Exercise – Life by Daily Burn http://dailyburn.com/life Tue, 16 Jan 2018 05:19:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.1 8 Exercises Trainers Never Do (And What to Do Instead) http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/worst-strength-exercises-trainer-tips/ Mon, 15 Jan 2018 16:15:45 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=64783

[caption id="attachment_64798" align="alignnone" width="620"]8 Strength Exercises Trainers Never Do (And What to Do Instead) Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

Heading into the gym with a solid workout plan is a surefire way to have a successful, efficient sweat session. But figuring out exactly what strength exercises to do can get a little tricky. While certain exercises (think biceps curls and crunches) seem like easy, familiar choices, they’re not always the best bet for seeing results. In fact, just because everyone’s doing a certain move, doesn’t mean it’s even safe.

“It's important to measure the risk-to-benefit ratio of any exercise,” says Susie Crossland-Dwyer, strength and run coach and founder of Studio S in Cincinnati, OH. She tends to avoid exercises that target a single muscle or muscle group and moves that carry little benefit with high risk of injury. So what are the strength exercises trainers never do? Here are eight for starters, plus recommendations for safer, more effective substitutions.

RELATED: The 7 Best Strength Exercises You’re Not Doing

Strength Exercises You Should Skip and What To Do Instead

1. Skip: Crunches

Old news that still rings true: Crunches aren’t nearly as effective as other core exercises. Yet people still continue to do them. “A lot of exercise enthusiasts do crunches ad nauseam without really increasing their core strength,” says Crossland-Dwyer. What’s worse is the move can lead to neck or back pain and sometimes hip issues.

Substitution: Pilates Roll-Up

Unlike a traditional crunch, this move targets deeper layers of your abs, which will increase your stability and improve your posture.

How to: Lie on your back with your legs extended and your arms overhead, palms facing one another (a). Slowly roll up, making a C-shape with your spine as you do. Your abs should be pulled in and engaged during the entire movement, creating a hollowing feeling through the low abdominals (b). Continue to roll forward into a stretch, while keeping your shoulders down, away from your ears (c). Hold the stretch for about 10 seconds, then roll back to start and repeat.

2. Skip: Hip Abductor Machine

“People often think that machines make it easier to perform the exercise movement and manipulate the body because they look user-friendly,” says Nikki Snow, a Les Mills International trainer based in Chicago. But strength exercises on hip abductor machines often aren’t as beneficial as moves with free weights or even just your bodyweight. “The abductor machine — aka thigh master machine — packs a big burn, but there are more effective exercises that can isolate the side glutes and hips safe and effectively.”

Substitution: Sumo Squat

This squat variation, with your legs wide apart, targets your inner thighs like none other.

How to: Stand with legs a few steps wider than hip-width apart, toes turned out. Hold a dumbbell in each hand at your hips (a). Lower your hips down and back until your thighs are parallel to the floor (b). Stand back up and repeat.

RELATED: 50 Butt Exercises to Sculpt Stronger Glutes

3. Skip: Weighted Standing Side Bends

Holding a dumbbell on one side of your body during side bends “puts the spine in a compromised position, and it’s hard to maintain alignment to isolate the obliques properly,” says Snow. “It’s easy to use momentum and rock side to side, which can put strain on the lower back and decrease isolation in the targeted muscle group.”

Substitution: Side Plank with Hip Lift

“This move isolates the obliques and strengthens shoulders and surrounding core muscles very effectively,” Snow says.

How to: Lie on your side and prop yourself up on your forearm and elbow. Your feet, hips and shoulders should align. Extend your top arm toward the ceiling (a). Lift your hips off the ground and up toward the ceiling. Hips should stay stacked, with body in one straight line (b). Lower your hips a few inches toward the floor, then lift back up to a straight side plank, using your abs to move you (c). Repeat.

4. Skip: Leg Press

The leg press can be fun, because you can typically lift more weight on the machine than you can handle on a standing squat, so you feel extra-powerful. But that increased weight is part of the problem, says Greg Justice, MA, owner of AYC Health and Fitness in Kansas City, KS. “The biggest problem I see with the leg press is the inclination to put too much weight on the machine, potentially causing the pelvis to rotate away from the back rest as you lower the weight. This can cause a herniated disc.” Plus, using the leg press takes stability out of the equation, forcing your quads to do most of the work, without hitting the hamstrings or glutes, says Crossland-Dwyer.

Substitution: Bulgarian Split Squat

“With split squats, you start with stabilizing the body before going through the range of motion,” Justice explains. “You need to engage the whole body throughout the entire process, and that transfers to real life movements or recreational sports.”

How to: Stand with your back facing a bench or box. Put one foot on top of the bench. Make sure you’re far enough away from the bench so you can create a 90-degree bend in your front knee (a). Bend your front knee to lower your back knee toward the ground, and aim to get your front thigh parallel to the floor (b). Push through the heel of your front foot to return to the starting position, keeping your chest up, eyes forward and shoulders back (c). Repeat.

RELATED: How Strong Is Your Squat? Try This Trainer-Backed Test

[caption id="attachment_64799" align="alignnone" width="620"]Worst Strength Exercises, According to Trainers: Russian Twist (Instead Do Plank Hip Dips) Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

5. Skip: Russian Twist

This core workout move, in which you sit on the floor and twist from side to side (usually holding a weight), is a popular one. While it might seem more functional than a crunch, it’s not necessarily better. “Recent research has shown that Russian twists are more harmful than beneficial,” says James Thomas, a Les Mills national trainer based in New York City. “Combining the compression and flexion of this movement with rotation places a lot of pressure on the spinal disc, excessive compression of the lumbar spine, and movement of disc fluid.”

Substitution: Forearm Plank with Hip Dips

Planks target your entire core while keeping the spine in a safe, neutral position. Add a side-to-side motion and you also get deep into the side of your abs, aka your oblique muscles.

How to: Bring your elbows directly under your shoulders pressing both forearms into the floor. Keeping feet hip-distance apart, extend legs behind you as you bring your body off the ground. Your body should from a straight line from head to heel as you keep your chin tucked in, squeeze your abs tight, and tailbone tucked (a). When you’re steady, slowly drop your left hip toward the floor (b). Bring your hips back toward neutral, and continue through the middle to drop your right hip toward the floor (c). Continue alternating.

6. Skip: Behind-the-Head Military Press

This move is a common one with body builders, but it’s far from the safest way to gain muscle in your upper body. “It puts undue stress on most people’s shoulders — even if you were just doing the movement with a broomstick,” says Mike Donavanik, CSCS, a personal trainer based in Los Angeles. “Most people lack the shoulder mobility, strength, posture and stabilization to do this correctly.” As a result, the movement pattern gets messed up, other muscles start compensating, and you could walk away with an upper body injury.

Substitution: Arnold Press

You’ll work through a full range of motion with this exercise, nixing excess stress on your shoulder joints. Plus, it uses dumbbells rather than a barbell, so each arm and shoulder joint has to work independently of the other, says Donavanik. “If you have any mobility or strength issues on one side, you’ll figure it out pretty quickly this way.”

How to: Start standing with one dumbbell in each hand, elbows bent and palms facing you with dumbbells held at just above collarbone level (don’t let the weights rest on your body) (a). Open your arms out to the sides, bringing your palms to face forward (c). Then, press the dumbbells up overhead. Palms should face away from you by the time you reach the top of the motion (d). Lower back down the way you went up and repeat.

RELATED: 8 Arm Exercises You Haven’t Done Before

7. Skip: Smith Machine Squat

The Smith machine holds the barbell in place while you move up and down. “It makes you move in a straight line. But while this might sound good, it’s not natural for the barbell to travel in a perfectly straight line,” explains Scarlett MacFarlane, a CrossFit level 2 trainer at Brick in New York City. “The body naturally deviates to a small degree, especially taking into account each person's different anatomical needs. So this can be potentially unnatural for the knees, hips or lower back.” The machine can also hinder your range of motion, meaning you don’t get all the strengthening benefits you could with free weights.

Substitution: Front Squat

This strength exercise will allow your body to naturally go up and down to maximize results.

How to: Stand with feet shoulder-width apart, holding a barbell (or two dumbbells) against your body at the front of your chest, palms facing up (if using a barbell) (a). Keeping your weight in your heels to mid-sole, send your hips back and down with your chest up and back flat. Lower until your hips are below your knees (b). Keeping your core tight, return to the starting position (c).

8. Skip: Kipping Pull-Up

These swinging pull-ups —  the ones you see CrossFitters busting out like nobody’s business — do look cool. And the momentum you generate while moving your body forward and back allows you to do more reps than traditional pull-ups. But there’s a catch. You’re putting your shoulders at risk if they aren’t strong enough to support the swinging force. “Most people just don't have the muscular strength and shoulder mobility to do these safely,” says Justice.

Substitution: Traditional Pull-Up

A regular pull-up is one of the best moves you can do for your upper body. It’s a true compound exercise, working muscles in your back, shoulders, and arms at once, says Justice.

How to:  Grab onto a bar with an overhand grip (palms facing away from you), hands shoulder width apart (a). Starting with your arms straightened, pull yourself upward until chin is over the bar. Don't arch your back or swing; instead bend your knees and cross your feet (b). Then lower to start and repeat. (Can’t do a pull-up without swinging? Check out these exercises to get you there, then check out this how-to for working up to full range of motion.)

Read More
The 20 Worst People at the Gym, According to Trainers
6 Common TRX Mistakes (And How to Fix Them)
275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine

The post 8 Exercises Trainers Never Do (And What to Do Instead) appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>

[caption id="attachment_64798" align="alignnone" width="620"]8 Strength Exercises Trainers Never Do (And What to Do Instead) Photo: Twenty20[/caption] Heading into the gym with a solid workout plan is a surefire way to have a successful, efficient sweat session. But figuring out exactly what strength exercises to do can get a little tricky. While certain exercises (think biceps curls and crunches) seem like easy, familiar choices, they’re not always the best bet for seeing results. In fact, just because everyone’s doing a certain move, doesn’t mean it’s even safe. “It's important to measure the risk-to-benefit ratio of any exercise,” says Susie Crossland-Dwyer, strength and run coach and founder of Studio S in Cincinnati, OH. She tends to avoid exercises that target a single muscle or muscle group and moves that carry little benefit with high risk of injury. So what are the strength exercises trainers never do? Here are eight for starters, plus recommendations for safer, more effective substitutions. RELATED: The 7 Best Strength Exercises You’re Not Doing

Strength Exercises You Should Skip and What To Do Instead

1. Skip: Crunches

Old news that still rings true: Crunches aren’t nearly as effective as other core exercises. Yet people still continue to do them. “A lot of exercise enthusiasts do crunches ad nauseam without really increasing their core strength,” says Crossland-Dwyer. What’s worse is the move can lead to neck or back pain and sometimes hip issues. Substitution: Pilates Roll-Up Unlike a traditional crunch, this move targets deeper layers of your abs, which will increase your stability and improve your posture. How to: Lie on your back with your legs extended and your arms overhead, palms facing one another (a). Slowly roll up, making a C-shape with your spine as you do. Your abs should be pulled in and engaged during the entire movement, creating a hollowing feeling through the low abdominals (b). Continue to roll forward into a stretch, while keeping your shoulders down, away from your ears (c). Hold the stretch for about 10 seconds, then roll back to start and repeat.

2. Skip: Hip Abductor Machine

“People often think that machines make it easier to perform the exercise movement and manipulate the body because they look user-friendly,” says Nikki Snow, a Les Mills International trainer based in Chicago. But strength exercises on hip abductor machines often aren’t as beneficial as moves with free weights or even just your bodyweight. “The abductor machine — aka thigh master machine — packs a big burn, but there are more effective exercises that can isolate the side glutes and hips safe and effectively.” Substitution: Sumo Squat This squat variation, with your legs wide apart, targets your inner thighs like none other. How to: Stand with legs a few steps wider than hip-width apart, toes turned out. Hold a dumbbell in each hand at your hips (a). Lower your hips down and back until your thighs are parallel to the floor (b). Stand back up and repeat. RELATED: 50 Butt Exercises to Sculpt Stronger Glutes

3. Skip: Weighted Standing Side Bends

Holding a dumbbell on one side of your body during side bends “puts the spine in a compromised position, and it’s hard to maintain alignment to isolate the obliques properly,” says Snow. “It’s easy to use momentum and rock side to side, which can put strain on the lower back and decrease isolation in the targeted muscle group.” Substitution: Side Plank with Hip Lift “This move isolates the obliques and strengthens shoulders and surrounding core muscles very effectively,” Snow says. How to: Lie on your side and prop yourself up on your forearm and elbow. Your feet, hips and shoulders should align. Extend your top arm toward the ceiling (a). Lift your hips off the ground and up toward the ceiling. Hips should stay stacked, with body in one straight line (b). Lower your hips a few inches toward the floor, then lift back up to a straight side plank, using your abs to move you (c). Repeat.

4. Skip: Leg Press

The leg press can be fun, because you can typically lift more weight on the machine than you can handle on a standing squat, so you feel extra-powerful. But that increased weight is part of the problem, says Greg Justice, MA, owner of AYC Health and Fitness in Kansas City, KS. “The biggest problem I see with the leg press is the inclination to put too much weight on the machine, potentially causing the pelvis to rotate away from the back rest as you lower the weight. This can cause a herniated disc.” Plus, using the leg press takes stability out of the equation, forcing your quads to do most of the work, without hitting the hamstrings or glutes, says Crossland-Dwyer. Substitution: Bulgarian Split Squat “With split squats, you start with stabilizing the body before going through the range of motion,” Justice explains. “You need to engage the whole body throughout the entire process, and that transfers to real life movements or recreational sports.” How to: Stand with your back facing a bench or box. Put one foot on top of the bench. Make sure you’re far enough away from the bench so you can create a 90-degree bend in your front knee (a). Bend your front knee to lower your back knee toward the ground, and aim to get your front thigh parallel to the floor (b). Push through the heel of your front foot to return to the starting position, keeping your chest up, eyes forward and shoulders back (c). Repeat. RELATED: How Strong Is Your Squat? Try This Trainer-Backed Test [caption id="attachment_64799" align="alignnone" width="620"]Worst Strength Exercises, According to Trainers: Russian Twist (Instead Do Plank Hip Dips) Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

5. Skip: Russian Twist

This core workout move, in which you sit on the floor and twist from side to side (usually holding a weight), is a popular one. While it might seem more functional than a crunch, it’s not necessarily better. “Recent research has shown that Russian twists are more harmful than beneficial,” says James Thomas, a Les Mills national trainer based in New York City. “Combining the compression and flexion of this movement with rotation places a lot of pressure on the spinal disc, excessive compression of the lumbar spine, and movement of disc fluid.” Substitution: Forearm Plank with Hip Dips Planks target your entire core while keeping the spine in a safe, neutral position. Add a side-to-side motion and you also get deep into the side of your abs, aka your oblique muscles. How to: Bring your elbows directly under your shoulders pressing both forearms into the floor. Keeping feet hip-distance apart, extend legs behind you as you bring your body off the ground. Your body should from a straight line from head to heel as you keep your chin tucked in, squeeze your abs tight, and tailbone tucked (a). When you’re steady, slowly drop your left hip toward the floor (b). Bring your hips back toward neutral, and continue through the middle to drop your right hip toward the floor (c). Continue alternating.

6. Skip: Behind-the-Head Military Press

This move is a common one with body builders, but it’s far from the safest way to gain muscle in your upper body. “It puts undue stress on most people’s shoulders — even if you were just doing the movement with a broomstick,” says Mike Donavanik, CSCS, a personal trainer based in Los Angeles. “Most people lack the shoulder mobility, strength, posture and stabilization to do this correctly.” As a result, the movement pattern gets messed up, other muscles start compensating, and you could walk away with an upper body injury. Substitution: Arnold Press You’ll work through a full range of motion with this exercise, nixing excess stress on your shoulder joints. Plus, it uses dumbbells rather than a barbell, so each arm and shoulder joint has to work independently of the other, says Donavanik. “If you have any mobility or strength issues on one side, you’ll figure it out pretty quickly this way.” How to: Start standing with one dumbbell in each hand, elbows bent and palms facing you with dumbbells held at just above collarbone level (don’t let the weights rest on your body) (a). Open your arms out to the sides, bringing your palms to face forward (c). Then, press the dumbbells up overhead. Palms should face away from you by the time you reach the top of the motion (d). Lower back down the way you went up and repeat. RELATED: 8 Arm Exercises You Haven’t Done Before

7. Skip: Smith Machine Squat

The Smith machine holds the barbell in place while you move up and down. “It makes you move in a straight line. But while this might sound good, it’s not natural for the barbell to travel in a perfectly straight line,” explains Scarlett MacFarlane, a CrossFit level 2 trainer at Brick in New York City. “The body naturally deviates to a small degree, especially taking into account each person's different anatomical needs. So this can be potentially unnatural for the knees, hips or lower back.” The machine can also hinder your range of motion, meaning you don’t get all the strengthening benefits you could with free weights. Substitution: Front Squat This strength exercise will allow your body to naturally go up and down to maximize results. How to: Stand with feet shoulder-width apart, holding a barbell (or two dumbbells) against your body at the front of your chest, palms facing up (if using a barbell) (a). Keeping your weight in your heels to mid-sole, send your hips back and down with your chest up and back flat. Lower until your hips are below your knees (b). Keeping your core tight, return to the starting position (c).

8. Skip: Kipping Pull-Up

These swinging pull-ups —  the ones you see CrossFitters busting out like nobody’s business — do look cool. And the momentum you generate while moving your body forward and back allows you to do more reps than traditional pull-ups. But there’s a catch. You’re putting your shoulders at risk if they aren’t strong enough to support the swinging force. “Most people just don't have the muscular strength and shoulder mobility to do these safely,” says Justice. Substitution: Traditional Pull-Up A regular pull-up is one of the best moves you can do for your upper body. It’s a true compound exercise, working muscles in your back, shoulders, and arms at once, says Justice. How to:  Grab onto a bar with an overhand grip (palms facing away from you), hands shoulder width apart (a). Starting with your arms straightened, pull yourself upward until chin is over the bar. Don't arch your back or swing; instead bend your knees and cross your feet (b). Then lower to start and repeat. (Can’t do a pull-up without swinging? Check out these exercises to get you there, then check out this how-to for working up to full range of motion.) Read More The 20 Worst People at the Gym, According to Trainers 6 Common TRX Mistakes (And How to Fix Them) 275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine

The post 8 Exercises Trainers Never Do (And What to Do Instead) appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
Easy 5K and 10K Run-Walk Training Plans http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/run-walk-5k-10k-training-plan/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/run-walk-5k-10k-training-plan/#comments Sat, 13 Jan 2018 14:15:39 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=42491 The Easiest 5k and 10k Training Plan Ever (Walking, Allowed)

[caption id="attachment_64756" align="alignnone" width="620"]The Easiest 5k and 10k Training Plan Ever Photo: Pond5[/caption]

If you’ve got zero running experience, the thought of tackling a 5K or 10K can be pretty nerve-wracking. But even if you haven’t logged a mile since middle school, you can still cross the finish line happy and injury-free. Just try adopting a run-walk training strategy, says Denise Sauriol, owner and founder of Run for Change in Chicago.

Run-walk plans are just what you’d expect: They break down the miles into intervals of walking, followed by running.“[A run-walk plan] is not as intimidating and is more maintainable in the long run,” says Sauriol, who’s run 59 marathons and specializes in coaching newbie runners to their first race. “If you train this way you won’t hurt as much near the end of training or as much after the race.”

Whether you're training for a 5K (3.1 miles) or a 10K (6.21 miles), these Daily Burn plans combine running with walking to help you build miles and make the habit actually stick. “My goal for runners is not just to help them do a 5K but make running part of their lifestyle,” says Sauriol.

RELATED: Hate Running? 25 Ways to Learn to Love It

How to Run-Walk Your First 5K or 10K

If you’re a newbie, it’s all about easing into your training runs. That’s why you’ll start both your 5K and 10K training plans with nine minutes of walking and one minute of running per interval. Sounds crazy easy, right? That’s the whole point. Someone who doesn’t have a running base can follow this plan comfortably. And building up slowly while increasing the total number of minutes you’re training will boost your confidence, while reducing risk of injury, says Sauriol.

RELATED: 5 Expert Tips for Proper Running Form

If you’re slightly more experienced or find the 60-second run interval too easy, you can start out with seven minutes of walking and three minutes of running, or five and five. “Runners usually get a sense of excitement that they can run more. That’s your cue that you’re ready to run longer intervals and cut down on walking,” Sauriol says. This will also allow you to rake up the miles without burning yourself out too soon.

You’ll focus on 10-minute intervals because Sauriol finds that longer stretches allow you to get into a nice groove without having to constantly switch back and forth between running and walking. (Besides, they’re easier mathematically and you don’t have to plot out mile markers or wear a GPS watch.)

RELATED: 50 Running Resources for Speed, Strength and Nutrition

To make your training as effective as possible, make sure you’re walking with a purpose. Think: Hustling to a sale at Best Buy, but not quite booking it at a Black Friday speed. When you’re running, remember: Sprinting will only wear you down. Maintain a pace at which you can easily hold a conversation. Lace up your sneakers and prepare to hit the roads with two totally doable training plans from Sauriol.

Your Run-Walk 5K Training Plan

You've signed up for a 5K, so how many miles do you have to run? 3.1 miles to be exact. Don't worry you don't have to run every day to get there. The 5K run-walk training plan below includes cross training and rest days to help you find balance in your routine.

The Easiest 5K Training Plan Ever (Walking, Allowed)

Your Run-Walk 10K Training Plan

Congrats on finishing your first 5K! Now that you've got a race under your belt, you might be ready to tack on more miles. If that's the case, check out the 10K training plan below. How long is a 10K race? 6.21 miles. Double the miles, means double the fun, right? Here, you'll increase your training time, but walking is still totally encouraged.

The Easiest 10K Training Plan Ever (Walking, Allowed)

3 Race Day Survival Strategies

You’ve made it through weeks of training — congrats! These simple tips will help you run-walk your way through any race.

First mile: “It’s easy to get pulled into the excitement of your first race and sprint out of the gate. Hold that energy back and run at the pace you’ve been training at,” says Sauriol. “Consciously let people pass you and run your own race,” she says.

RELATED: 13 Race Day Tips for Newbie Runners

Middle miles: Remember to stick to your run-walk plan because that’s what you’ve been training at this whole time. To avoid frustration (your legs are tired, so-and-so is passing you) remember why you came here: to enjoy the experience. “Thank a volunteer, high-five a kid. We’re not getting paid to do this, it’s all for fun!” says Sauriol.

Last mile: The last quarter of the race is the most mentally challenging, says Sauriol. “Think about how far you’ve come, and remember that everyone else is hurting, too!” Just as you think the race won’t end, the finish line appears, giving you a sudden burst of jet fuel energy. If you want to leave everyone else in the dust and run through the finish line, do it!

Originally posted August 2015. Updated January 2018. 

Read More
Your Ultimate Guide to Running a Personal Best
Why I Started Running — and Never Stopped
7 Expert Tips for Pacing Yourself on the Run

The post Easy 5K and 10K Run-Walk Training Plans appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
The Easiest 5k and 10k Training Plan Ever (Walking, Allowed)

[caption id="attachment_64756" align="alignnone" width="620"]The Easiest 5k and 10k Training Plan Ever Photo: Pond5[/caption] If you’ve got zero running experience, the thought of tackling a 5K or 10K can be pretty nerve-wracking. But even if you haven’t logged a mile since middle school, you can still cross the finish line happy and injury-free. Just try adopting a run-walk training strategy, says Denise Sauriol, owner and founder of Run for Change in Chicago. Run-walk plans are just what you’d expect: They break down the miles into intervals of walking, followed by running.“[A run-walk plan] is not as intimidating and is more maintainable in the long run,” says Sauriol, who’s run 59 marathons and specializes in coaching newbie runners to their first race. “If you train this way you won’t hurt as much near the end of training or as much after the race.” Whether you're training for a 5K (3.1 miles) or a 10K (6.21 miles), these Daily Burn plans combine running with walking to help you build miles and make the habit actually stick. “My goal for runners is not just to help them do a 5K but make running part of their lifestyle,” says Sauriol. RELATED: Hate Running? 25 Ways to Learn to Love It

How to Run-Walk Your First 5K or 10K

If you’re a newbie, it’s all about easing into your training runs. That’s why you’ll start both your 5K and 10K training plans with nine minutes of walking and one minute of running per interval. Sounds crazy easy, right? That’s the whole point. Someone who doesn’t have a running base can follow this plan comfortably. And building up slowly while increasing the total number of minutes you’re training will boost your confidence, while reducing risk of injury, says Sauriol. RELATED: 5 Expert Tips for Proper Running Form If you’re slightly more experienced or find the 60-second run interval too easy, you can start out with seven minutes of walking and three minutes of running, or five and five. “Runners usually get a sense of excitement that they can run more. That’s your cue that you’re ready to run longer intervals and cut down on walking,” Sauriol says. This will also allow you to rake up the miles without burning yourself out too soon. You’ll focus on 10-minute intervals because Sauriol finds that longer stretches allow you to get into a nice groove without having to constantly switch back and forth between running and walking. (Besides, they’re easier mathematically and you don’t have to plot out mile markers or wear a GPS watch.) RELATED: 50 Running Resources for Speed, Strength and Nutrition To make your training as effective as possible, make sure you’re walking with a purpose. Think: Hustling to a sale at Best Buy, but not quite booking it at a Black Friday speed. When you’re running, remember: Sprinting will only wear you down. Maintain a pace at which you can easily hold a conversation. Lace up your sneakers and prepare to hit the roads with two totally doable training plans from Sauriol.

Your Run-Walk 5K Training Plan

You've signed up for a 5K, so how many miles do you have to run? 3.1 miles to be exact. Don't worry you don't have to run every day to get there. The 5K run-walk training plan below includes cross training and rest days to help you find balance in your routine. The Easiest 5K Training Plan Ever (Walking, Allowed)

Your Run-Walk 10K Training Plan

Congrats on finishing your first 5K! Now that you've got a race under your belt, you might be ready to tack on more miles. If that's the case, check out the 10K training plan below. How long is a 10K race? 6.21 miles. Double the miles, means double the fun, right? Here, you'll increase your training time, but walking is still totally encouraged. The Easiest 10K Training Plan Ever (Walking, Allowed)

3 Race Day Survival Strategies

You’ve made it through weeks of training — congrats! These simple tips will help you run-walk your way through any race. First mile: “It’s easy to get pulled into the excitement of your first race and sprint out of the gate. Hold that energy back and run at the pace you’ve been training at,” says Sauriol. “Consciously let people pass you and run your own race,” she says. RELATED: 13 Race Day Tips for Newbie Runners Middle miles: Remember to stick to your run-walk plan because that’s what you’ve been training at this whole time. To avoid frustration (your legs are tired, so-and-so is passing you) remember why you came here: to enjoy the experience. “Thank a volunteer, high-five a kid. We’re not getting paid to do this, it’s all for fun!” says Sauriol. Last mile: The last quarter of the race is the most mentally challenging, says Sauriol. “Think about how far you’ve come, and remember that everyone else is hurting, too!” Just as you think the race won’t end, the finish line appears, giving you a sudden burst of jet fuel energy. If you want to leave everyone else in the dust and run through the finish line, do it! Originally posted August 2015. Updated January 2018.  Read More Your Ultimate Guide to Running a Personal Best Why I Started Running — and Never Stopped 7 Expert Tips for Pacing Yourself on the Run

The post Easy 5K and 10K Run-Walk Training Plans appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/run-walk-5k-10k-training-plan/feed/ 2
Push Through Any Workout with These Trainer Mantras http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/trainer-mantras-positive-self-talk/ Fri, 12 Jan 2018 12:15:52 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=64691

[caption id="attachment_64724" align="alignnone" width="620"]Push Through Any Workout with These Trainer Mantras Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

We’ve all been there: You’re at the end of a workout class when the instructor says you have another set of burpees to do. Your muscles and your mind want to scream “no” as soon as the words come out of her mouth. You can’t possibly push through another cardio set...except you can. And you should.

Even some of the toughest trainers — ones who barrel through sprints and hoist heavy weights like they’re lighter than shaker bottles — play this mind game. And it all comes down to mental toughness and a few motivating mantras. So next time you’re up against a round of squat jumps or your last 50 meters of a 5K, channel these mental tricks from our top fitness pros. The only question you’ll have left to ask yourself: Can you handle the ego boost you’ll feel at the finish?

RELATED: 19 Positive Affirmations That’ll Change the Way You Think

13 Mantras Top Trainers Use to Boost Their Mental Toughness

1. “How we do anything is how we do everything.”

“The way we practice is the way we perform, so in moments of fatigue it’s a great reminder that even now — especially now — I need to give my best. The mantra motivates me to give 100 percent even when I’m tired or don’t feel like it. And these are the moments that help form my habits and shape my mentality as an athlete.” —Milan Costich founder of PREVAIL boxing

2. “Do more than expected.”

“My main mental focus while training and pushing through my last rep always circles back to what was embedded in me as a professional athlete. The importance of finishing is something I’ve carried with me not just in training but in life. I constantly remind myself of what I’ve accomplished simply by doing a little more than expected. Holding myself to that standard doesn’t change with how I train myself. Chasing greatness in all things is a mentality for me... a way of life. What you achieve is dictated by how you respond when you’re being challenged the most.” —Curtis Williams, owner of Training C.A.M.P. and former NFL player

RELATED: Meditation Meets HIIT in New Mindful Fitness Approach

3. “Think of how good you’ll feel.”

“Sometimes when I struggle with motivation, whether it's finishing a workout or even just getting to the gym in the first place, I try and tell myself, ‘Just think of how good you'll feel when you're done.’ Remembering the feeling of finishing a workout strong or pushing myself to do more than I thought I could always gets me through and keeps me coming back time and time again!” —Nora Minno, trainer on Daily Burn 365

4. “Let’s go!”

“Some days are just a struggle! But that doesn’t mean I give up; it means I have to get creative. The mind is the most creative and powerful muscle so I can either let the blues take over or I can shift my attitude and make it happen. My mantra ‘let’s go!’ is so simple but it really pumps me up. I also dance it out. I do just a little movement, side to side, shake out my hands and take a deep breath — all while repeating ‘let’s go!’” —Astrid Swan, celebrity trainer

RELATED: 9 Ways to Find Workout Motivation (Every Damn Day)

5. “Gratitude and competition.”

“On days where I want to stop the workout, I’ll think about how grateful I am to have a strong, healthy body, and how lucky I am that I get to choose the gift of exercise. It’s not a punishment. On the other hand, I am very motivated by competition. So on days when I take class, I'll take a mental note of who I think is a better athlete than me, and he/she will be my mental competition. It makes me work harder and it also makes it more fun for me.” —Ashley Borden, celebrity trainer

6. “I’ve got this.”

“I repeat this passionately — and with conviction. I also take a moment before a truly challenging moment, set or interval, and visualize the experience as clearly and authentically as possible. For example, seeing myself perform each rep of a set and vividly imagining what it will feel like, especially the last couple reps. I see and feel the struggle and myself successful in overcoming it. I actually feel my nervous system start working. I think that feeling is so important. Then during the movement, I focus all attention and energy on the muscles working and imagining them bursting with power. I also make sure to be fully in it until the very last second — like, bar back in the rack — before shifting my focus.” —Gregg Cook, trainer on Daily Burn 365

RELATED: 7 Trainer Quotes That Will Instantly Boost Your Confidence

[caption id="attachment_64700" align="alignnone" width="620"]13 Mantras Trainers Use to Push Through Tough Workouts Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

7. “Pain is only temporary.”

“With about 25 percent of my workouts dedicated to restoration, mobility and flexibility, the remaining 75 percent is all-out, like hill sprints, trail runs and kettlebell training. When I’m in these very challenging zones my mindset shifts to survival mood. And one thing that I always repeat in my mind is the pain I’m feeling right now won’t last forever. If I can hold on for just a few more seconds, I can reap the rewards. Pushing our bodies beyond what we thought we were capable of is simply one of the most satisfying things we can do in life.” —Nick Malizia, Master Trainer at Burn 60

8. “This is when change happens.”

“Change lies just on the other side of feeling uncomfortable. True change really begins when things get a little bit tough and you're able to work through that. [When you push] through a final 2 to 5 reps or 10 to 20 seconds past that uncomfortable point — keep in mind, during that time your body is adapting. However, it's also important to remember that if you begin to compromise your form, it is time to shut it down, reset, and then try again.” —Jason Walsh, owner and founder of Rise Nation

RELATED: 19 Reasons to Work Out (Beyond the Perfect Body)

9. “You’re stronger than this.”

“I repeat this to myself when I need to power through something tough. And it works just as well outside the gym in all areas of life. Also, I focus on the sensation of my breath as it comes and goes. It centers me and helps direct my energy and power into the challenge at hand.” —Adam Rosante, celebrity trainer and strength and conditioning coach

10. “I can.”

“It only takes trying it a few times to realize how motivating mantras really are. It tricks your brain into believing something is true. Think: ‘I will not give up!’ ‘I can and I will!’ Or, ‘I am strong, I am powerful!’ Another strategy that works is to imagine you are performing, and all eyes are on you. Visualize those cheering fans across the finish line. I guarantee you will push harder, sweat more, and even perfect your form! And when in doubt, crank up that music. Fast heart-pumping tunes have been shown to bring workouts to the next level.” —Jessica Schatz, master Pilates instructor

RELATED: The 25 Craziest Workout Excuses Trainers Have Ever Heard

11. “Are you a quitter?”

“I ask myself things that challenge my integrity towards my values. Things like, ‘What kind of man are you?’, ‘Are you a quitter?’ ‘Are you serious about what you set out to do?’ ‘Are you a mover and shaker or what?’ Those work for me, because I would never want to let myself down under those circumstances. My recommendation for everyone is to think about the things you value and tie them into the task in front of you. But it has to tie into your values.” —Prince Brathwaite, trainer on Daily Burn 365 and CEO and founder of Trooper Fitness

12. “Superhero.”

“I repeat mantras to myself when struggling with a workout or looking to push through it. I focus on single words and some of my go-tos include: ‘Strong. Capable. Badass. Superhero.’” —Emily Schromm, trainer and CrossFit coach

RELATED: 275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine

13. “Don’t quit on me.”

“My drive and commitment is the foundation to my overall success. Pushing the boundaries is something all too familiar and something I'm faced with every day. Some mental tricks I use to get through an extra tough workout including repeating, ‘Don’t quit on me,’ ‘Don’t cheat yourself; treat yourself,’ and ‘Work for it.’” —Corey Caillet, celebrity trainer on Revenge Body 

Read More
4 Science-Backed Ways to Motivate Yourself to Work Out
Get Sculpted Shoulders With These 5 Exercises
Just Not Feeling It Today? 33 Sources of Workout Motivation

The post Push Through Any Workout with These Trainer Mantras appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>

[caption id="attachment_64724" align="alignnone" width="620"]Push Through Any Workout with These Trainer Mantras Photo: Twenty20[/caption] We’ve all been there: You’re at the end of a workout class when the instructor says you have another set of burpees to do. Your muscles and your mind want to scream “no” as soon as the words come out of her mouth. You can’t possibly push through another cardio set...except you can. And you should. Even some of the toughest trainers — ones who barrel through sprints and hoist heavy weights like they’re lighter than shaker bottles — play this mind game. And it all comes down to mental toughness and a few motivating mantras. So next time you’re up against a round of squat jumps or your last 50 meters of a 5K, channel these mental tricks from our top fitness pros. The only question you’ll have left to ask yourself: Can you handle the ego boost you’ll feel at the finish? RELATED: 19 Positive Affirmations That’ll Change the Way You Think

13 Mantras Top Trainers Use to Boost Their Mental Toughness

1. “How we do anything is how we do everything.”

“The way we practice is the way we perform, so in moments of fatigue it’s a great reminder that even now — especially now — I need to give my best. The mantra motivates me to give 100 percent even when I’m tired or don’t feel like it. And these are the moments that help form my habits and shape my mentality as an athlete.” —Milan Costich founder of PREVAIL boxing

2. “Do more than expected.”

“My main mental focus while training and pushing through my last rep always circles back to what was embedded in me as a professional athlete. The importance of finishing is something I’ve carried with me not just in training but in life. I constantly remind myself of what I’ve accomplished simply by doing a little more than expected. Holding myself to that standard doesn’t change with how I train myself. Chasing greatness in all things is a mentality for me... a way of life. What you achieve is dictated by how you respond when you’re being challenged the most.” —Curtis Williams, owner of Training C.A.M.P. and former NFL player RELATED: Meditation Meets HIIT in New Mindful Fitness Approach

3. “Think of how good you’ll feel.”

“Sometimes when I struggle with motivation, whether it's finishing a workout or even just getting to the gym in the first place, I try and tell myself, ‘Just think of how good you'll feel when you're done.’ Remembering the feeling of finishing a workout strong or pushing myself to do more than I thought I could always gets me through and keeps me coming back time and time again!” —Nora Minno, trainer on Daily Burn 365

4. “Let’s go!”

“Some days are just a struggle! But that doesn’t mean I give up; it means I have to get creative. The mind is the most creative and powerful muscle so I can either let the blues take over or I can shift my attitude and make it happen. My mantra ‘let’s go!’ is so simple but it really pumps me up. I also dance it out. I do just a little movement, side to side, shake out my hands and take a deep breath — all while repeating ‘let’s go!’” —Astrid Swan, celebrity trainer RELATED: 9 Ways to Find Workout Motivation (Every Damn Day)

5. “Gratitude and competition.”

“On days where I want to stop the workout, I’ll think about how grateful I am to have a strong, healthy body, and how lucky I am that I get to choose the gift of exercise. It’s not a punishment. On the other hand, I am very motivated by competition. So on days when I take class, I'll take a mental note of who I think is a better athlete than me, and he/she will be my mental competition. It makes me work harder and it also makes it more fun for me.” —Ashley Borden, celebrity trainer

6. “I’ve got this.”

“I repeat this passionately — and with conviction. I also take a moment before a truly challenging moment, set or interval, and visualize the experience as clearly and authentically as possible. For example, seeing myself perform each rep of a set and vividly imagining what it will feel like, especially the last couple reps. I see and feel the struggle and myself successful in overcoming it. I actually feel my nervous system start working. I think that feeling is so important. Then during the movement, I focus all attention and energy on the muscles working and imagining them bursting with power. I also make sure to be fully in it until the very last second — like, bar back in the rack — before shifting my focus.” —Gregg Cook, trainer on Daily Burn 365 RELATED: 7 Trainer Quotes That Will Instantly Boost Your Confidence [caption id="attachment_64700" align="alignnone" width="620"]13 Mantras Trainers Use to Push Through Tough Workouts Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

7. “Pain is only temporary.”

“With about 25 percent of my workouts dedicated to restoration, mobility and flexibility, the remaining 75 percent is all-out, like hill sprints, trail runs and kettlebell training. When I’m in these very challenging zones my mindset shifts to survival mood. And one thing that I always repeat in my mind is the pain I’m feeling right now won’t last forever. If I can hold on for just a few more seconds, I can reap the rewards. Pushing our bodies beyond what we thought we were capable of is simply one of the most satisfying things we can do in life.” —Nick Malizia, Master Trainer at Burn 60

8. “This is when change happens.”

“Change lies just on the other side of feeling uncomfortable. True change really begins when things get a little bit tough and you're able to work through that. [When you push] through a final 2 to 5 reps or 10 to 20 seconds past that uncomfortable point — keep in mind, during that time your body is adapting. However, it's also important to remember that if you begin to compromise your form, it is time to shut it down, reset, and then try again.” —Jason Walsh, owner and founder of Rise Nation RELATED: 19 Reasons to Work Out (Beyond the Perfect Body)

9. “You’re stronger than this.”

“I repeat this to myself when I need to power through something tough. And it works just as well outside the gym in all areas of life. Also, I focus on the sensation of my breath as it comes and goes. It centers me and helps direct my energy and power into the challenge at hand.” —Adam Rosante, celebrity trainer and strength and conditioning coach

10. “I can.”

“It only takes trying it a few times to realize how motivating mantras really are. It tricks your brain into believing something is true. Think: ‘I will not give up!’ ‘I can and I will!’ Or, ‘I am strong, I am powerful!’ Another strategy that works is to imagine you are performing, and all eyes are on you. Visualize those cheering fans across the finish line. I guarantee you will push harder, sweat more, and even perfect your form! And when in doubt, crank up that music. Fast heart-pumping tunes have been shown to bring workouts to the next level.” —Jessica Schatz, master Pilates instructor RELATED: The 25 Craziest Workout Excuses Trainers Have Ever Heard

11. “Are you a quitter?”

“I ask myself things that challenge my integrity towards my values. Things like, ‘What kind of man are you?’, ‘Are you a quitter?’ ‘Are you serious about what you set out to do?’ ‘Are you a mover and shaker or what?’ Those work for me, because I would never want to let myself down under those circumstances. My recommendation for everyone is to think about the things you value and tie them into the task in front of you. But it has to tie into your values.” —Prince Brathwaite, trainer on Daily Burn 365 and CEO and founder of Trooper Fitness

12. “Superhero.”

“I repeat mantras to myself when struggling with a workout or looking to push through it. I focus on single words and some of my go-tos include: ‘Strong. Capable. Badass. Superhero.’” —Emily Schromm, trainer and CrossFit coach RELATED: 275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine

13. “Don’t quit on me.”

“My drive and commitment is the foundation to my overall success. Pushing the boundaries is something all too familiar and something I'm faced with every day. Some mental tricks I use to get through an extra tough workout including repeating, ‘Don’t quit on me,’ ‘Don’t cheat yourself; treat yourself,’ and ‘Work for it.’” —Corey Caillet, celebrity trainer on Revenge Body  Read More 4 Science-Backed Ways to Motivate Yourself to Work Out Get Sculpted Shoulders With These 5 Exercises Just Not Feeling It Today? 33 Sources of Workout Motivation

The post Push Through Any Workout with These Trainer Mantras appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/best-ab-exercises-core-workout/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/best-ab-exercises-core-workout/#respond Thu, 11 Jan 2018 16:15:51 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=59957 50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core

[caption id="attachment_59968" align="alignnone" width="620"]50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core Photo: Ryan Kelly / Barre Harmony[/caption]

The goal of ab exercises isn’t all about sculpting a six-pack or chiseling your middle. The core of every day movements comes from just that — your core. You need a solid midsection to stand upright, stay steady on your feet and twist and turn sans injury. (Though scoring flat abs is certainly a sweet bonus!)

So how do you land a stronger core? Work it from every angle and switch up your routine often. That’s where these 50 anything-but-boring abs exercises come in. They’ll skyrocket your strength and stability — and help you score that toned midsection in the meantime. Say hello to going hardcore.

RELATED: 50 Butt Exercises to Sculpt Stronger Glutes

Take Your Core Workout Beyond Crunches and Sit-Ups

Planks

When it comes to improving core stability, the plank has your back (and your front!). By working your transverse abdominis — the deep core muscles that wrap around your middle — as well as your back, shoulders and glutes (yes, you should activate your butt, too), you get a full body burn in one isometric movement. But the best thing about planks: You can continuously switch them up and make your muscles work even more. Check out these creative twists on a typical plank routine and you’ll see what we mean.

50 Ab Exercises: Spiderman Crunch

1. Spiderman Plank 

Get total-body toned with this amped up plank. While performing a triceps push-up, bring your knee to the outside of your elbow, and switch sides on the next rep. Don’t drop or pike your hips through the entire move — your body should stay in a straight line from shoulders to ankles.

[caption id="attachment_53637" align="alignnone" width="620"]50 Ab Exercises: Sphinx to Forearm Plank Photo courtesy of CorePower Yoga[/caption]

2. Sphinx to Forearm Plank

A slight twist on a high-low plank move, you’ll flow from a yoga sphinx pose (similar to a baby cobra) into a forearm plank. Try to minimize movement in your hips as you go.

50 Ab Exercises: Around the Clock Planks

3. Reach Around the Clock Planks

A regular plank is tough in itself. But balancing on one arm? Talk about taking this core challenge up a notch.

[caption id="attachment_52461" align="alignnone" width="620"]50 Ab Exercises: Army Crawl Side Planks GIF: Daily Burn 365[/caption]

4. Army Crawl Side Planks

Take your abs workout to P.E. class and army crawl your way across the mat. Stay low in a strong forearm plank as you slither your arms and legs forward. Then finish with a side plank to target your obliques.

50 Ab Exercises: TRX Plank to Pike

5. TRX Plank to Pike

Talk about tough! This pike-up plank offers a gymnastic element to build strength in your lower abs. The higher you pike, the harder the exercise...and the stronger your core.

6. Push-Up

Ask most fitness experts to break down the basics of a push-up and they’ll tell you it’s a moving plank. So learn how to master that solid, isometric position before you move onto the push-up part. When you do, you’ll build muscle in your entire upper body.

50 Ab Exercises: Side Plank with Leg Raise on a Foam Roller

7. Side Plank with Leg Raise

Foam rollers not only loosen up your fascia, they also add a stabilization challenge to ab exercises. In this side plank variation, you’ll feel your midsection fighting to keep your body steady.

50 Ab Exercises: The Snake Plank

8. The Snake 

A chaturanga-inspired exercise often done on a reformer, you’ll take this move to the mat. Your obliques work to bring you upright, as the rest of your core stays tight to move you through the middle.

9. Starfish

Do three moves for the work of one! This combination exercise not only targets your obliques and transverse abdominis, but also your hips and lats. A triple threat you’ll want to keep tackling.

[caption id="attachment_55642" align="alignnone" width="620"]50 Ab Exercises: Plank Jack to Tuck Jump GIF: Daily Burn 365[/caption]

10. Plank Jacks to Tuck Jump

Crush a core workout while also squeezing in some cardio. This two-for-one move will rev your heart rate, as you reach new calorie-torching heights. From the jack to the jump, it's one quick ab-strengthening routine.

11. Ab Roller

Skip the infomercial-inspired equipment and grab a towel for this “rolling” move. As you slide the towel forward on the floor, you’ll sculpt your stomach. Just don’t forget to keep your pelvis in a neutral position.

50 Ab Exercises: Giant Clam on a BOSU Ball

12. Giant Clam

BOSU balls work great for bettering your balance — and improving your core stability. This take on a conventional clamshell further challenges your abs, as you aim to keep your hips lifted.

13. Rotating Renegade Row

Chisel your core by mixing a push-up, row and T raise. Your midsection muscles work to keep your body in one long line, as you flow through the three-move mash-up.

50 Ab Exercises: Plank Knee Tucks on a Rower

14. Knee Tucks

Rowers aren’t reserved for cardio — though this will get your heart pumping. Hold a solid plank as you use your lower abs to drive both knees into your chest, without dropping or raising your hips.

Next Up: Crunches and Sit-Ups

The post 50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core

[caption id="attachment_59968" align="alignnone" width="620"]50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core Photo: Ryan Kelly / Barre Harmony[/caption] The goal of ab exercises isn’t all about sculpting a six-pack or chiseling your middle. The core of every day movements comes from just that — your core. You need a solid midsection to stand upright, stay steady on your feet and twist and turn sans injury. (Though scoring flat abs is certainly a sweet bonus!) So how do you land a stronger core? Work it from every angle and switch up your routine often. That’s where these 50 anything-but-boring abs exercises come in. They’ll skyrocket your strength and stability — and help you score that toned midsection in the meantime. Say hello to going hardcore. RELATED: 50 Butt Exercises to Sculpt Stronger Glutes

Take Your Core Workout Beyond Crunches and Sit-Ups

Planks

When it comes to improving core stability, the plank has your back (and your front!). By working your transverse abdominis — the deep core muscles that wrap around your middle — as well as your back, shoulders and glutes (yes, you should activate your butt, too), you get a full body burn in one isometric movement. But the best thing about planks: You can continuously switch them up and make your muscles work even more. Check out these creative twists on a typical plank routine and you’ll see what we mean. 50 Ab Exercises: Spiderman Crunch

1. Spiderman Plank 

Get total-body toned with this amped up plank. While performing a triceps push-up, bring your knee to the outside of your elbow, and switch sides on the next rep. Don’t drop or pike your hips through the entire move — your body should stay in a straight line from shoulders to ankles. [caption id="attachment_53637" align="alignnone" width="620"]50 Ab Exercises: Sphinx to Forearm Plank Photo courtesy of CorePower Yoga[/caption]

2. Sphinx to Forearm Plank

A slight twist on a high-low plank move, you’ll flow from a yoga sphinx pose (similar to a baby cobra) into a forearm plank. Try to minimize movement in your hips as you go.

50 Ab Exercises: Around the Clock Planks

3. Reach Around the Clock Planks

A regular plank is tough in itself. But balancing on one arm? Talk about taking this core challenge up a notch. [caption id="attachment_52461" align="alignnone" width="620"]50 Ab Exercises: Army Crawl Side Planks GIF: Daily Burn 365[/caption]

4. Army Crawl Side Planks

Take your abs workout to P.E. class and army crawl your way across the mat. Stay low in a strong forearm plank as you slither your arms and legs forward. Then finish with a side plank to target your obliques. 50 Ab Exercises: TRX Plank to Pike

5. TRX Plank to Pike

Talk about tough! This pike-up plank offers a gymnastic element to build strength in your lower abs. The higher you pike, the harder the exercise...and the stronger your core.

6. Push-Up

Ask most fitness experts to break down the basics of a push-up and they’ll tell you it’s a moving plank. So learn how to master that solid, isometric position before you move onto the push-up part. When you do, you’ll build muscle in your entire upper body. 50 Ab Exercises: Side Plank with Leg Raise on a Foam Roller

7. Side Plank with Leg Raise

Foam rollers not only loosen up your fascia, they also add a stabilization challenge to ab exercises. In this side plank variation, you’ll feel your midsection fighting to keep your body steady. 50 Ab Exercises: The Snake Plank

8. The Snake 

A chaturanga-inspired exercise often done on a reformer, you’ll take this move to the mat. Your obliques work to bring you upright, as the rest of your core stays tight to move you through the middle.

9. Starfish

Do three moves for the work of one! This combination exercise not only targets your obliques and transverse abdominis, but also your hips and lats. A triple threat you’ll want to keep tackling. [caption id="attachment_55642" align="alignnone" width="620"]50 Ab Exercises: Plank Jack to Tuck Jump GIF: Daily Burn 365[/caption]

10. Plank Jacks to Tuck Jump

Crush a core workout while also squeezing in some cardio. This two-for-one move will rev your heart rate, as you reach new calorie-torching heights. From the jack to the jump, it's one quick ab-strengthening routine.

11. Ab Roller

Skip the infomercial-inspired equipment and grab a towel for this “rolling” move. As you slide the towel forward on the floor, you’ll sculpt your stomach. Just don’t forget to keep your pelvis in a neutral position. 50 Ab Exercises: Giant Clam on a BOSU Ball

12. Giant Clam

BOSU balls work great for bettering your balance — and improving your core stability. This take on a conventional clamshell further challenges your abs, as you aim to keep your hips lifted.

13. Rotating Renegade Row

Chisel your core by mixing a push-up, row and T raise. Your midsection muscles work to keep your body in one long line, as you flow through the three-move mash-up.

50 Ab Exercises: Plank Knee Tucks on a Rower

14. Knee Tucks

Rowers aren’t reserved for cardio — though this will get your heart pumping. Hold a solid plank as you use your lower abs to drive both knees into your chest, without dropping or raising your hips.

Next Up: Crunches and Sit-Ups

The post 50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/best-ab-exercises-core-workout/feed/ 0
The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/best-marathons-fall/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/best-marathons-fall/#comments Wed, 10 Jan 2018 13:10:35 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=16585 The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S.

[caption id="attachment_64716" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. Photos (clockwise from top left): St. George Marathon, Donald Miralle / Rock 'n' Roll Marathon Series, NYRR, Bank of America Chicago Marathon[/caption]

For many of us, summer means lazy beach vacations, barbecues and a break from schoolwork. But for runners around the world, it’s also time to jump-start fall marathon training. Where will these aspiring marathoners, who sweat it out during the hot and humid months, run the 26.2-mile distance in the fall? Look no further than our list of the country’s 15 best fall marathons. Many of these popular races fill up fast, so mark your calendars early! (Note: The below races are listed by date, starting in September.)

RELATED: The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S.

15 Fall Marathons for Your Best Race Yet

[caption id="attachment_64663" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - Air Force Marathon in Dayton, Ohio Photo: Air Force Marathon[/caption]

1. Air Force Marathon

Location: Dayton, OH
Date: Saturday, September 15, 2018
Marathoners will hopefully feel light on their feet (and a bit of patriotic pride) at the Air Force Marathon. They’ll fly through a mostly flat 26.2-mile certified loop of the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, starting and finishing at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. Awesome jet flyovers kick off the day and enthusiastic volunteers line the course, as runners — military personnel and civilians alike — race past historical aviation sites like the Wright Brothers Memorial Monument. The race weekend also includes half-marathon, 10K and 5K events.

RELATED: The 30 Best Marathons in the Entire World

[caption id="attachment_64664" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - Guthrie Wineglass Marathon in Corning, New York Photo: A.D. Wheeler / Wineglass Marathon[/caption]

2. Guthrie Wineglass Marathon

Location: Corning, NY
Date: Sunday, September 30, 2018
Just try to guess what’s waiting at the finish line for the runners, who take on the Wineglass Marathon. For more than 35 years, this Boston Qualifier has grown at a rapid rate, selling out with 2,700 participants in 2017. Maybe it’s the flat and fast point-to-point course from Bath to Corning, NY. Maybe it’s the picturesque autumn colors. Or maybe it’s that wine country of the Finger Lakes region is right at your fingertips post-race. The weekend’s events also include a half-marathon, 8K and 5K.

[caption id="attachment_64665" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - St George Marathon in St. George, Utah Photo: St. George Marathon[/caption]

3. St. George Marathon

Location: St. George, UT
Date: Saturday, October 6, 2018
Scenic. Fast. Fun. Those are three words that come to mind when we think about the St. George Marathon. Nearly 8,000 runners sign up for the early morning wake-up call that will take them through the red rock canyons to the starting line at 5,240 feet above sea level. But don’t worry — there are plenty of toasty bonfires to keep you warm while catching the sunrise over the Pine Valley mountains. The certified course is net downhill, so it can be super speedy, but that doesn’t mean it’s easy. Watch out for the killer Veyo Hill around mile 7.

RELATED: 14 Trail Running Adventures to Try Before You Die

[caption id="attachment_64666" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - Chicago Marathon in Chicago, Illinois Photo: Bank of America Chicago Marathon[/caption]

4. Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Location: Chicago, IL
Date: Sunday, October 7, 2018
Founded in 1977, the Chicago Marathon had 4,200 participants in its first year (not to mention an incredible $5 entry fee). Today, the Windy City welcomes 45,000 runners from all 50 states and more than 100 countries around the world, including many elite runners, to the World Marathon Majors event. The renowned flat and fast course has many turns, and cruises through 29 different neighborhoods with a start and finish in the historic Grant Park. Call us crazy, but we like to think that even the elites indulge in deep dish pizza and Chicago-style hot dogs after the race.

[caption id="attachment_64667" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon in Minneapolis, Minnesota Photo: CT Ryan Photography / Twin Cities In Motion[/caption]

5. Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon

Location: Minneapolis, MN
Date: Sunday, October 7, 2018
When it comes to big city races, you might as well double down. At the Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon, the “most beautiful urban marathon in America,” runners get two cities for the price of one! More than 9,800 participants make their way from the U.S. Bank Stadium in downtown Minneapolis all the way to the State Capitol in St. Paul. Along the way, they’ll pass sparkling lakes, tree-lined streets, the riverbanks of the Mississippi, rolling hills and of course, some 300,000 cheering spectators. The weekend’s events also include 10-mile, 10K and 5K races.

[caption id="attachment_64668" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - Portland Marathon in Portland, Oregon Photo: Portland Marathon[/caption]

6. Portland Marathon

Location: Portland, OR
Date: Sunday, October 7, 2018
For more than 40 years, Portland has welcomed runners to its city with open arms. So it’s no surprise that the Portland Marathon is continually hailed as a fun, friendly and well-organized race. This fast BQ-certified course starts and ends in downtown Portland, crosses the St. John Bridge, and features 31 turns with great views of the city. There are plenty of serious runners in the field, but the race is also known for being especially walker-friendly. There’s also a half-marathon the same weekend if 13.1 miles is more your speed.

[caption id="attachment_64669" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - Steamtown Marathon in Scranton, Pennsylvania Photo: Steamtown Marathon[/caption]

7. Steamtown Marathon

Location: Scranton, PA
Date: Sunday, October 7, 2018
Yes, this is the same Scranton, PA that was home to Pam, Jim and the rest of The Office for nine seasons. Runners flock to the Steamtown Marathon for that small town charm and the opportunity to share the course with only 3,000 runners. Oh, and did we mention the net elevation drop of 955 feet? On average, around 25 percent of finishers qualify for the Boston Marathon. It’s also gotten rave reviews for its scenic course (with a 2.2-mile trail section), friendly volunteers and crowds, and some hilarious weekly emails from the race director leading up to the race — which can all help you forget about your screaming quads on the downhills.

RELATED: 5 Running Tweaks That Took an Hour Off My Marathon Time

[caption id="attachment_64670" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - Baltimore Marathon in Baltimore, Maryland Photo: Baltimore Running Festival[/caption]

8. Baltimore Marathon

Location: Baltimore, MD
Date: Saturday, October 20, 2018
The third weekend in October is a full-on running festival taking over Charm City. In addition to the Baltimore Marathon, there’s a half-marathon, team relay, 5K, .05K and quirky challenges like the “BaltiMORON-a-thon” for those crazy enough to run a half and 5K the same day. At the spectator-friendly 26.2 event, expect a sea of runners to fill the city neighborhoods of Federal Hill and Fells Point before flowing into a new finish line area, right in Inner Harbor — where the crab cakes and Natty Boh await!

[caption id="attachment_64671" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - Baystate Marathon in Lowell, Massachusetts Photo: Baystate Marathon[/caption]

9. Ashworth Awards Baystate Marathon

Location: Lowell, MA
Date: Sunday, October 21, 2018
The Ashworth Awards Baystate Marathon, located only 30 miles outside of Boston, is clear in its intentions. “For runners, by runners,” it wants to help you qualify for the Boston Marathon. Its no-nonsense approach to the race is what’s most appealing to the more than 1,000 finishers. And the double loop course is fast AF — 30 percent of the field earned a BQ in 2017! There is also a flat, fast half-marathon offered the same day.

RELATED: The 15 Fastest Fall Marathons to Earn a BQ

[caption id="attachment_16705" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - Marine Corps Marathon in Washington, D.C. Photo: Marine Corps Marathon[/caption]

10. Marine Corps Marathon

Location: Washington, D.C.
Date: Sunday, October 28, 2018
Often called the “People’s Marathon,” the Marine Corps Marathon doesn’t offer any prize money to the top finishers. And it’s so popular, it now uses a lottery entry system every March. For more than 40 years, thousands of runners have taken on this unique tour of the nation’s capitol, passing by monumental D.C. sights like the Jefferson Memorial, the National Mall and Arlington National Cemetery. But more rewarding than the miles, participants agree, are the Marines along the course who cheer runners on and place the finishing medals around their necks.

[caption id="attachment_64672" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - TCS New York City Marathon in New York, New York Photo: NYRR[/caption]

11. TCS New York City Marathon

Location: New York, NY
Date: Sunday, November 4, 2018
Ready for the big stage? The TCS New York City Marathon is the world’s largest marathon, featuring 26.2 miles through all five boroughs of the Big Apple. It’s notoriously difficult to get into the race via lottery (though you can sign up more easily through a charity team or with a qualified time). From hearing Frank Sinatra’s “New York, New York” at the starting line in Staten Island to pushing through the final stretch of the famous finish in Central Park, the marathoners who do get a bib will chase after some of the most iconic miles in marathon history.

RELATED: How to Run (And Watch!) the NYC Marathon Like a Pro

[caption id="attachment_16708" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - Anthem Richmond Marathon in RIchmond, Virginia Photo: Sports Backers[/caption]

12. Anthem Richmond Marathon

Location: Richmond, VA
Date: Saturday, November 10, 2018
First-time marathoners who may feel intimidated by some of the big city races on this list should check out the Anthem Richmond Marathon. It’s not called “America’s Friendliest Marathon” for nothing! There are "junk food stations" at miles 16 and 22, a few wet washcloth stops, energy-boosting “party zones,” and a post-race pizza and beer party on Brown’s Island. The 41th annual race loops through historic neighborhoods, along the James River and downhill to the finish line in the heart of the city. It also features a half-marathon, 8K and kids’ run all on the same day.

RELATED: 13 Race Day Tips for Newbie Runners

[caption id="attachment_64673" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - Rock ‘n’ Roll Las Vegas Marathon in Las Vegas, Nevada Photo: Donald Miralle / Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon Series[/caption]

13. Rock ‘n’ Roll Las Vegas Marathon

Location: Las Vegas, NV
Date: Sunday, November 11, 2018
Think you need sexy stilettos for a night out in Las Vegas? Guess again. All you need for the nighttime Rock ‘n’ Roll Las Vegas Marathon are your sneakers (and maybe a headlamp). The flat course runs straight through the flashy Las Vegas Strip to the tunes of live bands. After conquering 26.2 miles of Sin City, marathoners are invited to celebrate at an after-party. And yes, you can still leave those high heels at home. There’s also a half-marathon, 10K, 5K and even a “run through wedding” event over the weekend.

[caption id="attachment_64674" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - California International Marathon in Sacramento, California Photo: California International Marathon[/caption]

14. California International Marathon

Location: Sacramento, CA
Date: Sunday, December 2, 2018
For 35 years, the California International Marathon has offered a little something for everyone. The self-proclaimed “fastest course in the West” is a favorite among first timers, as well as those seeking a marathon PR or BQ time. The gentle rolling hills, very few turns, near-perfect running weather and beautiful fall foliage don’t hurt either. More than 9,000 runners will take on 26.2 point-to-point, feel-good miles through the City of Trees, but there is also a four-person relay and a 2.62-mile fun run the same day.

RELATED: The 15 Best Destination Half-Marathons in the World

[caption id="attachment_64675" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - Honolulu Marathon in Honolulu, Hawaii Photo: Honolulu Marathon[/caption]

15. Honolulu Marathon

Location: Honolulu, HI
Date: Sunday, December 9, 2018
How does an early December escape to paradise sound? The only catch is you have to start running the Honolulu Marathon at 5 a.m.! Don’t worry, fireworks and a gorgeous sunrise will help light the way. The mostly flat race starts in downtown Honolulu, passes through Waikiki and goes up and around Diamond Head. Say aloha to the most amazing mountain and ocean views, and generally a rainbow or two. At the beachfront finish line, you’ll be rewarded with a medal, a lei of shells, and “malasada” (Hawaiian fried dough). The race is one of the largest in the county — with no time limit or cap on participants — and there’s also a 10K and mile event the same weekend.

Originally posted August 12, 2013. Updated January 8, 2018.

Read More
50 Running Resources for Speed, Strength and Nutrition
Why I Started Running — And Never Stopped
How to Score Perfect Running Form Like the Pros

The post The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S.

[caption id="attachment_64716" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. Photos (clockwise from top left): St. George Marathon, Donald Miralle / Rock 'n' Roll Marathon Series, NYRR, Bank of America Chicago Marathon[/caption] For many of us, summer means lazy beach vacations, barbecues and a break from schoolwork. But for runners around the world, it’s also time to jump-start fall marathon training. Where will these aspiring marathoners, who sweat it out during the hot and humid months, run the 26.2-mile distance in the fall? Look no further than our list of the country’s 15 best fall marathons. Many of these popular races fill up fast, so mark your calendars early! (Note: The below races are listed by date, starting in September.) RELATED: The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S.

15 Fall Marathons for Your Best Race Yet

[caption id="attachment_64663" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - Air Force Marathon in Dayton, Ohio Photo: Air Force Marathon[/caption]

1. Air Force Marathon

Location: Dayton, OH Date: Saturday, September 15, 2018 Marathoners will hopefully feel light on their feet (and a bit of patriotic pride) at the Air Force Marathon. They’ll fly through a mostly flat 26.2-mile certified loop of the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, starting and finishing at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. Awesome jet flyovers kick off the day and enthusiastic volunteers line the course, as runners — military personnel and civilians alike — race past historical aviation sites like the Wright Brothers Memorial Monument. The race weekend also includes half-marathon, 10K and 5K events. RELATED: The 30 Best Marathons in the Entire World [caption id="attachment_64664" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - Guthrie Wineglass Marathon in Corning, New York Photo: A.D. Wheeler / Wineglass Marathon[/caption]

2. Guthrie Wineglass Marathon

Location: Corning, NY Date: Sunday, September 30, 2018 Just try to guess what’s waiting at the finish line for the runners, who take on the Wineglass Marathon. For more than 35 years, this Boston Qualifier has grown at a rapid rate, selling out with 2,700 participants in 2017. Maybe it’s the flat and fast point-to-point course from Bath to Corning, NY. Maybe it’s the picturesque autumn colors. Or maybe it’s that wine country of the Finger Lakes region is right at your fingertips post-race. The weekend’s events also include a half-marathon, 8K and 5K. [caption id="attachment_64665" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - St George Marathon in St. George, Utah Photo: St. George Marathon[/caption]

3. St. George Marathon

Location: St. George, UT Date: Saturday, October 6, 2018 Scenic. Fast. Fun. Those are three words that come to mind when we think about the St. George Marathon. Nearly 8,000 runners sign up for the early morning wake-up call that will take them through the red rock canyons to the starting line at 5,240 feet above sea level. But don’t worry — there are plenty of toasty bonfires to keep you warm while catching the sunrise over the Pine Valley mountains. The certified course is net downhill, so it can be super speedy, but that doesn’t mean it’s easy. Watch out for the killer Veyo Hill around mile 7. RELATED: 14 Trail Running Adventures to Try Before You Die [caption id="attachment_64666" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - Chicago Marathon in Chicago, Illinois Photo: Bank of America Chicago Marathon[/caption]

4. Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Location: Chicago, IL Date: Sunday, October 7, 2018 Founded in 1977, the Chicago Marathon had 4,200 participants in its first year (not to mention an incredible $5 entry fee). Today, the Windy City welcomes 45,000 runners from all 50 states and more than 100 countries around the world, including many elite runners, to the World Marathon Majors event. The renowned flat and fast course has many turns, and cruises through 29 different neighborhoods with a start and finish in the historic Grant Park. Call us crazy, but we like to think that even the elites indulge in deep dish pizza and Chicago-style hot dogs after the race. [caption id="attachment_64667" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon in Minneapolis, Minnesota Photo: CT Ryan Photography / Twin Cities In Motion[/caption]

5. Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon

Location: Minneapolis, MN Date: Sunday, October 7, 2018 When it comes to big city races, you might as well double down. At the Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon, the “most beautiful urban marathon in America,” runners get two cities for the price of one! More than 9,800 participants make their way from the U.S. Bank Stadium in downtown Minneapolis all the way to the State Capitol in St. Paul. Along the way, they’ll pass sparkling lakes, tree-lined streets, the riverbanks of the Mississippi, rolling hills and of course, some 300,000 cheering spectators. The weekend’s events also include 10-mile, 10K and 5K races. [caption id="attachment_64668" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - Portland Marathon in Portland, Oregon Photo: Portland Marathon[/caption]

6. Portland Marathon

Location: Portland, OR Date: Sunday, October 7, 2018 For more than 40 years, Portland has welcomed runners to its city with open arms. So it’s no surprise that the Portland Marathon is continually hailed as a fun, friendly and well-organized race. This fast BQ-certified course starts and ends in downtown Portland, crosses the St. John Bridge, and features 31 turns with great views of the city. There are plenty of serious runners in the field, but the race is also known for being especially walker-friendly. There’s also a half-marathon the same weekend if 13.1 miles is more your speed. [caption id="attachment_64669" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - Steamtown Marathon in Scranton, Pennsylvania Photo: Steamtown Marathon[/caption]

7. Steamtown Marathon

Location: Scranton, PA Date: Sunday, October 7, 2018 Yes, this is the same Scranton, PA that was home to Pam, Jim and the rest of The Office for nine seasons. Runners flock to the Steamtown Marathon for that small town charm and the opportunity to share the course with only 3,000 runners. Oh, and did we mention the net elevation drop of 955 feet? On average, around 25 percent of finishers qualify for the Boston Marathon. It’s also gotten rave reviews for its scenic course (with a 2.2-mile trail section), friendly volunteers and crowds, and some hilarious weekly emails from the race director leading up to the race — which can all help you forget about your screaming quads on the downhills. RELATED: 5 Running Tweaks That Took an Hour Off My Marathon Time [caption id="attachment_64670" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - Baltimore Marathon in Baltimore, Maryland Photo: Baltimore Running Festival[/caption]

8. Baltimore Marathon

Location: Baltimore, MD Date: Saturday, October 20, 2018 The third weekend in October is a full-on running festival taking over Charm City. In addition to the Baltimore Marathon, there’s a half-marathon, team relay, 5K, .05K and quirky challenges like the “BaltiMORON-a-thon” for those crazy enough to run a half and 5K the same day. At the spectator-friendly 26.2 event, expect a sea of runners to fill the city neighborhoods of Federal Hill and Fells Point before flowing into a new finish line area, right in Inner Harbor — where the crab cakes and Natty Boh await! [caption id="attachment_64671" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - Baystate Marathon in Lowell, Massachusetts Photo: Baystate Marathon[/caption]

9. Ashworth Awards Baystate Marathon

Location: Lowell, MA Date: Sunday, October 21, 2018 The Ashworth Awards Baystate Marathon, located only 30 miles outside of Boston, is clear in its intentions. “For runners, by runners,” it wants to help you qualify for the Boston Marathon. Its no-nonsense approach to the race is what’s most appealing to the more than 1,000 finishers. And the double loop course is fast AF — 30 percent of the field earned a BQ in 2017! There is also a flat, fast half-marathon offered the same day. RELATED: The 15 Fastest Fall Marathons to Earn a BQ [caption id="attachment_16705" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - Marine Corps Marathon in Washington, D.C. Photo: Marine Corps Marathon[/caption]

10. Marine Corps Marathon

Location: Washington, D.C. Date: Sunday, October 28, 2018 Often called the “People’s Marathon,” the Marine Corps Marathon doesn’t offer any prize money to the top finishers. And it’s so popular, it now uses a lottery entry system every March. For more than 40 years, thousands of runners have taken on this unique tour of the nation’s capitol, passing by monumental D.C. sights like the Jefferson Memorial, the National Mall and Arlington National Cemetery. But more rewarding than the miles, participants agree, are the Marines along the course who cheer runners on and place the finishing medals around their necks. [caption id="attachment_64672" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - TCS New York City Marathon in New York, New York Photo: NYRR[/caption]

11. TCS New York City Marathon

Location: New York, NY Date: Sunday, November 4, 2018 Ready for the big stage? The TCS New York City Marathon is the world’s largest marathon, featuring 26.2 miles through all five boroughs of the Big Apple. It’s notoriously difficult to get into the race via lottery (though you can sign up more easily through a charity team or with a qualified time). From hearing Frank Sinatra’s “New York, New York” at the starting line in Staten Island to pushing through the final stretch of the famous finish in Central Park, the marathoners who do get a bib will chase after some of the most iconic miles in marathon history. RELATED: How to Run (And Watch!) the NYC Marathon Like a Pro [caption id="attachment_16708" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - Anthem Richmond Marathon in RIchmond, Virginia Photo: Sports Backers[/caption]

12. Anthem Richmond Marathon

Location: Richmond, VA Date: Saturday, November 10, 2018 First-time marathoners who may feel intimidated by some of the big city races on this list should check out the Anthem Richmond Marathon. It’s not called “America’s Friendliest Marathon” for nothing! There are "junk food stations" at miles 16 and 22, a few wet washcloth stops, energy-boosting “party zones,” and a post-race pizza and beer party on Brown’s Island. The 41th annual race loops through historic neighborhoods, along the James River and downhill to the finish line in the heart of the city. It also features a half-marathon, 8K and kids’ run all on the same day. RELATED: 13 Race Day Tips for Newbie Runners [caption id="attachment_64673" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - Rock ‘n’ Roll Las Vegas Marathon in Las Vegas, Nevada Photo: Donald Miralle / Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon Series[/caption]

13. Rock ‘n’ Roll Las Vegas Marathon

Location: Las Vegas, NV Date: Sunday, November 11, 2018 Think you need sexy stilettos for a night out in Las Vegas? Guess again. All you need for the nighttime Rock ‘n’ Roll Las Vegas Marathon are your sneakers (and maybe a headlamp). The flat course runs straight through the flashy Las Vegas Strip to the tunes of live bands. After conquering 26.2 miles of Sin City, marathoners are invited to celebrate at an after-party. And yes, you can still leave those high heels at home. There’s also a half-marathon, 10K, 5K and even a “run through wedding” event over the weekend. [caption id="attachment_64674" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - California International Marathon in Sacramento, California Photo: California International Marathon[/caption]

14. California International Marathon

Location: Sacramento, CA Date: Sunday, December 2, 2018 For 35 years, the California International Marathon has offered a little something for everyone. The self-proclaimed “fastest course in the West” is a favorite among first timers, as well as those seeking a marathon PR or BQ time. The gentle rolling hills, very few turns, near-perfect running weather and beautiful fall foliage don’t hurt either. More than 9,000 runners will take on 26.2 point-to-point, feel-good miles through the City of Trees, but there is also a four-person relay and a 2.62-mile fun run the same day. RELATED: The 15 Best Destination Half-Marathons in the World [caption id="attachment_64675" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. - Honolulu Marathon in Honolulu, Hawaii Photo: Honolulu Marathon[/caption]

15. Honolulu Marathon

Location: Honolulu, HI Date: Sunday, December 9, 2018 How does an early December escape to paradise sound? The only catch is you have to start running the Honolulu Marathon at 5 a.m.! Don’t worry, fireworks and a gorgeous sunrise will help light the way. The mostly flat race starts in downtown Honolulu, passes through Waikiki and goes up and around Diamond Head. Say aloha to the most amazing mountain and ocean views, and generally a rainbow or two. At the beachfront finish line, you’ll be rewarded with a medal, a lei of shells, and “malasada” (Hawaiian fried dough). The race is one of the largest in the county — with no time limit or cap on participants — and there’s also a 10K and mile event the same weekend. Originally posted August 12, 2013. Updated January 8, 2018. Read More 50 Running Resources for Speed, Strength and Nutrition Why I Started Running — And Never Stopped How to Score Perfect Running Form Like the Pros

The post The 15 Best Fall Marathons in the U.S. appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/best-marathons-fall/feed/ 8
20 Questions With Olympic Skier Gus Kenworthy http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/gus-kenworthy-skier-winter-olympics/ Tue, 09 Jan 2018 12:15:17 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=64688 Gus Kenworthy Olympic Freestyle Skier

[caption id="attachment_64703" align="alignnone" width="620"]20 Questions With Gus Kenworthy Olympic Skier Photo: 24 Hour Fitness[/caption]

Even if you didn’t grow up skiing double black diamonds, you probably know the name Gus Kenworthy, after making headlines as the first openly gay man to compete in the Winter Olympics. And if you’re planning to watch the 2018 Winter Olympics, the seven-time world champion and Olympic silver medalist is the guy you want to watch in PyeongChang.

Also worth noting: Kenworthy is impossibly fit (2017 ESPN Body Issue proof here). And when the Telluride-native isn’t on the slopes, he’s most likely at the squat rack. So it’s no surprise that 24 Hour Fitness tapped Kenworthy (among other U.S. Olympic medalists) as inspiration for their new Team USA Bootcamp program. The high-intensity interval training class, which launched on January 1, features training techniques stolen straight from the pros. Think: functional bodyweight training, metabolic conditioning and burns-so-good plyometrics.

Daily Burn posted up next to Kenworthy for the pre-PyeongChang kick-off class, then grilled the 26-year-old slopestyle star on his hopes, fears, fitness routine and what’s in his fridge. (Hint: a whole lot of hot sauce.)

RELATED: The Olympics-Inspired Bodyweight Workout [INFOGRAPHIC]

https://www.instagram.com/p/BL4IhiZjAuK/

20 Questions with Freestyle Skier Gus Kenworthy

First time on skis… “I was three years old. My family moved to a small ski town, and my mom learned to ski at the same time as me and my brothers. My first skiing memory was riding up the chairlift with my mom. I would fall asleep in her lap, and then she'd wake me up at the top, and say, ‘Wake up, we're going!’ We’d do the run, then get back on the chairlift and I'd fall asleep again.”

Signature trick… “The double cork 1080 blunt grab, or the ‘dub cork, 10 blunt’ for short. It's not the most technical trick ever, but it's one of my favorites and probably most recognizable for me. Double cork basically means I'm going off axis, flipping twice; 1080 means that I'm spinning three times; and a blunt grab is just where you do a tail grab, but you're right on the very, very end of your skis.”

Greatest athletic achievement… “My silver medal in Sochi in slopestyle. That was the inaugural event — the first time our sport had ever been in the Games. I landed a run that I was really proud of, and got silver. The guy who got first and the guy who got third were also American, so it was the third sweep in U.S. history. The whole thing, it's still surreal.”

Hours on the slopes… “During the winter, I ski about five days a week, usually 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. It's not an insane amount of hours, but it's just a lot of work in those hours — grinding, trying new tricks, pushing, hustling, taking falls.”

Hours in the gym… “My workouts are between one and two hours, six days a week.”

Leg day workout… “I'll only do four exercises — each for three sets, 10 to 15 reps. For example, I’ll do back squats, then a leg press or a leg extension, a calf raise, and then a sissy squat or something for hamstrings.”

RELATED: 9 Reasons to Never Skip Leg Day

[caption id="attachment_64706" align="alignnone" width="620"]Gus Kenworthy Workout - Winter Olympics 2018 Photo: 24 Hour Fitness[/caption]

Exercise you love… “My favorite exercise is bench press. It's so meathead, I know. But it's been my favorite thing — ever since I blew my knee out a few years ago and couldn’t do legs, so I started doing everything else. I really got into working out, and started training with my brother. He was in the military, and I was so scrawny. I couldn't do a single rep, with the bar and a plate on each side. I was doing 10 reps, just with the bar, and it was so embarrassing how nothing it was. And so now, to do a full set of 10 at 205, or 225, it feels so cool. That's the exercise I've seen the most progress with by far.”

Exercise you love to hate… “Squats and deadlifts. I always dread doing them, but I know they’re important for my sport. I always feel really good about it afterwards. And it feels cool to move a lot of weight.”

Favorite cross-training workout… “We used to jump on the trampoline a lot. We actually don't do it that much anymore, but growing up, so many of the tricks I learned on skis, I first learned on the trampoline. That was the most fun cross-training I did as a kid, when I was first getting into the sport.”

RELATED: The 15 Most Underrated Exercises, According to Trainers

The one thing that's always in your fridge… “My sponsor Monster makes a Java Monster that I really like in the morning. And then, otherwise…it's basically a lot of hot sauces! I never make food at home because I travel so much, so I just always eat out or order in. Yeah, it's pretty much just condiments — it's bad.”

Go-to cheat meal… “Mint chocolate chip ice cream.”

Healthy airport snack… “Almonds or any sort of trail mix.”

Fancy juice or protein shake… “Both! I love fancy cold-pressed green juice, and I have a protein shake after every workout.”

RELATED: 15 Deliciously Healthy Green Smoothie Recipes

Secret talent… “After skiing I want to get into acting. I wish I could say I'm a super-talented actor, but — you know what, I going with it. I'm putting it out there in the universe.”

https://www.instagram.com/p/BbSQKmAAeOJ/

Signature celebration move… “I raise my hands out to the sides, like a ‘say something’ kind of thing. It’s kind of cocky, I know. But some people wave their poles around or throw a fist in the air, and I feel like mine is a little subtler.”

All-time hero… “My mom. She raised my brothers and I. She's so generous with her time, and definitely sacrificed a lot to take me around to ski competitions and hockey games and everything else when I was a kid.”

Motivational mantra… “One thing that I've been telling myself, especially in recent years, is: ‘This one thing doesn't define me.’ I have to remind myself of that, because I get caught up in feeling that I'm going to disappoint people if I don't do well. I want to be successful in skiing, and in so many things. But whether or not I win an event is not really going to change my life in that many ways. Whether I land that run, or I don't land that run. Whether I get on the podium, or I don't. My family is still going to be at the bottom, supporting me. I have such good friends and I have sponsors that are going to stand by me. I have so much to be appreciative of.”

RELATED: 19 Positive Affirmations That Will Change the Way You Think

The one thing that scares you… “Being alone, like literally. I have a house in Denver, and I used to have friends living in the guest rooms. But since [last] January, it's just been me. I love horror movies and crime shows, but then I'll be in my bed alone at night and I'll hear a creak downstairs, and get so freaked out.”

What excites you most about the 2018 Games… “Well first, I'll be most excited if I get to go. We still have a selection event [on January 15th], but I’m hopeful. Also, the last Games, none of my family made it. It was really last-minute when the team was announced and really expensive, so my family couldn't afford it. This time around, my mom wouldn't miss it for the world. I also have some amazing Olympic sponsors that are going to help make it easier for my family. That's what I'm most excited for, to have all my family there.”

Olympic goal… “Olympic gold. I think that's the same for everybody. But right now, I'm just focusing on making the team. I competed in two disciplines at the last Games. I just narrowly missed going for both of them. This time around, I'd really like to go for both, especially the one that I missed out on last time [halfpipe]. I'd like to get a medal in both my disciplines.”

Follow Gus Kenworthy’s road to the 2018 PyeongChang Olympic Games via Instagram (@guskenworthy) and Twitter (@guskenworthy). The Opening Ceremonies will air on Friday, February 9 on NBC. To try the Team USA Bootcamp, head to 24 Hour Fitness clubs nationwide.

Read More
3 Quick HIIT Workouts for Beginners
What Happens to Your Body When You Skip the Gym
11 Healthy Homemade Protein Bar Recipes

The post 20 Questions With Olympic Skier Gus Kenworthy appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
Gus Kenworthy Olympic Freestyle Skier

[caption id="attachment_64703" align="alignnone" width="620"]20 Questions With Gus Kenworthy Olympic Skier Photo: 24 Hour Fitness[/caption] Even if you didn’t grow up skiing double black diamonds, you probably know the name Gus Kenworthy, after making headlines as the first openly gay man to compete in the Winter Olympics. And if you’re planning to watch the 2018 Winter Olympics, the seven-time world champion and Olympic silver medalist is the guy you want to watch in PyeongChang. Also worth noting: Kenworthy is impossibly fit (2017 ESPN Body Issue proof here). And when the Telluride-native isn’t on the slopes, he’s most likely at the squat rack. So it’s no surprise that 24 Hour Fitness tapped Kenworthy (among other U.S. Olympic medalists) as inspiration for their new Team USA Bootcamp program. The high-intensity interval training class, which launched on January 1, features training techniques stolen straight from the pros. Think: functional bodyweight training, metabolic conditioning and burns-so-good plyometrics. Daily Burn posted up next to Kenworthy for the pre-PyeongChang kick-off class, then grilled the 26-year-old slopestyle star on his hopes, fears, fitness routine and what’s in his fridge. (Hint: a whole lot of hot sauce.) RELATED: The Olympics-Inspired Bodyweight Workout [INFOGRAPHIC] https://www.instagram.com/p/BL4IhiZjAuK/

20 Questions with Freestyle Skier Gus Kenworthy

First time on skis… “I was three years old. My family moved to a small ski town, and my mom learned to ski at the same time as me and my brothers. My first skiing memory was riding up the chairlift with my mom. I would fall asleep in her lap, and then she'd wake me up at the top, and say, ‘Wake up, we're going!’ We’d do the run, then get back on the chairlift and I'd fall asleep again.” Signature trick… “The double cork 1080 blunt grab, or the ‘dub cork, 10 blunt’ for short. It's not the most technical trick ever, but it's one of my favorites and probably most recognizable for me. Double cork basically means I'm going off axis, flipping twice; 1080 means that I'm spinning three times; and a blunt grab is just where you do a tail grab, but you're right on the very, very end of your skis.” Greatest athletic achievement… “My silver medal in Sochi in slopestyle. That was the inaugural event — the first time our sport had ever been in the Games. I landed a run that I was really proud of, and got silver. The guy who got first and the guy who got third were also American, so it was the third sweep in U.S. history. The whole thing, it's still surreal.” Hours on the slopes… “During the winter, I ski about five days a week, usually 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. It's not an insane amount of hours, but it's just a lot of work in those hours — grinding, trying new tricks, pushing, hustling, taking falls.” Hours in the gym… “My workouts are between one and two hours, six days a week.” Leg day workout… “I'll only do four exercises — each for three sets, 10 to 15 reps. For example, I’ll do back squats, then a leg press or a leg extension, a calf raise, and then a sissy squat or something for hamstrings.” RELATED: 9 Reasons to Never Skip Leg Day [caption id="attachment_64706" align="alignnone" width="620"]Gus Kenworthy Workout - Winter Olympics 2018 Photo: 24 Hour Fitness[/caption] Exercise you love… “My favorite exercise is bench press. It's so meathead, I know. But it's been my favorite thing — ever since I blew my knee out a few years ago and couldn’t do legs, so I started doing everything else. I really got into working out, and started training with my brother. He was in the military, and I was so scrawny. I couldn't do a single rep, with the bar and a plate on each side. I was doing 10 reps, just with the bar, and it was so embarrassing how nothing it was. And so now, to do a full set of 10 at 205, or 225, it feels so cool. That's the exercise I've seen the most progress with by far.” Exercise you love to hate… “Squats and deadlifts. I always dread doing them, but I know they’re important for my sport. I always feel really good about it afterwards. And it feels cool to move a lot of weight.” Favorite cross-training workout… “We used to jump on the trampoline a lot. We actually don't do it that much anymore, but growing up, so many of the tricks I learned on skis, I first learned on the trampoline. That was the most fun cross-training I did as a kid, when I was first getting into the sport.” RELATED: The 15 Most Underrated Exercises, According to Trainers The one thing that's always in your fridge… “My sponsor Monster makes a Java Monster that I really like in the morning. And then, otherwise…it's basically a lot of hot sauces! I never make food at home because I travel so much, so I just always eat out or order in. Yeah, it's pretty much just condiments — it's bad.” Go-to cheat meal… “Mint chocolate chip ice cream.” Healthy airport snack… “Almonds or any sort of trail mix.” Fancy juice or protein shake… “Both! I love fancy cold-pressed green juice, and I have a protein shake after every workout.” RELATED: 15 Deliciously Healthy Green Smoothie Recipes Secret talent… “After skiing I want to get into acting. I wish I could say I'm a super-talented actor, but — you know what, I going with it. I'm putting it out there in the universe.” https://www.instagram.com/p/BbSQKmAAeOJ/ Signature celebration move… “I raise my hands out to the sides, like a ‘say something’ kind of thing. It’s kind of cocky, I know. But some people wave their poles around or throw a fist in the air, and I feel like mine is a little subtler.” All-time hero… “My mom. She raised my brothers and I. She's so generous with her time, and definitely sacrificed a lot to take me around to ski competitions and hockey games and everything else when I was a kid.” Motivational mantra… “One thing that I've been telling myself, especially in recent years, is: ‘This one thing doesn't define me.’ I have to remind myself of that, because I get caught up in feeling that I'm going to disappoint people if I don't do well. I want to be successful in skiing, and in so many things. But whether or not I win an event is not really going to change my life in that many ways. Whether I land that run, or I don't land that run. Whether I get on the podium, or I don't. My family is still going to be at the bottom, supporting me. I have such good friends and I have sponsors that are going to stand by me. I have so much to be appreciative of.” RELATED: 19 Positive Affirmations That Will Change the Way You Think The one thing that scares you… “Being alone, like literally. I have a house in Denver, and I used to have friends living in the guest rooms. But since [last] January, it's just been me. I love horror movies and crime shows, but then I'll be in my bed alone at night and I'll hear a creak downstairs, and get so freaked out.” What excites you most about the 2018 Games… “Well first, I'll be most excited if I get to go. We still have a selection event [on January 15th], but I’m hopeful. Also, the last Games, none of my family made it. It was really last-minute when the team was announced and really expensive, so my family couldn't afford it. This time around, my mom wouldn't miss it for the world. I also have some amazing Olympic sponsors that are going to help make it easier for my family. That's what I'm most excited for, to have all my family there.” Olympic goal… “Olympic gold. I think that's the same for everybody. But right now, I'm just focusing on making the team. I competed in two disciplines at the last Games. I just narrowly missed going for both of them. This time around, I'd really like to go for both, especially the one that I missed out on last time [halfpipe]. I'd like to get a medal in both my disciplines.” Follow Gus Kenworthy’s road to the 2018 PyeongChang Olympic Games via Instagram (@guskenworthy) and Twitter (@guskenworthy). The Opening Ceremonies will air on Friday, February 9 on NBC. To try the Team USA Bootcamp, head to 24 Hour Fitness clubs nationwide. Read More 3 Quick HIIT Workouts for Beginners What Happens to Your Body When You Skip the Gym 11 Healthy Homemade Protein Bar Recipes

The post 20 Questions With Olympic Skier Gus Kenworthy appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
7 Ways to Power Your Workouts With Social Media http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/social-media-workout-motivation/ Fri, 05 Jan 2018 12:15:13 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=64520 7 Ways to Use Social Media to Better Your Workout Motivation

[caption id="attachment_64524" align="alignnone" width="620"]7 Ways to Use Social Media to Better Your Workout Motivation Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

Whether you aim to get your foot out the door and start a regular fitness routine or want to set a personal record, you probably have a list of goals you’re hoping to tackle this year. But let’s face it — sometimes staying motivated well beyond January is just plain hard.

Luckily, there’s a secret for nailing your objectives — that is, social media. While you might think post-workout selfies can cause more of a distraction than drive your determination (and they can be), it’s possible to harness the power of social media for good.

“Seeing others succeed in sport can spur a drive of wanting to achieve for ourselves. If we can learn to channel this innate tendency for comparison we can leverage social media to motivate performance and discipline goal attainment,” says Justin Ross, a Denver-based sports psychologist.

Make social media work in your workout favor with these go-getter strategies.

RELATED: Just Not Feeling It Today? 33 Sources of Workout Motivation

Social Media Tips to Pump Up Your Workout Motivation

1. Post a sweaty selfie.

It’s time to embrace it. Research shows that snapping a selfie can help with your weight loss goals. In particular, before and after photos can motivate you to stick with healthy habits. In Daily Burn’s active Facebook community group, members often post photos of weight loss success, leading to praise and applause from others.

Similarly, Tone It Up (TIU) users share evidence of their exercise and diet achievements. “On days when we need extra motivation, we turn to our community on Instagram @ToneItUp. We scroll through the check-ins for #TIUteam to see their sweaty selfies and healthy recipe pics — there's nothing more inspiring!” says Katrina Scott, co-creator of TIU.

RELATED: 19 Reasons to Work Out (Beyond the Perfect Body)

2. Join a community.

Not everyone has a cheerleader in their corner IRL. And that's OK, because social media is there to provide a virtual one. Online communities on Instagram, Facebook or even within certain apps let you connect to people all over the world and share your journey in a relatively anonymous platform, one which is available 24/7. New research found that sharing ups and downs with these online communities can be key to dropping pounds. “Encouragement from others is perhaps the greatest strength that social media can offer all of us,” says Ross.

These online support groups can be an incredible resource for overcoming those been-there, done-that challenges and pitfalls.We created Tone It Up because we envisioned a community where women can come together and support each other to reach their fitness goals, and social media plays a huge role in that,” says Karena Dawn, co-creator of Tone It Up. In Daily Burn’s community, you’ll also see words of congratulations and encouragement, as well as accountability threads. Whether you just nailed a full push-up or need someone to motivate you to get up and get sweating, people in the group provide the positivity.

3. Make it public.

If you have a workout goal, target race pace or even just a hard workout on the calendar, make it public. “Knowing that you've committed to a work out, a training cycle or an upcoming race, and that others will be following your progress online can motivate you to get out the door even when you don't necessarily want to,” says Ross.

Strava offers one example of this pay-off. “Strava is great for connecting fellow athletes and being able to follow in real time what others — including some elites and pros who share their profiles publicly — are doing. It can also spur friendly competition through segment chasing or signing up for challenges,” Ross says.

RELATED: 4 Science-Backed Ways to Motivate Yourself to Work Out

4. Do a challenge.

“Encouragement from others is perhaps the greatest strength that social media can offer all of us."

Speaking of a little healthy competition, it never hurt anyone, right? Fitness and health-related challenges are everywhere on social media from 30 days of yoga to #runstreak to Whole 30 and it can be a good way to kick-start a new habit or routine, while keeping you accountable.

“Right now I'm doing a 30-day gut cleanse. The day I decided to do the cleanse, I shared about it on Instagram. By publicly sharing my goal, I'm far more likely to stay committed to the plan,” says Gabby Bernstein, lululemon Global Yoga Ambassador and best-selling author of the new Judgment Detox.

5. Check in.

When you’re working out alone and don’t have someone to share your ups and downs with, it’s easy to lose your mojo. Instead, regularly update your social media friends on your progress and milestones. During Daily Burn 365, the live chat function allows members to discuss the day’s workout in real-time, including struggles they overcame and how strong they feel mid- and post-sweat.

Similarly, Scott says, “TIU girls always cheer each other on and comment on each other's check-ins, too. So many women have met their best friends through this beautiful community — it shows how powerful and life-changing social media can be!”

RELATED: 9 Ways to Find Workout Motivation (Every Damn Day)

6. Stay positive.

Social media doesn’t just build your physical fitness, it can help improve your mental muscles too. One of the easiest ways to re-train your brain? Affirmations.

Luckily, Instagram is full of positive self-talk. “Set your alarm with an affirmation in the morning or all throughout the day!” says Bernstein, whose Spirit Junkie app is also a treasure trove of positive self-talk. “Choose from any of the hundreds of previous affirmations to turn inward, and shift your perception. Save your favorite affirmations, and share with friends to spread the love,” she says.

7. Set limits.

While social media does fire up the competitive juices, it’s important not to go overboard. “We can quickly derail our training to chase what we see someone else doing on social media, which will ultimately hurt our own progress,” says Ross. “It’s important to realize that social media is only one tool in the arsenal of training.” His advice? Create your own guidelines for the total length of time you allow yourself on social media each day.

Read More
Social Media Addiction is Real. Here’s How to Avoid It
The Wake-Up Call That Finally Motivated Me to Lose Weight
19 Positive Affirmations That’ll Change the Way You Think

The post 7 Ways to Power Your Workouts With Social Media appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
7 Ways to Use Social Media to Better Your Workout Motivation

[caption id="attachment_64524" align="alignnone" width="620"]7 Ways to Use Social Media to Better Your Workout Motivation Photo: Twenty20[/caption] Whether you aim to get your foot out the door and start a regular fitness routine or want to set a personal record, you probably have a list of goals you’re hoping to tackle this year. But let’s face it — sometimes staying motivated well beyond January is just plain hard. Luckily, there’s a secret for nailing your objectives — that is, social media. While you might think post-workout selfies can cause more of a distraction than drive your determination (and they can be), it’s possible to harness the power of social media for good. “Seeing others succeed in sport can spur a drive of wanting to achieve for ourselves. If we can learn to channel this innate tendency for comparison we can leverage social media to motivate performance and discipline goal attainment,” says Justin Ross, a Denver-based sports psychologist. Make social media work in your workout favor with these go-getter strategies. RELATED: Just Not Feeling It Today? 33 Sources of Workout Motivation

Social Media Tips to Pump Up Your Workout Motivation

1. Post a sweaty selfie.

It’s time to embrace it. Research shows that snapping a selfie can help with your weight loss goals. In particular, before and after photos can motivate you to stick with healthy habits. In Daily Burn’s active Facebook community group, members often post photos of weight loss success, leading to praise and applause from others. Similarly, Tone It Up (TIU) users share evidence of their exercise and diet achievements. “On days when we need extra motivation, we turn to our community on Instagram @ToneItUp. We scroll through the check-ins for #TIUteam to see their sweaty selfies and healthy recipe pics — there's nothing more inspiring!” says Katrina Scott, co-creator of TIU. RELATED: 19 Reasons to Work Out (Beyond the Perfect Body)

2. Join a community.

Not everyone has a cheerleader in their corner IRL. And that's OK, because social media is there to provide a virtual one. Online communities on Instagram, Facebook or even within certain apps let you connect to people all over the world and share your journey in a relatively anonymous platform, one which is available 24/7. New research found that sharing ups and downs with these online communities can be key to dropping pounds. “Encouragement from others is perhaps the greatest strength that social media can offer all of us,” says Ross. These online support groups can be an incredible resource for overcoming those been-there, done-that challenges and pitfalls.We created Tone It Up because we envisioned a community where women can come together and support each other to reach their fitness goals, and social media plays a huge role in that,” says Karena Dawn, co-creator of Tone It Up. In Daily Burn’s community, you’ll also see words of congratulations and encouragement, as well as accountability threads. Whether you just nailed a full push-up or need someone to motivate you to get up and get sweating, people in the group provide the positivity.

3. Make it public.

If you have a workout goal, target race pace or even just a hard workout on the calendar, make it public. “Knowing that you've committed to a work out, a training cycle or an upcoming race, and that others will be following your progress online can motivate you to get out the door even when you don't necessarily want to,” says Ross. Strava offers one example of this pay-off. “Strava is great for connecting fellow athletes and being able to follow in real time what others — including some elites and pros who share their profiles publicly — are doing. It can also spur friendly competition through segment chasing or signing up for challenges,” Ross says. RELATED: 4 Science-Backed Ways to Motivate Yourself to Work Out

4. Do a challenge.

“Encouragement from others is perhaps the greatest strength that social media can offer all of us."
Speaking of a little healthy competition, it never hurt anyone, right? Fitness and health-related challenges are everywhere on social media from 30 days of yoga to #runstreak to Whole 30 and it can be a good way to kick-start a new habit or routine, while keeping you accountable. “Right now I'm doing a 30-day gut cleanse. The day I decided to do the cleanse, I shared about it on Instagram. By publicly sharing my goal, I'm far more likely to stay committed to the plan,” says Gabby Bernstein, lululemon Global Yoga Ambassador and best-selling author of the new Judgment Detox.

5. Check in.

When you’re working out alone and don’t have someone to share your ups and downs with, it’s easy to lose your mojo. Instead, regularly update your social media friends on your progress and milestones. During Daily Burn 365, the live chat function allows members to discuss the day’s workout in real-time, including struggles they overcame and how strong they feel mid- and post-sweat. Similarly, Scott says, “TIU girls always cheer each other on and comment on each other's check-ins, too. So many women have met their best friends through this beautiful community — it shows how powerful and life-changing social media can be!” RELATED: 9 Ways to Find Workout Motivation (Every Damn Day)

6. Stay positive.

Social media doesn’t just build your physical fitness, it can help improve your mental muscles too. One of the easiest ways to re-train your brain? Affirmations. Luckily, Instagram is full of positive self-talk. “Set your alarm with an affirmation in the morning or all throughout the day!” says Bernstein, whose Spirit Junkie app is also a treasure trove of positive self-talk. “Choose from any of the hundreds of previous affirmations to turn inward, and shift your perception. Save your favorite affirmations, and share with friends to spread the love,” she says.

7. Set limits.

While social media does fire up the competitive juices, it’s important not to go overboard. “We can quickly derail our training to chase what we see someone else doing on social media, which will ultimately hurt our own progress,” says Ross. “It’s important to realize that social media is only one tool in the arsenal of training.” His advice? Create your own guidelines for the total length of time you allow yourself on social media each day. Read More Social Media Addiction is Real. Here’s How to Avoid It The Wake-Up Call That Finally Motivated Me to Lose Weight 19 Positive Affirmations That’ll Change the Way You Think

The post 7 Ways to Power Your Workouts With Social Media appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/the-50-best-half-marathons-in-the-u-s/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/the-50-best-half-marathons-in-the-u-s/#respond Thu, 04 Jan 2018 16:15:47 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=23370 Best Half-Marathons

The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S.

If it seems like everywhere you look someone is running a half-marathon, that’s because it’s becoming increasingly true. According to Running USA, 1.9 million runners finished a half-marathon in the U.S. in 2016, with a record 2,800 half-marathon events in the country that year. While running 13.1 miles can still sound plenty intimidating, many runners see it as a way to work toward a full marathon, or as a more feasible (and still impressive!) goal to check off the bucket list. With the proper training (around 16 weeks for beginners), anyone really can run a half-marathon.

Whether you’re a running newbie or a seasoned pro who wants to run a half in every state of the nation, we’ve narrowed down the thousands of options. Trust us, these 50 half-marathons (listed in alphabetical order by state) are well worth the training and registration fees. You’ll know it as soon as you cross that 13.1-mile finish line!

RELATED: Daily Burn Audio Workouts: Take a Trainer on Your Run

The Best Half-Marathons Across the Country

[caption id="attachment_64478" align="alignnone" width="620"]The Best 50 Half-Marathons in the U.S. - Mercedes-Benz Half Marathon in Birmingham, Alabama Photo: Mercedes-Benz Marathon Weekend[/caption]

1. Alabama

Mercedes-Benz Half Marathon
Location: Birmingham, AL
Date: Sunday, February 11, 2018
Four thousand runners will take on this popular half-marathon course through Alabama’s largest city. Scan for sights on-the-go including the Birmingham Museum of Art, 16th Street Baptist Church, Birmingham Civil Rights Institute and the very hilly Highland Park neighborhood around mile 8. Registration fee: $70-$120

[caption id="attachment_23720" align="alignnone" width="620"]Mayor’s Midnight Sun Half Marathon Photo: goseawolves.com[/caption]

2. Alaska

Anchorage Mayor’s Half-Marathon
Location: Anchorage, AK
Date: Saturday, June 23, 2018
Celebrate the extra daylight hours of the summer solstice at Alaska’s largest half-marathon. With stunning views of Mt. McKinley on the clearest days, you’ll experience the wilderness and tough trails of the Last Frontier — in a whole new light. Registration fee: $60-$100

RELATED: 9 Things I Wish I Knew Before I Started Running

[caption id="attachment_23721" align="alignnone" width="620"]Sedona Half Marathon Photo: Sedona Half Marathon[/caption]

3. Arizona

Sedona Half Marathon
Location: Sedona, AZ
Date: Saturday, February 3, 2018
The 4,590 feet above sea level elevation may make it hard to catch your breath at this challenging half-marathon. The scenic red rocks and gorgeous valleys along the 13.1 miles of paved and dirt roads are worth the extra effort, and may also take your breath away. Registration fee: $50-$80

[caption id="attachment_64479" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - 
Little Rock Half Marathon Photo: Little Rock Marathon[/caption]

4. Arkansas

Little Rock Half Marathon
Location: Little Rock, AR
Date: Sunday, March 4, 2018
Up to 4,600 runners will trek through downtown Little Rock and along the Arkansas River to earn the “appropriately large” (at 4 ½ inches and 11 ounces!) finisher’s medal. It’s one of the state’s most popular running events with a fun, new theme each year and a new 2018 course. Registration fee: $70-$125

RELATED: Winter Running Guide: How to Run Faster by Spring

[caption id="attachment_64480" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - Napa to Sonoma Wine Country Half Marathon in Sonoma, California Photo: Napa-to-Sonoma Wine Country Half Marathon[/caption]

5. California

Napa to Sonoma Wine Country Half Marathon
Location: Sonoma, CA
Date: Sunday, July 15, 2018
Like running? Love wine? Those are the only requirements for this point-to-point half-marathon through the rolling vineyards of California wine country. It starts at Cuvaison Estate Wines and ends with tastings in Sonoma Plaza. But don’t worry, there’s also a special wine stop around mile 10! Registration fee: $180 for individuals and $175 for team participants; sold out

[caption id="attachment_23724" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Golden Leaf Half Marathon[/caption]

6. Colorado

Golden Leaf Half Marathon
Location: Snowmass Village, CO
Date: Saturday, September 22, 2018
Hailed by magazines like Colorado Runner and Trail Runner, this Snowmass Village-to-Aspen half-marathon attracts 1,000 serious runners and leaf peepers alike. Expect major elevation changes and tough backcountry trails through the Rocky Mountain ski areas, all surrounded by the brilliant colors of the fall foliage season. Registration fee: $80

RELATED: 50 Running Resources for Speed, Strength and Nutrition

[caption id="attachment_64481" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - Faxon Law Fairfield Half Marathon in Fairfield, Connecticut Photo: Faxon Law Fairfield Road Races[/caption]

7. Connecticut

Faxon Law Fairfield Half Marathon
Location: Fairfield, CT
Date: Sunday, June 3, 2018
This beachfront half-marathon has been a popular annual event since 1981. These days, up to 4,000 runners come out to Jennings Beach each year. You’ll race along Long Island Sound, over a few bridges and past the impressive area homes on this out-and-back course. Registration fee: $40-$65

[caption id="attachment_23689" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Dave Frederick / A Simple Running Log[/caption]

8. Delaware

Rehoboth Beach Seashore Half Marathon
Location: Rehoboth Beach, DE
Date: Saturday, December 8, 2018
It may be a chilly, little winter race but this coastal half-marathon has a lot of charm. The out-and-back course starts and finishes on the beach town’s historic boardwalk and features a stretch along the Junction and Breakwater Trail, which used to serve as a railroad line. Registration fee: $90-$160

RELATED: 13 Race Day Tips for Newbie Runners

[caption id="attachment_23725" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Disney Sports[/caption]

9. Florida

Disney Princess Half Marathon
Location: Orlando, FL
Date: Sunday, February 25, 2018
Show off your sparkliest tiara and join Snow White, Sleeping Beauty and the rest of the Disney princesses (plus some 13,000 other runners) at this magical 13.1-mile run. You never know which of your favorite characters might be hanging around Cinderella’s Castle, Magic Kingdom® Park and Epcot®, so be sure to bring a camera! Registration fee: $160-$195; sold out

[caption id="attachment_64486" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - Thanksgiving Day Half Marathon in Atlanta, Georgia Photo: Atlanta Track Club[/caption]

10. Georgia

Thanksgiving Day Half Marathon
Location: Atlanta, GA
Date: Thursday, November 22, 2018
Get a head start on burning off the gravy-soaked calories with this popular Thanksgiving Day race. You’ll have to make your way past Atlanta landmarks like Centennial Olympic Park before getting to the finish line — and the turkey and pie! Registration fee: $60

RELATED: The 10 Best Races That Are Fit for Foodies

[caption id="attachment_64487" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half Marathons in the U.S. - The Hapalua Half Marathon in Waikiki, Hawaii Photo: The Hapalua - Hawaii's Half Marathon[/caption]

11. Hawaii

The Hapalua
Location: Waikiki, HI
Date: Sunday, April 8, 2018
Its name means “half” in Hawaiian so it’s no surprise this five-year-old race (organized by the same team behind the Honolulu Marathon) already considers itself the half-marathon to run in the Aloha State. The 13.1 miles of paradise on Oahu’s south shore includes a loop around Diamond Head, Honolulu’s most famous volcano. Registration fee: $85-$180

[caption id="attachment_64492" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - 
Race to Robie Creek Half Marathon in Boise, Idaho Photo: Sawtooth Photo Pros[/caption]

12. Idaho

Race to Robie Creek Half Marathon
Location: Boise, ID
Date: Saturday, April 21, 2018
Considered the “toughest half-marathon in the Northwest,” this race has been a spring tradition in the Boise foothills for more than 40 years. Keep your head up as you climb, climb and climb some more — all the way to Aldape Summit, for an elevation gain of 2,072 feet in the course. Registration fee: $55

RELATED: 15 Best Destination Half-Marathons in the World

[caption id="attachment_16701" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Chicago Half Marathon[/caption]

13. Illinois

Chicago Half Marathon
Location: Chicago, IL
Date: Sunday, September 23, 2018
Take an exclusive tour of the Windy City (by foot) at the only race in Chicago that shuts down the busy Lake Shore Drive completely. This traffic-free stretch offers runners views of the city skyline and Lake Michigan, but you’ll also get to visit Jackson Park and Hyde Park along the way. Registration fee: $75-$135

[caption id="attachment_23691" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: 500festival[/caption]

14. Indiana

OneAmerica 500 Festival Mini-Marathon
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Date: Saturday, May 5, 2018
Start your engines for one of the largest half-marathons in the country, with more than 24,000 participants! Just don’t waste all of your fuel on the lap around the famed Indianapolis Motor Speedway at the halfway point. There’s still the “Victory Mile” to the finish line on New York Street in downtown Indy. Registration fee: $72-$100

RELATED: Why I Started Running — And Never Stopped

[caption id="attachment_64517" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - Dam to Dam Half Marathon in Des Moines, Iowa Photo: Dam to Dam[/caption]

15. Iowa

Dam to Dam Half Marathon
Location: Storm Lake, IA
Date: Saturday, June 2, 2018
This year marks the last (damn) time 8,000 runners will run this flat and fast half-marathon from one dam outside the city to another in the downtown Des Moines. Along the way, they'll pass through Birdland Park, along the Meredith Trail and over the Iowa Women of Achievement Bridge as a fond farewell to the beloved 39-year-old fall race. Registration fee: $40-$60

[caption id="attachment_64503" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - 
Garmin Half Marathon in Olathe, Kansas Photo: Dan Hutchins / Garmin Marathon[/caption]

16. Kansas

Garmin Half Marathon
Location: Olathe, KS
Date: Saturday, April 21, 2018
There’s no place like… Kansas for a half-marathon that’s fit for fans of The Wizard of Oz. Fly through the speedy, flat race (with a few wicked rolling hills) alongside some costumed Dorothys and Cowardly Lions. The loop course also travels along some historic wagon trails early settlers used to go west to California, Oregon and Santa Fe. Registration fee: $70-$120

RELATED: The 9 Best Fun Runs You Can Do With Your Dog

[caption id="attachment_23692" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Run the Bluegrass[/caption]

17. Kentucky

Run the Bluegrass
Location: Lexington, KY
Date: Saturday, March 31, 2018
Join 5,000 runners and horse racing enthusiasts for one of “America’s prettiest half-marathons” through the picturesque Thoroughbred Farms of Kentucky. The rural race starts at Keeneland Race Course, where the 2003 film Seabiscuit was filmed. While there may not be many spectators, expect plenty of horses that’ll motivate you to keep trottin’. Registration fee: $90-$125

[caption id="attachment_23693" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon Series[/caption]

18. Louisiana

Humana Rock ‘n’ Roll New Orleans Half Marathon
Location: New Orleans, LA
Date: Sunday, March 4, 2018
Put on your party pants (and beads) to hightail it from downtown New Orleans, to the beautiful Garden District, back through the world-famous French Quarter and to the finish in New Orleans City Park. The Rock ‘n’ Roll race series is known for its high-energy entertainment, so you’ll love running to the tunes of local Big Easy jazz. Registration fee: $90-$100

RELATED: Need Running Motivation? 20 Epic 'Runspo' Instagrams

[caption id="attachment_23694" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Gameface Media[/caption]

19. Maine

Shipyard Old Port Half
Location: Portland, ME
Date: Saturday, June 23, 2018
It’s like you’re running through a New England postcard (with 3,500 other runners) at this coastal half-marathon through Portland. If the nautical sights of sailboats, lobster boats and tiny little islands all around Casco Bay aren’t enough, how does Shipyard Brewing Company beer at the finish line sound? Registration fee: $59

[caption id="attachment_23695" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Baltimore Half Marathon[/caption]

20. Maryland

CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield Baltimore Half Marathon
Location: Baltimore, MD
Date: Saturday, October 20, 2018
More than 11,000 runners come out each year for a loop around Charm City at this popular urban half-marathon. You’ll pass Patterson Park, climb the hills up to Lake Montebello and run by Johns Hopkins University before cruising into the new finish line at the iconic Inner Harbor. Registration fee: $80-$130

[caption id="attachment_23696" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Run to Remember Boston[/caption]

21. Massachusetts

Run to Remember Boston
Location: Boston, MA
Date: Sunday, May 27, 2018
For more than 10 years, this half-marathon honors Boston’s fallen law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty and takes thousands of runners on a trip around downtown Boston. The race starts and ends at the Seaport World Trade Center, and includes city landmarks like the Charles River, Massachusetts State House and Boston Common. Registration fee: $100-$120

RELATED: The Most Popular Running Routes in All 50 States

[caption id="attachment_23697" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Detroit Marathon[/caption]

22. Michigan

Detroit Free Press/Chemical Bank International Half-Marathon
Location: Detroit, MI
Date: Sunday, October 21, 2018
Technically, this may be one of the best half-marathons in the U.S. and Canada. So bring your passport, because this fast race will motor through mostly flat urban streets and cross the Detroit River (and international border) twice via the Ambassador Bridge and Detroit-Windsor Tunnel. Registration fee: $90-$115

[caption id="attachment_23718" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Jeff Frey & Associates / Grandma’s Marathon[/caption]

23. Minnesota

Garry Bjorklund Half Marathon
Location: Duluth, MN
Date: Saturday, June 16, 2018
The half-marathon counterpart of the beloved Grandma’s Marathon, this 13.1-mile race covers the second half of the gorgeous course. The point-to-point run is named after a local Olympian and follows Old Highway 61 along the beautiful, shimmering waters of Lake Superior. Registration fee: $95

[caption id="attachment_23698" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Mississippi River Half Marathon[/caption]

24. Mississippi

Mississippi River Half Marathon
Location: Greenville, MS
Date: Saturday, February 10, 2018
Imagine the mighty views as you run right up and over the Mississippi River on the Highway 82 Bridge at the start of this point-to-point half-marathon. In fact, it’s the only actual hill in the entire course! In its sixth year, the race continues to make new additions—like this year’s Arkansas side half-marathon. Registration fee: $60-$105

[caption id="attachment_23699" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Karen Martinez[/caption]

25. Missouri

GO! St. Louis Half Marathon
Location: Louis, MO
Date: Sunday, April 8, 2018
The runner’s high comes early in this half-marathon, which hosts 12,000 runners. Catch a straight-on view of The Lou’s Gateway Arch in the first few miles. Hear the roar of the crowd outside Busch Stadium, home of the Cardinals, at mile 5. And smell the hops from Anheuser-Busch Brewery right around the halfway mark. And Registration fee: $55-$110

RELATED: 12 Secrets from the Pros to Run a Personal Best

[caption id="attachment_23729" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Missoula Marathon[/caption]

26. Montana

Missoula Half Marathon
Location: Missoula, MT
Date: Sunday, July 15, 2018
Often called the “Hub of Five Valleys,” Missoula hosts 4,000 runners in its scenic, high-elevation Rocky Mountain town. Though it’s not completely closed to traffic, this rural point-to-point half-marathon starts in the countryside, travels along the Bitterroot River and rolls into the downtown area for a memorable finish. Registration fee: $77-$127

[caption id="attachment_23730" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Gary Dougherty[/caption]

27. Nebraska

Lincoln Half Marathon
Location: Lincoln, NE
Date: Sunday, May 6, 2018
Join thousands of Cornhuskers (and maybe some out-of-towners) for this popular 40-year half-marathon in the heart of the Great Plains. The flat and fast course starts and ends at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and passes the historic State Capitol in the first mile out. Registration fee: $60

[caption id="attachment_23842" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Pond5[/caption]

28. Nevada

Twilight Red Rock Half Marathon
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Date: Saturday, October 13, 2018
Seventeen miles west of the glitzy Las Vegas strip, experience Red Rock Canyon’s colorful sandstone, Joshua trees and Mojave Desert vistas under the moonlight at this nighttime (BYO-headlamp!) half-marathon. There will be a new course this year, but the same sunset start time that night runners love. Registration: $75-$90

[caption id="attachment_64504" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - Big Lake Half Marathon in Alton, New Hampshire Photo: Loco Races[/caption]

29. New Hampshire

Big Lake Half Marathon
Location: Alton, NH
Date: Saturday, May 19, 2018
Need to escape city life? With the glistening waters of Lake Winnipesaukee and the majestic views of the White Mountains, this small annual half-marathon is fit for nature lovers. The “lollipop loop” course runs right along the lake, over many rolling hills and among the nearby cozy vacation cottages. Registration fee: $49-$79

[caption id="attachment_23700" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: RunAPalooza[/caption]

30. New Jersey

Asbury Park Half Marathon
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
Date: Saturday, April 21, 2018
Greetings from Asbury Park, home of a true Jersey Shore half-marathon! (No, not the TV show.) This flat and fast race is in the land of Bruce Springsteen, with local icon Tillie as its funny-faced mascot. You’ll run through the area beach towns, along the historic boardwalk and finish with the “RunAPalooza” post-race party at Convention Hall. Registration fee: $50-$65

RELATED: The Strength Training Workout Every Runner Needs

[caption id="attachment_23701" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Santa Fe Thunder Half Marathon[/caption]

31. New Mexico

Santa Fe Thunder Half Marathon
Location: Santa Fe, NM
Date: Sunday, September 16, 2018
Surrounded by the Sangre de Cristo and Jemez Mountains, you can’t beat the vistas at this point-to-point half-marathon in the Rio Grande Valley. Unless of course, if it was also downhill. And it is! After a short two-mile climb, you’ll drop 1,300 feet overall, passing other sites like Camel Rock and the open-air Sante Fe Opera House. Registration fee: $55-$75

[caption id="attachment_23702" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: NYRR[/caption]

32. New York

United Airlines NYC Half
Location: New York, NY
Date: Sunday, March 18, 2018
Elite runners lead a pack of more than 20,000 runners through 13.1 miles of the Big Apple. With a new course in 2018, you’ll start in Brooklyn, cross the Manhattan Bridge, and head north along the East River to the tourist-filled Times Square, before finishing with four miles in the world famous Central Park. This tour definitely beats any double-decker bus! Registration fee: $130-$145

[caption id="attachment_23704" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Southern Fried Half Marathon[/caption]

33. North Carolina

Southern Fried Half Marathon
Location: Nags Head, NC
Date: Sunday, November 11, 2018
We love the sound of this point-to-point half-marathon — especially with the promise of southern fried sweet taters at the finish line! To earn ‘em, you (and more than 4,000 other runners) will take on the second half of the Outer Banks Marathon course, from the Nags Head sand dunes to the enchanting coastal village of Manteo. Registration fee: $60-$75

[caption id="attachment_23719" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Fargo Marathon[/caption]

34. North Dakota

Fargo Half Marathon
Location: Fargo, ND
Date: Saturday, May 19, 2018
With only a few hundred at the very first half-marathon in 2002, up to 6,500 runners now take to the streets of North Dakota’s largest city each spring. Starting and finishing inside the Fargodome (smile for the jumbotron!), the flat and fast course travels through the “Gateway to the West” and feels like a giant dance party with live bands at every mile. Registration fee: $65-$85

[caption id="attachment_64506" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - Capital City Half Marathon in Columbus, Ohio Photo: The Capital City Half Marathon[/caption]

35. Ohio

OhioHealth Capital City Half Marathon
Location: Columbus, OH
Date: Saturday, April 28, 2018
This 15th annual race promises a whopping 14,500 runners “the best tour of Columbus on two feet” with a new course for 2018. The loop course hits city hotspots like The Ohio State University campus, the Short North Arts District, German Village and downtown Columbus. It also promises a pizza and margaritas at the finish line. Who can argue with that? Registration fee: $60-$115

[caption id="attachment_23706" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - 
The Williams Route 66 Half Marathon in Tulsa, Oklahoma Photo: Route 66 Marathon[/caption]

36. Oklahoma

The Williams Route 66 Half Marathon
Location: Tulsa, OK
Date: Sunday, November 18, 2018
This beloved, high-energy race rocks the streets of downtown Tulsa. Get ready for a fast (though pretty hilly first half) run among Art Deco architecture, bustling neighborhoods and a cross over the famous Route 66 — twice! Registration fee: $90-$105

RELATED: 15 Races for People Who'd Rather Walk Than Run

[caption id="attachment_23707" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - Eugene Half Marathon in Eugene, Oregon Photo: Eugene Marathon[/caption]

37. Oregon

Eugene Half Marathon
Location: Eugene, OR
Date: Sunday, April 29, 2018
What better place for a speedy PR than TrackTown USA itself? Along the course you’ll see the Willamette River and the historic Hayward Field Track, home to Olympic trials, countless record-breaking events and the old stomping grounds of legends like Steve Prefontaine. Finish strong on those last 200 yards on the track — just like Pre himself! Registration fee: $70-$120

[caption id="attachment_64507" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - Philadelphia Half Marathon in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Photo: Philadelphia Marathon[/caption]

38. Pennsylvania

Dietz & Watson Philadelphia Half Marathon
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Date: Sunday, November 20, 2016
Do the steps at the starting line look familiar? That’s because they’re the same steps Rocky sprinted! You can become a champ too with 13.1 miles through Philly’s historic streets of Old City, the high-energy of Center City and the fall trails along the Schuylkill River, before rounding the corner back to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Registration fee: $60-$115

RELATED: Is Your Race Training Giving You Anxiety?

[caption id="attachment_23709" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Liz Cardoso / Global Click Photography[/caption]

39. Rhode Island

Amica Newport Half Marathon
Location: Newport, RI
Date: Sunday, October 7, 2018
You’ll hardly notice all the rolling hills with so much to look at during this picture-perfect oceanside race. The half-marathon, voted best in the Northeast by Competitor magazine in 2016, starts at Easton’s Beach and makes its way around Fort Adams State Park and past the larger-than-life Bellevue Avenue mansions. Registration fee: $65-$85

[caption id="attachment_23786" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S.: Kiawah Island Golf Resort Photo: Kiawah Island Golf Resort[/caption]

40. South Carolina

Kiawah Island Golf Resort Half Marathon
Location: Kiawah Island, SC
Date: Saturday, December 8, 2018
How does an early winter runcation sound? Plan a getaway to this luxurious golf resort for a relaxing retreat and its 41st annual half-marathon. The flat-as-can-be race attracts more than 3,000 to run around the island community, among oak, maple and pine tree-lined streets and scenic marshlands. Just save a little energy to hit the links, too. Registration: $60-$115

[caption id="attachment_23843" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Action Sports Images[/caption]

41. South Dakota

Run Crazy Horse Half Marathon
Location: Hill City, SD
Date: Sunday, October 7, 2018
The colossal Crazy Horse Memorial directs you to the start of this half-marathon through the Black Hills country. After a very short stretch uphill, the course is nearly all downhill for the remainder of the race, as it leads runners to the limestone and gravel trails of the scenic George S. Mickelson Trail. Registration fee: $65-$90

[caption id="attachment_64508" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - 
St. Jude Rock ‘n’ Roll Nashville Half Marathon in Nashville, Tennessee Photo: Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon Series[/caption]

42. Tennessee

St. Jude Rock ‘n’ Roll Nashville Half Marathon
Location: Nashville, TN
Date: Saturday, April 28, 2018
Leave the headphones at home for 13.1 miles through Music City! On-course rock and country tunes will carry 18,000 of y’all from the honky tonks of Broadway to Nissan Stadium, home of the Tennessee Titans. Just save some energy for the two-steppin’ at the post-race party. Registration fee: $90-$100

RELATED: 13 Awesome Podcasts to Get You Through a Long Run

[caption id="attachment_23711" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Mario Cantu[/caption]

43. Texas

Austin Half Marathon
Location: Austin, TX
Date: Sunday, February 18, 2018
Up to 12,000 runners get to see what keeps Austin weird at this urban half-marathon. You’ll pass Lady Bird Lake, Congress Avenue, the Colorado River and the Texas State Capitol. But it’s the extraordinary crowd support from friendly Austinites, Longhorns and local entertainment that makes this race most memorable. Registration fee: $70-$140

[caption id="attachment_23712" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Salt Lake City Marathon[/caption]

44. Utah

Alaska Airlines Salt Lake City Half Marathon
Location: Salt Lake City, UT
Date: Saturday, April 21, 2018
The snow-capped Wasatch Mountains and budding flowers create a beautiful contrast at this annual springtime half. The point-to-point race starts at Olympic Legacy Bridge at the University of Utah, which served as the 2002 Winter Olympic Athlete Village. Maybe the slightly downhill course will help you make it to a medal podium, too! Registration fee: $70-$140

RELATED: Carb Loading for Runners: How to Prep for Race Day

[caption id="attachment_23875" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Nancy Nutitle-McMenemy[/caption]

45. Vermont

Covered Bridges Half Marathon
Location: Woodstock, VT
Date: Sunday, June 3, 2018
How does such a small town race sell out 2,300 spots in 30 minutes? It might have something to do with the classic New England point-to-point course, with popular ski areas, open farmland, shimmering rivers and covered bridges along the way. Bonus: Age group winners take home Vermont maple syrup and cheese as prizes! Registration fee: $75; sold out

[caption id="attachment_64509" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - 
Markel Richmond Half Marathon in Richmond, Virginia Photo: Richmond Marathon[/caption]

46. Virginia

 Markel Richmond Half Marathon
Location: Richmond, VA
Date: Saturday, November 10, 2018
Get the whole family together for this first-timer-friendly younger sibling of the Anthem Richmond Marathon (always a favorite fall race). There are plenty of downtown city sites, residential tree-lined streets, a loop in Bryan Park and even a sweet junk food mile stop (think gummy bears and cookies!) to keep you smiling along the way. Registration fee: $60-$115

[caption id="attachment_23715" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Adrenaline Event Photography[/caption]

47. Washington

Bellingham Bay Half Marathon
Location: Bellingham, WA
Date: Sunday, September 30, 2018
Down by the bay (Bellingham Bay, of course), you’ll find a tranquil half-marathon that offers more than 1,000 runners impressive mountain and seaside views. The waterfront course captures the sights, sounds and smells of the Pacific Northwest, courtesy of San Juan Island and Mount Baker vistas, short trails and small bridge crossings. Registration fee: $70

[caption id="attachment_23716" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Hatfield McCoy Marathon[/caption]

48. West Virginia

The Hatfield McCoy Half Marathon
Location: Matewan, WV
Date: Saturday, June 9, 2018
There are two important choices to make in this 15th annual half. Which of the course options will you run? And, are you a Hatfield or a McCoy? Read up on this famous American family feud before taking on the scenic course(s) near the Blackberry Mountains and Tug River. No matter which side you’re on, you’ll feel like family. Registration fee: $60-$85

RELATED: 7 Common Fears for Runners (and How to Overcome Them)

[caption id="attachment_23717" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Race-Brewers[/caption]

49. Wisconsin

Brewers Mini-Marathon
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Date: Saturday, September 22, 2018
In just a few years, this half-marathon has become a fall tradition — especially for baseball fans. The hilly course passes the Harley Davidson Museum and runs through Miller Valley, but runners finish with a trip ‘round the outer track of Miller Park, where they’ll earn a voucher for a free Milwaukee Brewers spring home game. Registration fee: $65-$110

[caption id="attachment_64510" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - Hole Half Marathon in Jackson, Wyoming Photo: Jackson Hole Marathon[/caption]

50. Wyoming

Hole Half Marathon
Location: Jackson, WY
Date: Saturday, September 1, 2018
Discover the thrill of adventure at a destination half-marathon in the heart of the Jackson Hole valleys. It’s small, quiet and somewhat serene, but the point-to-point course’s jaw-dropping mountain views of Grand Teton and the brilliant, natural colors sure pack a punch. Registration fee: $89-$125

Originally published January 2014. Updated January 2018. 

Read More
20-Minute HIIT Treadmill Workout to Get Fit, Fast
How to Score Perfect Running Form Like the Pros
The 10 Best Running Tours to Explore the World

The post The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
Best Half-Marathons

The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S.
If it seems like everywhere you look someone is running a half-marathon, that’s because it’s becoming increasingly true. According to Running USA, 1.9 million runners finished a half-marathon in the U.S. in 2016, with a record 2,800 half-marathon events in the country that year. While running 13.1 miles can still sound plenty intimidating, many runners see it as a way to work toward a full marathon, or as a more feasible (and still impressive!) goal to check off the bucket list. With the proper training (around 16 weeks for beginners), anyone really can run a half-marathon. Whether you’re a running newbie or a seasoned pro who wants to run a half in every state of the nation, we’ve narrowed down the thousands of options. Trust us, these 50 half-marathons (listed in alphabetical order by state) are well worth the training and registration fees. You’ll know it as soon as you cross that 13.1-mile finish line! RELATED: Daily Burn Audio Workouts: Take a Trainer on Your Run

The Best Half-Marathons Across the Country

[caption id="attachment_64478" align="alignnone" width="620"]The Best 50 Half-Marathons in the U.S. - Mercedes-Benz Half Marathon in Birmingham, Alabama Photo: Mercedes-Benz Marathon Weekend[/caption]

1. Alabama

Mercedes-Benz Half Marathon Location: Birmingham, AL Date: Sunday, February 11, 2018 Four thousand runners will take on this popular half-marathon course through Alabama’s largest city. Scan for sights on-the-go including the Birmingham Museum of Art, 16th Street Baptist Church, Birmingham Civil Rights Institute and the very hilly Highland Park neighborhood around mile 8. Registration fee: $70-$120 [caption id="attachment_23720" align="alignnone" width="620"]Mayor’s Midnight Sun Half Marathon Photo: goseawolves.com[/caption]

2. Alaska

Anchorage Mayor’s Half-Marathon Location: Anchorage, AK Date: Saturday, June 23, 2018 Celebrate the extra daylight hours of the summer solstice at Alaska’s largest half-marathon. With stunning views of Mt. McKinley on the clearest days, you’ll experience the wilderness and tough trails of the Last Frontier — in a whole new light. Registration fee: $60-$100 RELATED: 9 Things I Wish I Knew Before I Started Running [caption id="attachment_23721" align="alignnone" width="620"]Sedona Half Marathon Photo: Sedona Half Marathon[/caption]

3. Arizona

Sedona Half Marathon Location: Sedona, AZ Date: Saturday, February 3, 2018 The 4,590 feet above sea level elevation may make it hard to catch your breath at this challenging half-marathon. The scenic red rocks and gorgeous valleys along the 13.1 miles of paved and dirt roads are worth the extra effort, and may also take your breath away. Registration fee: $50-$80 [caption id="attachment_64479" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - 
Little Rock Half Marathon Photo: Little Rock Marathon[/caption]

4. Arkansas

Little Rock Half Marathon Location: Little Rock, AR Date: Sunday, March 4, 2018 Up to 4,600 runners will trek through downtown Little Rock and along the Arkansas River to earn the “appropriately large” (at 4 ½ inches and 11 ounces!) finisher’s medal. It’s one of the state’s most popular running events with a fun, new theme each year and a new 2018 course. Registration fee: $70-$125 RELATED: Winter Running Guide: How to Run Faster by Spring [caption id="attachment_64480" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - Napa to Sonoma Wine Country Half Marathon in Sonoma, California Photo: Napa-to-Sonoma Wine Country Half Marathon[/caption]

5. California

Napa to Sonoma Wine Country Half Marathon Location: Sonoma, CA Date: Sunday, July 15, 2018 Like running? Love wine? Those are the only requirements for this point-to-point half-marathon through the rolling vineyards of California wine country. It starts at Cuvaison Estate Wines and ends with tastings in Sonoma Plaza. But don’t worry, there’s also a special wine stop around mile 10! Registration fee: $180 for individuals and $175 for team participants; sold out [caption id="attachment_23724" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Golden Leaf Half Marathon[/caption]

6. Colorado

Golden Leaf Half Marathon Location: Snowmass Village, CO Date: Saturday, September 22, 2018 Hailed by magazines like Colorado Runner and Trail Runner, this Snowmass Village-to-Aspen half-marathon attracts 1,000 serious runners and leaf peepers alike. Expect major elevation changes and tough backcountry trails through the Rocky Mountain ski areas, all surrounded by the brilliant colors of the fall foliage season. Registration fee: $80 RELATED: 50 Running Resources for Speed, Strength and Nutrition [caption id="attachment_64481" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - Faxon Law Fairfield Half Marathon in Fairfield, Connecticut Photo: Faxon Law Fairfield Road Races[/caption]

7. Connecticut

Faxon Law Fairfield Half Marathon Location: Fairfield, CT Date: Sunday, June 3, 2018 This beachfront half-marathon has been a popular annual event since 1981. These days, up to 4,000 runners come out to Jennings Beach each year. You’ll race along Long Island Sound, over a few bridges and past the impressive area homes on this out-and-back course. Registration fee: $40-$65 [caption id="attachment_23689" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Dave Frederick / A Simple Running Log[/caption]

8. Delaware

Rehoboth Beach Seashore Half Marathon Location: Rehoboth Beach, DE Date: Saturday, December 8, 2018 It may be a chilly, little winter race but this coastal half-marathon has a lot of charm. The out-and-back course starts and finishes on the beach town’s historic boardwalk and features a stretch along the Junction and Breakwater Trail, which used to serve as a railroad line. Registration fee: $90-$160 RELATED: 13 Race Day Tips for Newbie Runners [caption id="attachment_23725" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Disney Sports[/caption]

9. Florida

Disney Princess Half Marathon Location: Orlando, FL Date: Sunday, February 25, 2018 Show off your sparkliest tiara and join Snow White, Sleeping Beauty and the rest of the Disney princesses (plus some 13,000 other runners) at this magical 13.1-mile run. You never know which of your favorite characters might be hanging around Cinderella’s Castle, Magic Kingdom® Park and Epcot®, so be sure to bring a camera! Registration fee: $160-$195; sold out [caption id="attachment_64486" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - Thanksgiving Day Half Marathon in Atlanta, Georgia Photo: Atlanta Track Club[/caption]

10. Georgia

Thanksgiving Day Half Marathon Location: Atlanta, GA Date: Thursday, November 22, 2018 Get a head start on burning off the gravy-soaked calories with this popular Thanksgiving Day race. You’ll have to make your way past Atlanta landmarks like Centennial Olympic Park before getting to the finish line — and the turkey and pie! Registration fee: $60 RELATED: The 10 Best Races That Are Fit for Foodies [caption id="attachment_64487" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half Marathons in the U.S. - The Hapalua Half Marathon in Waikiki, Hawaii Photo: The Hapalua - Hawaii's Half Marathon[/caption]

11. Hawaii

The Hapalua Location: Waikiki, HI Date: Sunday, April 8, 2018 Its name means “half” in Hawaiian so it’s no surprise this five-year-old race (organized by the same team behind the Honolulu Marathon) already considers itself the half-marathon to run in the Aloha State. The 13.1 miles of paradise on Oahu’s south shore includes a loop around Diamond Head, Honolulu’s most famous volcano. Registration fee: $85-$180 [caption id="attachment_64492" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - 
Race to Robie Creek Half Marathon in Boise, Idaho Photo: Sawtooth Photo Pros[/caption]

12. Idaho

Race to Robie Creek Half Marathon Location: Boise, ID Date: Saturday, April 21, 2018 Considered the “toughest half-marathon in the Northwest,” this race has been a spring tradition in the Boise foothills for more than 40 years. Keep your head up as you climb, climb and climb some more — all the way to Aldape Summit, for an elevation gain of 2,072 feet in the course. Registration fee: $55 RELATED: 15 Best Destination Half-Marathons in the World [caption id="attachment_16701" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Chicago Half Marathon[/caption]

13. Illinois

Chicago Half Marathon Location: Chicago, IL Date: Sunday, September 23, 2018 Take an exclusive tour of the Windy City (by foot) at the only race in Chicago that shuts down the busy Lake Shore Drive completely. This traffic-free stretch offers runners views of the city skyline and Lake Michigan, but you’ll also get to visit Jackson Park and Hyde Park along the way. Registration fee: $75-$135 [caption id="attachment_23691" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: 500festival[/caption]

14. Indiana

OneAmerica 500 Festival Mini-Marathon Location: Indianapolis, IN Date: Saturday, May 5, 2018 Start your engines for one of the largest half-marathons in the country, with more than 24,000 participants! Just don’t waste all of your fuel on the lap around the famed Indianapolis Motor Speedway at the halfway point. There’s still the “Victory Mile” to the finish line on New York Street in downtown Indy. Registration fee: $72-$100 RELATED: Why I Started Running — And Never Stopped [caption id="attachment_64517" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - Dam to Dam Half Marathon in Des Moines, Iowa Photo: Dam to Dam[/caption]

15. Iowa

Dam to Dam Half Marathon Location: Storm Lake, IA Date: Saturday, June 2, 2018 This year marks the last (damn) time 8,000 runners will run this flat and fast half-marathon from one dam outside the city to another in the downtown Des Moines. Along the way, they'll pass through Birdland Park, along the Meredith Trail and over the Iowa Women of Achievement Bridge as a fond farewell to the beloved 39-year-old fall race. Registration fee: $40-$60 [caption id="attachment_64503" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - 
Garmin Half Marathon in Olathe, Kansas Photo: Dan Hutchins / Garmin Marathon[/caption]

16. Kansas

Garmin Half Marathon Location: Olathe, KS Date: Saturday, April 21, 2018 There’s no place like… Kansas for a half-marathon that’s fit for fans of The Wizard of Oz. Fly through the speedy, flat race (with a few wicked rolling hills) alongside some costumed Dorothys and Cowardly Lions. The loop course also travels along some historic wagon trails early settlers used to go west to California, Oregon and Santa Fe. Registration fee: $70-$120 RELATED: The 9 Best Fun Runs You Can Do With Your Dog [caption id="attachment_23692" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Run the Bluegrass[/caption]

17. Kentucky

Run the Bluegrass Location: Lexington, KY Date: Saturday, March 31, 2018 Join 5,000 runners and horse racing enthusiasts for one of “America’s prettiest half-marathons” through the picturesque Thoroughbred Farms of Kentucky. The rural race starts at Keeneland Race Course, where the 2003 film Seabiscuit was filmed. While there may not be many spectators, expect plenty of horses that’ll motivate you to keep trottin’. Registration fee: $90-$125 [caption id="attachment_23693" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon Series[/caption]

18. Louisiana

Humana Rock ‘n’ Roll New Orleans Half Marathon Location: New Orleans, LA Date: Sunday, March 4, 2018 Put on your party pants (and beads) to hightail it from downtown New Orleans, to the beautiful Garden District, back through the world-famous French Quarter and to the finish in New Orleans City Park. The Rock ‘n’ Roll race series is known for its high-energy entertainment, so you’ll love running to the tunes of local Big Easy jazz. Registration fee: $90-$100 RELATED: Need Running Motivation? 20 Epic 'Runspo' Instagrams [caption id="attachment_23694" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Gameface Media[/caption]

19. Maine

Shipyard Old Port Half Location: Portland, ME Date: Saturday, June 23, 2018 It’s like you’re running through a New England postcard (with 3,500 other runners) at this coastal half-marathon through Portland. If the nautical sights of sailboats, lobster boats and tiny little islands all around Casco Bay aren’t enough, how does Shipyard Brewing Company beer at the finish line sound? Registration fee: $59 [caption id="attachment_23695" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Baltimore Half Marathon[/caption]

20. Maryland

CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield Baltimore Half Marathon Location: Baltimore, MD Date: Saturday, October 20, 2018 More than 11,000 runners come out each year for a loop around Charm City at this popular urban half-marathon. You’ll pass Patterson Park, climb the hills up to Lake Montebello and run by Johns Hopkins University before cruising into the new finish line at the iconic Inner Harbor. Registration fee: $80-$130 [caption id="attachment_23696" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Run to Remember Boston[/caption]

21. Massachusetts

Run to Remember Boston Location: Boston, MA Date: Sunday, May 27, 2018 For more than 10 years, this half-marathon honors Boston’s fallen law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty and takes thousands of runners on a trip around downtown Boston. The race starts and ends at the Seaport World Trade Center, and includes city landmarks like the Charles River, Massachusetts State House and Boston Common. Registration fee: $100-$120 RELATED: The Most Popular Running Routes in All 50 States [caption id="attachment_23697" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Detroit Marathon[/caption]

22. Michigan

Detroit Free Press/Chemical Bank International Half-Marathon Location: Detroit, MI Date: Sunday, October 21, 2018 Technically, this may be one of the best half-marathons in the U.S. and Canada. So bring your passport, because this fast race will motor through mostly flat urban streets and cross the Detroit River (and international border) twice via the Ambassador Bridge and Detroit-Windsor Tunnel. Registration fee: $90-$115 [caption id="attachment_23718" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Jeff Frey & Associates / Grandma’s Marathon[/caption]

23. Minnesota

Garry Bjorklund Half Marathon Location: Duluth, MN Date: Saturday, June 16, 2018 The half-marathon counterpart of the beloved Grandma’s Marathon, this 13.1-mile race covers the second half of the gorgeous course. The point-to-point run is named after a local Olympian and follows Old Highway 61 along the beautiful, shimmering waters of Lake Superior. Registration fee: $95 [caption id="attachment_23698" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Mississippi River Half Marathon[/caption]

24. Mississippi

Mississippi River Half Marathon Location: Greenville, MS Date: Saturday, February 10, 2018 Imagine the mighty views as you run right up and over the Mississippi River on the Highway 82 Bridge at the start of this point-to-point half-marathon. In fact, it’s the only actual hill in the entire course! In its sixth year, the race continues to make new additions—like this year’s Arkansas side half-marathon. Registration fee: $60-$105 [caption id="attachment_23699" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Karen Martinez[/caption]

25. Missouri

GO! St. Louis Half Marathon Location: Louis, MO Date: Sunday, April 8, 2018 The runner’s high comes early in this half-marathon, which hosts 12,000 runners. Catch a straight-on view of The Lou’s Gateway Arch in the first few miles. Hear the roar of the crowd outside Busch Stadium, home of the Cardinals, at mile 5. And smell the hops from Anheuser-Busch Brewery right around the halfway mark. And Registration fee: $55-$110 RELATED: 12 Secrets from the Pros to Run a Personal Best [caption id="attachment_23729" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Missoula Marathon[/caption]

26. Montana

Missoula Half Marathon Location: Missoula, MT Date: Sunday, July 15, 2018 Often called the “Hub of Five Valleys,” Missoula hosts 4,000 runners in its scenic, high-elevation Rocky Mountain town. Though it’s not completely closed to traffic, this rural point-to-point half-marathon starts in the countryside, travels along the Bitterroot River and rolls into the downtown area for a memorable finish. Registration fee: $77-$127 [caption id="attachment_23730" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Gary Dougherty[/caption]

27. Nebraska

Lincoln Half Marathon Location: Lincoln, NE Date: Sunday, May 6, 2018 Join thousands of Cornhuskers (and maybe some out-of-towners) for this popular 40-year half-marathon in the heart of the Great Plains. The flat and fast course starts and ends at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and passes the historic State Capitol in the first mile out. Registration fee: $60 [caption id="attachment_23842" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Pond5[/caption]

28. Nevada

Twilight Red Rock Half Marathon Location: Las Vegas, NV Date: Saturday, October 13, 2018 Seventeen miles west of the glitzy Las Vegas strip, experience Red Rock Canyon’s colorful sandstone, Joshua trees and Mojave Desert vistas under the moonlight at this nighttime (BYO-headlamp!) half-marathon. There will be a new course this year, but the same sunset start time that night runners love. Registration: $75-$90 [caption id="attachment_64504" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - Big Lake Half Marathon in Alton, New Hampshire Photo: Loco Races[/caption]

29. New Hampshire

Big Lake Half Marathon Location: Alton, NH Date: Saturday, May 19, 2018 Need to escape city life? With the glistening waters of Lake Winnipesaukee and the majestic views of the White Mountains, this small annual half-marathon is fit for nature lovers. The “lollipop loop” course runs right along the lake, over many rolling hills and among the nearby cozy vacation cottages. Registration fee: $49-$79 [caption id="attachment_23700" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: RunAPalooza[/caption]

30. New Jersey

Asbury Park Half Marathon Location: Asbury Park, NJ Date: Saturday, April 21, 2018 Greetings from Asbury Park, home of a true Jersey Shore half-marathon! (No, not the TV show.) This flat and fast race is in the land of Bruce Springsteen, with local icon Tillie as its funny-faced mascot. You’ll run through the area beach towns, along the historic boardwalk and finish with the “RunAPalooza” post-race party at Convention Hall. Registration fee: $50-$65 RELATED: The Strength Training Workout Every Runner Needs [caption id="attachment_23701" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Santa Fe Thunder Half Marathon[/caption]

31. New Mexico

Santa Fe Thunder Half Marathon Location: Santa Fe, NM Date: Sunday, September 16, 2018 Surrounded by the Sangre de Cristo and Jemez Mountains, you can’t beat the vistas at this point-to-point half-marathon in the Rio Grande Valley. Unless of course, if it was also downhill. And it is! After a short two-mile climb, you’ll drop 1,300 feet overall, passing other sites like Camel Rock and the open-air Sante Fe Opera House. Registration fee: $55-$75 [caption id="attachment_23702" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: NYRR[/caption]

32. New York

United Airlines NYC Half Location: New York, NY Date: Sunday, March 18, 2018 Elite runners lead a pack of more than 20,000 runners through 13.1 miles of the Big Apple. With a new course in 2018, you’ll start in Brooklyn, cross the Manhattan Bridge, and head north along the East River to the tourist-filled Times Square, before finishing with four miles in the world famous Central Park. This tour definitely beats any double-decker bus! Registration fee: $130-$145 [caption id="attachment_23704" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Southern Fried Half Marathon[/caption]

33. North Carolina

Southern Fried Half Marathon Location: Nags Head, NC Date: Sunday, November 11, 2018 We love the sound of this point-to-point half-marathon — especially with the promise of southern fried sweet taters at the finish line! To earn ‘em, you (and more than 4,000 other runners) will take on the second half of the Outer Banks Marathon course, from the Nags Head sand dunes to the enchanting coastal village of Manteo. Registration fee: $60-$75 [caption id="attachment_23719" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Fargo Marathon[/caption]

34. North Dakota

Fargo Half Marathon Location: Fargo, ND Date: Saturday, May 19, 2018 With only a few hundred at the very first half-marathon in 2002, up to 6,500 runners now take to the streets of North Dakota’s largest city each spring. Starting and finishing inside the Fargodome (smile for the jumbotron!), the flat and fast course travels through the “Gateway to the West” and feels like a giant dance party with live bands at every mile. Registration fee: $65-$85 [caption id="attachment_64506" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - Capital City Half Marathon in Columbus, Ohio Photo: The Capital City Half Marathon[/caption]

35. Ohio

OhioHealth Capital City Half Marathon Location: Columbus, OH Date: Saturday, April 28, 2018 This 15th annual race promises a whopping 14,500 runners “the best tour of Columbus on two feet” with a new course for 2018. The loop course hits city hotspots like The Ohio State University campus, the Short North Arts District, German Village and downtown Columbus. It also promises a pizza and margaritas at the finish line. Who can argue with that? Registration fee: $60-$115 [caption id="attachment_23706" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - 
The Williams Route 66 Half Marathon in Tulsa, Oklahoma Photo: Route 66 Marathon[/caption]

36. Oklahoma

The Williams Route 66 Half Marathon Location: Tulsa, OK Date: Sunday, November 18, 2018 This beloved, high-energy race rocks the streets of downtown Tulsa. Get ready for a fast (though pretty hilly first half) run among Art Deco architecture, bustling neighborhoods and a cross over the famous Route 66 — twice! Registration fee: $90-$105 RELATED: 15 Races for People Who'd Rather Walk Than Run [caption id="attachment_23707" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - Eugene Half Marathon in Eugene, Oregon Photo: Eugene Marathon[/caption]

37. Oregon

Eugene Half Marathon Location: Eugene, OR Date: Sunday, April 29, 2018 What better place for a speedy PR than TrackTown USA itself? Along the course you’ll see the Willamette River and the historic Hayward Field Track, home to Olympic trials, countless record-breaking events and the old stomping grounds of legends like Steve Prefontaine. Finish strong on those last 200 yards on the track — just like Pre himself! Registration fee: $70-$120 [caption id="attachment_64507" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - Philadelphia Half Marathon in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Photo: Philadelphia Marathon[/caption]

38. Pennsylvania

Dietz & Watson Philadelphia Half Marathon Location: Philadelphia, PA Date: Sunday, November 20, 2016 Do the steps at the starting line look familiar? That’s because they’re the same steps Rocky sprinted! You can become a champ too with 13.1 miles through Philly’s historic streets of Old City, the high-energy of Center City and the fall trails along the Schuylkill River, before rounding the corner back to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Registration fee: $60-$115 RELATED: Is Your Race Training Giving You Anxiety? [caption id="attachment_23709" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Liz Cardoso / Global Click Photography[/caption]

39. Rhode Island

Amica Newport Half Marathon Location: Newport, RI Date: Sunday, October 7, 2018 You’ll hardly notice all the rolling hills with so much to look at during this picture-perfect oceanside race. The half-marathon, voted best in the Northeast by Competitor magazine in 2016, starts at Easton’s Beach and makes its way around Fort Adams State Park and past the larger-than-life Bellevue Avenue mansions. Registration fee: $65-$85 [caption id="attachment_23786" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S.: Kiawah Island Golf Resort Photo: Kiawah Island Golf Resort[/caption]

40. South Carolina

Kiawah Island Golf Resort Half Marathon Location: Kiawah Island, SC Date: Saturday, December 8, 2018 How does an early winter runcation sound? Plan a getaway to this luxurious golf resort for a relaxing retreat and its 41st annual half-marathon. The flat-as-can-be race attracts more than 3,000 to run around the island community, among oak, maple and pine tree-lined streets and scenic marshlands. Just save a little energy to hit the links, too. Registration: $60-$115 [caption id="attachment_23843" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Action Sports Images[/caption]

41. South Dakota

Run Crazy Horse Half Marathon Location: Hill City, SD Date: Sunday, October 7, 2018 The colossal Crazy Horse Memorial directs you to the start of this half-marathon through the Black Hills country. After a very short stretch uphill, the course is nearly all downhill for the remainder of the race, as it leads runners to the limestone and gravel trails of the scenic George S. Mickelson Trail. Registration fee: $65-$90 [caption id="attachment_64508" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - 
St. Jude Rock ‘n’ Roll Nashville Half Marathon in Nashville, Tennessee Photo: Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon Series[/caption]

42. Tennessee

St. Jude Rock ‘n’ Roll Nashville Half Marathon Location: Nashville, TN Date: Saturday, April 28, 2018 Leave the headphones at home for 13.1 miles through Music City! On-course rock and country tunes will carry 18,000 of y’all from the honky tonks of Broadway to Nissan Stadium, home of the Tennessee Titans. Just save some energy for the two-steppin’ at the post-race party. Registration fee: $90-$100 RELATED: 13 Awesome Podcasts to Get You Through a Long Run [caption id="attachment_23711" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Mario Cantu[/caption]

43. Texas

Austin Half Marathon Location: Austin, TX Date: Sunday, February 18, 2018 Up to 12,000 runners get to see what keeps Austin weird at this urban half-marathon. You’ll pass Lady Bird Lake, Congress Avenue, the Colorado River and the Texas State Capitol. But it’s the extraordinary crowd support from friendly Austinites, Longhorns and local entertainment that makes this race most memorable. Registration fee: $70-$140 [caption id="attachment_23712" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Salt Lake City Marathon[/caption]

44. Utah

Alaska Airlines Salt Lake City Half Marathon Location: Salt Lake City, UT Date: Saturday, April 21, 2018 The snow-capped Wasatch Mountains and budding flowers create a beautiful contrast at this annual springtime half. The point-to-point race starts at Olympic Legacy Bridge at the University of Utah, which served as the 2002 Winter Olympic Athlete Village. Maybe the slightly downhill course will help you make it to a medal podium, too! Registration fee: $70-$140 RELATED: Carb Loading for Runners: How to Prep for Race Day [caption id="attachment_23875" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Nancy Nutitle-McMenemy[/caption]

45. Vermont

Covered Bridges Half Marathon Location: Woodstock, VT Date: Sunday, June 3, 2018 How does such a small town race sell out 2,300 spots in 30 minutes? It might have something to do with the classic New England point-to-point course, with popular ski areas, open farmland, shimmering rivers and covered bridges along the way. Bonus: Age group winners take home Vermont maple syrup and cheese as prizes! Registration fee: $75; sold out [caption id="attachment_64509" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - 
Markel Richmond Half Marathon in Richmond, Virginia Photo: Richmond Marathon[/caption]

46. Virginia

 Markel Richmond Half Marathon Location: Richmond, VA Date: Saturday, November 10, 2018 Get the whole family together for this first-timer-friendly younger sibling of the Anthem Richmond Marathon (always a favorite fall race). There are plenty of downtown city sites, residential tree-lined streets, a loop in Bryan Park and even a sweet junk food mile stop (think gummy bears and cookies!) to keep you smiling along the way. Registration fee: $60-$115 [caption id="attachment_23715" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Adrenaline Event Photography[/caption]

47. Washington

Bellingham Bay Half Marathon Location: Bellingham, WA Date: Sunday, September 30, 2018 Down by the bay (Bellingham Bay, of course), you’ll find a tranquil half-marathon that offers more than 1,000 runners impressive mountain and seaside views. The waterfront course captures the sights, sounds and smells of the Pacific Northwest, courtesy of San Juan Island and Mount Baker vistas, short trails and small bridge crossings. Registration fee: $70 [caption id="attachment_23716" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Hatfield McCoy Marathon[/caption]

48. West Virginia

The Hatfield McCoy Half Marathon Location: Matewan, WV Date: Saturday, June 9, 2018 There are two important choices to make in this 15th annual half. Which of the course options will you run? And, are you a Hatfield or a McCoy? Read up on this famous American family feud before taking on the scenic course(s) near the Blackberry Mountains and Tug River. No matter which side you’re on, you’ll feel like family. Registration fee: $60-$85 RELATED: 7 Common Fears for Runners (and How to Overcome Them) [caption id="attachment_23717" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. Photo: Race-Brewers[/caption]

49. Wisconsin

Brewers Mini-Marathon Location: Milwaukee, WI Date: Saturday, September 22, 2018 In just a few years, this half-marathon has become a fall tradition — especially for baseball fans. The hilly course passes the Harley Davidson Museum and runs through Miller Valley, but runners finish with a trip ‘round the outer track of Miller Park, where they’ll earn a voucher for a free Milwaukee Brewers spring home game. Registration fee: $65-$110 [caption id="attachment_64510" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. - Hole Half Marathon in Jackson, Wyoming Photo: Jackson Hole Marathon[/caption]

50. Wyoming

Hole Half Marathon Location: Jackson, WY Date: Saturday, September 1, 2018 Discover the thrill of adventure at a destination half-marathon in the heart of the Jackson Hole valleys. It’s small, quiet and somewhat serene, but the point-to-point course’s jaw-dropping mountain views of Grand Teton and the brilliant, natural colors sure pack a punch. Registration fee: $89-$125 Originally published January 2014. Updated January 2018.  Read More 20-Minute HIIT Treadmill Workout to Get Fit, Fast How to Score Perfect Running Form Like the Pros The 10 Best Running Tours to Explore the World

The post The 50 Best Half-Marathons in the U.S. appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/the-50-best-half-marathons-in-the-u-s/feed/ 0
5 Exercises for the Perfect Beginner Bodyweight Workout http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/beginner-bodyweight-workout-exercises/ Sun, 31 Dec 2017 14:15:13 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=64361 5 Exercises for the Perfect Beginner Bodyweight Workout

[caption id="attachment_64528" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Exercises for the Perfect Beginner Bodyweight Workout Photo: Pond5[/caption]

If you’ve committed to exercising every day this month (and want to keep it up all year!),­ we’ve got the perfect beginner bodyweight workout plan for you. Here, you’ll find five moves, complete with the beginner, intermediate and advanced variations so you can progress as you gain strength. Even better, you’ll get cheat sheet on how to put them all together into a circuit that fits your schedule and fitness level. Time to welcome your fittest year yet.

RELATED: Got 10 Minutes? 3 Fat-Blasting Bodyweight Workouts

5 Beginner Bodyweight Workout: Meet Your Moves 

These five must-do exercises, curated by Daily Burn 365 trainer Dean Sheremet, will work your body from top to bottom. As a bonus, they require zero equipment (unless you choose to add weight), and you’ll get the swing of them in no time, Sheremet says. That means you can focus on pushing yourself toward more sweat and a better workout, instead of wasting time trying to figure out the exercise.

Start with the beginner version of each move below and work your way up to the advanced version as your strength and fitness improves. It’s the progressive workout that improves right along with you.

RELATED: The 15-Minute Home Workout to Survive the Holidays

[caption id="attachment_64451" align="alignright" width="240"]Beginner Bodyweight Workout: Up-Down Plank Exercise GIFs: Dean Sheremet[/caption]

1. Plank (Beginner)

How to: Begin in a forearm plank position with elbows bent and directly beneath your shoulders, forearms flat on the floor (a). Contract your midsection to maintain a straight torso and hold for time. Don’t allow your low-back to sag toward the floor or your hips pike up toward the ceiling (b).

Up-Down Plank (Intermediate)

How to: Begin in a high plank push-up position with arms straight and hands directly under your shoulders (a). Keeping your back flat and your body in a straight line, contract your midsection and bend one elbow to lower onto your forearm, then follow with the other arm (b). Return to starting position by straightening one arm and planting your hand under your shoulder. Then, push up with the opposite arm so both arms are straight and you’re back in a high plank position (c). Continue for time, alternating which forearm goes down first and which pushes back up to starting position.

Up-Down Plank to Push-Up (Advanced)

How to: See up-down plank above, and add a push-up each time you reach the extended arm plank.

Why it’s on the list: No matter which plank variation you choose, you’ll build core strength and stability — a must-do if you want to move with ease and even stand upright. With the intermediate and advanced versions, you’ll also target your chest, triceps and back.

RELATED: This is How to Do Perfect Push-Ups (Even on Your Knees)

Beginner Bodyweight Workout: Reverse Lunge Exercise

2. Reverse Lunge (Beginner)

How to: Stand tall with feet hip-width apart, arms at your sides (a). Step backward with one foot and bend both knees to lower your hips toward the floor. Knees should bent 90 degrees, while the front knee stays behind your front toes (b). Return to standing by pushing through the heel of your front foot (c). Repeat with the opposite leg. Continue alternating sides for time.

Split Squat Jump (Intermediate)

How to: Begin in a lunge position, knees bent with your front thigh parallel to the floor (a). Jump up explosively and switch legs midair so your back leg becomes your front leg (b). Land softly and repeat for time (c).

180 Split Squat Jump (Advanced)

How to: See the split squat jump above, but squeeze in a 180-degree turn as you jump and switch legs to hit each lunge.

Why it’s on the list: You’ll hit your quads, hamstrings and glutes — some of the biggest muscles in the body. Translation: You burn more calories as you build strength. The intermediate and advanced variations also give you a cardio boost.

Beginner Bodyweight Workout: March Exercise

3. Bodyweight March (Beginner)

How to: Stand tall with feet hip-width apart, arms at your sides (a). Simultaneously drive your knee and opposite arm up so both are bent 90 degrees (b). Lower to the starting stance and repeat the movement with the opposite arm and leg (c). Continue for time. When marching, think about pulling your heel directly up to avoid overarching your back. Shoulders should stay over your hips.

High Knees (Intermediate)

How to: Stand tall with feet hip-width apart, arms at your sides (a). Standing in place, drive one knee high toward your chest as quickly as possible, place your foot back on the floor and immediately driving the other knee high toward your chest (b). Continue to alternate your knees as quickly as you can while maintaining a straight torso (c). Keep repeating for time.

Quick High Knees (Advanced)

How to: See high knees above, but simply go faster, just like you would on the run. Keep aiming to get your knees as high as possible, too.

Why it’s on the list: Whether you go fast or slow, you’ll get your heart pumping while you strengthen your hip flexors.

RELATED: 3 Quick HIIT Workouts for Beginners

Beginner Bodyweight Workout: Lateral Lunge Exercise

4. Lateral Lunge (Beginner)

How to: Stand tall with feet hip-width apart, arms at your sides (a). With one foot, take a big step to the side, bending that knee and sitting down and back on your leg. Lower your hips as far as possible. Think about hitting a squat position on that side moving leg, as your other leg stays straight (b). Return to standing by pushing off the foot of your bent leg (c). Continue alternating sides for time.

Curtsy Lunge (Intermediate)

How to: Stand with feet hip-width apart (a). Keeping your weight on one leg, step the opposite foot back on a diagonal until you end in a lunge, with your back foot to the back and side of your front foot (b). Drive back to starting position by pushing through the hip of your stationary leg (c). Continue alternating sides for time.

Weighted Curtsy Lunge (Advanced)

How to: See curtsy lunge above. Now pick up some dumbbells or a kettlebell. Added weight will help build your strength even faster.

Why it’s on the list: This move strengthens your quads, hamstrings and glutes, as well as targets your inner thighs — all important for walking, running, jumping and twisting.

Beginner Bodyweight Workout: Knee Grab Sit-Up Exercise

5. Knee Grab Sit-Up (Beginner)

How to: Lie on your back on the floor with your arms and legs extended (a). Brace your core and perform a sit-up, as you simultaneously bend your knees toward your chest and grab your knees with your arms at the top of the movement (b). Slowly lower back down to the floor and straighten your legs (c). Repeat for time.

V-Ups (Intermediate)

How to: Lie on your back on the floor with your arms and legs extended (a). Keeping your legs straight, lift your feet up toward the ceiling to form about a 45-degree angle at your hips. At the same time, lift your torso and raise your arms to reach your fingers toward your toes (b). Lower your legs, torso and arms back down to the floor (c). Repeat for time.

Quick Tempo V-Up (Advanced)

How to: See V-up above, but pick up the tempo to amp up your heart rate and the calorie burn. Or pause at the top of the movement to really feel your core fire.

Why it’s on the list: You’ll challenge your entire core as you improve balance and stability.

RELATED: 50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core

Create Your Own Beginner Bodyweight Workout

No matter your fitness level, preference and schedule, you can easily put the five exercises above together to create a 10-, 20- or 30-minute circuit. Here’s how. 

For a 10-minute circuit: Pick three moves. Perform the first move for 30 seconds, followed by 30 seconds of rest. Then, perform the second move for 30 seconds, followed by 30 seconds of rest. Finally, perform the third move for 30 seconds, followed by 30 seconds of rest. Repeat two to three times for a total of three to four rounds. Or, run through all five moves two times.

For a 20-minute circuit: Perform all five moves using the same format as the 10-minute routine, working for 30 seconds followed by 30 seconds of rest. Complete four rounds.

For a 30-minute circuit: Follow the same format as the 20-minute circuit, but perform six rounds. You can also play with the work to rest ratio, going hard for 45 seconds and resting for just 15.

Read More
275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine
20-Minute Bodyweight Workout for Your Busiest Days
The Quick Calisthenics Workout You Can Do Anywhere

The post 5 Exercises for the Perfect Beginner Bodyweight Workout appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
5 Exercises for the Perfect Beginner Bodyweight Workout

[caption id="attachment_64528" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Exercises for the Perfect Beginner Bodyweight Workout Photo: Pond5[/caption] If you’ve committed to exercising every day this month (and want to keep it up all year!),­ we’ve got the perfect beginner bodyweight workout plan for you. Here, you’ll find five moves, complete with the beginner, intermediate and advanced variations so you can progress as you gain strength. Even better, you’ll get cheat sheet on how to put them all together into a circuit that fits your schedule and fitness level. Time to welcome your fittest year yet. RELATED: Got 10 Minutes? 3 Fat-Blasting Bodyweight Workouts

5 Beginner Bodyweight Workout: Meet Your Moves 

These five must-do exercises, curated by Daily Burn 365 trainer Dean Sheremet, will work your body from top to bottom. As a bonus, they require zero equipment (unless you choose to add weight), and you’ll get the swing of them in no time, Sheremet says. That means you can focus on pushing yourself toward more sweat and a better workout, instead of wasting time trying to figure out the exercise. Start with the beginner version of each move below and work your way up to the advanced version as your strength and fitness improves. It’s the progressive workout that improves right along with you. RELATED: The 15-Minute Home Workout to Survive the Holidays [caption id="attachment_64451" align="alignright" width="240"]Beginner Bodyweight Workout: Up-Down Plank Exercise GIFs: Dean Sheremet[/caption]

1. Plank (Beginner)

How to: Begin in a forearm plank position with elbows bent and directly beneath your shoulders, forearms flat on the floor (a). Contract your midsection to maintain a straight torso and hold for time. Don’t allow your low-back to sag toward the floor or your hips pike up toward the ceiling (b).

Up-Down Plank (Intermediate)

How to: Begin in a high plank push-up position with arms straight and hands directly under your shoulders (a). Keeping your back flat and your body in a straight line, contract your midsection and bend one elbow to lower onto your forearm, then follow with the other arm (b). Return to starting position by straightening one arm and planting your hand under your shoulder. Then, push up with the opposite arm so both arms are straight and you’re back in a high plank position (c). Continue for time, alternating which forearm goes down first and which pushes back up to starting position.

Up-Down Plank to Push-Up (Advanced)

How to: See up-down plank above, and add a push-up each time you reach the extended arm plank. Why it’s on the list: No matter which plank variation you choose, you’ll build core strength and stability — a must-do if you want to move with ease and even stand upright. With the intermediate and advanced versions, you’ll also target your chest, triceps and back. RELATED: This is How to Do Perfect Push-Ups (Even on Your Knees) Beginner Bodyweight Workout: Reverse Lunge Exercise

2. Reverse Lunge (Beginner)

How to: Stand tall with feet hip-width apart, arms at your sides (a). Step backward with one foot and bend both knees to lower your hips toward the floor. Knees should bent 90 degrees, while the front knee stays behind your front toes (b). Return to standing by pushing through the heel of your front foot (c). Repeat with the opposite leg. Continue alternating sides for time.

Split Squat Jump (Intermediate)

How to: Begin in a lunge position, knees bent with your front thigh parallel to the floor (a). Jump up explosively and switch legs midair so your back leg becomes your front leg (b). Land softly and repeat for time (c).

180 Split Squat Jump (Advanced)

How to: See the split squat jump above, but squeeze in a 180-degree turn as you jump and switch legs to hit each lunge. Why it’s on the list: You’ll hit your quads, hamstrings and glutes — some of the biggest muscles in the body. Translation: You burn more calories as you build strength. The intermediate and advanced variations also give you a cardio boost. Beginner Bodyweight Workout: March Exercise

3. Bodyweight March (Beginner)

How to: Stand tall with feet hip-width apart, arms at your sides (a). Simultaneously drive your knee and opposite arm up so both are bent 90 degrees (b). Lower to the starting stance and repeat the movement with the opposite arm and leg (c). Continue for time. When marching, think about pulling your heel directly up to avoid overarching your back. Shoulders should stay over your hips.

High Knees (Intermediate)

How to: Stand tall with feet hip-width apart, arms at your sides (a). Standing in place, drive one knee high toward your chest as quickly as possible, place your foot back on the floor and immediately driving the other knee high toward your chest (b). Continue to alternate your knees as quickly as you can while maintaining a straight torso (c). Keep repeating for time.

Quick High Knees (Advanced)

How to: See high knees above, but simply go faster, just like you would on the run. Keep aiming to get your knees as high as possible, too. Why it’s on the list: Whether you go fast or slow, you’ll get your heart pumping while you strengthen your hip flexors. RELATED: 3 Quick HIIT Workouts for Beginners Beginner Bodyweight Workout: Lateral Lunge Exercise

4. Lateral Lunge (Beginner)

How to: Stand tall with feet hip-width apart, arms at your sides (a). With one foot, take a big step to the side, bending that knee and sitting down and back on your leg. Lower your hips as far as possible. Think about hitting a squat position on that side moving leg, as your other leg stays straight (b). Return to standing by pushing off the foot of your bent leg (c). Continue alternating sides for time.

Curtsy Lunge (Intermediate)

How to: Stand with feet hip-width apart (a). Keeping your weight on one leg, step the opposite foot back on a diagonal until you end in a lunge, with your back foot to the back and side of your front foot (b). Drive back to starting position by pushing through the hip of your stationary leg (c). Continue alternating sides for time.

Weighted Curtsy Lunge (Advanced)

How to: See curtsy lunge above. Now pick up some dumbbells or a kettlebell. Added weight will help build your strength even faster. Why it’s on the list: This move strengthens your quads, hamstrings and glutes, as well as targets your inner thighs — all important for walking, running, jumping and twisting.

Beginner Bodyweight Workout: Knee Grab Sit-Up Exercise

5. Knee Grab Sit-Up (Beginner)

How to: Lie on your back on the floor with your arms and legs extended (a). Brace your core and perform a sit-up, as you simultaneously bend your knees toward your chest and grab your knees with your arms at the top of the movement (b). Slowly lower back down to the floor and straighten your legs (c). Repeat for time.

V-Ups (Intermediate)

How to: Lie on your back on the floor with your arms and legs extended (a). Keeping your legs straight, lift your feet up toward the ceiling to form about a 45-degree angle at your hips. At the same time, lift your torso and raise your arms to reach your fingers toward your toes (b). Lower your legs, torso and arms back down to the floor (c). Repeat for time.

Quick Tempo V-Up (Advanced)

How to: See V-up above, but pick up the tempo to amp up your heart rate and the calorie burn. Or pause at the top of the movement to really feel your core fire. Why it’s on the list: You’ll challenge your entire core as you improve balance and stability. RELATED: 50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core

Create Your Own Beginner Bodyweight Workout

No matter your fitness level, preference and schedule, you can easily put the five exercises above together to create a 10-, 20- or 30-minute circuit. Here’s how.  For a 10-minute circuit: Pick three moves. Perform the first move for 30 seconds, followed by 30 seconds of rest. Then, perform the second move for 30 seconds, followed by 30 seconds of rest. Finally, perform the third move for 30 seconds, followed by 30 seconds of rest. Repeat two to three times for a total of three to four rounds. Or, run through all five moves two times. For a 20-minute circuit: Perform all five moves using the same format as the 10-minute routine, working for 30 seconds followed by 30 seconds of rest. Complete four rounds. For a 30-minute circuit: Follow the same format as the 20-minute circuit, but perform six rounds. You can also play with the work to rest ratio, going hard for 45 seconds and resting for just 15. Read More 275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine 20-Minute Bodyweight Workout for Your Busiest Days The Quick Calisthenics Workout You Can Do Anywhere

The post 5 Exercises for the Perfect Beginner Bodyweight Workout appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
5 Battle Rope Exercises, 1 Full-Body Cardio Workout http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/battle-rope-exercises-full-body-workout/ Thu, 28 Dec 2017 12:15:07 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=64197 5 Battle Rope Exercises for a Full-Body Workout

[caption id="attachment_64200" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Battle Rope Exercises for a Full-Body Workout Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

Remember those giant ropes you used to play tug of war with as a kid? Well, you can also use them as a tool to blast calories and build muscle at the gym. In fact, you only need a few minutes at the end of your regularly scheduled strength workout to get your burst of cardio in, along with a full-body workout burn.

With the five battle rope exercises below, you’ll strengthen your abs, arms and shoulders, as well as activate your leg muscles and increase both upper and lower body power production. Even better, you get high-intensity conditioning all at the same time, says Liz Adams, athlete and coach at CrossFit Union Square. To top it off, any move can remain low-impact, which means they’re great for athletes with joint issues, and you can cater each exercise to any fitness level, Adams adds.

So, next time you see those burly ropes at the gym, head over and give them a whirl (or whip) for 10 minutes. Research from the Journal of Strength and Conditioning shows that’s all you need to achieve a vigorous full-body workout. These five battle rope exercises will give you a creative, seriously taxing Tabata-style routine, so get slamming!

RELATED: 5 Agility Ladder Drills for a Full-Body Burn

5 Battle Rope Exercises for a HIIT Full-Body Workout

Before you start swinging, make sure you anchor the rope around a heavy kettlebell (think more than 50 pounds), a weight machine or a railing. When you’re set, it’s time to wave in the results.

Full-Body Workout with Battle Ropes: Jumping Power Slams Exercise

1. Jumping Power Slams

Power slams offer a total-body plyometric burn that tires your muscles out fast, says Adams. Now, add an explosive lower-body element and you turn up the benefits even more.

How to: Stand with feet shoulder-width apart in a quarter squat, facing the anchor. Hold one side of the rope in each hand, then lower the battle ropes down to your sides with your arms extended (a). Lower into a squat, tighten your core, and then explode into the air, jumping high, while raising both hands overhead (b). As you land softly back down into a squat, forcefully slam the ropes onto the ground in a wave motion (c). Repeat 30 seconds, then rest for 30 seconds. Do 3-4 sets.

RELATED: 5 Easy Moves for an Awesome 30-Minute Arm Workout

Full-Body Workout with Battle Ropes: Squat to Press Exercise

2. Squat to Shoulder Press

Strengthen your shoulders as you work your lower body and core, too. This movement is especially beneficial for barbell athletes because it uses the same muscles as the thruster or clean and jerk, Adams says. Instead of going for HIIT-style for this movement, focus on form. When your form starts to break, it’s time to stop, she says.

How to: Start with your feet slightly wider than hip-width apart. Hold the ropes on your shoulders, making sure that there is very little slack in the rope itself (a). Lower down into a squat (b). As you stand back up, simultaneously press the ropes overhead to straighten your arms (c). Then, in one fluid motion lower the ropes back to the tops of your shoulders as you sink back into a squat (d). Repeat for 10-20 reps, rest for 60 seconds, then repeat for 3-4 sets.

Full-Body Workout with Battle Ropes: Alternating Wide Arm Circles Exercise

3. Alternating Wide Circles

The wide circle motion in this full-body move puts extra emphasis on your back and grip strength, says Adams. Make the circles as big as you can, using your legs only if you need to. “I recommend keeping as much momentum going throughout the exercise as possible, because the more you slow down, the heavier those ropes will feel and the harder it will be to get those ropes moving again,” Adams says.

How to: Stand with feet hip-width apart in a shallow squat. Grip one end of the rope in each of your hands. Tighten your core, and move each rope out to the side in a circle motion (a). Then, complete the circle by bringing your arm back in front of your body (b). Use the momentum to keep the circular motion going. Each arm should move independently, but still in-sync (c). Repeat for 30 seconds, then rest for 30 seconds. Do 3-4 sets.

RELATED: 3 Cardio Workouts Under 20 Minutes — No Treadmill Required

Full-Body Workout with Battle Ropes: Jumping Jacks Exercise

4. Jumping Jacks

Jack up your heart rate up while working the smaller muscles in and around the shoulders. You’ll definitely feel this in your core and obliques, too, Adams says.

How to: Start by holding one end of the rope in each hand, elbows bent and feet about hip-width apart (b). Jump your feet out wide as you bring your arms up and out to the sides, keeping your elbows bent so you can lift the ropes to shoulder height (b). Then, slam the ropes back down as you jump your feet back together (c). Continue the jack for 30 seconds, then rest for 30 seconds. Do 3-4 sets.

Full-Body Workout with Battle Ropes: Jumping Jacks Exercise

5. Alternating Jump Wave

Finish up arm day with a little full-body workout action that requires solid coordination and power. You’ll feel it in your shoulders, arms and back, while the squats target your glutes and legs, too.

How to: Stand with your feet hip-width apart and grab one side of the rope with each hand. Place both hands to the right side of your hips and drop down into a squat (a). Explode off the ground as your swing the ropes up and over to the outside of your left hip, landing softly back into a squat (b). Continue alternating swings as you do jump squats for 30 seconds, then rest for 30 seconds. Do 3-4 sets.

Read More
6 Killer Cardio Workouts That Don’t Involve Running
Got 30 Minutes? The Ultimate HIIT Jump Rope Workout
15-Minute Plyometrics Workout for Cardio and Power

The post 5 Battle Rope Exercises, 1 Full-Body Cardio Workout appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
5 Battle Rope Exercises for a Full-Body Workout

[caption id="attachment_64200" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Battle Rope Exercises for a Full-Body Workout Photo: Twenty20[/caption] Remember those giant ropes you used to play tug of war with as a kid? Well, you can also use them as a tool to blast calories and build muscle at the gym. In fact, you only need a few minutes at the end of your regularly scheduled strength workout to get your burst of cardio in, along with a full-body workout burn. With the five battle rope exercises below, you’ll strengthen your abs, arms and shoulders, as well as activate your leg muscles and increase both upper and lower body power production. Even better, you get high-intensity conditioning all at the same time, says Liz Adams, athlete and coach at CrossFit Union Square. To top it off, any move can remain low-impact, which means they’re great for athletes with joint issues, and you can cater each exercise to any fitness level, Adams adds. So, next time you see those burly ropes at the gym, head over and give them a whirl (or whip) for 10 minutes. Research from the Journal of Strength and Conditioning shows that’s all you need to achieve a vigorous full-body workout. These five battle rope exercises will give you a creative, seriously taxing Tabata-style routine, so get slamming! RELATED: 5 Agility Ladder Drills for a Full-Body Burn

5 Battle Rope Exercises for a HIIT Full-Body Workout

Before you start swinging, make sure you anchor the rope around a heavy kettlebell (think more than 50 pounds), a weight machine or a railing. When you’re set, it’s time to wave in the results. Full-Body Workout with Battle Ropes: Jumping Power Slams Exercise

1. Jumping Power Slams

Power slams offer a total-body plyometric burn that tires your muscles out fast, says Adams. Now, add an explosive lower-body element and you turn up the benefits even more. How to: Stand with feet shoulder-width apart in a quarter squat, facing the anchor. Hold one side of the rope in each hand, then lower the battle ropes down to your sides with your arms extended (a). Lower into a squat, tighten your core, and then explode into the air, jumping high, while raising both hands overhead (b). As you land softly back down into a squat, forcefully slam the ropes onto the ground in a wave motion (c). Repeat 30 seconds, then rest for 30 seconds. Do 3-4 sets. RELATED: 5 Easy Moves for an Awesome 30-Minute Arm Workout Full-Body Workout with Battle Ropes: Squat to Press Exercise

2. Squat to Shoulder Press

Strengthen your shoulders as you work your lower body and core, too. This movement is especially beneficial for barbell athletes because it uses the same muscles as the thruster or clean and jerk, Adams says. Instead of going for HIIT-style for this movement, focus on form. When your form starts to break, it’s time to stop, she says. How to: Start with your feet slightly wider than hip-width apart. Hold the ropes on your shoulders, making sure that there is very little slack in the rope itself (a). Lower down into a squat (b). As you stand back up, simultaneously press the ropes overhead to straighten your arms (c). Then, in one fluid motion lower the ropes back to the tops of your shoulders as you sink back into a squat (d). Repeat for 10-20 reps, rest for 60 seconds, then repeat for 3-4 sets. Full-Body Workout with Battle Ropes: Alternating Wide Arm Circles Exercise

3. Alternating Wide Circles

The wide circle motion in this full-body move puts extra emphasis on your back and grip strength, says Adams. Make the circles as big as you can, using your legs only if you need to. “I recommend keeping as much momentum going throughout the exercise as possible, because the more you slow down, the heavier those ropes will feel and the harder it will be to get those ropes moving again,” Adams says. How to: Stand with feet hip-width apart in a shallow squat. Grip one end of the rope in each of your hands. Tighten your core, and move each rope out to the side in a circle motion (a). Then, complete the circle by bringing your arm back in front of your body (b). Use the momentum to keep the circular motion going. Each arm should move independently, but still in-sync (c). Repeat for 30 seconds, then rest for 30 seconds. Do 3-4 sets. RELATED: 3 Cardio Workouts Under 20 Minutes — No Treadmill Required Full-Body Workout with Battle Ropes: Jumping Jacks Exercise

4. Jumping Jacks

Jack up your heart rate up while working the smaller muscles in and around the shoulders. You’ll definitely feel this in your core and obliques, too, Adams says. How to: Start by holding one end of the rope in each hand, elbows bent and feet about hip-width apart (b). Jump your feet out wide as you bring your arms up and out to the sides, keeping your elbows bent so you can lift the ropes to shoulder height (b). Then, slam the ropes back down as you jump your feet back together (c). Continue the jack for 30 seconds, then rest for 30 seconds. Do 3-4 sets. Full-Body Workout with Battle Ropes: Jumping Jacks Exercise

5. Alternating Jump Wave

Finish up arm day with a little full-body workout action that requires solid coordination and power. You’ll feel it in your shoulders, arms and back, while the squats target your glutes and legs, too. How to: Stand with your feet hip-width apart and grab one side of the rope with each hand. Place both hands to the right side of your hips and drop down into a squat (a). Explode off the ground as your swing the ropes up and over to the outside of your left hip, landing softly back into a squat (b). Continue alternating swings as you do jump squats for 30 seconds, then rest for 30 seconds. Do 3-4 sets. Read More 6 Killer Cardio Workouts That Don’t Involve Running Got 30 Minutes? The Ultimate HIIT Jump Rope Workout 15-Minute Plyometrics Workout for Cardio and Power

The post 5 Battle Rope Exercises, 1 Full-Body Cardio Workout appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
The Top 8 Fitness Trends for a Fitter 2018 http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/top-fitness-trends-2018/ Wed, 27 Dec 2017 12:15:00 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=64327 The Top 8 Fitness Trends for a Fitter 2018

Top 8 Fitness Trends for 2018

These days, your workout routine might not involve a big box gym. And if you’re up on the latest fitness trends, it might look a little something like this: sled pushes and battle ropes before work, mindfulness meditation during your lunch break, and a cryotherapy appointment before dinner. Because when it comes to wellness, it’s more than just a routine; it’s a lifestyle. And the numbers say it all: According to the Global Wellness Institute, the wellness industry is a $3.7 trillion business. It grew 10.6 percent from 2013 to 2015, and is expected to grow 17 percent in the next five years.

But it's not just the feel-good effects of exercise that keep us coming back for more. It’s also the appeal of training and living like an athlete. Pete McCall, MS, CSCS, former exercise physiologist for the American Council on Exercise and director of fitness programming for Vicore Fitness, says, “More people want the athlete experience and that’s why we’ll continue to see athletic-based training workouts.”

That’s right, people aren’t just interested in working out like LeBron James. They want to eat and recover like him, too. So if you, too, want to train like athlete, check out our list of the biggest fitness trends for 2018.

RELATED: The Most Popular Health Food Trends of 2017

 8 Biggest Fitness Trends to Try in 2018

[caption id="attachment_64329" align="alignnone" width="620"]2018 Fitness Trends: Boxing Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn Undefeated[/caption]

1. Boutique Boxing

Muhammad Ali fans aren’t the only ones hopping in the ring to train “Thrilla in Manila” style these days. Celebs, models and everyday athletes are shuffling into new studios like Rumble, Everybody Fights and Box Union in impressive numbers. And when people can’t hit a bag, they can do it at home with programs like Daily Burn’s Undefeated kickboxing program. One reason boxing is the knock-out workout of the year? Sandy Todd Webster, editor in chief of the IDEA Fitness Journal, says, “We’re all living with an incredible amount of stress in our lives and hitting a bag or throwing forceful air punches using the torque of our whole bodies is an amazing release!”

And since most boxing studios offer the experience of training like a true boxer with strength training and conditioning components in each class, you get the performance benefits, too. Rick Richey, MS, LMT, NASM-certified trainer, says, “Exercise can seem boring when only focusing on physiological outcomes, but sports conditioning classes provide us with performance-based outcomes that make the exercises more engaging and fun.”

[caption id="attachment_64330" align="alignnone" width="620"]2018 Fitness Trends: Functional Training 2.0 Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

2. Functional Training 2.0

While functional training is nothing new, McCall says there’s going to be greater focus on enhancing strength in all planes of motion. Think about the daily activities, like pushing, pulling, lifting, bending and twisting, you do. “If you’re going to live a healthy, active and injury-free life, functional training needs to be the baseline for everything else you do,” Webster says.

Barbells have become more popular for functional training, but McCall thinks, “We’ll see a re-birth in using medicine balls, resistance bands and plyometric training.” On the other hand, Richey says since more educational courses and trainers are trending toward weightlifting modalities themselves, their clients and classes will soon follow. "There will likely be an uptick in weightlifting, Olympic lifting and kettlebell classes that focus on building strength.” According to the Sports & Fitness Industry Association 2017 report, the use of barbells rose 4.3 percent last year and kettebells 3.2 percent.

[caption id="attachment_64336" align="alignnone" width="620"]2018 Fitness Trends: Fitness Studios With Recovery Photo: Tone House[/caption]

3. Revved-Up Recovery

Over the past decade, workouts like HIIT and CrossFit have encouraged us to dial up the intensity, but 2018 is going to be all about slowing down. “Instead of killing ourselves with extremely intense workouts seven days a week, we’ll see more intelligent programming that includes recovery,” McCall says. “High-intensity workouts are just one part of the equation for better performance. The other half is recovery,” he explains. But recovery goes beyond taking a 30-second water break in between circuits or supersets. Webster notes, “Recovery is multifaceted and includes taking short breaks from exercise, active rest, myofascial release, sleep…they’re all a huge part of overall health.”

RELATED: 3 Fitness Studios That Are Going Big on Recovery

[caption id="attachment_64331" align="alignnone" width="620"]2018 Fitness Trends: Cryotherapy Photo: Pond5[/caption]

4. Going hot…or cold

Speaking of chilling out between sweat sessions, cryotherapy is continuing to gain popularity for post-workout recovery. Proponents of cryotherapy believe that sub-freezing temps can help speed up muscle recovery and reduce inflammation by constricting blood vessels. Post-session, you should experience improved blood flow and less pain overall. “Cryotherapy is something you see more professional athletes who train at a high level doing,” McCall says, but with ClassPass offerings and flash sales, cryo appears to be making a cold dash for the mainstream.

Meanwhile, some fitness studios believe heat is a better way to relieve pain and reduce stress. Sky Ting yoga studio in New York City has a built-in infrared sauna, and the Fhitting Room recently partnered with HigherDOSE to offer a sauna sesh post-workout. But are these recovery methods just a smoke show? Richey, who is opening his own recovery facility in early 2018, says, “There’s a lot of theoretical reasoning and rational, but little empirical research [about these recovery methods].” That will all change once science starts catching up with the trends, he says. “Research in fitness is often not pioneering. Research tries to measure, validate and quantify outcomes of what is already being done in the field. “

[caption id="attachment_64332" align="alignnone" width="620"]2018 Fitness Trends: Immersive Fitness Photo: Asi Zeevi / Woom Center[/caption]

5. Exercise in 3D

Basic, one-dimensional fitness classes won’t cut it in 2018. Studios are going immersive with their experiences. That means yoga studios with sound baths, and spin studios leveraging virtual reality into their classes. “Change and experimentation are inevitable in an industry with super creative minds, and necessary to keep offerings dynamic for exercisers who want to stay motivated through change,” Webster explains. These immersive experiences also provide perspective on how to use fitness to overcome life’s challenges. Webster says. “The instructor takes you on an amazing journey through imagery, storytelling, varied tempos and inspiring music.”

RELATED: Mindfulness for Athletes: The Secret to Better Performance?

[caption id="attachment_64333" align="alignnone" width="620"]2018 Fitness Trends: At-Home Workouts Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

6. At-Home Workouts

This year, we saw FlyWheel and ClassPass expand their businesses online with live streaming workouts, joining the likes of Daily Burn and Peloton. “I think this is the next generation of exercise DVDs. Some people just prefer to work out in the comfort of their own homes,” Webster says. McCall says this is also another way for trainers to connect with their clients when they can’t make it to the gym. “It will be interesting to see how people start to re-create a live experience. We’re going to see how technology can change fitness,” McCall says.

[caption id="attachment_64337" align="alignnone" width="620"]2018 Fitness Trends: Mindful Movement Photo: Matt Doyle[/caption]

7. Mindful Movement

Meditation hit it big in 2017. And it incorporated HIIT, too. Nike Master Trainer Holly Rilinger’s Lifted class, for instance, infuses a meditation pre- and post-workout. But McCall predicts meditation will be baked into other types of workouts in the new year. “We’re going to see mindful movement as part of strength training to improve cognitive function and mental acuity,” he says. Think: Workout apps and audio workouts with five-minute meditations. Webster says since we’re constantly glued to our screens, meditation can give us the headspace we need to truly focus on the push-up at hand. “If it’s five minutes before or after a class of guided meditation, it might be the only personal quiet time a person gets all day,” Webster says.

RELATED: Meditation Meets HIIT in New Mindful Fitness Approach

[caption id="attachment_64334" align="alignnone" width="620"]2018 Fitness Trends: Breath Work Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

8. Breath Work

OK, now that we’ve learned how to be more present, what’s the next step in fueling our workouts from within? That’s where breathing classes come in. “Meditation classes may turn the corner this year and start offering breathing techniques,” Richey says. The Valsalva maneuver is a method used in many weightlifting workouts. It involves taking a deep breath before lifting and holding that breath while you lift. At the release, you exhale. And if you’re new to meditating altogether, perhaps simply sitting and breathing could be the first step.

“We are distracted by our screens and devices 24/7,” Webster says. “Emphasis on being more present and mindful in our lives — for however long we can manage — is an important way to regroup with yourself.”

Read More
Daily Burn 365: New Workouts, 7 Days a Week
3 Quick HIIT Workouts for Beginners
5 Moves, 30 Minutes: Your Ultimate Kickboxing Workout

The post The Top 8 Fitness Trends for a Fitter 2018 appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
The Top 8 Fitness Trends for a Fitter 2018

Top 8 Fitness Trends for 2018
These days, your workout routine might not involve a big box gym. And if you’re up on the latest fitness trends, it might look a little something like this: sled pushes and battle ropes before work, mindfulness meditation during your lunch break, and a cryotherapy appointment before dinner. Because when it comes to wellness, it’s more than just a routine; it’s a lifestyle. And the numbers say it all: According to the Global Wellness Institute, the wellness industry is a $3.7 trillion business. It grew 10.6 percent from 2013 to 2015, and is expected to grow 17 percent in the next five years. But it's not just the feel-good effects of exercise that keep us coming back for more. It’s also the appeal of training and living like an athlete. Pete McCall, MS, CSCS, former exercise physiologist for the American Council on Exercise and director of fitness programming for Vicore Fitness, says, “More people want the athlete experience and that’s why we’ll continue to see athletic-based training workouts.” That’s right, people aren’t just interested in working out like LeBron James. They want to eat and recover like him, too. So if you, too, want to train like athlete, check out our list of the biggest fitness trends for 2018. RELATED: The Most Popular Health Food Trends of 2017

 8 Biggest Fitness Trends to Try in 2018

[caption id="attachment_64329" align="alignnone" width="620"]2018 Fitness Trends: Boxing Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn Undefeated[/caption]

1. Boutique Boxing

Muhammad Ali fans aren’t the only ones hopping in the ring to train “Thrilla in Manila” style these days. Celebs, models and everyday athletes are shuffling into new studios like Rumble, Everybody Fights and Box Union in impressive numbers. And when people can’t hit a bag, they can do it at home with programs like Daily Burn’s Undefeated kickboxing program. One reason boxing is the knock-out workout of the year? Sandy Todd Webster, editor in chief of the IDEA Fitness Journal, says, “We’re all living with an incredible amount of stress in our lives and hitting a bag or throwing forceful air punches using the torque of our whole bodies is an amazing release!” And since most boxing studios offer the experience of training like a true boxer with strength training and conditioning components in each class, you get the performance benefits, too. Rick Richey, MS, LMT, NASM-certified trainer, says, “Exercise can seem boring when only focusing on physiological outcomes, but sports conditioning classes provide us with performance-based outcomes that make the exercises more engaging and fun.” [caption id="attachment_64330" align="alignnone" width="620"]2018 Fitness Trends: Functional Training 2.0 Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

2. Functional Training 2.0

While functional training is nothing new, McCall says there’s going to be greater focus on enhancing strength in all planes of motion. Think about the daily activities, like pushing, pulling, lifting, bending and twisting, you do. “If you’re going to live a healthy, active and injury-free life, functional training needs to be the baseline for everything else you do,” Webster says. Barbells have become more popular for functional training, but McCall thinks, “We’ll see a re-birth in using medicine balls, resistance bands and plyometric training.” On the other hand, Richey says since more educational courses and trainers are trending toward weightlifting modalities themselves, their clients and classes will soon follow. "There will likely be an uptick in weightlifting, Olympic lifting and kettlebell classes that focus on building strength.” According to the Sports & Fitness Industry Association 2017 report, the use of barbells rose 4.3 percent last year and kettebells 3.2 percent. [caption id="attachment_64336" align="alignnone" width="620"]2018 Fitness Trends: Fitness Studios With Recovery Photo: Tone House[/caption]

3. Revved-Up Recovery

Over the past decade, workouts like HIIT and CrossFit have encouraged us to dial up the intensity, but 2018 is going to be all about slowing down. “Instead of killing ourselves with extremely intense workouts seven days a week, we’ll see more intelligent programming that includes recovery,” McCall says. “High-intensity workouts are just one part of the equation for better performance. The other half is recovery,” he explains. But recovery goes beyond taking a 30-second water break in between circuits or supersets. Webster notes, “Recovery is multifaceted and includes taking short breaks from exercise, active rest, myofascial release, sleep…they’re all a huge part of overall health.” RELATED: 3 Fitness Studios That Are Going Big on Recovery [caption id="attachment_64331" align="alignnone" width="620"]2018 Fitness Trends: Cryotherapy Photo: Pond5[/caption]

4. Going hot…or cold

Speaking of chilling out between sweat sessions, cryotherapy is continuing to gain popularity for post-workout recovery. Proponents of cryotherapy believe that sub-freezing temps can help speed up muscle recovery and reduce inflammation by constricting blood vessels. Post-session, you should experience improved blood flow and less pain overall. “Cryotherapy is something you see more professional athletes who train at a high level doing,” McCall says, but with ClassPass offerings and flash sales, cryo appears to be making a cold dash for the mainstream. Meanwhile, some fitness studios believe heat is a better way to relieve pain and reduce stress. Sky Ting yoga studio in New York City has a built-in infrared sauna, and the Fhitting Room recently partnered with HigherDOSE to offer a sauna sesh post-workout. But are these recovery methods just a smoke show? Richey, who is opening his own recovery facility in early 2018, says, “There’s a lot of theoretical reasoning and rational, but little empirical research [about these recovery methods].” That will all change once science starts catching up with the trends, he says. “Research in fitness is often not pioneering. Research tries to measure, validate and quantify outcomes of what is already being done in the field. “ [caption id="attachment_64332" align="alignnone" width="620"]2018 Fitness Trends: Immersive Fitness Photo: Asi Zeevi / Woom Center[/caption]

5. Exercise in 3D

Basic, one-dimensional fitness classes won’t cut it in 2018. Studios are going immersive with their experiences. That means yoga studios with sound baths, and spin studios leveraging virtual reality into their classes. “Change and experimentation are inevitable in an industry with super creative minds, and necessary to keep offerings dynamic for exercisers who want to stay motivated through change,” Webster explains. These immersive experiences also provide perspective on how to use fitness to overcome life’s challenges. Webster says. “The instructor takes you on an amazing journey through imagery, storytelling, varied tempos and inspiring music.” RELATED: Mindfulness for Athletes: The Secret to Better Performance? [caption id="attachment_64333" align="alignnone" width="620"]2018 Fitness Trends: At-Home Workouts Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

6. At-Home Workouts

This year, we saw FlyWheel and ClassPass expand their businesses online with live streaming workouts, joining the likes of Daily Burn and Peloton. “I think this is the next generation of exercise DVDs. Some people just prefer to work out in the comfort of their own homes,” Webster says. McCall says this is also another way for trainers to connect with their clients when they can’t make it to the gym. “It will be interesting to see how people start to re-create a live experience. We’re going to see how technology can change fitness,” McCall says. [caption id="attachment_64337" align="alignnone" width="620"]2018 Fitness Trends: Mindful Movement Photo: Matt Doyle[/caption]

7. Mindful Movement

Meditation hit it big in 2017. And it incorporated HIIT, too. Nike Master Trainer Holly Rilinger’s Lifted class, for instance, infuses a meditation pre- and post-workout. But McCall predicts meditation will be baked into other types of workouts in the new year. “We’re going to see mindful movement as part of strength training to improve cognitive function and mental acuity,” he says. Think: Workout apps and audio workouts with five-minute meditations. Webster says since we’re constantly glued to our screens, meditation can give us the headspace we need to truly focus on the push-up at hand. “If it’s five minutes before or after a class of guided meditation, it might be the only personal quiet time a person gets all day,” Webster says. RELATED: Meditation Meets HIIT in New Mindful Fitness Approach [caption id="attachment_64334" align="alignnone" width="620"]2018 Fitness Trends: Breath Work Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

8. Breath Work

OK, now that we’ve learned how to be more present, what’s the next step in fueling our workouts from within? That’s where breathing classes come in. “Meditation classes may turn the corner this year and start offering breathing techniques,” Richey says. The Valsalva maneuver is a method used in many weightlifting workouts. It involves taking a deep breath before lifting and holding that breath while you lift. At the release, you exhale. And if you’re new to meditating altogether, perhaps simply sitting and breathing could be the first step. “We are distracted by our screens and devices 24/7,” Webster says. “Emphasis on being more present and mindful in our lives — for however long we can manage — is an important way to regroup with yourself.” Read More Daily Burn 365: New Workouts, 7 Days a Week 3 Quick HIIT Workouts for Beginners 5 Moves, 30 Minutes: Your Ultimate Kickboxing Workout

The post The Top 8 Fitness Trends for a Fitter 2018 appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
8 Fitness Goals to Set for 2018 and How to Crush Them http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/fitness-goals-workout-resolutions/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/fitness-goals-workout-resolutions/#respond Mon, 25 Dec 2017 14:10:44 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=54986 7 Fitness Goals to Set for 2018 and How to Crush Them

[caption id="attachment_64302" align="alignnone" width="620"]8 Fitness Goals to Set for 2018 and How to Crush Them Photo: Pond5[/caption]

It’s time to set that New Year’s resolution. And we’re not talking about vowing to drop pounds or get lean (though these ideas might help in those departments, too). When it comes to following through with resolutions, the more specific, the better. So we rounded up eight of the most badass (yet doable!) fitness goals you’ll want to steal for 2018 — from finally crushing a pull-up to balancing in a handstand, and a few others in between. Plus, we share the concrete steps to help get you to the finish.­ Pick one or tackle all eight. Either way, we see some big wins in your future.

RELATED: 19 Reasons to Work Out (Beyond the Perfect Body)

8 Big-Time Fitness Goals to Set for 2018

1. Master the Perfect Push-Up

Why it matters: Most trainers will tout push-ups as a top total-body move, targeting your shoulders and back to your core and thighs. So becoming a push-up protégé will do your body some serious good.

How to nail it: Believe us, it’s A-OK to perform the move on your knees, especially if you’re a workout newbie. But don’t settle for the modified version. Work on progressing to that high plank position. Daily Burn 365 trainer Prince Brathwaite explains how to do just that in the video above. Start by holding the top of the push-up position (aka a plank), then the bottom. Next, work on the eccentric or downward motion. Before you know it, you’ll perform it like a pro. Feeling super motivated? Work toward the plyo variation in this story, which scorches mega calories.

RELATED: THIS Is How to Do Perfect Push-Ups (Even on Your Knees)

[caption id="attachment_64287" align="alignnone" width="620"]2018 Fitness Goals: Finish a Race Photo: Oregon Wine Country Half Marathon[/caption]

2. Finish Your First Race

Why it matters: Nothing compares to the glory you’ll feel at the finish line of your first 5K, 10K, half-marathon, marathon or triathlon (take your pick!). Even if you’ve covered a shorter distance before and move on to the next feat, you’ll feel so proud of the medal you earn after conquering that longer run. Other options for more cardio adventure: a trail race or mud run, like the Spartan Race. “Aroo!” as the Spartans say. (For a kick-ass training plan that’ll get you ready for the obstacle race, sign up for the Daily Burn Spartan program.)

How to nail it: Of course, any distance requires some prep. Lucky for you, we have lots of race day tips and training plans. Sign up for a race in a cool new city or see your hometown from a different angle. (Check out this list of 263 races to choose from.) Then peep this advice to get you to the finish:

The 5K Training Plan You Can Actually Do

The Easiest 10K Training Plan Ever

The Half-Marathon Training Plan for Beginners

A Beginner’s Guide to Triathlon Training

13 Race Day Tips for Newbie Runners

5 Running Tweaks That Took an Hour Off My Marathon Time

7 Expert Tips for Pacing Yourself on the Run

12 Secrets from the Pros to Run a Personal Best

3. Hit That Handstand

Why it matters: Besides seriously impressing your friends and Instagram followers, balancing in an inverted position requires pretty top-notch core strength. It also builds muscle in your arms, shoulders and back. Not to mention, it can increase circulation in your upper body, while taking some pressure off your legs (at least for a little while).

How to nail it: Defying gravity requires tackling small steps along the way. To do so, follow yoga expert Briohny Smyth’s progression in the video above. She’ll take you through grip and stabilization exercises, and teach you how to gain more strength in your core. Put in the effort and balancing on your hands could become as easy as standing on your feet.

RELATED: 50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core

[caption id="attachment_64285" align="alignnone" width="620"]2018 Fitness Goals: Do a Pull-Up Photo: Pond5[/caption]

4. Finally Do a Pull-Up

Why it matters: You probably perform the pulling motion — one of the body’s primary movement patterns — countless times in your day. So gaining strength in that area just makes everyday tasks way easier. Besides a more defined back, you’ll also gain arm and core power and improve your strength in relation to your body mass (aka relative strength). Ladies, we totally understand this move is exceptionally difficult to master, which is exactly why you should try.

How to nail it: The most important step of the move comes from the eccentric or downward motion, says Ben Bruno, a Los Angeles-based trainer, in this overview of how to do a pull-up. You’ll spend a good amount of time practicing this portion, until you’re ready to try the real deal. (An assisted band will help with the full range of motion, too.) Continue practicing the movement, as many times as you can, until you’re ready to incorporate it into a workout. To build more strength before you even take it to the bar, try these 10 upper body exercises that prime your muscles for the pull-up.

RELATED: 5 Total-Body Moves to Take Your TRX Training Up a Notch

5. Show Off an Impressive Lift

Why it matters: Not only will you blend in with CrossFit crowd (and look like a regular amongst them) when you learn to lift heavy, but you’ll also get seriously stronger. While lifting heavy might seem scary at first, it’s the most effective way to build muscle — which will burn more cals for you in the long run.

Three notable lifts to add to your list: the deadlift (a total-body move that focuses on your posterior chain, especially hamstrings and glutes, and helps improve alignment), barbell snatch (for strength and power in your core, glutes and calves) and the clean and jerk (which targets the entire body and throws in a cardio endurance challenge).

How to nail it: It’s all about breaking ‘em down — and we don’t just mean your muscle fibers, but the moves as well. Follow these links to master each step of the three lifts mentioned:

The 5 Most Important Lifts to Master (deadlifts are number one)

How to Do a Perfect Deadlift

Olympic Lifts 101: How to Do the Barbell Snatch

Weight Lifting 101: The Ultimate Clean and Jerk Guide

[caption id="attachment_64286" align="alignnone" width="620"]2018 Fitness Goals: Master Crow Pose Photo: Pond5[/caption]

6. Balance in Crow Pose

Why it matters: A skill any wannabe yogi covets, crow takes you from a deep squat position to putting all your bodyweight on your hands. You’ll do this by placing your knees right at your armpits. Anyone looking to work their core will also see the advantages of this move, as it’s all about balance.

How to nail it: You’ll need to stretch and strengthen a few key areas of the body before bouncing up into the balance position. Practice these three moves to master crow from Kristin McGee, a New York City-based yoga instructor. Then, follow her form tips for reaching the top. (Just have a crash pad handy if you’re scared of falling!) You’ll be a crow pose pro in no time.

RELATED: Are You Doing These Yoga Poses All Wrong?

7. Tackle a Pistol Squat

Why it matters: You probably do hundreds of regular squats throughout your day, but this single-leg variation kicks up the stability challenge. It’s the ultimate test for strength, ankle mobility and balance. The payoff: running and jumping off one foot more efficiently (looking at you, racers!), enhanced mobility, muscle gain and improved coordination. Oh, and some serious CrossFit cred. Who can turn that down?

How to nail it: Form takes priority with this move, so that you don’t overload the knee joint. Follow the steps to building up to full range of (unassisted) motion in the beginner’s guide to the pistol squat video above. You’ll know you need to start from the bottom of the progression if your toes or heels leave the floor at any time during the exercise.

8. Learn a New Dance

Why it matters: Experts say the best workout you can do is the one you'll actually keep doing. And who can turn down a fun-filled dance party? Not only will you smile right through the sweat, but you'll also raise your heart rate for a cardio kick, while twisting and turning your way to fit. It's the perfect way to build stamina while testing your coordination skills, too.

How to nail it: Just follow Dancing with the Stars alum and creator of Daily Burn's LaBlast program, Louis van Amstel in the video above. He teaches the main step of four ballroom dance methods, including the hustle, cha-cha, quickstep and lindy hop. Master all four and rule the dance floor. Or take it up a level by trying the Daily Burn LaBlast program, featuring even more personality and creative sequences from van Amstel — plus a ton more fun and fitness.

Originally published December 2016. Updated December 2017. 

Read More
Winter Running Guide: How to Run Faster by Spring
5 Agility Ladder Drills for a Full-Body Burn
Train Like an Athlete with This 30-Day Plan

The post 8 Fitness Goals to Set for 2018 and How to Crush Them appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
7 Fitness Goals to Set for 2018 and How to Crush Them

[caption id="attachment_64302" align="alignnone" width="620"]8 Fitness Goals to Set for 2018 and How to Crush Them Photo: Pond5[/caption] It’s time to set that New Year’s resolution. And we’re not talking about vowing to drop pounds or get lean (though these ideas might help in those departments, too). When it comes to following through with resolutions, the more specific, the better. So we rounded up eight of the most badass (yet doable!) fitness goals you’ll want to steal for 2018 — from finally crushing a pull-up to balancing in a handstand, and a few others in between. Plus, we share the concrete steps to help get you to the finish.­ Pick one or tackle all eight. Either way, we see some big wins in your future. RELATED: 19 Reasons to Work Out (Beyond the Perfect Body)

8 Big-Time Fitness Goals to Set for 2018

1. Master the Perfect Push-Up

Why it matters: Most trainers will tout push-ups as a top total-body move, targeting your shoulders and back to your core and thighs. So becoming a push-up protégé will do your body some serious good. How to nail it: Believe us, it’s A-OK to perform the move on your knees, especially if you’re a workout newbie. But don’t settle for the modified version. Work on progressing to that high plank position. Daily Burn 365 trainer Prince Brathwaite explains how to do just that in the video above. Start by holding the top of the push-up position (aka a plank), then the bottom. Next, work on the eccentric or downward motion. Before you know it, you’ll perform it like a pro. Feeling super motivated? Work toward the plyo variation in this story, which scorches mega calories. RELATED: THIS Is How to Do Perfect Push-Ups (Even on Your Knees) [caption id="attachment_64287" align="alignnone" width="620"]2018 Fitness Goals: Finish a Race Photo: Oregon Wine Country Half Marathon[/caption]

2. Finish Your First Race

Why it matters: Nothing compares to the glory you’ll feel at the finish line of your first 5K, 10K, half-marathon, marathon or triathlon (take your pick!). Even if you’ve covered a shorter distance before and move on to the next feat, you’ll feel so proud of the medal you earn after conquering that longer run. Other options for more cardio adventure: a trail race or mud run, like the Spartan Race. “Aroo!” as the Spartans say. (For a kick-ass training plan that’ll get you ready for the obstacle race, sign up for the Daily Burn Spartan program.) How to nail it: Of course, any distance requires some prep. Lucky for you, we have lots of race day tips and training plans. Sign up for a race in a cool new city or see your hometown from a different angle. (Check out this list of 263 races to choose from.) Then peep this advice to get you to the finish: The 5K Training Plan You Can Actually Do The Easiest 10K Training Plan Ever The Half-Marathon Training Plan for Beginners A Beginner’s Guide to Triathlon Training 13 Race Day Tips for Newbie Runners 5 Running Tweaks That Took an Hour Off My Marathon Time 7 Expert Tips for Pacing Yourself on the Run 12 Secrets from the Pros to Run a Personal Best

3. Hit That Handstand

Why it matters: Besides seriously impressing your friends and Instagram followers, balancing in an inverted position requires pretty top-notch core strength. It also builds muscle in your arms, shoulders and back. Not to mention, it can increase circulation in your upper body, while taking some pressure off your legs (at least for a little while). How to nail it: Defying gravity requires tackling small steps along the way. To do so, follow yoga expert Briohny Smyth’s progression in the video above. She’ll take you through grip and stabilization exercises, and teach you how to gain more strength in your core. Put in the effort and balancing on your hands could become as easy as standing on your feet. RELATED: 50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core [caption id="attachment_64285" align="alignnone" width="620"]2018 Fitness Goals: Do a Pull-Up Photo: Pond5[/caption]

4. Finally Do a Pull-Up

Why it matters: You probably perform the pulling motion — one of the body’s primary movement patterns — countless times in your day. So gaining strength in that area just makes everyday tasks way easier. Besides a more defined back, you’ll also gain arm and core power and improve your strength in relation to your body mass (aka relative strength). Ladies, we totally understand this move is exceptionally difficult to master, which is exactly why you should try. How to nail it: The most important step of the move comes from the eccentric or downward motion, says Ben Bruno, a Los Angeles-based trainer, in this overview of how to do a pull-up. You’ll spend a good amount of time practicing this portion, until you’re ready to try the real deal. (An assisted band will help with the full range of motion, too.) Continue practicing the movement, as many times as you can, until you’re ready to incorporate it into a workout. To build more strength before you even take it to the bar, try these 10 upper body exercises that prime your muscles for the pull-up. RELATED: 5 Total-Body Moves to Take Your TRX Training Up a Notch

5. Show Off an Impressive Lift

Why it matters: Not only will you blend in with CrossFit crowd (and look like a regular amongst them) when you learn to lift heavy, but you’ll also get seriously stronger. While lifting heavy might seem scary at first, it’s the most effective way to build muscle — which will burn more cals for you in the long run. Three notable lifts to add to your list: the deadlift (a total-body move that focuses on your posterior chain, especially hamstrings and glutes, and helps improve alignment), barbell snatch (for strength and power in your core, glutes and calves) and the clean and jerk (which targets the entire body and throws in a cardio endurance challenge). How to nail it: It’s all about breaking ‘em down — and we don’t just mean your muscle fibers, but the moves as well. Follow these links to master each step of the three lifts mentioned: The 5 Most Important Lifts to Master (deadlifts are number one) How to Do a Perfect Deadlift Olympic Lifts 101: How to Do the Barbell Snatch Weight Lifting 101: The Ultimate Clean and Jerk Guide [caption id="attachment_64286" align="alignnone" width="620"]2018 Fitness Goals: Master Crow Pose Photo: Pond5[/caption]

6. Balance in Crow Pose

Why it matters: A skill any wannabe yogi covets, crow takes you from a deep squat position to putting all your bodyweight on your hands. You’ll do this by placing your knees right at your armpits. Anyone looking to work their core will also see the advantages of this move, as it’s all about balance. How to nail it: You’ll need to stretch and strengthen a few key areas of the body before bouncing up into the balance position. Practice these three moves to master crow from Kristin McGee, a New York City-based yoga instructor. Then, follow her form tips for reaching the top. (Just have a crash pad handy if you’re scared of falling!) You’ll be a crow pose pro in no time. RELATED: Are You Doing These Yoga Poses All Wrong?

7. Tackle a Pistol Squat

Why it matters: You probably do hundreds of regular squats throughout your day, but this single-leg variation kicks up the stability challenge. It’s the ultimate test for strength, ankle mobility and balance. The payoff: running and jumping off one foot more efficiently (looking at you, racers!), enhanced mobility, muscle gain and improved coordination. Oh, and some serious CrossFit cred. Who can turn that down? How to nail it: Form takes priority with this move, so that you don’t overload the knee joint. Follow the steps to building up to full range of (unassisted) motion in the beginner’s guide to the pistol squat video above. You’ll know you need to start from the bottom of the progression if your toes or heels leave the floor at any time during the exercise.

8. Learn a New Dance

Why it matters: Experts say the best workout you can do is the one you'll actually keep doing. And who can turn down a fun-filled dance party? Not only will you smile right through the sweat, but you'll also raise your heart rate for a cardio kick, while twisting and turning your way to fit. It's the perfect way to build stamina while testing your coordination skills, too. How to nail it: Just follow Dancing with the Stars alum and creator of Daily Burn's LaBlast program, Louis van Amstel in the video above. He teaches the main step of four ballroom dance methods, including the hustle, cha-cha, quickstep and lindy hop. Master all four and rule the dance floor. Or take it up a level by trying the Daily Burn LaBlast program, featuring even more personality and creative sequences from van Amstel — plus a ton more fun and fitness. Originally published December 2016. Updated December 2017.  Read More Winter Running Guide: How to Run Faster by Spring 5 Agility Ladder Drills for a Full-Body Burn Train Like an Athlete with This 30-Day Plan

The post 8 Fitness Goals to Set for 2018 and How to Crush Them appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/fitness-goals-workout-resolutions/feed/ 0
275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/workout-routine-bodyweight-exercises/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/workout-routine-bodyweight-exercises/#respond Sun, 24 Dec 2017 14:15:52 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=51889 275 Ways to Shake Up Your Workout Routine

[caption id="attachment_51932" align="alignnone" width="620"]275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn[/caption]

You know the drill: Hop on the treadmill for a 20-minute interval workout. Next, hit the mat for a few sets of squats and lunges. Then, finish off with some planks and crunches. The thing about getting into a regular workout routine is that it can become, well, routine — even boring.

But thanks to these countless variations and modifications from top fitness experts, including our very own Daily Burn 365 trainers, you’ll never run out of ideas on how to challenge your arms, abs, glutes, quads, calves. You’ll be able to mix up your workout style, too — from barre to HIIT to CrossFit, and more. Whether your goal is to torch serious calories, tighten and tone, or improve your flexibility and mobility, we’ve got 275 exercises to reignite your workout motivation. (Seriously, you’ll never think of a burpee, squat, plank or jumping jack the same way again!) Exercise equipment is optional, but having some dumbbells on hand can challenge your body in new ways. Now, get up and get moving!

275 Bodyweight Exercises to Mix Up Your Workout Routine

[caption id="attachment_51890" align="alignnone" width="620"]275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine: Arm Workouts Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn[/caption]

7 Arm Workouts for Stronger Shoulders, Biceps and Triceps

The beauty of most full-body strength training workouts is that they’ll, in some shape or form, hit the arms. But if you want to devote some quality reps to your shoulders, tris and bis, this is where it’s at. From push-ups to renegade rows to battle ropes, you’ll get pro tips on how to flex your arms and test the limits of your upper body. Plus, learn how to engage your arm muscles and create resistance with no-equipment workouts.

30-Minute Arm Workout

5 Moves, 15 Minutes: Your Bodyweight Arm Workout

6 Moves for Awesome Triceps and Biceps

20-Minute Battle Ropes Workout

6 Resistance Band Exercises for Strong, Lean Arms

5 Advanced Push-Up Exercises to Try Now

The Towel Workout for Your Arms

[caption id="attachment_51891" align="alignnone" width="620"]275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine: Ab Workouts Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn[/caption]

8 Ab Workouts for a Stronger Core

Crunches, planks, side planks, leg raises, spidermans, toe touches, bicycles — there’s no shortage of exercises to help you tone and strengthen your core. What’s more, there are countless variations — standing, sitting or laying on a mat — for these classic moves. Consider your core repertoire upgraded!

5 New Crunch Variations to Try Now

5 Planks to Sculpt Your Entire Core

7 TRX Moves to Work Your Abs

Your 6-Minute Ab Workout

6 Core Exercises for Beginners

5 Oblique Exercises to Sculpt Your Abs

6 Essential Core Exercises for Runners

7 No-Crunch Exercises for Six-Pack Abs

[caption id="attachment_51892" align="alignnone" width="620"]275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn[/caption]

8 Plyometric Workouts for Better Conditioning

Plyometrics are high-intensity exercises that stretch and shorten your muscles, while raising your heart rate. The result is a calorie-torching and muscle-toning workout. From plyo lunges to jump squats to plank jacks and broad jumps, here are some exercises that will help you improve agility, while increasing strength and speed. Ready to jump?

5 Plyo Box Exercises to Rev Your Fitness

4 Bodyweight Partner Moves

7 Creative Burpee Variations to Test Your Strength

15-Minute Plyometrics Workout for Cardio and Power

Your 20-Minute MetCon Workout

30-Minute HIIT Jump Rope Workout

Full-Body Plyometrics Workout

The Weight Vest CrossFit Workout

[caption id="attachment_51893" align="alignnone" width="620"]275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine: Cardio Workouts Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn[/caption]

8 Cardio Workouts to Burn Calories Fast

These days, cardio doesn’t just mean a 30-minute jog on the treadmill or power walking on the elliptical. Virtually any workout can incorporate a little cardio by simply adding a jump, increasing speed and challenging your agility and mobility. Here, you’ll find new ways to get your heart rate up, go outside of your comfort zone and break a sweat.

The 5-Minute Kickboxing Workout

22-Minute, 5-Circuit Total-Body Workout

3 Fat-Blasting HIIT Workouts to Try Now

3 Quick HIIT Workouts for Beginners

7 Burpee Progressions to Get Your Heart Pumping

5 Quick Cardio Exercises That Don't Involve Running

3 Treadmill Workouts for Power Walkers

A 10-Minute Rowing Workout

[caption id="attachment_51895" align="alignnone" width="620"]275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine: Butt Workouts Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn[/caption]

9 Butt Workouts to Get Your Glutes in Gear

While some people are obsessed with toning their arms and show off their perfectly sculpted guns, others would prefer a much more shapely and stronger backside to charge through hills or pack serious kicks. Lunges, squats, single-leg touchdowns, donkey kicks and bridges are designed to work the glutes, sculpt thigh muscles and strengthen your hamstrings. Check out these exercises to show your lower half some TLC.

5 Power Lunges for Killer Glutes

3 Exercises for Seriously Toned Thighs

4 Lower-Body Exercises Towel Exercises

5 Moves for Your Butt, Hips and Thighs

How to Kettlebell Swing Like the Pros

How to Do a Pistol Squat

6 Squat Variations for Total-Body Strength

5 Exercises to Sculpt a Stronger Butt

6 Butt Exercises for Runners

[caption id="attachment_51896" align="alignnone" width="620"]275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine: Full-Body Workouts Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn[/caption]

6 Total-Body Workouts You Can Do Anywhere

Sure, dumbbells, kettlebells and med balls can help you build muscle mass and achieve a leaner physique. But no piece of equipment can compare to your own bodyweight. Bodyweight training can help improve your stability and condition your muscles so that you shed more pounds faster.

The 15 Bodyweight Exercises You Should Be Doing

5 Two-for-One Bodyweight Moves From Brooke Burke

3 Fat-Blasting Bodyweight Workouts

8 Ways to Amp Up Your Bodyweight Workout

5 No-Equipment Back Exercises

8 Advanced TRX Exercises to Build Total-Body Strength

[caption id="attachment_51897" align="alignnone" width="620"]275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine: Barre Workouts Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn[/caption]

10 Low-Impact Workouts to Improve Your Mobility 

Don’t let these barefoot exercises fool you! Sure, you can get comfy by doing these workouts at home, but we guarantee you’ll be feeling the burn and maybe even wiping some sweat off your brow in no time. The bonus is that these yoga and barre-inspired exercises will help relieve stress and put mind over matter. Don’t forget to throw in some stretches to start or end your day!

30-Minute Inner Thigh Barre Workout

5 Butt-Sculpting Barre Exercises

2 Sun Salutation Flows for Mega Calorie Burn

7 Beginner Yoga Poses

5 Relaxing Yoga Poses to Do Before Bed

3 Yoga Poses to Energize Your Morning

9 Yoga Poses to Survive Work, Stress and Travel

10 Easy Yoga Poses to Help Relieve Stress

5 Standing Desk Stretches

15 Stretches You Should Do Every Damn Day

Want more daily workouts and be part of a community that inspires you to be fit? Sign up for Daily Burn 365!

This story was originally published August 2016. Updated December 2017.

The post 275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
275 Ways to Shake Up Your Workout Routine

[caption id="attachment_51932" align="alignnone" width="620"]275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn[/caption] You know the drill: Hop on the treadmill for a 20-minute interval workout. Next, hit the mat for a few sets of squats and lunges. Then, finish off with some planks and crunches. The thing about getting into a regular workout routine is that it can become, well, routine — even boring. But thanks to these countless variations and modifications from top fitness experts, including our very own Daily Burn 365 trainers, you’ll never run out of ideas on how to challenge your arms, abs, glutes, quads, calves. You’ll be able to mix up your workout style, too — from barre to HIIT to CrossFit, and more. Whether your goal is to torch serious calories, tighten and tone, or improve your flexibility and mobility, we’ve got 275 exercises to reignite your workout motivation. (Seriously, you’ll never think of a burpee, squat, plank or jumping jack the same way again!) Exercise equipment is optional, but having some dumbbells on hand can challenge your body in new ways. Now, get up and get moving!

275 Bodyweight Exercises to Mix Up Your Workout Routine

[caption id="attachment_51890" align="alignnone" width="620"]275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine: Arm Workouts Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn[/caption]

7 Arm Workouts for Stronger Shoulders, Biceps and Triceps

The beauty of most full-body strength training workouts is that they’ll, in some shape or form, hit the arms. But if you want to devote some quality reps to your shoulders, tris and bis, this is where it’s at. From push-ups to renegade rows to battle ropes, you’ll get pro tips on how to flex your arms and test the limits of your upper body. Plus, learn how to engage your arm muscles and create resistance with no-equipment workouts.

30-Minute Arm Workout

5 Moves, 15 Minutes: Your Bodyweight Arm Workout

6 Moves for Awesome Triceps and Biceps

20-Minute Battle Ropes Workout

6 Resistance Band Exercises for Strong, Lean Arms

5 Advanced Push-Up Exercises to Try Now

The Towel Workout for Your Arms

[caption id="attachment_51891" align="alignnone" width="620"]275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine: Ab Workouts Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn[/caption]

8 Ab Workouts for a Stronger Core

Crunches, planks, side planks, leg raises, spidermans, toe touches, bicycles — there’s no shortage of exercises to help you tone and strengthen your core. What’s more, there are countless variations — standing, sitting or laying on a mat — for these classic moves. Consider your core repertoire upgraded!

5 New Crunch Variations to Try Now

5 Planks to Sculpt Your Entire Core

7 TRX Moves to Work Your Abs

Your 6-Minute Ab Workout

6 Core Exercises for Beginners

5 Oblique Exercises to Sculpt Your Abs

6 Essential Core Exercises for Runners

7 No-Crunch Exercises for Six-Pack Abs

[caption id="attachment_51892" align="alignnone" width="620"]275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn[/caption]

8 Plyometric Workouts for Better Conditioning

Plyometrics are high-intensity exercises that stretch and shorten your muscles, while raising your heart rate. The result is a calorie-torching and muscle-toning workout. From plyo lunges to jump squats to plank jacks and broad jumps, here are some exercises that will help you improve agility, while increasing strength and speed. Ready to jump?

5 Plyo Box Exercises to Rev Your Fitness

4 Bodyweight Partner Moves

7 Creative Burpee Variations to Test Your Strength

15-Minute Plyometrics Workout for Cardio and Power

Your 20-Minute MetCon Workout

30-Minute HIIT Jump Rope Workout

Full-Body Plyometrics Workout

The Weight Vest CrossFit Workout

[caption id="attachment_51893" align="alignnone" width="620"]275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine: Cardio Workouts Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn[/caption]

8 Cardio Workouts to Burn Calories Fast

These days, cardio doesn’t just mean a 30-minute jog on the treadmill or power walking on the elliptical. Virtually any workout can incorporate a little cardio by simply adding a jump, increasing speed and challenging your agility and mobility. Here, you’ll find new ways to get your heart rate up, go outside of your comfort zone and break a sweat.

The 5-Minute Kickboxing Workout

22-Minute, 5-Circuit Total-Body Workout

3 Fat-Blasting HIIT Workouts to Try Now

3 Quick HIIT Workouts for Beginners

7 Burpee Progressions to Get Your Heart Pumping

5 Quick Cardio Exercises That Don't Involve Running

3 Treadmill Workouts for Power Walkers

A 10-Minute Rowing Workout

[caption id="attachment_51895" align="alignnone" width="620"]275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine: Butt Workouts Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn[/caption]

9 Butt Workouts to Get Your Glutes in Gear

While some people are obsessed with toning their arms and show off their perfectly sculpted guns, others would prefer a much more shapely and stronger backside to charge through hills or pack serious kicks. Lunges, squats, single-leg touchdowns, donkey kicks and bridges are designed to work the glutes, sculpt thigh muscles and strengthen your hamstrings. Check out these exercises to show your lower half some TLC.

5 Power Lunges for Killer Glutes

3 Exercises for Seriously Toned Thighs

4 Lower-Body Exercises Towel Exercises

5 Moves for Your Butt, Hips and Thighs

How to Kettlebell Swing Like the Pros

How to Do a Pistol Squat

6 Squat Variations for Total-Body Strength

5 Exercises to Sculpt a Stronger Butt

6 Butt Exercises for Runners

[caption id="attachment_51896" align="alignnone" width="620"]275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine: Full-Body Workouts Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn[/caption]

6 Total-Body Workouts You Can Do Anywhere

Sure, dumbbells, kettlebells and med balls can help you build muscle mass and achieve a leaner physique. But no piece of equipment can compare to your own bodyweight. Bodyweight training can help improve your stability and condition your muscles so that you shed more pounds faster.

The 15 Bodyweight Exercises You Should Be Doing

5 Two-for-One Bodyweight Moves From Brooke Burke

3 Fat-Blasting Bodyweight Workouts

8 Ways to Amp Up Your Bodyweight Workout

5 No-Equipment Back Exercises

8 Advanced TRX Exercises to Build Total-Body Strength

[caption id="attachment_51897" align="alignnone" width="620"]275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine: Barre Workouts Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn[/caption]

10 Low-Impact Workouts to Improve Your Mobility 

Don’t let these barefoot exercises fool you! Sure, you can get comfy by doing these workouts at home, but we guarantee you’ll be feeling the burn and maybe even wiping some sweat off your brow in no time. The bonus is that these yoga and barre-inspired exercises will help relieve stress and put mind over matter. Don’t forget to throw in some stretches to start or end your day!

30-Minute Inner Thigh Barre Workout

5 Butt-Sculpting Barre Exercises

2 Sun Salutation Flows for Mega Calorie Burn

7 Beginner Yoga Poses

5 Relaxing Yoga Poses to Do Before Bed

3 Yoga Poses to Energize Your Morning

9 Yoga Poses to Survive Work, Stress and Travel

10 Easy Yoga Poses to Help Relieve Stress

5 Standing Desk Stretches

15 Stretches You Should Do Every Damn Day

Want more daily workouts and be part of a community that inspires you to be fit? Sign up for Daily Burn 365! This story was originally published August 2016. Updated December 2017.

The post 275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/workout-routine-bodyweight-exercises/feed/ 0
9 Easy Yoga Poses to Survive Work, Stress and Travel http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/easy-yoga-poses-happy-go-yoga/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/easy-yoga-poses-happy-go-yoga/#comments Fri, 22 Dec 2017 12:45:02 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=38941 9 Easy Yoga Poses to Help You Survive Work, Stress and Travel

[caption id="attachment_64253" align="alignnone" width="620"]9 Easy Yoga Poses to Help You Survive Work Stress and Travel Illustrations by Cody Shipman[/caption]

A former Emmy award-winning news anchor and reporter, Christine Chen used to spend hours behind the news desk, delivering headlines about the latest disasters and scandals. Over time, the lack of sleep, stress and her hectic schedule led to anxiety and back pain. During commercial breaks, she’d lie on the floor of the newsroom to muster up enough relief to smile through the next news segment.

“I see many patients who work in finance or jobs where you’re at your desk all day,” says Dr. Johnny Arnouk, orthopedic surgeon at Mount Sinai Beth Israel in New York City. “Since most people don’t sit with good posture, their back starts to hurt. What seems like a mild strain at first often becomes a chronic problem years later.”

RELATED: 8 Signs You're Way Too Stressed (And How to Deal)

Chen, then in her early 30s, was willing to do anything to feel better. Eventually, thanks to a combination of medical treatments and yoga, she began experiencing relief. Most importantly, as she began to incorporate yoga into her everyday life, she felt happier and less stressed. Eventually, she left her job in TV news to become a certified yoga instructor.

While many of us could benefit from a stress-busting yoga practice, the truth is, it’s difficult to find time to go to class. Chen’s solution, detailed in her new book, Happy-Go-Yoga, is to take traditional yoga poses and adapt them to everyday situations. “When I was in a lot of pain and stressed out, all I wanted was to not feel so terrible,” says Chen, now 47. “Sometimes it’s the little things that can make a big difference, doing little things on a consistent basis.” And encouraging movement throughout the day is good for you, too. “It makes you think of yourself and your health first once in a while,” says Dr. Arnouk.

Want to reap the benefits of yoga, even off the mat? These nine tension tamers and feel-good moves can be done anytime, anywhere.

RELATED: 50 Resources to Step Up Your Yoga Game

Sunrise Stretches: Yoga Poses to Start Your Day

Take control of your day before it gets away from you. These three moves help set a good overall tone for your morning by opening your body and mind.

1. Rock Your Heart

9 Easy Yoga Poses to Help You Survive Work, Stress and Travel

Desperately in need of a good stretch when you wake up in the morning? This pose might help. “It’s a good, gentle way to balance the body,” says Chen, who lives in New York City. “When you wake up in the morning, you’re crumpled and slumped from sleeping. This opens your chest, gets your blood moving and brings suppleness to the spine.”

How to: Sit up in a comfortable chair and place your hands on your hips (a). Inhale and lift up the center of your chest. It should feel like the lift originates from your middle upper back between your shoulder blades. (b). Exhale and draw your belly button into your body and gently tuck your chin to your chest. Feel your upper back dome slightly. (c). Repeat at least five times or more.

2. Swimmingly

9 Easy Yoga Poses to Help You Survive Work, Stress and Travel

This move is based on yoga’s classic fish pose. Instead of lying on the floor, you’ll use the wall to find the shape. “I feel like I’m snorkeling in this pose,” says Chen. “Reach your arms behind you and lift your head and chest slightly like you’re looking for fish in front of you.” This pose stretches your chest and helps release tension in the neck.

How to: Stand with your back against the wall and your feet hip-width distance apart, shoulder blades resting on the wall (a). With your arms by your side, press your fingertips, palms and forearms firmly into the wall. (b). Begin to lift your chest up and away from the wall. Your shoulder blades should move slightly closer together on your back while your lower back remains on the wall. (c). Inhale and lift your chest a little more. Continue to breathe deeply.

RELATED: 6 Exercises That Will Seriously Improve Your Posture

3. Unbreakable You

9 Easy Yoga Poses to Help You Survive Work, Stress and Travel

Have a big presentation or important meeting ahead? This move is based on a traditional mudra, or hand gesture, meant to connect you with your inner strength. Your interlocked fingers represent the coming together of your skills; the act of pulling your fingers apart is a symbol of your power, Chen says.

How to: Stand or sit, back straight, and let your shoulders relax (a). Interlace your fingers and place your palms on your torso, just below your chest and above your belly button. Extend your thumbs up toward your chest. (b). Pretend to pull your fingers apart and reach your elbows out to the side. Your fingers should form a lock and prevent your hands from separating. Don’t let your shoulders creep up to your ears. (c). Slide your shoulder blades down toward your waist and reach through the crown of your head toward the ceiling.

Deskside De-Stressors: Yoga Poses for Work

Sitting and staring at your computer screen for hours isn’t doing your body any favors. “It’s important to get up every so often, stretch and keep yourself loose,” says Dr. Arnouk. These three moves address the main culprits of on-the-job pain — poor posture, tight hips and neck tension.

4. Spine Align

9 Easy Yoga Poses to Help You Survive Work, Stress and Travel

When you sit for a while, you may inevitably start to slouch. To counteract this, “All you need is a thin blanket or thick scarf to re-create the same feeling of a bolster to help you sit up nice and tall,” says Chen. “This aligns the spine, and relieves tightness in the neck, shoulders and back so you’re not working so hard to sit up.”

How to: Roll your blanket, scarf or towel into a thin, smooth roll. The roll should be about as long as the distance between your seat and the base of your neck (a). Vertically align the roll with your spine and place it between your back and the back of the chair. Make sure you’re sitting back in your chair to secure the base of the roll in place. (b). Lean back and feel your chest and shoulders gently open.

5. Counter Pose

9 Easy Yoga Poses to Help You Survive Work, Stress and Travel

Do your hips feel as tight as rubber bands when you stand up from your desk? This pose was one of Chen’s go-to’s at the news desk to counteract the built up tension in her hips. It’s based on yoga’s pigeon pose.

How to: Stand and face your desk, making sure that the space in front of you is clear (a). Lift your right leg and rest your outer shin, calf and knee on the desk. Your knee should be positioned slightly wider than your shoulder. (b). Place your hands on the desk to stabilize yourself. Flex your right foot, drawing your toes towards your shin. (c). Lean forward gently onto your left hand. Take your right hand to your right hip crease and let your fingers fan along the outer thigh. Press gently and rotate your thigh out and down toward the desk. Try to keep your hips even. (d). If you still feel okay, hinge forward at the hips while maintaining a flat back and walk your fingertips forward. The forward fold will further calm your mind. Switch sides.

RELATED: 5 Standing Desk Stretches to Relieve Stress Now

6. Let It Roll

9 Easy Yoga Poses to Help You Survive Work, Stress and Travel

When you’re stressed, it’s common to find your shoulders slowly creeping towards your ears, causing your neck and shoulders to become stiff over time. Next time you feel your anxiety levels rise, this move will help you roll away the tension and restore mobility in your neck in 10 seconds max.

How to: Sit in a chair, back straight (a). Inhale and shrug your shoulders, drawing them toward your ears. (b). Exhale and relax your shoulders. (c). Keeping your right shoulder down, inhale and gently drop your right ear toward your right shoulder. (d). Exhale and roll your chin toward your chest. (e). Inhale and continue to roll your head so that your left ear comes toward your left shoulder. (f). Exhale and roll your head back to center. (g). Inhale and roll your head to the right. Repeat several times.

Commute Calmers: Easy Yoga Poses for Travel

Can’t stand your commute? Crowded trains and planes, combined with delays and cranky passengers are a recipe for stress. The next time you travel from point A to point B, try these moves to find relief for your body and mind.

7. Eagle Perch

9 Easy Yoga Poses to Help You Survive Work, Stress and Travel

There’s nothing worse than being stuck in the middle seat. Instead of elbowing your neighbors, make your own space with this pose. It releases tension in your shoulders and upper back and helps you turn your focus inwards.

How to: Sit up straight. Bend your elbows and lift them straight in front of you, to shoulder height (a). Take your right arm underneath your left arm and wrap it around your left arm. Connect your palms or the back of your hands together. Alternatively, press your arms together from elbow to palm. (b). Move your elbows forward slightly and let the tops of your shoulders drop away from ears. You should feel a stretch in your shoulders, upper arms and back. Switch sides.

RELATED: 7 Beginner Yoga Poses to Get You Through Your First Class

8. Bird of Prey

9 Easy Yoga Poses to Help You Survive Work, Stress and Travel

This pose will help you improve your focus, while also teaching you to pay attention to your posture. You’ll open up your chest and sit taller. It’s also a good pose to complement Eagle Perch.

How to: Sit in a chair towards the front of your seat (a). Take one arm behind you, elbow bent and forearm resting against the middle of your back, parallel to the seat of your chair. Your palm should face the back of the seat. Roll your shoulder up and back toward the seat. (b). If you feel comfortable, take your other arm behind you in the same fashion. Grasp opposite elbows. (c). Gently lift your chest forward and up. Widen across the collarbones and breathe deeply.

9. Reach for the Moon

9 Easy Yoga Poses to Help You Survive Work, Stress and Travel

If your energy levels are shot at the end of the day, try this pose on your commute home. It’s based on the yoga pose Standing Half Moon and is designed to refresh you, working your core and spine while improving your flexibility. It’s best for train or subway commuters.

How to: Stand up straight (a). Inhale, reach your right arm up and over your head to grasp an overhead bar or handle. Let your left arm rest by your side. (b). As your reach for the bar, let the back of your right shoulder drop toward your waist. Keep your right arm straight but not locked. (c). Inhale and grow taller in your spine. Gaze up at your upper arm and don’t let your chest collapse. (d). Exhale and gently side bend to your left. Gaze towards your right shoulder. (e). Inhale and exhale at least 5 times. On an exhale, come out of the side bend.

Originally published April 2015. Updated December 2017. 

Read More
6 Mistakes You're Probably Making in Yoga Class
The Beginner's Guide to Every Type of Yoga
Stressed Out? 45 Resources to Help You Relax

The post 9 Easy Yoga Poses to Survive Work, Stress and Travel appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
9 Easy Yoga Poses to Help You Survive Work, Stress and Travel

[caption id="attachment_64253" align="alignnone" width="620"]9 Easy Yoga Poses to Help You Survive Work Stress and Travel Illustrations by Cody Shipman[/caption] A former Emmy award-winning news anchor and reporter, Christine Chen used to spend hours behind the news desk, delivering headlines about the latest disasters and scandals. Over time, the lack of sleep, stress and her hectic schedule led to anxiety and back pain. During commercial breaks, she’d lie on the floor of the newsroom to muster up enough relief to smile through the next news segment. “I see many patients who work in finance or jobs where you’re at your desk all day,” says Dr. Johnny Arnouk, orthopedic surgeon at Mount Sinai Beth Israel in New York City. “Since most people don’t sit with good posture, their back starts to hurt. What seems like a mild strain at first often becomes a chronic problem years later.” RELATED: 8 Signs You're Way Too Stressed (And How to Deal) Chen, then in her early 30s, was willing to do anything to feel better. Eventually, thanks to a combination of medical treatments and yoga, she began experiencing relief. Most importantly, as she began to incorporate yoga into her everyday life, she felt happier and less stressed. Eventually, she left her job in TV news to become a certified yoga instructor. While many of us could benefit from a stress-busting yoga practice, the truth is, it’s difficult to find time to go to class. Chen’s solution, detailed in her new book, Happy-Go-Yoga, is to take traditional yoga poses and adapt them to everyday situations. “When I was in a lot of pain and stressed out, all I wanted was to not feel so terrible,” says Chen, now 47. “Sometimes it’s the little things that can make a big difference, doing little things on a consistent basis.” And encouraging movement throughout the day is good for you, too. “It makes you think of yourself and your health first once in a while,” says Dr. Arnouk. Want to reap the benefits of yoga, even off the mat? These nine tension tamers and feel-good moves can be done anytime, anywhere. RELATED: 50 Resources to Step Up Your Yoga Game

Sunrise Stretches: Yoga Poses to Start Your Day

Take control of your day before it gets away from you. These three moves help set a good overall tone for your morning by opening your body and mind.

1. Rock Your Heart

9 Easy Yoga Poses to Help You Survive Work, Stress and Travel Desperately in need of a good stretch when you wake up in the morning? This pose might help. “It’s a good, gentle way to balance the body,” says Chen, who lives in New York City. “When you wake up in the morning, you’re crumpled and slumped from sleeping. This opens your chest, gets your blood moving and brings suppleness to the spine.” How to: Sit up in a comfortable chair and place your hands on your hips (a). Inhale and lift up the center of your chest. It should feel like the lift originates from your middle upper back between your shoulder blades. (b). Exhale and draw your belly button into your body and gently tuck your chin to your chest. Feel your upper back dome slightly. (c). Repeat at least five times or more.

2. Swimmingly

9 Easy Yoga Poses to Help You Survive Work, Stress and Travel This move is based on yoga’s classic fish pose. Instead of lying on the floor, you’ll use the wall to find the shape. “I feel like I’m snorkeling in this pose,” says Chen. “Reach your arms behind you and lift your head and chest slightly like you’re looking for fish in front of you.” This pose stretches your chest and helps release tension in the neck. How to: Stand with your back against the wall and your feet hip-width distance apart, shoulder blades resting on the wall (a). With your arms by your side, press your fingertips, palms and forearms firmly into the wall. (b). Begin to lift your chest up and away from the wall. Your shoulder blades should move slightly closer together on your back while your lower back remains on the wall. (c). Inhale and lift your chest a little more. Continue to breathe deeply. RELATED: 6 Exercises That Will Seriously Improve Your Posture

3. Unbreakable You

9 Easy Yoga Poses to Help You Survive Work, Stress and Travel Have a big presentation or important meeting ahead? This move is based on a traditional mudra, or hand gesture, meant to connect you with your inner strength. Your interlocked fingers represent the coming together of your skills; the act of pulling your fingers apart is a symbol of your power, Chen says. How to: Stand or sit, back straight, and let your shoulders relax (a). Interlace your fingers and place your palms on your torso, just below your chest and above your belly button. Extend your thumbs up toward your chest. (b). Pretend to pull your fingers apart and reach your elbows out to the side. Your fingers should form a lock and prevent your hands from separating. Don’t let your shoulders creep up to your ears. (c). Slide your shoulder blades down toward your waist and reach through the crown of your head toward the ceiling.

Deskside De-Stressors: Yoga Poses for Work

Sitting and staring at your computer screen for hours isn’t doing your body any favors. “It’s important to get up every so often, stretch and keep yourself loose,” says Dr. Arnouk. These three moves address the main culprits of on-the-job pain — poor posture, tight hips and neck tension.

4. Spine Align

9 Easy Yoga Poses to Help You Survive Work, Stress and Travel When you sit for a while, you may inevitably start to slouch. To counteract this, “All you need is a thin blanket or thick scarf to re-create the same feeling of a bolster to help you sit up nice and tall,” says Chen. “This aligns the spine, and relieves tightness in the neck, shoulders and back so you’re not working so hard to sit up.” How to: Roll your blanket, scarf or towel into a thin, smooth roll. The roll should be about as long as the distance between your seat and the base of your neck (a). Vertically align the roll with your spine and place it between your back and the back of the chair. Make sure you’re sitting back in your chair to secure the base of the roll in place. (b). Lean back and feel your chest and shoulders gently open.

5. Counter Pose

9 Easy Yoga Poses to Help You Survive Work, Stress and Travel Do your hips feel as tight as rubber bands when you stand up from your desk? This pose was one of Chen’s go-to’s at the news desk to counteract the built up tension in her hips. It’s based on yoga’s pigeon pose. How to: Stand and face your desk, making sure that the space in front of you is clear (a). Lift your right leg and rest your outer shin, calf and knee on the desk. Your knee should be positioned slightly wider than your shoulder. (b). Place your hands on the desk to stabilize yourself. Flex your right foot, drawing your toes towards your shin. (c). Lean forward gently onto your left hand. Take your right hand to your right hip crease and let your fingers fan along the outer thigh. Press gently and rotate your thigh out and down toward the desk. Try to keep your hips even. (d). If you still feel okay, hinge forward at the hips while maintaining a flat back and walk your fingertips forward. The forward fold will further calm your mind. Switch sides. RELATED: 5 Standing Desk Stretches to Relieve Stress Now

6. Let It Roll

9 Easy Yoga Poses to Help You Survive Work, Stress and Travel When you’re stressed, it’s common to find your shoulders slowly creeping towards your ears, causing your neck and shoulders to become stiff over time. Next time you feel your anxiety levels rise, this move will help you roll away the tension and restore mobility in your neck in 10 seconds max. How to: Sit in a chair, back straight (a). Inhale and shrug your shoulders, drawing them toward your ears. (b). Exhale and relax your shoulders. (c). Keeping your right shoulder down, inhale and gently drop your right ear toward your right shoulder. (d). Exhale and roll your chin toward your chest. (e). Inhale and continue to roll your head so that your left ear comes toward your left shoulder. (f). Exhale and roll your head back to center. (g). Inhale and roll your head to the right. Repeat several times.

Commute Calmers: Easy Yoga Poses for Travel

Can’t stand your commute? Crowded trains and planes, combined with delays and cranky passengers are a recipe for stress. The next time you travel from point A to point B, try these moves to find relief for your body and mind.

7. Eagle Perch

9 Easy Yoga Poses to Help You Survive Work, Stress and Travel There’s nothing worse than being stuck in the middle seat. Instead of elbowing your neighbors, make your own space with this pose. It releases tension in your shoulders and upper back and helps you turn your focus inwards. How to: Sit up straight. Bend your elbows and lift them straight in front of you, to shoulder height (a). Take your right arm underneath your left arm and wrap it around your left arm. Connect your palms or the back of your hands together. Alternatively, press your arms together from elbow to palm. (b). Move your elbows forward slightly and let the tops of your shoulders drop away from ears. You should feel a stretch in your shoulders, upper arms and back. Switch sides. RELATED: 7 Beginner Yoga Poses to Get You Through Your First Class

8. Bird of Prey

9 Easy Yoga Poses to Help You Survive Work, Stress and Travel

This pose will help you improve your focus, while also teaching you to pay attention to your posture. You’ll open up your chest and sit taller. It’s also a good pose to complement Eagle Perch. How to: Sit in a chair towards the front of your seat (a). Take one arm behind you, elbow bent and forearm resting against the middle of your back, parallel to the seat of your chair. Your palm should face the back of the seat. Roll your shoulder up and back toward the seat. (b). If you feel comfortable, take your other arm behind you in the same fashion. Grasp opposite elbows. (c). Gently lift your chest forward and up. Widen across the collarbones and breathe deeply.

9. Reach for the Moon

9 Easy Yoga Poses to Help You Survive Work, Stress and Travel If your energy levels are shot at the end of the day, try this pose on your commute home. It’s based on the yoga pose Standing Half Moon and is designed to refresh you, working your core and spine while improving your flexibility. It’s best for train or subway commuters. How to: Stand up straight (a). Inhale, reach your right arm up and over your head to grasp an overhead bar or handle. Let your left arm rest by your side. (b). As your reach for the bar, let the back of your right shoulder drop toward your waist. Keep your right arm straight but not locked. (c). Inhale and grow taller in your spine. Gaze up at your upper arm and don’t let your chest collapse. (d). Exhale and gently side bend to your left. Gaze towards your right shoulder. (e). Inhale and exhale at least 5 times. On an exhale, come out of the side bend. Originally published April 2015. Updated December 2017.  Read More 6 Mistakes You're Probably Making in Yoga Class The Beginner's Guide to Every Type of Yoga Stressed Out? 45 Resources to Help You Relax

The post 9 Easy Yoga Poses to Survive Work, Stress and Travel appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/easy-yoga-poses-happy-go-yoga/feed/ 3
5 Plyo Exercises to Supercharge Your Workout http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/bodyweight-plyometrics-exercises/ Thu, 21 Dec 2017 12:15:19 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=64221 5 Bodyweight-to-Plyo Exercises to Supercharge Your Workout

[caption id="attachment_64252" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Plyometric Exercises to Supercharge Your Workout Photo: Ryan Kelly / Power Cardio[/caption]

We’re about to take your workout from basic to beyond. Plyometrics, also known as jump training, turn ordinary exercises into powerhouse moves.

And the magic starts deep within your muscle fibers. Your slow-twitch (type I) and fast-twitch (type II) muscle fibers to be exact. Training your slow-twitch muscle fibers helps improve how you use oxygen during aerobic exercise. On the other hand, fast-twitch muscle fibers generate more force and are activated during plyometric exercises. Imagine running a race: Your slow-twitch muscle fibers will give you the stamina to get through each mile. As you approach the finish line, your fast-twitch muscles kick in so you can sprint to the end.

But faster doesn’t always mean better — it’s important to activate both muscle groups. CeCe Marizu, Daily Burn 365 trainer, says, “Fast-twitch muscle fibers wear out faster than slow-twitch muscle fibers and are used when the body is pushing to its max potential.” Here’s your perfect workout to keep it simple — or power up with a plyometric variation.

RELATED: 3 Quick HIIT Workouts for Beginners

5 Bodyweight Exercises to Make Plyometric

Here Marizu shows us how to take five bodyweight training moves, then level them up. Do 15-20 reps of each bodyweight exercise and then three to five reps of its plyometrics counterpart. Rest for a minute after completing one round of each pair of moves.

5 Bodyweight to Plyometric Exercises: Bodyweight Squat

1. Squat to Squat Jump

The squat is one of the most important functional movement patterns to master. When you pick up a bag of groceries off the floor, you’re squatting. Squats primarily train the muscle fibers in your glutes, but they also work your hip flexors, core and back. Scale your squat up not just by adding weight or some height, too.

5 Plyometric Exercises to Supercharge Your Workout: Squat Jump

To make it plyometric: From the bodyweight squat position, release the tension in your glutes by driving your hips forward and swinging your arms behind you as you jump off the ground. Marizu says the key to creating momentum is using your arms. “Try jumping with your hands behind your head — it’s hard! Your arms act almost like sails to take you up a notch,” she says.

RELATED: 6 Plyometric Exercises for a No-Running Cardio Workout

Bodyweight to Plyometrics: Bodyweight Lunges

2. Lunge to Plyo Lunge

Unlike squats, which use a broader base of support, lunges are more dynamic and force you to recruit more muscles in your core and quads to maintain balance. Get a leg up on your lunges by adding some speed to your split stance in the plyo version.

5 Plyometric Exercises to Supercharge Your Workout: Plyo Lunge

To make it plyometric: “Make sure your stride is big enough between your front and back legs so you can still feel that connection with your heel and the floor. Also, use your quads to help you out,” Marizu says. Because plyo lunges can make you tired faster (and require a bit more coordination, too), Marizu recommends focusing on the depth of your lunge and to slow down so you don’t sacrifice form.

Bodyweight to Plyometrics: Step Jacks

3. Step Jack to Star Jumps

Step jacks are used in every warm-up before a workout or run for a reason. “They work everything from your glutes to your calves and inner thighs,” Marizu says. Meanwhile, the plyometric variation, the star jump, also recruits your arms, deltoids (shoulders) and lats to help pull your body upward.

5 Plyometric Exercises to Supercharge Your Workout: Star Jumps

To make it plyometric: Marizu says slightly bending your knees will help prevent your fast-twitch muscle fibers from tiring too quickly, so you don’t lose height. “Think of your knees like a coil. When you press down into them in a tighter position, the spring moves a little faster and with more force,” Marizu explains.

RELATED: Burn Calories Fast with This 10-Minute Plyometric Workout

Bodyweight to Plyometrics: Plank Spider Lunge

4. Plank to Plyo Spider Lunge

The ultimate isometric exercise, the plank is a true test of core strength. Start by holding a plank for 30 seconds and work your way up to a full minute. The dynamic variation, the spider lunge, uses your upper body and core to push off the floor to stabilize your body. Just remember to keep your core tight and your back and pelvis lifted throughout the exercise.

5 Plyometric Exercises to Supercharge Your Workout: Plyo Spider Lunge

To make it plyometric: “Push the floor away from you to create room for your foot to come up and keep your joints in alignment,” Marizu says. Another pro tip: Pull your stomach up and in to allow more space to fill your abs. “The small details in this move help make it one tough move at any pace!” Marizu says.

RELATED: 3 Plyometric Planks You Need to Try ASAP

Bodyweight to Plyometrics: Plank to Frogger

5. Plank to Frogger

The frogger, also called a squat thrust, is one of the most underrated bodyweight exercises, Marizu says. It combines lower body strength, shoulder stability, hip mobility and balance. The low-impact step-up frogger exercise is a great way to practice good plank and squat form. But if you’re ready to power things up (and burn more calories), go for plyometrics!

Bodyweight to Plyometrics: Plank to Plyo Frogger

To make it plyometric: Hop your feet forward from the high-plank position to generate more force. Use the same pushing motion in the plank to spider lunge to engage your core and get into a squat position.

Read More
Hate Squats? 7 Glute Exercises for an Instant Butt Lift
8 Arm Exercises You Haven’t Done Before
5 Mountain Climbers for Seriously Sculpted Abs

The post 5 Plyo Exercises to Supercharge Your Workout appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
5 Bodyweight-to-Plyo Exercises to Supercharge Your Workout

[caption id="attachment_64252" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Plyometric Exercises to Supercharge Your Workout Photo: Ryan Kelly / Power Cardio[/caption] We’re about to take your workout from basic to beyond. Plyometrics, also known as jump training, turn ordinary exercises into powerhouse moves. And the magic starts deep within your muscle fibers. Your slow-twitch (type I) and fast-twitch (type II) muscle fibers to be exact. Training your slow-twitch muscle fibers helps improve how you use oxygen during aerobic exercise. On the other hand, fast-twitch muscle fibers generate more force and are activated during plyometric exercises. Imagine running a race: Your slow-twitch muscle fibers will give you the stamina to get through each mile. As you approach the finish line, your fast-twitch muscles kick in so you can sprint to the end. But faster doesn’t always mean better — it’s important to activate both muscle groups. CeCe Marizu, Daily Burn 365 trainer, says, “Fast-twitch muscle fibers wear out faster than slow-twitch muscle fibers and are used when the body is pushing to its max potential.” Here’s your perfect workout to keep it simple — or power up with a plyometric variation. RELATED: 3 Quick HIIT Workouts for Beginners

5 Bodyweight Exercises to Make Plyometric

Here Marizu shows us how to take five bodyweight training moves, then level them up. Do 15-20 reps of each bodyweight exercise and then three to five reps of its plyometrics counterpart. Rest for a minute after completing one round of each pair of moves. 5 Bodyweight to Plyometric Exercises: Bodyweight Squat

1. Squat to Squat Jump

The squat is one of the most important functional movement patterns to master. When you pick up a bag of groceries off the floor, you’re squatting. Squats primarily train the muscle fibers in your glutes, but they also work your hip flexors, core and back. Scale your squat up not just by adding weight or some height, too. 5 Plyometric Exercises to Supercharge Your Workout: Squat Jump To make it plyometric: From the bodyweight squat position, release the tension in your glutes by driving your hips forward and swinging your arms behind you as you jump off the ground. Marizu says the key to creating momentum is using your arms. “Try jumping with your hands behind your head — it’s hard! Your arms act almost like sails to take you up a notch,” she says. RELATED: 6 Plyometric Exercises for a No-Running Cardio Workout

Bodyweight to Plyometrics: Bodyweight Lunges

2. Lunge to Plyo Lunge

Unlike squats, which use a broader base of support, lunges are more dynamic and force you to recruit more muscles in your core and quads to maintain balance. Get a leg up on your lunges by adding some speed to your split stance in the plyo version. 5 Plyometric Exercises to Supercharge Your Workout: Plyo Lunge To make it plyometric: “Make sure your stride is big enough between your front and back legs so you can still feel that connection with your heel and the floor. Also, use your quads to help you out,” Marizu says. Because plyo lunges can make you tired faster (and require a bit more coordination, too), Marizu recommends focusing on the depth of your lunge and to slow down so you don’t sacrifice form. Bodyweight to Plyometrics: Step Jacks

3. Step Jack to Star Jumps

Step jacks are used in every warm-up before a workout or run for a reason. “They work everything from your glutes to your calves and inner thighs,” Marizu says. Meanwhile, the plyometric variation, the star jump, also recruits your arms, deltoids (shoulders) and lats to help pull your body upward. 5 Plyometric Exercises to Supercharge Your Workout: Star Jumps To make it plyometric: Marizu says slightly bending your knees will help prevent your fast-twitch muscle fibers from tiring too quickly, so you don’t lose height. “Think of your knees like a coil. When you press down into them in a tighter position, the spring moves a little faster and with more force,” Marizu explains. RELATED: Burn Calories Fast with This 10-Minute Plyometric Workout Bodyweight to Plyometrics: Plank Spider Lunge

4. Plank to Plyo Spider Lunge

The ultimate isometric exercise, the plank is a true test of core strength. Start by holding a plank for 30 seconds and work your way up to a full minute. The dynamic variation, the spider lunge, uses your upper body and core to push off the floor to stabilize your body. Just remember to keep your core tight and your back and pelvis lifted throughout the exercise. 5 Plyometric Exercises to Supercharge Your Workout: Plyo Spider Lunge To make it plyometric: “Push the floor away from you to create room for your foot to come up and keep your joints in alignment,” Marizu says. Another pro tip: Pull your stomach up and in to allow more space to fill your abs. “The small details in this move help make it one tough move at any pace!” Marizu says. RELATED: 3 Plyometric Planks You Need to Try ASAP

Bodyweight to Plyometrics: Plank to Frogger

5. Plank to Frogger

The frogger, also called a squat thrust, is one of the most underrated bodyweight exercises, Marizu says. It combines lower body strength, shoulder stability, hip mobility and balance. The low-impact step-up frogger exercise is a great way to practice good plank and squat form. But if you’re ready to power things up (and burn more calories), go for plyometrics! Bodyweight to Plyometrics: Plank to Plyo Frogger To make it plyometric: Hop your feet forward from the high-plank position to generate more force. Use the same pushing motion in the plank to spider lunge to engage your core and get into a squat position. Read More Hate Squats? 7 Glute Exercises for an Instant Butt Lift 8 Arm Exercises You Haven’t Done Before 5 Mountain Climbers for Seriously Sculpted Abs

The post 5 Plyo Exercises to Supercharge Your Workout appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
7 Strength Exercises You Can Do with Yoga Blocks http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/yoga-blocks-strength-exercises/ Tue, 19 Dec 2017 12:15:03 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=64082 7 Strength Exercises You Can Do with Yoga Blocks

[caption id="attachment_64085" align="alignnone" width="620"]7 Strength Exercises You Can Do with Yoga Blocks Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

Don’t get it twisted: Yoga blocks aren’t just for beginners — and they’re not just for yoga, either. While it may seem like these foam and cork cubes have been pigeonholed to assisting vinyasa flows, they can actually take your strength workout to a new level, too. Just take a cue from Caitlin Lavelle, founder of Lavelle Yoga Fit and trainer at Uplift Studios in New York City, who uses yoga blocks during most workouts with her clients. “They foam versions provide an unsteady surface to force people to work on balance,” she says. “They can also help with better body alignment, range of motion and develop proprioception,” aka understanding where your limps are in space. (A key for proper form.)

These tools also add resistance to common moves. “Even for the most seasoned fitness veterans, they can make an exercise feel brand new,” Lavelle says. For instance, squeeze the block between your thighs during a plank or glute bridge and you’ll instantly feel new muscles fire. To learn other ways to incorporate yoga blocks into your workout for heightened strength and stability, check out some of Lavelle’s favorites. Ready to rise to the challenge?

RELATED: The 15-Minute Medicine Ball HIIT Workout

7 Strength Exercises to Try with a Yoga Block

[caption id="attachment_64086" align="alignnone" width="620"]Strength Exercises with Yoga Blocks: Dead Bug GIFs: Mallory Creveling / Uplift Studios[/caption]

1. Dead Bug

Squeeze the yoga block between your elbow and knee for this core-centric exercise and it’ll make your midsection work extra hard during the entire move.

How to: Lie on your back. Place a yoga block the long way between your left elbow and left knee, both joints bent 90 degrees. Extend your right arm and left leg straight up toward the ceiling (a). Slowly and with control, lower both your right arm and right leg toward the ground. Keep your spine in a neutral position and head on the mat (b). Bring your right arm and leg back overhead and repeat for 8-10 reps (c). Then switch sides.

RELATED: 50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core

Strength Exercises with Yoga Blocks: Bird Dog

2. Bird Dog

Here’s where you’ll feel that balance kick into gear, thanks to the elevation. Remember to keep your abs braced to execute the move with solid form.

How to: Start on your hands and knees, with both your left knee and right hand on yoga blocks. Point your left toe behind you (the secret to targeting your core stability) (a). Extend your left arm and right leg straight out, so they’re in line with your shoulders and hips. Keep your shoulders and hips squared to the floor as you move, and your neck in a neutral position (b). Now, pull your left elbow and right knee in toward each other (c). Extend again and keep repeating for 8-10 reps (d). Switch sides.

Strength Exercises with Yoga Blocks: Tricep Push-Up

3. Tricep Push-Up

Want to master the perfect triceps push-up? Grab your blocks — they’ll help get your body in the proper position.

How to: Start in a high plank position, with a yoga block placed right at the top of each middle finger (a). Slowly lower down on a two-count to the yoga blocks (to focus on the eccentric phase), until your shoulders touch them. Make sure to squeeze your elbows in toward your sides (b). Then, press yourself back up to the plank (c). Repeat for 8-10 reps.

RELATED: This is How To Do a Perfect Push-Up (Even on Your Knees)

Strength Exercises with Yoga Blocks: Single-Leg Glute Bridge

4. Single-Leg Glute Bridge

Talk about finding the right footing. You’ll have to keep your hip and foot flexed and your leg straight to stop the block from falling as you move. This will also turn up the burn on your opposite glute and hamstring.

How to: Lie on your back with knees bent and feet placed close enough to your butt that you can almost touch them. Extend your arms down by your sides and your left leg up toward the ceiling, foot flexed. Place the block on top of your left foot (a). On an exhale, lift your hips up toward the ceiling, engaging your glutes and abs and keeping the block steady (b). Slowly lower your hips back down and repeat for 8-10 reps (c). Switch sides.

Strength Exercises with Yoga Blocks: Single-Leg Romanian Deadlift

5. Single-Leg Romanian Deadlift

This exercise already tests how strong you can stand on one foot — and the yoga block only makes it more difficult. Engage your core and glutes to stay upright.

How to: Stand with your left foot on a yoga block (a). Keeping you back flat, shoulders down away from your ears and a slight bend in your standing right leg, lean forward, bringing your chest toward the ground and your left leg straight up behind you. Think about keeping your foot flexed and hips squared toward the ground. Hands can remain straight down by your sides, on your hips or up by your ears (b). Squeeze your glutes to come back up to stand and repeat for 8-10 reps (c). Switch sides.

RELATED: Are You Doing the Deadlift All Wrong?

Strength Exercises with Yoga Blocks: Plank IYTW

6. Plank IYTW

Crank up your core stability: The block adds an extra element of unsteadiness. The block in your moving hand will help with body awareness so you hit each letter with precision.

How to: Start in a high plank position with you left hand on a block at its lowest height and your right hand holding another block (a). Lift your right arm straight up in line with your shoulder for form an I, bicep by your ear (b). Tap the block back down to the floor, and then lift it out to a Y shape (c). Next, tap the block back down to the floor, and then lift it straight out to the side in line with your shoulder to form a T (d). Tap your block back down to the floor again, and then lift your arm up to shoulder height and pull your elbow back to form a W (e). Once again, tap the block back down to the floor and repeat for 8-10 reps, maintaining a strong plank the entire time (f). Switch sides.

Strength Exercises with Yoga Blocks: Flying Plank

7. Flying Plank

Tack this on to the end of your workout to give your core one final test of strength. You’ll have to engage everything from your abs to your glutes to your thighs to stay in one straight line.

How to: Start in a high plank position, with a yoga block placed right at the top of each middle finger (a). Slowly lower down to the yoga blocks, until your shoulders are resting on them (b). Practice the flying plank by picking up your right hand and straightening it back behind you (c). Then lift and straighten the right arm (d). When you feel stable, pick up both hands and straighten your arms back by your hips (e). Hold this position for 30 seconds or as long as you can.

Read More
Hate Crunches? 6 Better Core Exercises for Beginners
50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core
7 Easy Pilates Moves for a Quick Core Workout

The post 7 Strength Exercises You Can Do with Yoga Blocks appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
7 Strength Exercises You Can Do with Yoga Blocks

[caption id="attachment_64085" align="alignnone" width="620"]7 Strength Exercises You Can Do with Yoga Blocks Photo: Twenty20[/caption] Don’t get it twisted: Yoga blocks aren’t just for beginners — and they’re not just for yoga, either. While it may seem like these foam and cork cubes have been pigeonholed to assisting vinyasa flows, they can actually take your strength workout to a new level, too. Just take a cue from Caitlin Lavelle, founder of Lavelle Yoga Fit and trainer at Uplift Studios in New York City, who uses yoga blocks during most workouts with her clients. “They foam versions provide an unsteady surface to force people to work on balance,” she says. “They can also help with better body alignment, range of motion and develop proprioception,” aka understanding where your limps are in space. (A key for proper form.) These tools also add resistance to common moves. “Even for the most seasoned fitness veterans, they can make an exercise feel brand new,” Lavelle says. For instance, squeeze the block between your thighs during a plank or glute bridge and you’ll instantly feel new muscles fire. To learn other ways to incorporate yoga blocks into your workout for heightened strength and stability, check out some of Lavelle’s favorites. Ready to rise to the challenge? RELATED: The 15-Minute Medicine Ball HIIT Workout

7 Strength Exercises to Try with a Yoga Block

[caption id="attachment_64086" align="alignnone" width="620"]Strength Exercises with Yoga Blocks: Dead Bug GIFs: Mallory Creveling / Uplift Studios[/caption]

1. Dead Bug

Squeeze the yoga block between your elbow and knee for this core-centric exercise and it’ll make your midsection work extra hard during the entire move. How to: Lie on your back. Place a yoga block the long way between your left elbow and left knee, both joints bent 90 degrees. Extend your right arm and left leg straight up toward the ceiling (a). Slowly and with control, lower both your right arm and right leg toward the ground. Keep your spine in a neutral position and head on the mat (b). Bring your right arm and leg back overhead and repeat for 8-10 reps (c). Then switch sides. RELATED: 50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core Strength Exercises with Yoga Blocks: Bird Dog

2. Bird Dog

Here’s where you’ll feel that balance kick into gear, thanks to the elevation. Remember to keep your abs braced to execute the move with solid form. How to: Start on your hands and knees, with both your left knee and right hand on yoga blocks. Point your left toe behind you (the secret to targeting your core stability) (a). Extend your left arm and right leg straight out, so they’re in line with your shoulders and hips. Keep your shoulders and hips squared to the floor as you move, and your neck in a neutral position (b). Now, pull your left elbow and right knee in toward each other (c). Extend again and keep repeating for 8-10 reps (d). Switch sides. Strength Exercises with Yoga Blocks: Tricep Push-Up

3. Tricep Push-Up

Want to master the perfect triceps push-up? Grab your blocks — they’ll help get your body in the proper position. How to: Start in a high plank position, with a yoga block placed right at the top of each middle finger (a). Slowly lower down on a two-count to the yoga blocks (to focus on the eccentric phase), until your shoulders touch them. Make sure to squeeze your elbows in toward your sides (b). Then, press yourself back up to the plank (c). Repeat for 8-10 reps. RELATED: This is How To Do a Perfect Push-Up (Even on Your Knees) Strength Exercises with Yoga Blocks: Single-Leg Glute Bridge

4. Single-Leg Glute Bridge

Talk about finding the right footing. You’ll have to keep your hip and foot flexed and your leg straight to stop the block from falling as you move. This will also turn up the burn on your opposite glute and hamstring. How to: Lie on your back with knees bent and feet placed close enough to your butt that you can almost touch them. Extend your arms down by your sides and your left leg up toward the ceiling, foot flexed. Place the block on top of your left foot (a). On an exhale, lift your hips up toward the ceiling, engaging your glutes and abs and keeping the block steady (b). Slowly lower your hips back down and repeat for 8-10 reps (c). Switch sides. Strength Exercises with Yoga Blocks: Single-Leg Romanian Deadlift

5. Single-Leg Romanian Deadlift

This exercise already tests how strong you can stand on one foot — and the yoga block only makes it more difficult. Engage your core and glutes to stay upright. How to: Stand with your left foot on a yoga block (a). Keeping you back flat, shoulders down away from your ears and a slight bend in your standing right leg, lean forward, bringing your chest toward the ground and your left leg straight up behind you. Think about keeping your foot flexed and hips squared toward the ground. Hands can remain straight down by your sides, on your hips or up by your ears (b). Squeeze your glutes to come back up to stand and repeat for 8-10 reps (c). Switch sides. RELATED: Are You Doing the Deadlift All Wrong? Strength Exercises with Yoga Blocks: Plank IYTW

6. Plank IYTW

Crank up your core stability: The block adds an extra element of unsteadiness. The block in your moving hand will help with body awareness so you hit each letter with precision. How to: Start in a high plank position with you left hand on a block at its lowest height and your right hand holding another block (a). Lift your right arm straight up in line with your shoulder for form an I, bicep by your ear (b). Tap the block back down to the floor, and then lift it out to a Y shape (c). Next, tap the block back down to the floor, and then lift it straight out to the side in line with your shoulder to form a T (d). Tap your block back down to the floor again, and then lift your arm up to shoulder height and pull your elbow back to form a W (e). Once again, tap the block back down to the floor and repeat for 8-10 reps, maintaining a strong plank the entire time (f). Switch sides. Strength Exercises with Yoga Blocks: Flying Plank

7. Flying Plank

Tack this on to the end of your workout to give your core one final test of strength. You’ll have to engage everything from your abs to your glutes to your thighs to stay in one straight line. How to: Start in a high plank position, with a yoga block placed right at the top of each middle finger (a). Slowly lower down to the yoga blocks, until your shoulders are resting on them (b). Practice the flying plank by picking up your right hand and straightening it back behind you (c). Then lift and straighten the right arm (d). When you feel stable, pick up both hands and straighten your arms back by your hips (e). Hold this position for 30 seconds or as long as you can. Read More Hate Crunches? 6 Better Core Exercises for Beginners 50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core 7 Easy Pilates Moves for a Quick Core Workout

The post 7 Strength Exercises You Can Do with Yoga Blocks appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
6 Hip Exercises You Should Do Before a Run http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/hip-exercises-run/ Mon, 18 Dec 2017 12:15:47 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=64067 6 Hip Exercises You Should Do Before a Run

[caption id="attachment_64071" align="alignnone" width="620"]6 Hip Exercises You Should Do Before a Run Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

As a runner, you’ve probably given some thought to keeping your hips happy and healthy. But, if you’re like most mile chasers, that stops at hip exercises to “strengthen them.”

While that’s definitely a start, you can’t effectively train any muscle that’s tight, overstretched, or altogether asleep, explains David Reavy, PT, a board-certified clinical specialist in orthopedic physical therapy and founder of React Physical Therapy in Chicago. No matter how dedicated you are to a running routine, the muscles that move your hip probably deserve one (if not all) of these adjectives.

RELATED: 9 Things I Wish I Knew Before I Started Running

Why So Many People Have Tight Hips

Research from Northwestern University shows that people who exercise sit just as much as those who don’t, and if you haven’t guessed, sitting does a number on your hip muscles. Sitting shortens the anterior chain (or front of the body) and stretches the glutes, says Reavy. He notes that in this position, the glutes and abs then shut down. After all, when you’re sitting on your keister, crouched over a computer screen, these muscles don’t need to activate. So they stop firing.

Problem is, the act of running hammers your hips with forces 12 times your body weight, Reavy says, and your butt and core muscles don’t simply start firing again after sitting. Meanwhile, the tightened-up muscles on the front of your body — including your hip flexors, which raise your knee to your chest with every stride — can’t properly absorb the shock or propel you forward. In the end, your running performance suffers and your risk of injury increases, Reavy explains.

“Your body follows the path of least resistance, and when your hip muscles are inactive or tight, that path isn’t going to be the healthy one,” he says. While hip-related injuries can strike anywhere throughout the body, knee pain, IT band syndrome, and herniated discs are a few notables, he says.

That’s why Reavy recommends runners perform hip-activation and release exercises regularly. By moving your hip muscles through eccentric (aka lengthening) actions, you stimulate specialized neurological sensors, called spindles, housed in every muscle fiber. The result: Your muscles return to their normal length, wake up and get ready to power your best run yet.

Here, Reavy shares his six favorite hip exercises. Perform them every day for optimal results. On running and cross-training days, use them as part of your pre-sweat warm-up.

RELATED: 3 Running Drills from Olympic Sprinter Tori Bowie

6 Hip Exercises to Add to Your Run Warm-Up

[caption id="attachment_64073" align="alignnone" width="620"]Hip Exercises for Runners: Hip-Flexor Roll-Out with Hip Rotations GIFs: K. Aleisha Fetters / React Physical Therapy[/caption]

1. Hip-Flexor Roll-Out with Hip Rotations 

How to: Lie face-down on the floor, and prop your torso up on your forearms. Position yourself so that both knees are bent, the inside of your left leg and the front of your right thigh is flat on the floor. Your right foot should extend toward the ceiling. Place a massage or lacrosse ball (a tennis ball will work, too) under your right hip crease, just inside and below your hip bone. This is your starting position (a). From here, slowly lower your foot toward the left, then to the right. That’s one rep (b). Perform 15 reps, then repeat on the opposite side.

Hip Exercises for Runners: Hip-Flexor Roll-Out with Knee Extension

2. Hip-Flexor Roll-Out with Knee Extension

How to: Lie face-down on the floor, and prop your torso up on your forearms. Position yourself so that both knees are bent, the inside of your left leg and the front of your right thigh is flat on the floor. Your right foot should extend toward the ceiling. Place a massage or lacrosse ball (a tennis ball will work, too) under your right hip crease, just inside and below your hip bone. This is your starting position (a). From here, slowly lower your foot toward the floor, then back up toward your butt. That’s one rep (b). Perform 15 reps, then repeat on the opposite side.

RELATED: 5 Foam Rolling Moves You Aren’t Doing (But Should)

Hip Exercises for Runners: Forward-Reaching Lunges

3. Forward-Reaching Lunges

How to: Get in a split stance with one leg in front of you and the other behind you, and your arms bent and hands held just outside of your shoulders. Bend your knees to lower your back knee toward the floor until your hips are just higher than your knees. Keep your weight in the heel of your front foot. This is your starting position (a). From here, while keeping your back flat, hinge at the hips to bend forward as if you are reaching for something in front of you on the floor (b). Reverse the movement to return to start. That’s one rep (c). Perform 20 reps, then repeat on the opposite side.

Hip Exercises for Runners: Side-to-Side Lunges

4. Side-to-Side Lunges

How to: Get in a split stance with one leg in front of you and the other behind you. Bend your elbows and hold your hands just outside of your shoulders. Bend your knees to lower your back knee toward the floor until your hips are just higher than your knees. Keep your weight in the heel of your front foot. This is your starting position (a). From here, while keeping your back straight, spine neutral and hips steady, bend your torso toward the right, then the left. That’s one rep (b). Perform 20 reps, then repeat on the opposite side.

RELATED: 15 Stretches You Should Do Every Damn Day

Hip Exercises for Runners: Rotational Lunges

5. Rotational Lunges

How to: Get in a split stance with one leg in front of you and the other behind you. Bend your elbows and hold your hands just outside of your shoulders. Bend your knees to lower your back knee toward the floor until your hips are just higher than your knees. Keep your weight in the heel of your front foot. This is your starting position (a). From here, while keeping your back straight, spine neutral and hips steady, twist and rotate your torso to the right, then the left. That’s one rep (b). Perform 20 reps, then repeat on the opposite side.

Hip Exercises for Runners: Up-and-Down Lunges

6. Up-and-Down Lunges

How to: Get in a split stance with one leg in front of you and the other behind you, and your arms bent and hands held just outside of your shoulders. Keep your weight in the heel of your front foot. This is your starting position (a). From here, while keeping your back flat, bend your knees to lower your back knee toward the floor until your hips are just higher than your knees (b). Then, drive through your front foot to reverse the movement and return to start. That’s one rep (c). Perform 20 reps, then repeat on the opposite side.

Read More
6 Butt Exercises Every Runner Should Be Doing
Hate Running? 25 Ways to Learn to Love It
The 5 Hip Stretches You Need to Relieve Tightness Now

The post 6 Hip Exercises You Should Do Before a Run appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
6 Hip Exercises You Should Do Before a Run

[caption id="attachment_64071" align="alignnone" width="620"]6 Hip Exercises You Should Do Before a Run Photo: Twenty20[/caption] As a runner, you’ve probably given some thought to keeping your hips happy and healthy. But, if you’re like most mile chasers, that stops at hip exercises to “strengthen them.” While that’s definitely a start, you can’t effectively train any muscle that’s tight, overstretched, or altogether asleep, explains David Reavy, PT, a board-certified clinical specialist in orthopedic physical therapy and founder of React Physical Therapy in Chicago. No matter how dedicated you are to a running routine, the muscles that move your hip probably deserve one (if not all) of these adjectives. RELATED: 9 Things I Wish I Knew Before I Started Running

Why So Many People Have Tight Hips

Research from Northwestern University shows that people who exercise sit just as much as those who don’t, and if you haven’t guessed, sitting does a number on your hip muscles. Sitting shortens the anterior chain (or front of the body) and stretches the glutes, says Reavy. He notes that in this position, the glutes and abs then shut down. After all, when you’re sitting on your keister, crouched over a computer screen, these muscles don’t need to activate. So they stop firing. Problem is, the act of running hammers your hips with forces 12 times your body weight, Reavy says, and your butt and core muscles don’t simply start firing again after sitting. Meanwhile, the tightened-up muscles on the front of your body — including your hip flexors, which raise your knee to your chest with every stride — can’t properly absorb the shock or propel you forward. In the end, your running performance suffers and your risk of injury increases, Reavy explains. “Your body follows the path of least resistance, and when your hip muscles are inactive or tight, that path isn’t going to be the healthy one,” he says. While hip-related injuries can strike anywhere throughout the body, knee pain, IT band syndrome, and herniated discs are a few notables, he says. That’s why Reavy recommends runners perform hip-activation and release exercises regularly. By moving your hip muscles through eccentric (aka lengthening) actions, you stimulate specialized neurological sensors, called spindles, housed in every muscle fiber. The result: Your muscles return to their normal length, wake up and get ready to power your best run yet. Here, Reavy shares his six favorite hip exercises. Perform them every day for optimal results. On running and cross-training days, use them as part of your pre-sweat warm-up. RELATED: 3 Running Drills from Olympic Sprinter Tori Bowie

6 Hip Exercises to Add to Your Run Warm-Up

[caption id="attachment_64073" align="alignnone" width="620"]Hip Exercises for Runners: Hip-Flexor Roll-Out with Hip Rotations GIFs: K. Aleisha Fetters / React Physical Therapy[/caption]

1. Hip-Flexor Roll-Out with Hip Rotations 

How to: Lie face-down on the floor, and prop your torso up on your forearms. Position yourself so that both knees are bent, the inside of your left leg and the front of your right thigh is flat on the floor. Your right foot should extend toward the ceiling. Place a massage or lacrosse ball (a tennis ball will work, too) under your right hip crease, just inside and below your hip bone. This is your starting position (a). From here, slowly lower your foot toward the left, then to the right. That’s one rep (b). Perform 15 reps, then repeat on the opposite side. Hip Exercises for Runners: Hip-Flexor Roll-Out with Knee Extension

2. Hip-Flexor Roll-Out with Knee Extension

How to: Lie face-down on the floor, and prop your torso up on your forearms. Position yourself so that both knees are bent, the inside of your left leg and the front of your right thigh is flat on the floor. Your right foot should extend toward the ceiling. Place a massage or lacrosse ball (a tennis ball will work, too) under your right hip crease, just inside and below your hip bone. This is your starting position (a). From here, slowly lower your foot toward the floor, then back up toward your butt. That’s one rep (b). Perform 15 reps, then repeat on the opposite side. RELATED: 5 Foam Rolling Moves You Aren’t Doing (But Should) Hip Exercises for Runners: Forward-Reaching Lunges

3. Forward-Reaching Lunges

How to: Get in a split stance with one leg in front of you and the other behind you, and your arms bent and hands held just outside of your shoulders. Bend your knees to lower your back knee toward the floor until your hips are just higher than your knees. Keep your weight in the heel of your front foot. This is your starting position (a). From here, while keeping your back flat, hinge at the hips to bend forward as if you are reaching for something in front of you on the floor (b). Reverse the movement to return to start. That’s one rep (c). Perform 20 reps, then repeat on the opposite side. Hip Exercises for Runners: Side-to-Side Lunges

4. Side-to-Side Lunges

How to: Get in a split stance with one leg in front of you and the other behind you. Bend your elbows and hold your hands just outside of your shoulders. Bend your knees to lower your back knee toward the floor until your hips are just higher than your knees. Keep your weight in the heel of your front foot. This is your starting position (a). From here, while keeping your back straight, spine neutral and hips steady, bend your torso toward the right, then the left. That’s one rep (b). Perform 20 reps, then repeat on the opposite side. RELATED: 15 Stretches You Should Do Every Damn Day Hip Exercises for Runners: Rotational Lunges

5. Rotational Lunges

How to: Get in a split stance with one leg in front of you and the other behind you. Bend your elbows and hold your hands just outside of your shoulders. Bend your knees to lower your back knee toward the floor until your hips are just higher than your knees. Keep your weight in the heel of your front foot. This is your starting position (a). From here, while keeping your back straight, spine neutral and hips steady, twist and rotate your torso to the right, then the left. That’s one rep (b). Perform 20 reps, then repeat on the opposite side. Hip Exercises for Runners: Up-and-Down Lunges

6. Up-and-Down Lunges

How to: Get in a split stance with one leg in front of you and the other behind you, and your arms bent and hands held just outside of your shoulders. Keep your weight in the heel of your front foot. This is your starting position (a). From here, while keeping your back flat, bend your knees to lower your back knee toward the floor until your hips are just higher than your knees (b). Then, drive through your front foot to reverse the movement and return to start. That’s one rep (c). Perform 20 reps, then repeat on the opposite side. Read More 6 Butt Exercises Every Runner Should Be Doing Hate Running? 25 Ways to Learn to Love It The 5 Hip Stretches You Need to Relieve Tightness Now

The post 6 Hip Exercises You Should Do Before a Run appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
The One Shoulder Muscle You’re Neglecting http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/shoulder-exercises-serratus-anterior/ Thu, 14 Dec 2017 12:15:36 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=63961 3 Shoulder Exercises to Strengthen Your Serratus Anterior

[caption id="attachment_63967" align="alignnone" width="620"]3 Shoulder Exercises That’ll Sculpt Your Serratus Anterior Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn 365[/caption]

When you do shoulder or back exercises, chances are you’ll engage your rhomboids, traps and delts. But one crucial shoulder muscle you should also be working is your serratus anterior. “It gets its name from its serrated shape, like a knife blade, as it attaches to the ribs, and is anterior (forward to) the shoulder blade,” says Phoenix Carnevale, Daily Burn 365 trainer and martial artist.

RELATED: Get Sculpted Shoulders with These 5 Moves

As the most flexible joint in your body, your shoulders rely on the serratus anterior for upward rotation of the arms and protracting the scapula. Think: front raises, chest presses, rowing or doing a push-up. “The serratus anterior anchors and stabilizes the shoulder blade, aiding in an open chest and lifted posture,” Carnevale explains. “The serratus anterior is also occasionally called the ‘boxer’s muscle’ because it assist in the action of punching.” So if you want to put more power behind your jabs and crosses, strengthening your serratus anterior is key.

The catch? Because the serratus anterior is located on the underside of the shoulder blade near the inner ribs, it’s hard to target and is often a neglected muscle. “When the serratus anterior muscles are weak, they contribute to neck problems, rotator cuff issues and scapular winging (damage to the long thoracic nerve of the shoulder),” Carnevale says.

Here are three moves to help you improve your serratus anterior strength.

RELATED: 5 Yoga-Inspired Shoulder Openers

3 Shoulder Exercises to Strengthen Your Serratus Anterior

We’ve got your back (and your shoulders, too). Try these three shoulder exercises from Carnevale that target the serratus anterior. Perform eight to 10 reps each.

[caption id="attachment_63965" align="alignnone" width="620"]Shoulder Exercises for Your Serratus Anterior: Serratus Push-Up GIF: Daily Burn 365[/caption]

1. Serratus Push-Up

You won’t feel like you’ve moved much with this shoulder exercise, but you should feel a retraction of your “wings,” Carnevale says.

How to: Get into a push-up position with your hands directly under your shoulders (a). Lower your body between your shoulders without bending your elbows. Keep your elbows soft as you slide your shoulder blades back (b). Bring your shoulder blades forward and then squeeze them together as you engage your core and push away from the ground.

RELATED: Got Shoulder Pain? 5 Exercise Modifications That Can Help

2. Wall Angels

The key part of this exercise is to keep your hands against the wall. If your hands aren’t able to touch the wall, don’t force it. But some common mistakes you want to avoid are bringing the chest forward or extending the lower back off the wall.

How to: Stand with your back against a wall with your arms in cactus position at head height (a). Slide your arms upward with your shoulders down. Start with your thumbs touching the wall, and your elbows pressed as far back as you can reach (b). Lower your arms back to head height, while keeping your back against the wall.

RELATED: Sculpt a Stronger Back with These 5 Moves

3. Accordion Breathing

People with asthma or breathing issues experience problems with the serratus anterior, Carnevale says. This breathing technique helps you engage your serratus anterior for a more effective workout.

How to: Place your hands on each side of your rib cage and breath in by pulling your shoulder blades out, and then back and down.

Read More
5 No-Equipment Back Exercises You Need in Your Life
5 Advanced Push-Up Exercises to Try Now
10 Upper-Body Exercises to Master the Perfect Pull-Up

The post The One Shoulder Muscle You’re Neglecting appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
3 Shoulder Exercises to Strengthen Your Serratus Anterior

[caption id="attachment_63967" align="alignnone" width="620"]3 Shoulder Exercises That’ll Sculpt Your Serratus Anterior Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn 365[/caption] When you do shoulder or back exercises, chances are you’ll engage your rhomboids, traps and delts. But one crucial shoulder muscle you should also be working is your serratus anterior. “It gets its name from its serrated shape, like a knife blade, as it attaches to the ribs, and is anterior (forward to) the shoulder blade,” says Phoenix Carnevale, Daily Burn 365 trainer and martial artist. RELATED: Get Sculpted Shoulders with These 5 Moves As the most flexible joint in your body, your shoulders rely on the serratus anterior for upward rotation of the arms and protracting the scapula. Think: front raises, chest presses, rowing or doing a push-up. “The serratus anterior anchors and stabilizes the shoulder blade, aiding in an open chest and lifted posture,” Carnevale explains. “The serratus anterior is also occasionally called the ‘boxer’s muscle’ because it assist in the action of punching.” So if you want to put more power behind your jabs and crosses, strengthening your serratus anterior is key. The catch? Because the serratus anterior is located on the underside of the shoulder blade near the inner ribs, it’s hard to target and is often a neglected muscle. “When the serratus anterior muscles are weak, they contribute to neck problems, rotator cuff issues and scapular winging (damage to the long thoracic nerve of the shoulder),” Carnevale says. Here are three moves to help you improve your serratus anterior strength. RELATED: 5 Yoga-Inspired Shoulder Openers

3 Shoulder Exercises to Strengthen Your Serratus Anterior

We’ve got your back (and your shoulders, too). Try these three shoulder exercises from Carnevale that target the serratus anterior. Perform eight to 10 reps each. [caption id="attachment_63965" align="alignnone" width="620"]Shoulder Exercises for Your Serratus Anterior: Serratus Push-Up GIF: Daily Burn 365[/caption]

1. Serratus Push-Up

You won’t feel like you’ve moved much with this shoulder exercise, but you should feel a retraction of your “wings,” Carnevale says. How to: Get into a push-up position with your hands directly under your shoulders (a). Lower your body between your shoulders without bending your elbows. Keep your elbows soft as you slide your shoulder blades back (b). Bring your shoulder blades forward and then squeeze them together as you engage your core and push away from the ground. RELATED: Got Shoulder Pain? 5 Exercise Modifications That Can Help

2. Wall Angels

The key part of this exercise is to keep your hands against the wall. If your hands aren’t able to touch the wall, don’t force it. But some common mistakes you want to avoid are bringing the chest forward or extending the lower back off the wall. How to: Stand with your back against a wall with your arms in cactus position at head height (a). Slide your arms upward with your shoulders down. Start with your thumbs touching the wall, and your elbows pressed as far back as you can reach (b). Lower your arms back to head height, while keeping your back against the wall. RELATED: Sculpt a Stronger Back with These 5 Moves

3. Accordion Breathing

People with asthma or breathing issues experience problems with the serratus anterior, Carnevale says. This breathing technique helps you engage your serratus anterior for a more effective workout. How to: Place your hands on each side of your rib cage and breath in by pulling your shoulder blades out, and then back and down. Read More 5 No-Equipment Back Exercises You Need in Your Life 5 Advanced Push-Up Exercises to Try Now 10 Upper-Body Exercises to Master the Perfect Pull-Up

The post The One Shoulder Muscle You’re Neglecting appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
5 Agility Ladder Drills for a Full-Body Burn http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/agility-ladder-drills-cardio-workout/ Mon, 11 Dec 2017 12:15:09 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=63927 5 Agility Ladder Drills for a Full-Body Burn

[caption id="attachment_63939" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Agility Ladder Drills for a Full-Body Burn Photos: Daily Burn[/caption]

If you’ve ever watched a basketball or football game, it’s not just the halftime-leading three pointers or the game-winning touchdowns that keep us glued to the screen. It’s the remarkable speed, skill and agility of the athletes. Players need to react quickly, move seamlessly in all directions and jump with precision. That’s where the type II muscle fibers come in. So what’s the secret to activating these fast-twitch muscles? Agility ladder drills.

CeCe Marizu, a former Division I swimmer and Daily Burn 365 trainer says, “We’re creatures of habit and we tend to always stick to routines that we know. An agility ladder works on one’s coordination, balance and even our neurological patterns.” After all, sports are as much of a mental game as a physical one.

But even if the Super Bowl or the NBA final isn’t your goal, these agility ladder drills are sure to keep you on your toes — from cardio conditioning to honing better coordination and reflexes. Tack them onto your strength workout for a great heart-pumping finisher.

RELATED: Burn Calories Fast with This 10-Minute Plyometric Workout

5 Agility Ladder Drills to Train Like an Athlete

Ready to step up your fitness? “Master simplicity before moving onto more complex foot patterns,” Marizu says. As for your arms? They’re key to making each drill a full-body movement. “Try running like a toy soldier and see how quickly you move. Add in your arms, and you suddenly feel a lot more graceful and powerful at the same time,” Marizu says. Repeat each of Marizu’s ladder drills three to four times through.

[caption id="attachment_63929" align="alignnone" width="620"]Agility Ladder Drills: Linear Run GIFs: Life by Daily Burn[/caption]

1. Linear Run Through

Quick! Zip through this drill touching both feet inside in each box. At the end of the ladder, hustle back to the start to keep your heart rate up. As you progress, reduce the amount of time your feet are on the ground and add in high knees.

RELATED: Get Fit Fast with This Total-Body EMOM Workout

Agility Ladder Drills: Lateral Shuffle

2. Lateral Shuffle

Similar to the linear run through, the goal with this drill is to get both feet in the box while moving laterally. Marizu recommends a soft bend in your knees to help protect your joints. “This drill is a great way to get balance work in while keeping the move dynamic,” she says.

Agility Ladder Drills: Squat Hop

3. Squat Hop

Want to add some strength work to your drill? Insert a squat! The bodyweight exercise works your glutes, and you get your heart rate up even more by making it plyometric. “Squats add power by increasing the range of motion in the move,” Marizu says. If you want to amp things up, carry a weight, like a sandbag or kettlebell, to make it a goblet squat. Just don’t sacrifice proper squat form!

RELATED: 5 Planks, 10 Minutes : Your Ultimate Ab Workout

Agility Ladder Drills: The Beast Crawl

4. Beast Crawl

The beast drill is great for strengthening your upper-body and core. But before you run or walk…you have to crawl. Proper beast form starts with getting into tabletop position and lining your shoulders directly above your wrists. Then, lift your knees an inch or two off the floor. “Once you have it, the move is almost like a puzzle. You move from side to side to find the right spot. Your whole body is engaged throughout the movement,” Marizu says.

Agility Ladder Drills: The Heisman Shuffle

5. Heisman Shuffle

The Heisman is the most advanced drill on the list, so don’t worry if you can’t nail it down right away. “The Heisman is hard, even for me!” Marizu says. To do this drill, alternate stepping each foot in and out of the box, and then pause to bring one knee up towards your chest to meet the opposite elbow. Alternate knees as you move through the boxes. “I count to myself and start moving super slow. Then, I find my own rhythm and increase the intensity,” Marizu says.

For more awesome cardio workouts and sports conditioning exercises, sign up HERE for Daily Burn 365. Start your free trial today!

Read More
7 New Burpee Variations to Test Your Strength
3 Cardio Workouts Under 20 Minutes — No Treadmill
3 Sprint Workouts That’ll Torch Calories Fast

The post 5 Agility Ladder Drills for a Full-Body Burn appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
5 Agility Ladder Drills for a Full-Body Burn

[caption id="attachment_63939" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Agility Ladder Drills for a Full-Body Burn Photos: Daily Burn[/caption] If you’ve ever watched a basketball or football game, it’s not just the halftime-leading three pointers or the game-winning touchdowns that keep us glued to the screen. It’s the remarkable speed, skill and agility of the athletes. Players need to react quickly, move seamlessly in all directions and jump with precision. That’s where the type II muscle fibers come in. So what’s the secret to activating these fast-twitch muscles? Agility ladder drills. CeCe Marizu, a former Division I swimmer and Daily Burn 365 trainer says, “We’re creatures of habit and we tend to always stick to routines that we know. An agility ladder works on one’s coordination, balance and even our neurological patterns.” After all, sports are as much of a mental game as a physical one. But even if the Super Bowl or the NBA final isn’t your goal, these agility ladder drills are sure to keep you on your toes — from cardio conditioning to honing better coordination and reflexes. Tack them onto your strength workout for a great heart-pumping finisher. RELATED: Burn Calories Fast with This 10-Minute Plyometric Workout

5 Agility Ladder Drills to Train Like an Athlete

Ready to step up your fitness? “Master simplicity before moving onto more complex foot patterns,” Marizu says. As for your arms? They’re key to making each drill a full-body movement. “Try running like a toy soldier and see how quickly you move. Add in your arms, and you suddenly feel a lot more graceful and powerful at the same time,” Marizu says. Repeat each of Marizu’s ladder drills three to four times through. [caption id="attachment_63929" align="alignnone" width="620"]Agility Ladder Drills: Linear Run GIFs: Life by Daily Burn[/caption]

1. Linear Run Through

Quick! Zip through this drill touching both feet inside in each box. At the end of the ladder, hustle back to the start to keep your heart rate up. As you progress, reduce the amount of time your feet are on the ground and add in high knees. RELATED: Get Fit Fast with This Total-Body EMOM Workout Agility Ladder Drills: Lateral Shuffle

2. Lateral Shuffle

Similar to the linear run through, the goal with this drill is to get both feet in the box while moving laterally. Marizu recommends a soft bend in your knees to help protect your joints. “This drill is a great way to get balance work in while keeping the move dynamic,” she says. Agility Ladder Drills: Squat Hop

3. Squat Hop

Want to add some strength work to your drill? Insert a squat! The bodyweight exercise works your glutes, and you get your heart rate up even more by making it plyometric. “Squats add power by increasing the range of motion in the move,” Marizu says. If you want to amp things up, carry a weight, like a sandbag or kettlebell, to make it a goblet squat. Just don’t sacrifice proper squat form! RELATED: 5 Planks, 10 Minutes : Your Ultimate Ab Workout Agility Ladder Drills: The Beast Crawl

4. Beast Crawl

The beast drill is great for strengthening your upper-body and core. But before you run or walk…you have to crawl. Proper beast form starts with getting into tabletop position and lining your shoulders directly above your wrists. Then, lift your knees an inch or two off the floor. “Once you have it, the move is almost like a puzzle. You move from side to side to find the right spot. Your whole body is engaged throughout the movement,” Marizu says.

Agility Ladder Drills: The Heisman Shuffle

5. Heisman Shuffle

The Heisman is the most advanced drill on the list, so don’t worry if you can’t nail it down right away. “The Heisman is hard, even for me!” Marizu says. To do this drill, alternate stepping each foot in and out of the box, and then pause to bring one knee up towards your chest to meet the opposite elbow. Alternate knees as you move through the boxes. “I count to myself and start moving super slow. Then, I find my own rhythm and increase the intensity,” Marizu says. For more awesome cardio workouts and sports conditioning exercises, sign up HERE for Daily Burn 365. Start your free trial today! Read More 7 New Burpee Variations to Test Your Strength 3 Cardio Workouts Under 20 Minutes — No Treadmill 3 Sprint Workouts That’ll Torch Calories Fast

The post 5 Agility Ladder Drills for a Full-Body Burn appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
Winter Running Guide: How to Run Faster by Spring http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/winter-running-how-to-run-faster/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/winter-running-how-to-run-faster/#respond Sat, 09 Dec 2017 14:15:46 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=35180 Winter Running Guide: How to Run Faster by Spring

[caption id="attachment_63915" align="alignnone" width="620"]Winter Running Guide: How to Get Faster by Spring Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Now that all the big fall races are over and the weather is getting colder, most people are ready to pack away their sneakers and hibernate. While some consider the winter an off-season, it’s definitely not the time to slack off from training.

“Many runners simply take the winter off, but this is a huge mistake,” says Jason Fitzgerald, USATF-certified running coach. “Taking a season off — or barely running at all — prevents most runners from progressing.”

Take elite Saucony-sponsored runner Tina Muir, for example. After running the Chicago Marathon in October 2014, Muir has spent time working on the little things to make her a stronger runner like building strength, improving her form, and practicing yoga. “This downtime between racing is the best time to do it,” says Muir. “You can’t throw a lot of this work in when you’re training hard since your muscles are already fatigued. And, this way, you don’t have to spend half the spring and summer getting back into shape.”

RELATED: Hate Running? 25 Ways to Learn to Love It

In fact, the winter is the perfect time to build a solid foundation for running. “Figure out what your weak links are and to focus on those things,” says Jay Dicharry, director of the REP Biomechanics Lab, author of Anatomy for Runners and USATF-certified coach. “It’s not good enough to just have a strong engine. You need to have a strong chassis too — mobility, stability and strength. That will give you a better body to run with.”

So, what’s a runner to do when the temps start dropping and workouts get moved indoors? For starters, focus on these seven key areas this winter. These exercises will help you figure out the right way to move so that you’ll be ready for a strong season of running once the weather warms back up.

RELATED: 3 Running Drills from Olympic Sprinter Tori Bowie

7 Tips on How to Run Faster by Spring

1. Maintain Your Base

No matter the season, you want to maintain some level of base fitness. Ideally, you’ll want to keep logging the same amount of miles you’re used to. “If that’s not possible, reduce mileage by 10 to 20 percent. It’s a good way to stay in shape while being on a mental break from harder training,” says Fitzgerald.

Reducing intensity is fine, too, just remember: “These aren’t junk miles,” says Dicharry. There are three important things that happen in your body when you train at approximately 60 percent of your maximum heart rate, he says. First, you build capillaries, the smallest blood vessels in your body. More capillaries means more efficient blood flow to your muscles and greater surface area for oxygen to transfer from your bloodstream into your tissues. Second, you build more mitochondria, the energy powerhouses of your cells. More mitochondria means more energy you can use, Dicharry explains. Third, you teach your body to regulate its blood sugar levels better so that you use your energy stores more efficiently.

RELATED: 7 Expert Tips for Pacing Yourself on the Run

2. Build a Strong Behind

Many runners are plagued with inactive glutes and weak hips. Due to the inordinate amount of sitting we do in our daily lives, our behinds tend to be unresponsive, compromising their ability to do their job when we need them, like during a race. In fact, research shows that weak hip and bum muscles are often to blame for running injuries.

In terms of mechanics, strong glutes help you drive off the ground in order to run more efficiently. Single-leg glute bridges are a great way to strengthen this area. During the exercise, “Ask yourself, ‘What muscles do I feel working?’ Most people will feel it in their lower back, or their hamstring will cramp,” says Dicharry, which isn’t good. “You want to learn how to move and drive from your hips to lift and stabilize the pelvis.

If you’re having trouble isolating your glutes, Dicharry suggests imagining that you are squeezing a quarter between your butt cheeks as you raise your hips off the floor. “It seems like a simple exercise, but if you can’t master the basic bridge, you’re going to do everything else incorrectly,” says Dicharry. Add in clam shells, hip hikes and lateral leg raises and you’ll be on your way to building a strong bum.

RELATED: 6 Butt Exercises Every Runner Should Be Doing

3. Improve Your Posture

Your mother was right: Good posture does matter. According to Dicharry, balance, alignment and posture all directly impact our running ability and form. “Most of us stand back on our heels and lock out our knees. We just ‘hang out’ in our posture,” says Dicharry. “When you stand like this all day, you’ll start to run like this, too. And, poor posture can inhibit your hip strength by half.”

In order to stand up tall, you first need to find a neutral position in your spine. Stand and become aware of where the weight is in your feet. “Then, drop your breastbone and the front of your ribs down and you should feel the weight shift off your heels to the other parts of your feet,” says Dicharry. “Most people will feel like their muscles must work to maintain this position.”

Practice proper posture all day — when standing, sitting, walking and running — so that it becomes second nature and you can maintain this position even during a hard workout. Muir also suggests doing drills to help you concentrate on your form, which translates to more efficient and faster running. Muir’s favorites include high knees, butt kicks and side shuffles.

RELATED: 6 Exercises That'll Seriously Improve Your Posture

[caption id="attachment_63916" align="alignnone" width="620"]Winter Running Guide: How to Run Faster by Spring Photo: Pond5[/caption]

4. Build a Strong Core

Having a sturdy center helps improve stabilization and allows your lower body and upper body to communicate more effectively. “The runners I’ve trained who have focused on this have performed much better,” says Cheri Paige Fogleman, trainer for Daily Burn 365. “A strong core gives runners an advantage in that your form doesn’t break down when you get tired.”

Fitzgerald’s “bread and butter” core workout includes everything from planks and side planks to modified bicycles and bird-dog exercises. He recommends doing a routine like this two to three times a week.

RELATED: 6 Core Exercises to Make You a Stronger, Faster Runner

5. Practice Toe Yoga

Your feet play an important role in running. Not only do they absorb the impact upon landing, they also help generate the force required to propel you forward when you run. Yet, according to Dicharry, many runners have weak feet and poor foot coordination. How can you make your feet more resilient? Practice toe yoga!

What exactly is toe yoga? It’s learning how to move your big toe and little piggies independently of each other. Keeping the ball of your foot on the ground, lift up just your big toe while your little toes remain on the floor and hold. Then, drive your big toe down into the ground while you lift up your little toes and hold.

“One of the most helpful things to do is to learn how to use your big toe,” Dicharry says. “Being able to drive your big toe down is a critical skill. You’re isolating the muscle in the arch of your foot. Its only job is to stabilize the arch.”

RELATED: How to Score Perfect Running Form Like the Pros

6. Try Something New

Aqua jogging, stair mill, spin class… “There are so many other modalities that can support running,” says Fogleman. If you’re not training for a race, it’s a great time to switch things up. “The more things you do that are different, the better athlete you become,” says Dicharry. If some form of cross-training isn’t already in your weekly routine, mix in your favorite low-impact activity (or try something new!). Just one hour a week can pay dividends come spring.

7. Hit the ‘Mill!

Don’t want to run outside? No problem. Try the treadmill hill workout, featured below, from CLAY Health Club + Spa. It will build glute and leg strength as well as increase fast-twitch muscle fibers. The result: You're able to run farther, better, faster and stronger.

RELATED: 20-Minute HIIT Treadmill Workout to Get Fit, Fast

Your Winter Treadmill Workout

Before you start, you’ll need to determine your speed and incline for the workout. Find your goal pace-per-mile for the desired incline — six percent for this workout — and corresponding treadmill mph setting. After you finish your warm-up, step off the treadmill belt and bring your speed up to your hill sprint speed and your desired incline. Step back onto the belt to begin your hill intervals.

[caption id="attachment_63922" align="alignnone" width="620"]Winter Running Guide: How to Run Faster by Spring Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

Originally published December 2014. Updated December 2017.

Read More
Why I Started Running — And Never Stopped
9 Things I Wish I Knew Before I Started Running
50 Running Resources for Speed, Strength and Nutrition

The post Winter Running Guide: How to Run Faster by Spring appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
Winter Running Guide: How to Run Faster by Spring

[caption id="attachment_63915" align="alignnone" width="620"]Winter Running Guide: How to Get Faster by Spring Photo: Pond5[/caption] Now that all the big fall races are over and the weather is getting colder, most people are ready to pack away their sneakers and hibernate. While some consider the winter an off-season, it’s definitely not the time to slack off from training. “Many runners simply take the winter off, but this is a huge mistake,” says Jason Fitzgerald, USATF-certified running coach. “Taking a season off — or barely running at all — prevents most runners from progressing.” Take elite Saucony-sponsored runner Tina Muir, for example. After running the Chicago Marathon in October 2014, Muir has spent time working on the little things to make her a stronger runner like building strength, improving her form, and practicing yoga. “This downtime between racing is the best time to do it,” says Muir. “You can’t throw a lot of this work in when you’re training hard since your muscles are already fatigued. And, this way, you don’t have to spend half the spring and summer getting back into shape.” RELATED: Hate Running? 25 Ways to Learn to Love It In fact, the winter is the perfect time to build a solid foundation for running. “Figure out what your weak links are and to focus on those things,” says Jay Dicharry, director of the REP Biomechanics Lab, author of Anatomy for Runners and USATF-certified coach. “It’s not good enough to just have a strong engine. You need to have a strong chassis too — mobility, stability and strength. That will give you a better body to run with.” So, what’s a runner to do when the temps start dropping and workouts get moved indoors? For starters, focus on these seven key areas this winter. These exercises will help you figure out the right way to move so that you’ll be ready for a strong season of running once the weather warms back up. RELATED: 3 Running Drills from Olympic Sprinter Tori Bowie

7 Tips on How to Run Faster by Spring

1. Maintain Your Base

No matter the season, you want to maintain some level of base fitness. Ideally, you’ll want to keep logging the same amount of miles you’re used to. “If that’s not possible, reduce mileage by 10 to 20 percent. It’s a good way to stay in shape while being on a mental break from harder training,” says Fitzgerald. Reducing intensity is fine, too, just remember: “These aren’t junk miles,” says Dicharry. There are three important things that happen in your body when you train at approximately 60 percent of your maximum heart rate, he says. First, you build capillaries, the smallest blood vessels in your body. More capillaries means more efficient blood flow to your muscles and greater surface area for oxygen to transfer from your bloodstream into your tissues. Second, you build more mitochondria, the energy powerhouses of your cells. More mitochondria means more energy you can use, Dicharry explains. Third, you teach your body to regulate its blood sugar levels better so that you use your energy stores more efficiently. RELATED: 7 Expert Tips for Pacing Yourself on the Run

2. Build a Strong Behind

Many runners are plagued with inactive glutes and weak hips. Due to the inordinate amount of sitting we do in our daily lives, our behinds tend to be unresponsive, compromising their ability to do their job when we need them, like during a race. In fact, research shows that weak hip and bum muscles are often to blame for running injuries. In terms of mechanics, strong glutes help you drive off the ground in order to run more efficiently. Single-leg glute bridges are a great way to strengthen this area. During the exercise, “Ask yourself, ‘What muscles do I feel working?’ Most people will feel it in their lower back, or their hamstring will cramp,” says Dicharry, which isn’t good. “You want to learn how to move and drive from your hips to lift and stabilize the pelvis. If you’re having trouble isolating your glutes, Dicharry suggests imagining that you are squeezing a quarter between your butt cheeks as you raise your hips off the floor. “It seems like a simple exercise, but if you can’t master the basic bridge, you’re going to do everything else incorrectly,” says Dicharry. Add in clam shells, hip hikes and lateral leg raises and you’ll be on your way to building a strong bum. RELATED: 6 Butt Exercises Every Runner Should Be Doing

3. Improve Your Posture

Your mother was right: Good posture does matter. According to Dicharry, balance, alignment and posture all directly impact our running ability and form. “Most of us stand back on our heels and lock out our knees. We just ‘hang out’ in our posture,” says Dicharry. “When you stand like this all day, you’ll start to run like this, too. And, poor posture can inhibit your hip strength by half.” In order to stand up tall, you first need to find a neutral position in your spine. Stand and become aware of where the weight is in your feet. “Then, drop your breastbone and the front of your ribs down and you should feel the weight shift off your heels to the other parts of your feet,” says Dicharry. “Most people will feel like their muscles must work to maintain this position.” Practice proper posture all day — when standing, sitting, walking and running — so that it becomes second nature and you can maintain this position even during a hard workout. Muir also suggests doing drills to help you concentrate on your form, which translates to more efficient and faster running. Muir’s favorites include high knees, butt kicks and side shuffles. RELATED: 6 Exercises That'll Seriously Improve Your Posture [caption id="attachment_63916" align="alignnone" width="620"]Winter Running Guide: How to Run Faster by Spring Photo: Pond5[/caption]

4. Build a Strong Core

Having a sturdy center helps improve stabilization and allows your lower body and upper body to communicate more effectively. “The runners I’ve trained who have focused on this have performed much better,” says Cheri Paige Fogleman, trainer for Daily Burn 365. “A strong core gives runners an advantage in that your form doesn’t break down when you get tired.” Fitzgerald’s “bread and butter” core workout includes everything from planks and side planks to modified bicycles and bird-dog exercises. He recommends doing a routine like this two to three times a week. RELATED: 6 Core Exercises to Make You a Stronger, Faster Runner

5. Practice Toe Yoga

Your feet play an important role in running. Not only do they absorb the impact upon landing, they also help generate the force required to propel you forward when you run. Yet, according to Dicharry, many runners have weak feet and poor foot coordination. How can you make your feet more resilient? Practice toe yoga! What exactly is toe yoga? It’s learning how to move your big toe and little piggies independently of each other. Keeping the ball of your foot on the ground, lift up just your big toe while your little toes remain on the floor and hold. Then, drive your big toe down into the ground while you lift up your little toes and hold. “One of the most helpful things to do is to learn how to use your big toe,” Dicharry says. “Being able to drive your big toe down is a critical skill. You’re isolating the muscle in the arch of your foot. Its only job is to stabilize the arch.” RELATED: How to Score Perfect Running Form Like the Pros

6. Try Something New

Aqua jogging, stair mill, spin class… “There are so many other modalities that can support running,” says Fogleman. If you’re not training for a race, it’s a great time to switch things up. “The more things you do that are different, the better athlete you become,” says Dicharry. If some form of cross-training isn’t already in your weekly routine, mix in your favorite low-impact activity (or try something new!). Just one hour a week can pay dividends come spring.

7. Hit the ‘Mill!

Don’t want to run outside? No problem. Try the treadmill hill workout, featured below, from CLAY Health Club + Spa. It will build glute and leg strength as well as increase fast-twitch muscle fibers. The result: You're able to run farther, better, faster and stronger. RELATED: 20-Minute HIIT Treadmill Workout to Get Fit, Fast

Your Winter Treadmill Workout

Before you start, you’ll need to determine your speed and incline for the workout. Find your goal pace-per-mile for the desired incline — six percent for this workout — and corresponding treadmill mph setting. After you finish your warm-up, step off the treadmill belt and bring your speed up to your hill sprint speed and your desired incline. Step back onto the belt to begin your hill intervals. [caption id="attachment_63922" align="alignnone" width="620"]Winter Running Guide: How to Run Faster by Spring Photo: Twenty20[/caption] Originally published December 2014. Updated December 2017. Read More Why I Started Running — And Never Stopped 9 Things I Wish I Knew Before I Started Running 50 Running Resources for Speed, Strength and Nutrition

The post Winter Running Guide: How to Run Faster by Spring appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/winter-running-how-to-run-faster/feed/ 0