, slow jogs on the treadmill? Tabata may be just the answer. The popular high-intensity training protocol utilizes a 2:1 work-to-rest ratio — using 100 percent maximum effort during the work phase — to maximize fat loss. “It’s efficient — studies show that you can burn the same amount of calories as a long-distance run in a fraction of the time,” says Greg Johnson, CSCS, a Sacramento, CA based strength and conditioning coach. “This allows you to burn more fat while maintaining and gaining muscle mass.”

RELATED: Hate Crunches? 6 Better Core Exercises for Beginners

Want to see what Tabata is all about? Try the routine below. Perform 20 seconds on each move, then 10 seconds off, repeated for four consecutive minutes. Once you complete the first exercise, immediately move onto the next. When you finish the full cycle, rest for five minutes, and repeat as desired. Pro tip: It’s not easy to sustain 100 percent max effort, so work at the highest effort output level you’re able to in order to sustain the interval pace of four minutes per cycle.

[caption id="attachment_30784" align="alignnone" width="620"]20-Minute Tabata Workout Photo: Pond5[/caption]

The Tabata Workout

1. Medicine Ball Slam
Targets:
Full body, cardio
How to: Grab a soft medicine ball and raise it overhead as high as you can (a). Keeping your torso straight and core tight, throw the ball as hard as you can at the ground (b). Pick it up and repeat until 20 seconds have elapsed. Rest 10 seconds (c). Repeat this cycle until four minutes total, including work and rest time.

2. Half Jacks
Targets:
Full body, cardio
How to: Stand with your feet together and your hands at your sides (a). Jump and split your feet apart as if performing a jumping jack, while simultaneously lifting your arms up to shoulder level (b). Return to the start position, and repeat as fast as possible for 20 seconds. Rest for 10 seconds (c). Repeat this cycle until four minutes total have elapsed, including rest and work time.

RELATED: 3 HIIT Workouts to Take to the Beach

3. Burpee
Targets:
Full body, cardio
How to: Stand with your feet shoulder width apart. Jump as high as you can, reaching your arms overhead (a). Land, then squat down, and shoot your legs out behind you to end up in a push-up position (b). Return to a standing position. Repeat as fast as possible for 20 seconds, and then rest for 10 seconds (c). Repeat this cycle until four minutes total have elapsed, including work and rest time.

4. Battle Ropes Alternating Underhand Wave
Targets:
Arms, cardio
How to: While holding the two ends your battle ropes looped around an anchored object, assume an athletic position by pushing the hips back with a slight bend in the knees, shoulder blades back and down and lower back straight (a). Moving minimally from the shoulders (all the motion should be in your elbows), rapidly alternate waves with your hands as fast as you can for 20 seconds (b). Rest for 10 seconds. Repeat this cycle for a total of four minutes, including both work and rest time.

RELATED: The Ultimate Battle Ropes Workout

5. Mountain Climbers
Targets:
Full body, cardio
How to: Get into a push-up position (a). Rapidly tuck one knee up under your chest while keeping your other leg extended (b). Repeat with the opposite leg. Switch back and forth, keeping your hips down and your back straight for 20 seconds, then rest for 10 (c). Repeat cycle for four minutes total, once again including both work and rest time.

For more quick and effective HIIT workouts, head to DailyBurn.com to try it free for 30 days. 

Originally posted September 2013. Updated July 2o15. 

The post The 20-Minute Tabata Workout You Need to Try appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
Tabata-workout_1

[caption id="attachment_41117" align="alignnone" width="620"]19 Ways to Get Workout Motivation Photo: Pond5[/caption] Tired of slogging through long, slow jogs on the treadmill? Tabata may be just the answer. The popular high-intensity training protocol utilizes a 2:1 work-to-rest ratio — using 100 percent maximum effort during the work phase — to maximize fat loss. “It’s efficient — studies show that you can burn the same amount of calories as a long-distance run in a fraction of the time,” says Greg Johnson, CSCS, a Sacramento, CA based strength and conditioning coach. “This allows you to burn more fat while maintaining and gaining muscle mass.” RELATED: Hate Crunches? 6 Better Core Exercises for Beginners Want to see what Tabata is all about? Try the routine below. Perform 20 seconds on each move, then 10 seconds off, repeated for four consecutive minutes. Once you complete the first exercise, immediately move onto the next. When you finish the full cycle, rest for five minutes, and repeat as desired. Pro tip: It’s not easy to sustain 100 percent max effort, so work at the highest effort output level you’re able to in order to sustain the interval pace of four minutes per cycle. [caption id="attachment_30784" align="alignnone" width="620"]20-Minute Tabata Workout Photo: Pond5[/caption]

The Tabata Workout

1. Medicine Ball Slam Targets: Full body, cardio How to: Grab a soft medicine ball and raise it overhead as high as you can (a). Keeping your torso straight and core tight, throw the ball as hard as you can at the ground (b). Pick it up and repeat until 20 seconds have elapsed. Rest 10 seconds (c). Repeat this cycle until four minutes total, including work and rest time. 2. Half Jacks Targets: Full body, cardio How to: Stand with your feet together and your hands at your sides (a). Jump and split your feet apart as if performing a jumping jack, while simultaneously lifting your arms up to shoulder level (b). Return to the start position, and repeat as fast as possible for 20 seconds. Rest for 10 seconds (c). Repeat this cycle until four minutes total have elapsed, including rest and work time. RELATED: 3 HIIT Workouts to Take to the Beach 3. Burpee Targets: Full body, cardio How to: Stand with your feet shoulder width apart. Jump as high as you can, reaching your arms overhead (a). Land, then squat down, and shoot your legs out behind you to end up in a push-up position (b). Return to a standing position. Repeat as fast as possible for 20 seconds, and then rest for 10 seconds (c). Repeat this cycle until four minutes total have elapsed, including work and rest time. 4. Battle Ropes Alternating Underhand Wave Targets: Arms, cardio How to: While holding the two ends your battle ropes looped around an anchored object, assume an athletic position by pushing the hips back with a slight bend in the knees, shoulder blades back and down and lower back straight (a). Moving minimally from the shoulders (all the motion should be in your elbows), rapidly alternate waves with your hands as fast as you can for 20 seconds (b). Rest for 10 seconds. Repeat this cycle for a total of four minutes, including both work and rest time. RELATED: The Ultimate Battle Ropes Workout 5. Mountain Climbers Targets: Full body, cardio How to: Get into a push-up position (a). Rapidly tuck one knee up under your chest while keeping your other leg extended (b). Repeat with the opposite leg. Switch back and forth, keeping your hips down and your back straight for 20 seconds, then rest for 10 (c). Repeat cycle for four minutes total, once again including both work and rest time. For more quick and effective HIIT workouts, head to DailyBurn.com to try it free for 30 days.  Originally posted September 2013. Updated July 2o15. 

The post The 20-Minute Tabata Workout You Need to Try appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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5 Strength Training Moves to Help You Run Faster http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/strength-training-run-faster/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/strength-training-run-faster/#comments Wed, 08 Jul 2015 11:15:07 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=41244 5 Strength Training Moves to Help You Run Faster

[caption id="attachment_41257" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Strength Training Moves to Help You Run Faster Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Jason Fitzgerald is a 2:39 marathoner, USA Track & Field certified coach, and the founder of Strength Running where runners go to get faster and prevent injuries.

There aren’t many runners who would turn down the opportunity to gain more speed. But anyone who’s ever trained for a PR knows that getting faster is easier said than done. To knock precious seconds off that mile time, you may need to incorporate some serious strength training into your routine. Yup, it’s time to move from the roads to the weight room.

RELATED: Hate Crunches? 6 Better Core Exercises for Beginners

“Strength work increases stride power, helping you cover more ground with each step,” says Scott Jones, an exercise physiologist and host of the Athlete on Fire podcast. “This is when you really start to see your pace increase.” Jones is adamant about the importance of core strength for runners, saying, “If you want to get faster, you'll need a more powerful core.”

"Remember that strength training should complement your running, not detract from it."

How to Fit Weights Into Your Routine

But what type of strength training is best? And how can you squeeze it into your (already hectic) schedule? Well, if you’ve never done any strength training, start with bodyweight exercises and work progressively toward weighted movements. And yes, you will need to start lifting heavy. It’s the best way to improve efficiency and power, which will allow you to exert greater force in the push-off phase of your stride.

RELATED: 3 Quick and Easy Ways to Prevent Running Injuries

When it comes to scheduling strength training, always remember this essential rule: Keep your hard days hard and your easy days easy. In other words, don’t schedule an intense weight session on the same day as a recovery run. Plan to do your strength training on the same day as medium or high-intensity runs to maximize results.

If you’re strapped for time, don’t worry: You only need to do heavier weight sessions one to two times per week. Make these sessions short and focused. Remember that strength training should complement your running, not detract from it. If lifting leaves you so sore that it compromises your running workouts, reduce your intensity, frequency, or both.

5 Strength Training Moves to Amp Up Your Speed

Step away from the gym machines — you can avoid wasting time on exercises that are overly specific and don’t support your running. Instead, try these compound movements that target multiple muscle groups. Lifting with free weights better simulates functional, real world movements and will help maximize muscle recruitment.

RELATED: Bored of Running? 2 Goals Every Runner Needs

For the workout below, complete two to three sets with four to eight reps per set, and allow adequate rest (two to three minutes) between exercises. Keep the intensity high and the duration short: 30 minutes of heavier lifting once a week is plenty. Not such which dumbbells to grab? Always master your form with lighter weights before progressing to something heavier.

[caption id="attachment_41248" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Strength Training Moves to Help You Run Faster Photo: Pond5[/caption]

1. Dumbbell Squats
How to: Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, toes straight ahead, dumbbell in each hand (a). With arms bent 90 degrees, hold dumbbells at shoulder-height (b). Sit back like there’s a chair behind you, until your thighs are parallel to the ground (c). Driving through your heels, return to the standing position, ensuring your lower back stays in a neutral position (d). Perform 10 reps.

RELATED: 7 Ways to Improve Your Squat

[caption id="attachment_41247" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Strength Training Moves to Help You Run Faster Photo: Pond5[/caption]

2. Deadlifts
How to: Stand with your feet hip-width apart, toes pointed forward (a). Squat down to grasp your barbell, hands shoulder-width apart (b). With your lower back in a neutral position (not rounded) and arms straight, drive through your heels and lift the bar straight up, clenching your glutes throughout the movement (c). Hinge at the hips with knees slightly bent to lower the bar to shin-level, maintaining a neutral back, shoulder and chest position (d). Perform 5-10 reps.

[caption id="attachment_41252" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Strength Training Moves to Help You Run Faster Photo: Pond5[/caption]

3. Bench Press
How to: Lie with your back on the bench, grabbing the bar with your palms facing away from you, grip slightly wider than your shoulders (a). Brace your abs while squeezing your glutes and shoulder blades to lift the bar off the rack (b). Slowly lower the bar to your chest, then raise it back to the starting position. Look straight up and use a spotter for safety. Keep the motion slow and controlled (c). Perform 4-8 reps.

[caption id="attachment_41250" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Strength Training Moves to Help You Run Faster Photo: Pond5[/caption]

4. Pull-Ups
How to: Start with your palms facing away from you, shoulder-width apart (a). Engaging your back, arms and core, pull yourself up toward the bar until your chest touches the bar (b). Lower yourself down to the starting position and repeat (c). For assisted pull-ups, use an exercise band to help propel you upward. Repeat for 4-8 reps (or however many you can complete with good form).

[caption id="attachment_41251" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Strength Training Moves to Help You Run Faster Photo: Pond5[/caption]

5. Weighted Lunges
How to: Stand with a dumbbell in each hand, feet shoulder-width apart (a). Step forward with your right leg, and lower your body down until your right knee is positioned over your ankle and your left knee kisses the ground (b). Always maintain a neutral spine and remain as stable as possible. Step back and repeat with the opposite leg (c). Perform 8-12 reps.

Once you have successfully made strength training a part of your schedule, don’t let yourself get too comfortable in your routine. Whether you’re lifting to prevent running injuries or to gain speed, be sure to challenge yourself over time. That PR you’re chasing will be so worth it.

The post 5 Strength Training Moves to Help You Run Faster appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
5 Strength Training Moves to Help You Run Faster

[caption id="attachment_41257" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Strength Training Moves to Help You Run Faster Photo: Pond5[/caption] Jason Fitzgerald is a 2:39 marathoner, USA Track & Field certified coach, and the founder of Strength Running where runners go to get faster and prevent injuries. There aren’t many runners who would turn down the opportunity to gain more speed. But anyone who’s ever trained for a PR knows that getting faster is easier said than done. To knock precious seconds off that mile time, you may need to incorporate some serious strength training into your routine. Yup, it’s time to move from the roads to the weight room. RELATED: Hate Crunches? 6 Better Core Exercises for Beginners “Strength work increases stride power, helping you cover more ground with each step,” says Scott Jones, an exercise physiologist and host of the Athlete on Fire podcast. “This is when you really start to see your pace increase.” Jones is adamant about the importance of core strength for runners, saying, “If you want to get faster, you'll need a more powerful core.”
"Remember that strength training should complement your running, not detract from it."

How to Fit Weights Into Your Routine

But what type of strength training is best? And how can you squeeze it into your (already hectic) schedule? Well, if you’ve never done any strength training, start with bodyweight exercises and work progressively toward weighted movements. And yes, you will need to start lifting heavy. It’s the best way to improve efficiency and power, which will allow you to exert greater force in the push-off phase of your stride. RELATED: 3 Quick and Easy Ways to Prevent Running Injuries When it comes to scheduling strength training, always remember this essential rule: Keep your hard days hard and your easy days easy. In other words, don’t schedule an intense weight session on the same day as a recovery run. Plan to do your strength training on the same day as medium or high-intensity runs to maximize results. If you’re strapped for time, don’t worry: You only need to do heavier weight sessions one to two times per week. Make these sessions short and focused. Remember that strength training should complement your running, not detract from it. If lifting leaves you so sore that it compromises your running workouts, reduce your intensity, frequency, or both.

5 Strength Training Moves to Amp Up Your Speed

Step away from the gym machines — you can avoid wasting time on exercises that are overly specific and don’t support your running. Instead, try these compound movements that target multiple muscle groups. Lifting with free weights better simulates functional, real world movements and will help maximize muscle recruitment. RELATED: Bored of Running? 2 Goals Every Runner Needs For the workout below, complete two to three sets with four to eight reps per set, and allow adequate rest (two to three minutes) between exercises. Keep the intensity high and the duration short: 30 minutes of heavier lifting once a week is plenty. Not such which dumbbells to grab? Always master your form with lighter weights before progressing to something heavier. [caption id="attachment_41248" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Strength Training Moves to Help You Run Faster Photo: Pond5[/caption] 1. Dumbbell Squats How to: Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, toes straight ahead, dumbbell in each hand (a). With arms bent 90 degrees, hold dumbbells at shoulder-height (b). Sit back like there’s a chair behind you, until your thighs are parallel to the ground (c). Driving through your heels, return to the standing position, ensuring your lower back stays in a neutral position (d). Perform 10 reps. RELATED: 7 Ways to Improve Your Squat [caption id="attachment_41247" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Strength Training Moves to Help You Run Faster Photo: Pond5[/caption] 2. Deadlifts How to: Stand with your feet hip-width apart, toes pointed forward (a). Squat down to grasp your barbell, hands shoulder-width apart (b). With your lower back in a neutral position (not rounded) and arms straight, drive through your heels and lift the bar straight up, clenching your glutes throughout the movement (c). Hinge at the hips with knees slightly bent to lower the bar to shin-level, maintaining a neutral back, shoulder and chest position (d). Perform 5-10 reps. [caption id="attachment_41252" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Strength Training Moves to Help You Run Faster Photo: Pond5[/caption] 3. Bench Press How to: Lie with your back on the bench, grabbing the bar with your palms facing away from you, grip slightly wider than your shoulders (a). Brace your abs while squeezing your glutes and shoulder blades to lift the bar off the rack (b). Slowly lower the bar to your chest, then raise it back to the starting position. Look straight up and use a spotter for safety. Keep the motion slow and controlled (c). Perform 4-8 reps. [caption id="attachment_41250" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Strength Training Moves to Help You Run Faster Photo: Pond5[/caption] 4. Pull-Ups How to: Start with your palms facing away from you, shoulder-width apart (a). Engaging your back, arms and core, pull yourself up toward the bar until your chest touches the bar (b). Lower yourself down to the starting position and repeat (c). For assisted pull-ups, use an exercise band to help propel you upward. Repeat for 4-8 reps (or however many you can complete with good form). [caption id="attachment_41251" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Strength Training Moves to Help You Run Faster Photo: Pond5[/caption] 5. Weighted Lunges How to: Stand with a dumbbell in each hand, feet shoulder-width apart (a). Step forward with your right leg, and lower your body down until your right knee is positioned over your ankle and your left knee kisses the ground (b). Always maintain a neutral spine and remain as stable as possible. Step back and repeat with the opposite leg (c). Perform 8-12 reps. Once you have successfully made strength training a part of your schedule, don’t let yourself get too comfortable in your routine. Whether you’re lifting to prevent running injuries or to gain speed, be sure to challenge yourself over time. That PR you’re chasing will be so worth it.

The post 5 Strength Training Moves to Help You Run Faster appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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The 2-Minute Calisthenics Workout You’ve Got to Try http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/quick-hiit-calisthenics-workout/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/quick-hiit-calisthenics-workout/#comments Mon, 06 Jul 2015 15:15:47 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=41218 The 2-Minute Calisthenics Workout You’ve Got to Try

[caption id="attachment_41223" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 2-Minute Calisthenics Workout You’ve Got to Try Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Whether PE was your favorite subject or worst nightmare, you surely remember slogging through gym classes full of jumping jacks, push-ups, chin-ups and crunches. The Presidential Fitness Test may be a thing of your past, but that doesn’t mean these exercises — also known as calisthenics — should be relegated to the area of your brain reserved for algebra. Calisthenics, simply defined as physical exercises done using mostly your bodyweight, have serious health benefits. In fact, new research shows that they may beat standing or walking as the best way to break up long periods of sitting during your day.

RELATED: Why Standing Desks Might Improve Concentration

Researchers at the University of Essex had 20 healthy participants interrupt 30 minutes of sitting by either standing, walking on a treadmill at 2.5 mph or doing a set of calisthenics (including squats and lunges), for two minutes. Overall, they found that calisthenics were most effective at both raising participants’ heart rates and burning calories. That’s right, according to researchers, doing a mini workout at your desk could improve your cardiovascular health and maybe even help you lose a few pounds (as long as your desk snacks don’t include candy).

The results aren’t surprising, says Cari Shoemate, co-creator of Bombshell Bootcamp in Houston. “Calisthenics exercises elevate your heart rate and usually work multiple muscle groups. Some of them also include a stretching element — so you get the benefit of strength training and a dynamic stretch in one move.”

RELATED: Is It Better to Do Cardio or Strength Training First?

Next time you’re feeling cramped at your desk, take a walk or head somewhere quiet and bust out this simple two-minute routine devised by Shoemate. If jumping jacks aren’t your thing (or will cause too much of a scene), simply step side to side while moving your arms overhead.

2-Minute Calisthenics Workout

[caption id="attachment_41224" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 2-Minute Calisthenics Workout You’ve Got to Try Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Can’t complete a regular push-up? Plant your hands on the side of your desk, or on a wall to make the movement easier. Bend your arms until they’re at a 90-degree angle, bringing your upper body close to the wall or desk. Return to starting position.

15-Minute Calisthenics HIIT Workout

If you’d rather save your squats and push-ups for the gym, you’ll get a great full-body workout from these simple exercises. According to Michele Olson, PhD, a principal researcher at the Auburn University at Montgomery Kinesiology Laboratory, calisthenics are the perfect exercises for high-intensity interval training and Tabata workouts, too. “When doing these types of workouts you want to recruit as many muscles as possible. That’s what helps raise the intensity,” she says. Calisthenics are a full-body challenge — so break out your best high-knees.

[caption id="attachment_41225" align="alignnone" width="620"]15 Minute Calisthenics Workout Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Exercise How-tos:

High-Knees
How to: Start in standing position, feet hip-width distance apart (a). Begin jogging in place, lifting your knees to waist-level (b). Continue lifting knees, pumping your arms as you go or tapping your knees with your hands.

Squats
How to: Start in standing position, feet hip-width distance apart (a). Shifting your weight into your heels, lower your buttocks like you are sitting in a chair, keeping your knees in line with your toes (b). Engage your glutes to return to standing.

Burpees
How to: Start in a standing position (a). Raising your arms, jump into the air (b). Upon landing, get into a push-up position and lower your body to the ground (c). Return to standing, repeat.

Crap Dips
How to: Get in reverse tabletop position, arms planted on the floor with your fingers facing your toes and feet planted on the ground (a). Bending your elbows, lower your glutes towards the floor (b). Push back up into tabletop. Repeat four times (c). After the fourth rep, remain in tabletop, release right hand and reach it to touch your left foot. Repeat on opposite side. 

Modified Pull-Ups
How to: Modify your pull-ups using an assisted pull-up machine or band (a). Choke your band around the pull-up bar, inserting one foot into the hanging end of the band (b). Use the band to help ease the resistance as you pull yourself up to the bar.

Calf Raises
How to: Stand, holding a dumbbell in each hand (optional) (a). Slowly rise up into your toes, squeezing through your calf muscles (b). Return to starting position, repeat.

Forearm Plank
How to: Get in a plank position, either with your arms fully extended (push-up position), or resting on your elbows (a). Hold plank, keeping abs engaged, while slowly lifting alternating legs a few inches off the ground.

Sit-Ups
How to: Lay on the ground, feet planted on the floor, knees bent, hands behind head (a). Engaging your abs, lift your shoulder blades off the floor (b). With control, lower back down to the ground.

The post The 2-Minute Calisthenics Workout You’ve Got to Try appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
The 2-Minute Calisthenics Workout You’ve Got to Try

[caption id="attachment_41223" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 2-Minute Calisthenics Workout You’ve Got to Try Photo: Pond5[/caption] Whether PE was your favorite subject or worst nightmare, you surely remember slogging through gym classes full of jumping jacks, push-ups, chin-ups and crunches. The Presidential Fitness Test may be a thing of your past, but that doesn’t mean these exercises — also known as calisthenics — should be relegated to the area of your brain reserved for algebra. Calisthenics, simply defined as physical exercises done using mostly your bodyweight, have serious health benefits. In fact, new research shows that they may beat standing or walking as the best way to break up long periods of sitting during your day. RELATED: Why Standing Desks Might Improve Concentration Researchers at the University of Essex had 20 healthy participants interrupt 30 minutes of sitting by either standing, walking on a treadmill at 2.5 mph or doing a set of calisthenics (including squats and lunges), for two minutes. Overall, they found that calisthenics were most effective at both raising participants’ heart rates and burning calories. That’s right, according to researchers, doing a mini workout at your desk could improve your cardiovascular health and maybe even help you lose a few pounds (as long as your desk snacks don’t include candy). The results aren’t surprising, says Cari Shoemate, co-creator of Bombshell Bootcamp in Houston. “Calisthenics exercises elevate your heart rate and usually work multiple muscle groups. Some of them also include a stretching element — so you get the benefit of strength training and a dynamic stretch in one move.” RELATED: Is It Better to Do Cardio or Strength Training First? Next time you’re feeling cramped at your desk, take a walk or head somewhere quiet and bust out this simple two-minute routine devised by Shoemate. If jumping jacks aren’t your thing (or will cause too much of a scene), simply step side to side while moving your arms overhead.

2-Minute Calisthenics Workout

[caption id="attachment_41224" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 2-Minute Calisthenics Workout You’ve Got to Try Photo: Pond5[/caption] Can’t complete a regular push-up? Plant your hands on the side of your desk, or on a wall to make the movement easier. Bend your arms until they’re at a 90-degree angle, bringing your upper body close to the wall or desk. Return to starting position.

15-Minute Calisthenics HIIT Workout

If you’d rather save your squats and push-ups for the gym, you’ll get a great full-body workout from these simple exercises. According to Michele Olson, PhD, a principal researcher at the Auburn University at Montgomery Kinesiology Laboratory, calisthenics are the perfect exercises for high-intensity interval training and Tabata workouts, too. “When doing these types of workouts you want to recruit as many muscles as possible. That’s what helps raise the intensity,” she says. Calisthenics are a full-body challenge — so break out your best high-knees. [caption id="attachment_41225" align="alignnone" width="620"]15 Minute Calisthenics Workout Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Exercise How-tos:

High-Knees How to: Start in standing position, feet hip-width distance apart (a). Begin jogging in place, lifting your knees to waist-level (b). Continue lifting knees, pumping your arms as you go or tapping your knees with your hands. Squats How to: Start in standing position, feet hip-width distance apart (a). Shifting your weight into your heels, lower your buttocks like you are sitting in a chair, keeping your knees in line with your toes (b). Engage your glutes to return to standing. Burpees How to: Start in a standing position (a). Raising your arms, jump into the air (b). Upon landing, get into a push-up position and lower your body to the ground (c). Return to standing, repeat. Crap Dips How to: Get in reverse tabletop position, arms planted on the floor with your fingers facing your toes and feet planted on the ground (a). Bending your elbows, lower your glutes towards the floor (b). Push back up into tabletop. Repeat four times (c). After the fourth rep, remain in tabletop, release right hand and reach it to touch your left foot. Repeat on opposite side.  Modified Pull-Ups How to: Modify your pull-ups using an assisted pull-up machine or band (a). Choke your band around the pull-up bar, inserting one foot into the hanging end of the band (b). Use the band to help ease the resistance as you pull yourself up to the bar. Calf Raises How to: Stand, holding a dumbbell in each hand (optional) (a). Slowly rise up into your toes, squeezing through your calf muscles (b). Return to starting position, repeat. Forearm Plank How to: Get in a plank position, either with your arms fully extended (push-up position), or resting on your elbows (a). Hold plank, keeping abs engaged, while slowly lifting alternating legs a few inches off the ground. Sit-Ups How to: Lay on the ground, feet planted on the floor, knees bent, hands behind head (a). Engaging your abs, lift your shoulder blades off the floor (b). With control, lower back down to the ground.

The post The 2-Minute Calisthenics Workout You’ve Got to Try appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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The Beginner’s Guide to Playing Tennis (Or Faking It Well) http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/how-to-play-tennis-beginners/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/how-to-play-tennis-beginners/#comments Tue, 30 Jun 2015 11:15:18 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=41033 young woman playing tennis on a sunny day

[caption id="attachment_41095" align="alignnone" width="620"]Beginners Guide to Tennis Photo: Pond5[/caption]

You’ve spent years watching Serena battle it out on the tennis court. Now, you’re ready to hit the ball yourself — but you have no idea where to start. Whether you’re intrigued by the outfits, the camaraderie of team play or the stress release of slamming that ball with all your might, tennis is also a great workout. You’ll burn up to 490 calories per hour playing a one-on-one match.

“Tennis is a unique sport that tests every part of your body,” says Maureen Diaz, National Coach at the United States Tennis Association’s (USTA) Player Development Training Center. “It will tone your shoulders, biceps, triceps, calves, hamstrings, quadriceps — using muscles you never knew you had.”

RELATED: U.S. Open Tennis Tips from the Bryan Brothers

Ready to get swinging? This tutorial from Diaz and Scott Hausthor, manager of the USTA Player Development Training Center in Flushing, New York will help you learn the most common grips and strokes you’ll need on the court. You’ll be rallying in no time!

Get a Grip

The first thing you’ll need to know is how to hold the racket. Sounds simple, but the proper “grip” will help you achieve maximum control and power on the court. The most common grips used by beginners include the Continental, Eastern and Semi-Western. The butt of your racket is shaped like an octagon, and players typically use the eight sides, known as bevels, to navigate the different grips. Practice your grips before hitting the court so you know what to do before a ball is flying at your face.

1. Continental
While you can use this grip for every shot, it’s best suited for serves, volleys and overhead swings. Think of it as though you were holding a hammer.
Benefits: This grip will give you a slightly open racket face, allowing for control for quick, defensive shots.
How to: As you’re looking at the butt of the racket, consider the top Bevel 1, and work your way clockwise for each subsequent bevel (a). Make a v-shape with your thumb and forefinger on top of the handle (b). The knuckle of your index finger and the heel of your hand should rest on Bevel 2 (c).

RELATED: 5 Major Benefits of Total-Body Workouts

2. Eastern
This grip is most commonly used for forehand strokes and is fairly similar to the Continental. It allows for fast, flat shots and the grip feels similar to as if you were shaking someone’s hand.
Benefits: This grip can help you flatten out the ball to make it more difficult for your opponents to return.
How to: Rest your index knuckle and heel of your hand on the third bevel (a).

3. Semi-Western
The semi-Western grip is an alternate option for forehands, and allows you to hit higher balls and gives you a bit more control than the Eastern grip. Your arm will be in the same position as a fist pump.
Benefits: Because of the topspin that the semi-Western grip generates from the closed racket face, this grip is best for more aggressive shots.
How to: Put your racket face flat on the ground and pick it up (a). Where you pick it up will naturally be with your index knuckle and heel of your hand on Bevel 4 (b).

The Right Strokes

Every tennis player, from first-timers to Rafael Nadal, relies on the same four basic strokes: forehand, backhand, volley and serve. Once you’ve got these down, you’ll be ready to take on your opponent.

Tennis Forehand Tips

1. Forehand

What It Is: You’ll rule the court with this is shot made by swinging the racquet across your body with your dominant hand, after the ball has bounced.

How to: Start with the racket in your right, or dominant hand, using a grip between Eastern and Semi-Western, and stand with feet parallel to the net (a). As the ball approaches, keep your elbow slightly bent and swing the racket back behind your body in a circular motion (b). Step forward onto your left foot, angling it slightly towards the net, and pivoting on the toe of your back, right foot, heel raised (c). Make contact with the ball just in front of your body with your racket parallel to the net (d). After contact, continue the swing across your body on an upward diagonal, finishing with your racket over your left shoulder (e).

Tennis Backhand Tips

2. Backhand

What It Is: If the ball is rocketing towards your non-dominant side, never fear. With this forceful two-handed shot, you’ll swing the racket from the opposite side of your body — with the back of your dominant hand facing forward. It’s also a groundstroke, meaning that it is used after the ball has bounced.

How to: Start with a two-handed grip, with your right, or dominant hand on the bottom in a Continental grip and your top, or left hand in an Eastern grip (a). Stand in your ready position facing the net, toes forward, shoulder-width apart (b). As the ball approaches, shift your stance, planting your left foot parallel to the net, as you bring the racket behind the left side of your body, keeping elbows slightly bent (c). Step forward with your right foot to meet the ball out in front of your body, keeping both hands on the racket (d). Follow through with your swing, ending with the racket behind and above your right shoulder (e).

RELATED: 7 Must-Have Products for Sun Protection

Tennis Volley Tips

3. Volley

What It Is: The ultimate power move, this shot requires just a slight swing. It’s executed before the ball bounces on the ground — and typically from close to the net.

How to: Hold the racket in a Continental grip with your right hand, placing your left hand above it (a). Your ready position will be with your racket in front of you and your feet facing the net, shoulder-width apart (b). Shifting your toes to the right, turn to your forehand side and swing the racket back slightly, until it is just in line with your body (c). Step forward with your left foot as you make contact with the ball (d). Cut off your swing just after making contact with the ball (e).

Tennis Serve Tips

 4. Serve

What It Is: This is the shot that starts each point. Your goal: To land the ball in the box diagonally opposite from you on the other side of the net. Grunting, optional.

How to: Your ready position will be holding the racket in your right, or dominant hand, using a continental grip, ball in your left hand (a). Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, parallel to the net (b). Swing the racket behind your body and above your head (c). Toss the ball just above head height, releasing at eye level (d). Tip your shoulders and pelvis back slightly, and make contact with the ball as you swing your racket over your head and in front of your body (e). As you hit the ball, your upper body will be fully extended as you plant your left foot, pivoting forward on your right foot (f). Follow through bringing your racket across your body, finishing with it near the court under your left arm. Recover back into your ready position (g).

The post The Beginner’s Guide to Playing Tennis (Or Faking It Well) appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
young woman playing tennis on a sunny day

[caption id="attachment_41095" align="alignnone" width="620"]Beginners Guide to Tennis Photo: Pond5[/caption] You’ve spent years watching Serena battle it out on the tennis court. Now, you’re ready to hit the ball yourself — but you have no idea where to start. Whether you’re intrigued by the outfits, the camaraderie of team play or the stress release of slamming that ball with all your might, tennis is also a great workout. You’ll burn up to 490 calories per hour playing a one-on-one match. “Tennis is a unique sport that tests every part of your body,” says Maureen Diaz, National Coach at the United States Tennis Association’s (USTA) Player Development Training Center. “It will tone your shoulders, biceps, triceps, calves, hamstrings, quadriceps — using muscles you never knew you had.” RELATED: U.S. Open Tennis Tips from the Bryan Brothers Ready to get swinging? This tutorial from Diaz and Scott Hausthor, manager of the USTA Player Development Training Center in Flushing, New York will help you learn the most common grips and strokes you’ll need on the court. You’ll be rallying in no time!

Get a Grip

The first thing you’ll need to know is how to hold the racket. Sounds simple, but the proper “grip” will help you achieve maximum control and power on the court. The most common grips used by beginners include the Continental, Eastern and Semi-Western. The butt of your racket is shaped like an octagon, and players typically use the eight sides, known as bevels, to navigate the different grips. Practice your grips before hitting the court so you know what to do before a ball is flying at your face. 1. Continental While you can use this grip for every shot, it’s best suited for serves, volleys and overhead swings. Think of it as though you were holding a hammer. Benefits: This grip will give you a slightly open racket face, allowing for control for quick, defensive shots. How to: As you’re looking at the butt of the racket, consider the top Bevel 1, and work your way clockwise for each subsequent bevel (a). Make a v-shape with your thumb and forefinger on top of the handle (b). The knuckle of your index finger and the heel of your hand should rest on Bevel 2 (c). RELATED: 5 Major Benefits of Total-Body Workouts 2. Eastern This grip is most commonly used for forehand strokes and is fairly similar to the Continental. It allows for fast, flat shots and the grip feels similar to as if you were shaking someone’s hand. Benefits: This grip can help you flatten out the ball to make it more difficult for your opponents to return. How to: Rest your index knuckle and heel of your hand on the third bevel (a). 3. Semi-Western The semi-Western grip is an alternate option for forehands, and allows you to hit higher balls and gives you a bit more control than the Eastern grip. Your arm will be in the same position as a fist pump. Benefits: Because of the topspin that the semi-Western grip generates from the closed racket face, this grip is best for more aggressive shots. How to: Put your racket face flat on the ground and pick it up (a). Where you pick it up will naturally be with your index knuckle and heel of your hand on Bevel 4 (b).

The Right Strokes

Every tennis player, from first-timers to Rafael Nadal, relies on the same four basic strokes: forehand, backhand, volley and serve. Once you’ve got these down, you’ll be ready to take on your opponent. Tennis Forehand Tips 1. Forehand What It Is: You’ll rule the court with this is shot made by swinging the racquet across your body with your dominant hand, after the ball has bounced. How to: Start with the racket in your right, or dominant hand, using a grip between Eastern and Semi-Western, and stand with feet parallel to the net (a). As the ball approaches, keep your elbow slightly bent and swing the racket back behind your body in a circular motion (b). Step forward onto your left foot, angling it slightly towards the net, and pivoting on the toe of your back, right foot, heel raised (c). Make contact with the ball just in front of your body with your racket parallel to the net (d). After contact, continue the swing across your body on an upward diagonal, finishing with your racket over your left shoulder (e). Tennis Backhand Tips 2. Backhand What It Is: If the ball is rocketing towards your non-dominant side, never fear. With this forceful two-handed shot, you’ll swing the racket from the opposite side of your body — with the back of your dominant hand facing forward. It’s also a groundstroke, meaning that it is used after the ball has bounced. How to: Start with a two-handed grip, with your right, or dominant hand on the bottom in a Continental grip and your top, or left hand in an Eastern grip (a). Stand in your ready position facing the net, toes forward, shoulder-width apart (b). As the ball approaches, shift your stance, planting your left foot parallel to the net, as you bring the racket behind the left side of your body, keeping elbows slightly bent (c). Step forward with your right foot to meet the ball out in front of your body, keeping both hands on the racket (d). Follow through with your swing, ending with the racket behind and above your right shoulder (e). RELATED: 7 Must-Have Products for Sun Protection Tennis Volley Tips 3. Volley What It Is: The ultimate power move, this shot requires just a slight swing. It’s executed before the ball bounces on the ground — and typically from close to the net. How to: Hold the racket in a Continental grip with your right hand, placing your left hand above it (a). Your ready position will be with your racket in front of you and your feet facing the net, shoulder-width apart (b). Shifting your toes to the right, turn to your forehand side and swing the racket back slightly, until it is just in line with your body (c). Step forward with your left foot as you make contact with the ball (d). Cut off your swing just after making contact with the ball (e). Tennis Serve Tips  4. Serve What It Is: This is the shot that starts each point. Your goal: To land the ball in the box diagonally opposite from you on the other side of the net. Grunting, optional. How to: Your ready position will be holding the racket in your right, or dominant hand, using a continental grip, ball in your left hand (a). Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, parallel to the net (b). Swing the racket behind your body and above your head (c). Toss the ball just above head height, releasing at eye level (d). Tip your shoulders and pelvis back slightly, and make contact with the ball as you swing your racket over your head and in front of your body (e). As you hit the ball, your upper body will be fully extended as you plant your left foot, pivoting forward on your right foot (f). Follow through bringing your racket across your body, finishing with it near the court under your left arm. Recover back into your ready position (g).

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The 15 Fastest Fall Marathons to Earn a BQ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/bq-boston-qualifying-best-fall-marathons/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/bq-boston-qualifying-best-fall-marathons/#comments Mon, 29 Jun 2015 15:15:05 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=40993 The 15 Fastest Fall Marathons to Earn a BQ

The 15 Fastest Fall Marathons to Earn a BQ

From the starting line in Hopkinton, MA to the iconic finish line on Boylston Street, the local roads and rolling hills that make up the Boston Marathon course are hallowed grounds to the running community. And it’s the only major public marathon to require official qualifying times for participants, excluding charity runners.

According to the Boston Athletic Association (BAA), this practice started back in 1970, when the field size of the race increased to well over 1,000 runners with the nation’s first running boom. Not wanting to compromise the quality of its race, the BAA determined the first qualifying time standards, which continue to evolve and grow tougher each year.

Qualifying times vary from year to year. In 2013, the times dropped by five minutes across all age groups. Today, if you’re between the ages of 25-34, you’ll have to run at least a 3:05 (men) or a 3:35 (women) marathon to earn a coveted BQ (short for “Boston Qualifying” time). We say at least because the actual registration is a rolling process, with the fastest qualifiers being allowed to sign up first. Those with slower BQ times run the risk of getting cut off, depending on the number of registrations in any given year.

RELATED: How to Run the Boston Marathon Like a Pro

These qualifying time standards often represent the pinnacle goal for marathon runners. Dreaming of racing in the most historic and fastest marathon in the country? Signing up for one of these BQ-friendly fall marathons may be your best to drop time and secure your spot on the storied streets.

Note: The qualifying window for the 2016 Boston Marathon opened on September 13, 2014 and registration will likely begin September 2015. Once the field fills up, the BAA will then open the qualifying window for the 2017 Boston Marathon.

The following races, listed by date starting in mid-September, were selected for their national reputations as fast, flat courses with high percentages of BQ times.

[caption id="attachment_40998" align="alignnone" width="620"]Advocate Marathon Photo: Advocate Dreyer Last Chance BQ.2 Chicagoland Marathon[/caption]

1. Advocate Dreyer Last Chance BQ.2 Chicagoland Marathon

Location: Geneva, IL
Date: September 12, 2015
Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 61%
What makes it so fast: This small race may be one of the last (and best!) opportunities for runners still hoping to qualify for 2016. It’s got BQing down to a science and treats its 300 participants like elites on the pancake-flat, eight loop course with 16 aid stations. There are even Boston Marathon registration kiosks waiting for you at the finish line!

RELATED: 5 Running Tweaks That Took an Hour Off My Marathon Time

[caption id="attachment_41004" align="alignnone" width="620"]Revel Big Cottonwood Photo: Revel Big Cottonwood[/caption]

2. Revel Big Cottonwood Marathon

Location: Salt Lake City, UT
Date: September 12, 2015
Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 20%
What makes it so fast: The stunning scenery of the Wasatch Mountain canyons and the foothills of Salt Lake City are the perfect backdrop for a speedy BQ. Because the downhill course, featuring multiple switchbacks, has a 5,278-foot elevation drop, runners who are used to sea-level running should barely notice any of the altitude effects usually associated with mountain runs.

[caption id="attachment_41057" align="alignnone" width="620"]Erie Marathon Photo: Erie Marathon / Todd Van Hoeser[/caption]

3. Erie Marathon

Location: Erie, PA
Date: September 13, 2015
Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 33%
What makes it so fast: This is another popular marathon packed with BQ hopefuls. Around 2,500 of them will head to the lakeshore city for a flat, two-loop course through Presque Isle State Park. The race offers few surprises, with gentle curves and little wind. And because of its mid-September date, a BQ in Erie might give you a qualifying time that’s good for two years.

[caption id="attachment_41001" align="alignnone" width="620"]Leigh Valley VIA Marathon Photo: Leigh Valley Via Marathon[/caption]

4. Lehigh Valley Health Network Via Marathon

Location: Allentown, PA
Date: September 13, 2015
Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 24%
What makes it so fast: Head to rural Lehigh Valley for the third fastest race in the country, with an average finish time of 3:54:24. Designed by Bart Yasso of Runner’s World, this super flat, fast course is strategic. Each year, 2,500 runners take advantage of the shady stretches, cinder trails and the net elevation drop of 240 feet.

RELATED: The 30 Best Marathons in the Entire World

[caption id="attachment_41058" align="alignnone" width="620"]St. Georges Marathon Photo: St Georges Marathon[/caption]

5. St. George Marathon

Location: St. George, UT
Date: October 3, 2015
Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 18%
What makes it so fast: While it’s often touted for its dreamy scenery and unparalleled race day logistics, this small southwestern marathon (less than 1,000 finishers) is also acclaimed for its speed. The point-to-point course near the Arizona border gives you a natural turbo charge as you descend nearly 2,600 feet among the red rocks.

[caption id="attachment_41002" align="alignnone" width="620"]Medtronic Marathon Photo: Twin Cities in Motion[/caption]

6. Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon

Location: Minneapolis, MN
Date: October 4, 2015|
Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 13% (2014)
What makes it so fast: This popular race is the ninth largest in the country and is the self-proclaimed “most beautiful urban marathon in America.” The vibrant course along the Mississippi’s riverbanks from Minneapolis to St. Paul, the 300,000 supportive spectators and the early fall weather set the scene for ideal racing conditions year after year.

[caption id="attachment_41006" align="alignnone" width="620"]Wineglass Marathon Photo: A.D. Wheeler[/caption]

7. Wineglass Marathon

Location: Corning, NY
Date: October 4, 2015
Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 15%
What makes it so fast: It’s one of our favorite fall marathons and often makes other top marathon lists for good reason. There are few flat, fast countryside courses as picturesque as this point-to-point race in the Finger Lakes during the peak of leaf-peeping season. The one-of-a-kind glass medals given to the 2,000 finishers don’t hurt, either.

[caption id="attachment_36534" align="alignnone" width="620"]Chicago Marathon Photo: Bank of America Chicago Marathon[/caption]

8. Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Location: Chicago, IL
Date: October 11, 2015
Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 10%
What makes it so fast: Clocking in at 45,000 runners, Chi-Town hosts the second largest and one of the most renowned marathons in the world. See where the Windy City can take you on the flat course that runs through 29 diverse neighborhoods. The field is deep and the support from 1.7 million cheering spectators is thick — just like the city’s signature pizza.

RELATED: 10 Lessons Learned While Running 100 Marathons

[caption id="attachment_41055" align="alignnone" width="620"]Mohawk Hudson Marathon Photo: Mohawk Hudson Marathon[/caption]

9. Mohawk Hudson River Marathon

Location: Schenectady, NY
Date: October 11, 2015
Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 23%
What makes it so fast: With nearly a quarter of the field earning a BQ, this simple, small-town race knows what it’s doing — without any extra hoopla. This flat, downhill (370-foot drop) course might be just what you need to hit your magic time. The scenic bike paths and city streets along the beautiful Mohawk and Hudson Rivers are just an added bonus.

[caption id="attachment_16702" align="alignnone" width="620"]Steamtown Marathon Photo: runphotos.com[/caption]

10. Steamtown Marathon

Location: Scranton, PA
Date: October 11, 2015
Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 20%
What makes it so fast: Celebrating its 20th year, this race is a classic favorite among BQ strivers. But even with a net elevation loss of 955 feet, it’s a challenging course for its 3,000 runners, due to the (cruel) timing of a few hills just before the finish. On the upside, two scenic miles on the Lackawanna River’s dirt trails will be a welcome respite for your tired legs.

[caption id="attachment_41056" align="alignnone" width="620"]Ashworth Awards Baystate Marathon Photo: Ashworth Awards Baystate Marathon[/caption]

11. Ashworth Awards Baystate Marathon

Location: Lowell, MA
Date: October 18, 2015
Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 25%
What makes it so fast: With an average finish time of 3:53:05, this “for runners, by runners” race just earned the number two spot for fastest marathon in the country. Its no-frills mission: To help you BQ. However, its double loop ‘round the Merrimack River has a few turns and rolling hills to keep you on your toes.

[caption id="attachment_41000" align="alignnone" width="620"]Indianapolis Marathon Photo: Indianapolis Monumental Marathon[/caption]

12. Indianapolis Monumental Marathon

Location: Indianapolis, IN
Date: November 7, 2015
Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 16%
What makes it so fast: Forget the Indy 500! There’s another high-speed race taking over Indianapolis. Join 4,000 racers in exploring the city’s biggest highlights along the loop course. Local fans will push you past the Indiana State Capitol, Lucas Oil Stadium and the famous Indianapolis Museum of Art as on your way to the finish.

[caption id="attachment_16708" align="alignnone" width="620"]Anthem Richmond Marathon Photo: Sports Backers[/caption]

13. Anthem Richmond Marathon

Location: Richmond, VA
Date: November 14, 2015
Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 10%
What makes it so fast: How did this riverside race earn the nickname of “America’s Friendliest Marathon?” Maybe it’s the high-energy bands and party zones. Or maybe it’s the junk food stations at mile 16 and 22, stocked with Gummy Bears, cookies and soda! Either way, the course is downhill to the finish line (where pizza and beer await), making it a fast and fun marathon.

RELATED: The 20 Most Inspiring Runners in the U.S.

[caption id="attachment_41003" align="alignnone" width="620"]Philadelphia Marathon Photo: GORE-TEX Philadelphia Marathon[/caption]

14. GORE-TEX Philadelphia Marathon

Location: Philadelphia, PA
Date: November 22, 2015
Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 13%
What makes it so fast: With an epic starting line soundtrack, the City of Brotherly Love sends more than 10,000 runners through America’s most historic streets. You’ll head over flat roads along two rivers, and back to the Philadelphia Art Museums steps for a memorable finish. It’s the country’s eighth largest race, and one of the loudest thanks to its enthusiastic crowds.

[caption id="attachment_40999" align="alignnone" width="620"]California Marathon Photo: runsra.org; Sean Dulany[/caption]

15. California International Marathon

Location: Sacramento, CA
Date: December 6, 2015
Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 23%
What makes it so fast: If you missed a BQ earlier in the season, look to this late fall race (“the fastest in the west”) to give it one more try before winter. With pace teams for every Boston qualifying standard, superb organization, cool temps, 50,000 fans, and a 340-foot net drop, this rolling hill marathon sets its 6,200 runners up for a BQ success story.

The post The 15 Fastest Fall Marathons to Earn a BQ appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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The 15 Fastest Fall Marathons to Earn a BQ

The 15 Fastest Fall Marathons to Earn a BQ From the starting line in Hopkinton, MA to the iconic finish line on Boylston Street, the local roads and rolling hills that make up the Boston Marathon course are hallowed grounds to the running community. And it’s the only major public marathon to require official qualifying times for participants, excluding charity runners. According to the Boston Athletic Association (BAA), this practice started back in 1970, when the field size of the race increased to well over 1,000 runners with the nation’s first running boom. Not wanting to compromise the quality of its race, the BAA determined the first qualifying time standards, which continue to evolve and grow tougher each year. Qualifying times vary from year to year. In 2013, the times dropped by five minutes across all age groups. Today, if you’re between the ages of 25-34, you’ll have to run at least a 3:05 (men) or a 3:35 (women) marathon to earn a coveted BQ (short for “Boston Qualifying” time). We say at least because the actual registration is a rolling process, with the fastest qualifiers being allowed to sign up first. Those with slower BQ times run the risk of getting cut off, depending on the number of registrations in any given year. RELATED: How to Run the Boston Marathon Like a Pro These qualifying time standards often represent the pinnacle goal for marathon runners. Dreaming of racing in the most historic and fastest marathon in the country? Signing up for one of these BQ-friendly fall marathons may be your best to drop time and secure your spot on the storied streets. Note: The qualifying window for the 2016 Boston Marathon opened on September 13, 2014 and registration will likely begin September 2015. Once the field fills up, the BAA will then open the qualifying window for the 2017 Boston Marathon. The following races, listed by date starting in mid-September, were selected for their national reputations as fast, flat courses with high percentages of BQ times. [caption id="attachment_40998" align="alignnone" width="620"]Advocate Marathon Photo: Advocate Dreyer Last Chance BQ.2 Chicagoland Marathon[/caption]

1. Advocate Dreyer Last Chance BQ.2 Chicagoland Marathon

Location: Geneva, IL Date: September 12, 2015 Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 61% What makes it so fast: This small race may be one of the last (and best!) opportunities for runners still hoping to qualify for 2016. It’s got BQing down to a science and treats its 300 participants like elites on the pancake-flat, eight loop course with 16 aid stations. There are even Boston Marathon registration kiosks waiting for you at the finish line! RELATED: 5 Running Tweaks That Took an Hour Off My Marathon Time [caption id="attachment_41004" align="alignnone" width="620"]Revel Big Cottonwood Photo: Revel Big Cottonwood[/caption]

2. Revel Big Cottonwood Marathon

Location: Salt Lake City, UT Date: September 12, 2015 Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 20% What makes it so fast: The stunning scenery of the Wasatch Mountain canyons and the foothills of Salt Lake City are the perfect backdrop for a speedy BQ. Because the downhill course, featuring multiple switchbacks, has a 5,278-foot elevation drop, runners who are used to sea-level running should barely notice any of the altitude effects usually associated with mountain runs. [caption id="attachment_41057" align="alignnone" width="620"]Erie Marathon Photo: Erie Marathon / Todd Van Hoeser[/caption]

3. Erie Marathon

Location: Erie, PA Date: September 13, 2015 Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 33% What makes it so fast: This is another popular marathon packed with BQ hopefuls. Around 2,500 of them will head to the lakeshore city for a flat, two-loop course through Presque Isle State Park. The race offers few surprises, with gentle curves and little wind. And because of its mid-September date, a BQ in Erie might give you a qualifying time that’s good for two years. [caption id="attachment_41001" align="alignnone" width="620"]Leigh Valley VIA Marathon Photo: Leigh Valley Via Marathon[/caption]

4. Lehigh Valley Health Network Via Marathon

Location: Allentown, PA Date: September 13, 2015 Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 24% What makes it so fast: Head to rural Lehigh Valley for the third fastest race in the country, with an average finish time of 3:54:24. Designed by Bart Yasso of Runner’s World, this super flat, fast course is strategic. Each year, 2,500 runners take advantage of the shady stretches, cinder trails and the net elevation drop of 240 feet. RELATED: The 30 Best Marathons in the Entire World [caption id="attachment_41058" align="alignnone" width="620"]St. Georges Marathon Photo: St Georges Marathon[/caption]

5. St. George Marathon

Location: St. George, UT Date: October 3, 2015 Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 18% What makes it so fast: While it’s often touted for its dreamy scenery and unparalleled race day logistics, this small southwestern marathon (less than 1,000 finishers) is also acclaimed for its speed. The point-to-point course near the Arizona border gives you a natural turbo charge as you descend nearly 2,600 feet among the red rocks. [caption id="attachment_41002" align="alignnone" width="620"]Medtronic Marathon Photo: Twin Cities in Motion[/caption]

6. Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon

Location: Minneapolis, MN Date: October 4, 2015| Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 13% (2014) What makes it so fast: This popular race is the ninth largest in the country and is the self-proclaimed “most beautiful urban marathon in America.” The vibrant course along the Mississippi’s riverbanks from Minneapolis to St. Paul, the 300,000 supportive spectators and the early fall weather set the scene for ideal racing conditions year after year. [caption id="attachment_41006" align="alignnone" width="620"]Wineglass Marathon Photo: A.D. Wheeler[/caption]

7. Wineglass Marathon

Location: Corning, NY Date: October 4, 2015 Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 15% What makes it so fast: It’s one of our favorite fall marathons and often makes other top marathon lists for good reason. There are few flat, fast countryside courses as picturesque as this point-to-point race in the Finger Lakes during the peak of leaf-peeping season. The one-of-a-kind glass medals given to the 2,000 finishers don’t hurt, either. [caption id="attachment_36534" align="alignnone" width="620"]Chicago Marathon Photo: Bank of America Chicago Marathon[/caption]

8. Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Location: Chicago, IL Date: October 11, 2015 Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 10% What makes it so fast: Clocking in at 45,000 runners, Chi-Town hosts the second largest and one of the most renowned marathons in the world. See where the Windy City can take you on the flat course that runs through 29 diverse neighborhoods. The field is deep and the support from 1.7 million cheering spectators is thick — just like the city’s signature pizza. RELATED: 10 Lessons Learned While Running 100 Marathons [caption id="attachment_41055" align="alignnone" width="620"]Mohawk Hudson Marathon Photo: Mohawk Hudson Marathon[/caption]

9. Mohawk Hudson River Marathon

Location: Schenectady, NY Date: October 11, 2015 Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 23% What makes it so fast: With nearly a quarter of the field earning a BQ, this simple, small-town race knows what it’s doing — without any extra hoopla. This flat, downhill (370-foot drop) course might be just what you need to hit your magic time. The scenic bike paths and city streets along the beautiful Mohawk and Hudson Rivers are just an added bonus. [caption id="attachment_16702" align="alignnone" width="620"]Steamtown Marathon Photo: runphotos.com[/caption]

10. Steamtown Marathon

Location: Scranton, PA Date: October 11, 2015 Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 20% What makes it so fast: Celebrating its 20th year, this race is a classic favorite among BQ strivers. But even with a net elevation loss of 955 feet, it’s a challenging course for its 3,000 runners, due to the (cruel) timing of a few hills just before the finish. On the upside, two scenic miles on the Lackawanna River’s dirt trails will be a welcome respite for your tired legs. [caption id="attachment_41056" align="alignnone" width="620"]Ashworth Awards Baystate Marathon Photo: Ashworth Awards Baystate Marathon[/caption]

11. Ashworth Awards Baystate Marathon

Location: Lowell, MA Date: October 18, 2015 Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 25% What makes it so fast: With an average finish time of 3:53:05, this “for runners, by runners” race just earned the number two spot for fastest marathon in the country. Its no-frills mission: To help you BQ. However, its double loop ‘round the Merrimack River has a few turns and rolling hills to keep you on your toes. [caption id="attachment_41000" align="alignnone" width="620"]Indianapolis Marathon Photo: Indianapolis Monumental Marathon[/caption]

12. Indianapolis Monumental Marathon

Location: Indianapolis, IN Date: November 7, 2015 Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 16% What makes it so fast: Forget the Indy 500! There’s another high-speed race taking over Indianapolis. Join 4,000 racers in exploring the city’s biggest highlights along the loop course. Local fans will push you past the Indiana State Capitol, Lucas Oil Stadium and the famous Indianapolis Museum of Art as on your way to the finish. [caption id="attachment_16708" align="alignnone" width="620"]Anthem Richmond Marathon Photo: Sports Backers[/caption]

13. Anthem Richmond Marathon

Location: Richmond, VA Date: November 14, 2015 Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 10% What makes it so fast: How did this riverside race earn the nickname of “America’s Friendliest Marathon?” Maybe it’s the high-energy bands and party zones. Or maybe it’s the junk food stations at mile 16 and 22, stocked with Gummy Bears, cookies and soda! Either way, the course is downhill to the finish line (where pizza and beer await), making it a fast and fun marathon. RELATED: The 20 Most Inspiring Runners in the U.S. [caption id="attachment_41003" align="alignnone" width="620"]Philadelphia Marathon Photo: GORE-TEX Philadelphia Marathon[/caption]

14. GORE-TEX Philadelphia Marathon

Location: Philadelphia, PA Date: November 22, 2015 Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 13% What makes it so fast: With an epic starting line soundtrack, the City of Brotherly Love sends more than 10,000 runners through America’s most historic streets. You’ll head over flat roads along two rivers, and back to the Philadelphia Art Museums steps for a memorable finish. It’s the country’s eighth largest race, and one of the loudest thanks to its enthusiastic crowds. [caption id="attachment_40999" align="alignnone" width="620"]California Marathon Photo: runsra.org; Sean Dulany[/caption]

15. California International Marathon

Location: Sacramento, CA Date: December 6, 2015 Percentage of runners who BQ (2014): 23% What makes it so fast: If you missed a BQ earlier in the season, look to this late fall race (“the fastest in the west”) to give it one more try before winter. With pace teams for every Boston qualifying standard, superb organization, cool temps, 50,000 fans, and a 340-foot net drop, this rolling hill marathon sets its 6,200 runners up for a BQ success story.

The post The 15 Fastest Fall Marathons to Earn a BQ appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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