Strength Training – Life by Daily Burn http://dailyburn.com/life Mon, 19 Feb 2018 18:05:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.4 5 Stability Ball Exercises That Work More Than Your Abs http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/stability-ball-exercises-total-body/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/stability-ball-exercises-total-body/#respond Sat, 17 Feb 2018 13:15:47 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=60891

[caption id="attachment_65774" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Stability Ball Exercises That Work More Than Your Abs Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

If you equate stability balls with core work only, you’re selling them (and your fitness results) short.

Adding stability ball exercises to your workout is a great, simple way to increase the difficulty of your favorite moves. Using just this tool, you can challenge both your upper and lower body in new, creative ways, explains trainer Tara Romeo, CSCS, CES, director of the Professional Athletic Performance Center in New York. (If you don’t already have one at home, we like the URBNFit Ball.)

RELATED: 5 Stability Ball Exercises for a Crazy Strong Core

Plus, no matter the exercise, performing a move with an exercise ball will force you to work double-time as you fight to keep your core stable. “Due to the ball's soft surface, your body has to constantly compensate for the continuous changes in balance throughout the exercise,” Romeo explains. “This strengthens the deep-lying stabilizing muscles in your core.”

To get you in on the total-body action, Romeo shares five challenging stability ball exercises you need to try. Add them into your existing exercise routine or perform each move for 10 reps and three sets for a workout that will leave your entire body shaking.

RELATED: 50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core

5 Stability Ball Exercises You’re Not Doing (But Should!)

Stability Ball Exercises: Elevated Split Squat

1. Stability-Ball-Elevated Split Squat

Take your squats to the next level with this advanced bodyweight move. It hammers your quads, glutes, and hamstrings while honing your total-body balance and core stability.

How to: Stand tall with your feet hip-width apart. Place the top of one foot on a stability ball directly behind your body (a). Keeping your weight in the heel of your front foot, bend your knees to lower your body toward the floor. Allow the ball to roll onto your back shin (b). Pause, then push through your front heel to stand up, rolling the top of your foot back onto the ball (c). Repeat for reps, then switch sides.

Stability Ball Exercises: Hamstring Curl

2. Stability-Ball Hamstring Curl

Ditch the gym’s bulky hamstring curl machine and opt for this at-home variation. It works your hammies and glutes in a big way — without taking the rest of your lower-body stabilizers out of the muscle-building equation.

How to: Lie flat on your back on the floor. Place both ankles on top of a stability ball hip-width apart (a). With your back flat, core braced and arms at your side, squeeze your glutes to raise your hips up off the ground so that your body forms a straight line from knees to shoulders. Your feet should be flat on the ball (b). From here, press your heels into the ball and bend your knees to pull the ball toward your butt (c). Pause, then straighten your knees to drive the ball back out, keeping your hips elevated as you do so (d). Repeat for reps, keeping hips elevated between reps.

RELATED: 275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine

Stability Ball Exercises: Lat Pull-Over

3. Lat Pull-Over on a Stability Ball

Despite the name, this simple yet effective exercise not only works your lats, but also your pecs and shoulders. And of course, it fires up your core. Just grab a dumbbell to get it done right.

How to: With your feet flat on the floor and placed shoulder-width apart, position your upper back on a stability ball (a). Lift your hips so you reach a table-top position, knees bent to 90 degrees and back completely flat. Hold the top of a dumbbell with both hands above your chest, allowing a slight bend in your elbows (b). From here, keeping your back flat, core braced and a slight bend in your elbows, slowly lower the weight behind your head (c). Pause, then drive the weight back up to start (d). Repeat.

Stability Ball Exercises: Y-Ups

4. Stability-Ball Y-Ups

This one is a lot harder than it looks, as you train the lower traps. You also hit the often-underworked rhomboids and rear delts for improved posture and upper-body stability. Start without weights before moving onto 5- or 10-pound dumbbells.

How to: Lie on your stomach on a stability ball, with your feet on the floor, spread shoulder-width apart for balance (a). Extend your arms straight out in front of you and rotate your hands so your thumbs point up toward the ceiling. Keep your shoulders down and away from your ears (b). From here, pinch your shoulder blades together like you are pinching an orange to slowly raise your arms up as far as you can without letting your torso move (c). Pause, then slowly lower back to start and repeat (c).

RELATED: 5 No-Equipment Back Exercises You Need in Your Life

Stability Ball Exercises: Dead Bug

5. Dead Bug

We’d be remiss not to include one core-specific exercise. After all, exercise balls have a reputation for a reason. And while equipment-free dead bugs train both the six-pack-looking abs and deep-lying core muscles like crazy, adding in a yoga ball is a great way to turn up the burn.

How to: Lie flat on your back on the floor with your arms and legs extended straight up toward the ceiling, bracing a stability ball between your arms and legs. Tilt your pelvis to press your low back into the floor, and brace your core to maintain this back position throughout the entire exercise (a). Lower one arm and the opposite leg toward the floor as low as you can while keeping a flat-back position and keeping the ball in place (b). Pause, then squeeze your abs to raise your arm and leg back to start (c). Repeat on the opposite side (d). Continue alternating.

Originally published August 2017. Updated February 2018. 

Read More
Hate Crunches? 6 Better Core Exercises for Beginners
Quick Lower Ab Exercises for a Stronger Core
3 Quick HIIT Workouts for Beginners

The post 5 Stability Ball Exercises That Work More Than Your Abs appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>

[caption id="attachment_65774" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Stability Ball Exercises That Work More Than Your Abs Photo: Twenty20[/caption] If you equate stability balls with core work only, you’re selling them (and your fitness results) short. Adding stability ball exercises to your workout is a great, simple way to increase the difficulty of your favorite moves. Using just this tool, you can challenge both your upper and lower body in new, creative ways, explains trainer Tara Romeo, CSCS, CES, director of the Professional Athletic Performance Center in New York. (If you don’t already have one at home, we like the URBNFit Ball.) RELATED: 5 Stability Ball Exercises for a Crazy Strong Core Plus, no matter the exercise, performing a move with an exercise ball will force you to work double-time as you fight to keep your core stable. “Due to the ball's soft surface, your body has to constantly compensate for the continuous changes in balance throughout the exercise,” Romeo explains. “This strengthens the deep-lying stabilizing muscles in your core.” To get you in on the total-body action, Romeo shares five challenging stability ball exercises you need to try. Add them into your existing exercise routine or perform each move for 10 reps and three sets for a workout that will leave your entire body shaking. RELATED: 50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core

5 Stability Ball Exercises You’re Not Doing (But Should!)

Stability Ball Exercises: Elevated Split Squat

1. Stability-Ball-Elevated Split Squat

Take your squats to the next level with this advanced bodyweight move. It hammers your quads, glutes, and hamstrings while honing your total-body balance and core stability. How to: Stand tall with your feet hip-width apart. Place the top of one foot on a stability ball directly behind your body (a). Keeping your weight in the heel of your front foot, bend your knees to lower your body toward the floor. Allow the ball to roll onto your back shin (b). Pause, then push through your front heel to stand up, rolling the top of your foot back onto the ball (c). Repeat for reps, then switch sides. Stability Ball Exercises: Hamstring Curl

2. Stability-Ball Hamstring Curl

Ditch the gym’s bulky hamstring curl machine and opt for this at-home variation. It works your hammies and glutes in a big way — without taking the rest of your lower-body stabilizers out of the muscle-building equation. How to: Lie flat on your back on the floor. Place both ankles on top of a stability ball hip-width apart (a). With your back flat, core braced and arms at your side, squeeze your glutes to raise your hips up off the ground so that your body forms a straight line from knees to shoulders. Your feet should be flat on the ball (b). From here, press your heels into the ball and bend your knees to pull the ball toward your butt (c). Pause, then straighten your knees to drive the ball back out, keeping your hips elevated as you do so (d). Repeat for reps, keeping hips elevated between reps. RELATED: 275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine Stability Ball Exercises: Lat Pull-Over

3. Lat Pull-Over on a Stability Ball

Despite the name, this simple yet effective exercise not only works your lats, but also your pecs and shoulders. And of course, it fires up your core. Just grab a dumbbell to get it done right. How to: With your feet flat on the floor and placed shoulder-width apart, position your upper back on a stability ball (a). Lift your hips so you reach a table-top position, knees bent to 90 degrees and back completely flat. Hold the top of a dumbbell with both hands above your chest, allowing a slight bend in your elbows (b). From here, keeping your back flat, core braced and a slight bend in your elbows, slowly lower the weight behind your head (c). Pause, then drive the weight back up to start (d). Repeat. Stability Ball Exercises: Y-Ups

4. Stability-Ball Y-Ups

This one is a lot harder than it looks, as you train the lower traps. You also hit the often-underworked rhomboids and rear delts for improved posture and upper-body stability. Start without weights before moving onto 5- or 10-pound dumbbells. How to: Lie on your stomach on a stability ball, with your feet on the floor, spread shoulder-width apart for balance (a). Extend your arms straight out in front of you and rotate your hands so your thumbs point up toward the ceiling. Keep your shoulders down and away from your ears (b). From here, pinch your shoulder blades together like you are pinching an orange to slowly raise your arms up as far as you can without letting your torso move (c). Pause, then slowly lower back to start and repeat (c). RELATED: 5 No-Equipment Back Exercises You Need in Your Life Stability Ball Exercises: Dead Bug

5. Dead Bug

We’d be remiss not to include one core-specific exercise. After all, exercise balls have a reputation for a reason. And while equipment-free dead bugs train both the six-pack-looking abs and deep-lying core muscles like crazy, adding in a yoga ball is a great way to turn up the burn. How to: Lie flat on your back on the floor with your arms and legs extended straight up toward the ceiling, bracing a stability ball between your arms and legs. Tilt your pelvis to press your low back into the floor, and brace your core to maintain this back position throughout the entire exercise (a). Lower one arm and the opposite leg toward the floor as low as you can while keeping a flat-back position and keeping the ball in place (b). Pause, then squeeze your abs to raise your arm and leg back to start (c). Repeat on the opposite side (d). Continue alternating. Originally published August 2017. Updated February 2018.  Read More Hate Crunches? 6 Better Core Exercises for Beginners Quick Lower Ab Exercises for a Stronger Core 3 Quick HIIT Workouts for Beginners

The post 5 Stability Ball Exercises That Work More Than Your Abs appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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Got 10 Minutes? 3 Fat-Blasting Bodyweight Workouts http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/bodyweight-workouts-burn-fat/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/bodyweight-workouts-burn-fat/#comments Thu, 15 Feb 2018 16:15:15 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=43282 Got 10 Minutes? 3 Fat-Blasting Bodyweight Workouts

[caption id="attachment_65734" align="alignnone" width="620"]Got 10 Minutes? 3 Fat-Blasting Bodyweight Workouts Photo: Pond5[/caption]

If you think your gym’s exercise machines don’t look too different than the characters from the latest Transformers movie, you’re not alone. All those levers and cables and pins can have you running for the exit. But before you flip the script in the name of gymtimidation, remember that there's one piece of equipment that's consistently better than the rest: Your own body.

That's right, your very own physique is the best and most versatile piece of fitness equipment you can use. According to Certified Strength and Conditioning Coach Mike Dewar of J2Fit, by performing bodyweight exercises and movements, you'll not only improve your balance and conditioning, you'll also start building muscle. And the more muscle you have, the more calories and fat your body will naturally burn.

RELATED: 5 Killer Cardio Workouts That Don't Involve Running

What’s more, Dewar stresses the importance of the body awareness and stability that comes from bodyweight training. “Without the ability to control your body in space, you can set yourself up for injury."

Got 10 minutes to get a jump on your fitness? We thought so. That’s why we’ve put together three 10-minute bodyweight workouts fit for any experience level. Choose one today, another tomorrow, and you’ve got an easy way to get your sweat on anytime, anywhere.

Try These 3 Bodyweight Exercises

Perform these routines as a standalone workout, or add them to the end of your regular weight training or cardio workout as a "finisher." Find certain moves too challenging? Each circuit can be easily modified to suit your needs (or spatial limitations). And while Dewar recommends resting 60 seconds between each round, take as much (or as little) time as you need. Now clear a spot in your living room, or claim a corner of your park or gym — it’s go time!

RELATED: 275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine

Bodyweight Workout: 10-Minute Tone Up

[caption id="attachment_65735" align="alignnone" width="620"]Bodyweight Workout: 10-Minute Tone Up Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Squat Jumps

How to: Start by standing straight up with your feet flat on the ground, hip-width apart. Keeping your arms straight out in front of you, drop into a squat position, keeping your back straight and your chest up (a). Press through your heels and extend your arms down to explode off the ground, jumping as high as you can (b). Land as softly as you can with your knees bent. Reset your body as fast as possible and repeat (c).
Beginner alternative: Not up for jumping? Dewar recommends bodyweight speed squats. “Jump squats and other power and speed-focused movements are amazing for developing new fast twitch muscle fibers,” he says. By upping the speed you’ll also be maximizing your calorie and fat burn, which translates to weight loss.

Side Lunges

How to: Stand straight up with your feet hip-width apart, hands on your hips or at your sides. With your abs tight, and hips pointing forward, take a big step to your right and bend your right knee 90 degrees (a). Driving through your right heel, return to the starting position (b). Next, do the same with your left leg (c).
Beginner alternative: Lie down on your side to work the glutes and thighs with side leg raises. With both legs straight and the glutes and abs engaged, lift the top leg one to two feet off the ground, hold, and return to starting position.

Rotational Push-Ups

How to: Start in perfect push-up position. Hands should be about shoulder-width apart and directly underneath your shoulders. Your body should be in a perfectly straight line, from your heels to the top of your head (a). Perform a push-up (b). Then while keeping your feet in place, twist your torso to the right and lift your right arm straight above your body so your left and right arm are in a perfect line (c). Return to starting position. Repeat and alternate your left and right sides (d).
Beginner alternative: If you haven’t mastered the basic push-up, try these beginner-friendly variations first. Go at your own pace — you’ll be working the same muscle groups and feeling the burn!

RELATED: 50 Butt Exercises to Sculpt Stronger Glutes

Bodyweight Workout: 10-Minute Cardio Blast

[caption id="attachment_65736" align="alignnone" width="620"]Bodyweight Workout: 10-Minute Cardio Blast Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Mountain Climbers

How to: Start in a push-up position with your hands directly underneath your shoulders (a). Keeping your butt down and your whole body as flat as possible, bringing your right knee in towards your chest, then your left knee. Repeat at a rapid pace (b). If you’re feeling this in your abs and shoulders you’re doing it right!
Beginner alternative: If the leg action has you gassed, simply hold the top of a push-up (aka a high plank). You’ll fire up your abdominals, not to mention your shoulders, glutes and legs! Alternating mountain climbers, in particular, help target your obliques and allow muscles to take over your love handles.

RELATED: 5 Mountain Climbers for Seriously Sculpted Abs

Bird Dog Crunches

How to: Begin on all fours with your hands flat on the ground directly beneath your shoulders (a). While keeping a flat back, reach your right arm out while pushing your left leg back. Think of flexing your left glute and your right shoulder as you fully extend (b). Hold that position for a second before using your core to pull your leg and arm back into your body so that your right elbow comes close to your left knee (c). Complete 10 reps and then switch sides (d). Check out this video demo!
Beginner alternative: Lie on your back for dead bugs. (See #4 here.) As you raise your right hand to meet your left foot, engage your abs while resisting arching your back. 

Burpees

How to: Everybody's favorite exercise… burpees. Start in a standing position (a). Squat down and put your hands on the floor, about shoulder-width apart (b). Keeping your hands there, jump your feet back so you are in the push-up position (c). Next jump your feet back towards your hands (d). Reset your body into the squat position and jump straight up. Once you land, repeat (e).
Beginner alternative: If you need to take things down a notch, step back into the push-up position, one foot at a time, and eliminate the jump once you step back up to standing. A common HIIT finisher, these calorie-torching exercises are one of the best ways to help burn fat and build muscle long after you've worked out.

RELATED: 7 Kick-Butt Burpee Variations You’ll Love to Hate

Bodyweight Workout 10-Minute HIIT Circuit

[caption id="attachment_65738" align="alignnone" width="620"]Fat-Blasting Bodyweight Exercises Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Reverse Lunges

How to: Time to hit the legs! Start in a standing position with your feet about hip-width apart (a). With your hands on your hips take one step back with your right leg and drop into a lunge. Your left leg should make a 90-degree angle at the knee (b). From the lunge position stand back up straight and repeat with the left leg (c).
Beginner alternative: Place a chair next to you for support as you perform the same move as detailed above. Lower as far as you can go and return to standing.

RELATED: 4 Lower Body Moves You Can Do in Front of the TV

Single-Leg Glute Bridges

How to: Lie on your back, arms at your sides with your palms facing up. Bend your left knee and bring your left foot flat on the ground, close to your butt. Your right leg should be straight and off the ground (a). Pushing through your left heel, lift your hips until your body forms a straight line from your upper body to your knee. You should feel your hamstrings and glutes doing most of the work (b). Hold the top position for a full second and return to the starting position. Repeat for 10 reps then switch legs (c).
Beginner alternative: Need a little more grounding? Try a two-leg glute bridge, with both feet planted firmly for support. As in the above progression, you'll strengthen your core, glutes and hamstrings, all in one efficient, no-equipment move.

Side Plank Leg Raises

How to: Lie on your side and prop yourself up onto your left forearm, with the side of your left foot on the ground, right foot stacked on top of it. Your body should be in a straight line (a). Raise your right arm straight up towards the sky (see video demo here) (b). Next, lift your right leg up and hold for a second. Return to the starting side plank position and repeat (c).
Beginner alternative: Take it down a notch with a simple side plank with the top hand placed on your hip. Hold for 20-30 seconds, and slowly work your way up to raising the top hand overhead.

RELATED: 5 Planks, 10 Minutes: Your Ultimate Abs Workout

Made it through all three workouts? These bodyweight circuits are simple (but not easy!) way to help you build strength and burn fat — and lose weight. Feel yourself progressing? Try this 20-minute MetCon workout on for size.

Originally posted September 2015. Updated February 2018. 

Read More
HIIT It Hard with These 27 Beginner Workouts and Tips
50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core
5 Easy Arm Exercises for an Awesome 30-Minute Workout

The post Got 10 Minutes? 3 Fat-Blasting Bodyweight Workouts appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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Got 10 Minutes? 3 Fat-Blasting Bodyweight Workouts

[caption id="attachment_65734" align="alignnone" width="620"]Got 10 Minutes? 3 Fat-Blasting Bodyweight Workouts Photo: Pond5[/caption] If you think your gym’s exercise machines don’t look too different than the characters from the latest Transformers movie, you’re not alone. All those levers and cables and pins can have you running for the exit. But before you flip the script in the name of gymtimidation, remember that there's one piece of equipment that's consistently better than the rest: Your own body. That's right, your very own physique is the best and most versatile piece of fitness equipment you can use. According to Certified Strength and Conditioning Coach Mike Dewar of J2Fit, by performing bodyweight exercises and movements, you'll not only improve your balance and conditioning, you'll also start building muscle. And the more muscle you have, the more calories and fat your body will naturally burn. RELATED: 5 Killer Cardio Workouts That Don't Involve Running What’s more, Dewar stresses the importance of the body awareness and stability that comes from bodyweight training. “Without the ability to control your body in space, you can set yourself up for injury." Got 10 minutes to get a jump on your fitness? We thought so. That’s why we’ve put together three 10-minute bodyweight workouts fit for any experience level. Choose one today, another tomorrow, and you’ve got an easy way to get your sweat on anytime, anywhere.

Try These 3 Bodyweight Exercises

Perform these routines as a standalone workout, or add them to the end of your regular weight training or cardio workout as a "finisher." Find certain moves too challenging? Each circuit can be easily modified to suit your needs (or spatial limitations). And while Dewar recommends resting 60 seconds between each round, take as much (or as little) time as you need. Now clear a spot in your living room, or claim a corner of your park or gym — it’s go time! RELATED: 275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine

Bodyweight Workout: 10-Minute Tone Up

[caption id="attachment_65735" align="alignnone" width="620"]Bodyweight Workout: 10-Minute Tone Up Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Squat Jumps

How to: Start by standing straight up with your feet flat on the ground, hip-width apart. Keeping your arms straight out in front of you, drop into a squat position, keeping your back straight and your chest up (a). Press through your heels and extend your arms down to explode off the ground, jumping as high as you can (b). Land as softly as you can with your knees bent. Reset your body as fast as possible and repeat (c). Beginner alternative: Not up for jumping? Dewar recommends bodyweight speed squats. “Jump squats and other power and speed-focused movements are amazing for developing new fast twitch muscle fibers,” he says. By upping the speed you’ll also be maximizing your calorie and fat burn, which translates to weight loss.

Side Lunges

How to: Stand straight up with your feet hip-width apart, hands on your hips or at your sides. With your abs tight, and hips pointing forward, take a big step to your right and bend your right knee 90 degrees (a). Driving through your right heel, return to the starting position (b). Next, do the same with your left leg (c). Beginner alternative: Lie down on your side to work the glutes and thighs with side leg raises. With both legs straight and the glutes and abs engaged, lift the top leg one to two feet off the ground, hold, and return to starting position.

Rotational Push-Ups

How to: Start in perfect push-up position. Hands should be about shoulder-width apart and directly underneath your shoulders. Your body should be in a perfectly straight line, from your heels to the top of your head (a). Perform a push-up (b). Then while keeping your feet in place, twist your torso to the right and lift your right arm straight above your body so your left and right arm are in a perfect line (c). Return to starting position. Repeat and alternate your left and right sides (d). Beginner alternative: If you haven’t mastered the basic push-up, try these beginner-friendly variations first. Go at your own pace — you’ll be working the same muscle groups and feeling the burn! RELATED: 50 Butt Exercises to Sculpt Stronger Glutes

Bodyweight Workout: 10-Minute Cardio Blast

[caption id="attachment_65736" align="alignnone" width="620"]Bodyweight Workout: 10-Minute Cardio Blast Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Mountain Climbers

How to: Start in a push-up position with your hands directly underneath your shoulders (a). Keeping your butt down and your whole body as flat as possible, bringing your right knee in towards your chest, then your left knee. Repeat at a rapid pace (b). If you’re feeling this in your abs and shoulders you’re doing it right! Beginner alternative: If the leg action has you gassed, simply hold the top of a push-up (aka a high plank). You’ll fire up your abdominals, not to mention your shoulders, glutes and legs! Alternating mountain climbers, in particular, help target your obliques and allow muscles to take over your love handles. RELATED: 5 Mountain Climbers for Seriously Sculpted Abs

Bird Dog Crunches

How to: Begin on all fours with your hands flat on the ground directly beneath your shoulders (a). While keeping a flat back, reach your right arm out while pushing your left leg back. Think of flexing your left glute and your right shoulder as you fully extend (b). Hold that position for a second before using your core to pull your leg and arm back into your body so that your right elbow comes close to your left knee (c). Complete 10 reps and then switch sides (d). Check out this video demo! Beginner alternative: Lie on your back for dead bugs. (See #4 here.) As you raise your right hand to meet your left foot, engage your abs while resisting arching your back. 

Burpees

How to: Everybody's favorite exercise… burpees. Start in a standing position (a). Squat down and put your hands on the floor, about shoulder-width apart (b). Keeping your hands there, jump your feet back so you are in the push-up position (c). Next jump your feet back towards your hands (d). Reset your body into the squat position and jump straight up. Once you land, repeat (e). Beginner alternative: If you need to take things down a notch, step back into the push-up position, one foot at a time, and eliminate the jump once you step back up to standing. A common HIIT finisher, these calorie-torching exercises are one of the best ways to help burn fat and build muscle long after you've worked out. RELATED: 7 Kick-Butt Burpee Variations You’ll Love to Hate

Bodyweight Workout 10-Minute HIIT Circuit

[caption id="attachment_65738" align="alignnone" width="620"]Fat-Blasting Bodyweight Exercises Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Reverse Lunges

How to: Time to hit the legs! Start in a standing position with your feet about hip-width apart (a). With your hands on your hips take one step back with your right leg and drop into a lunge. Your left leg should make a 90-degree angle at the knee (b). From the lunge position stand back up straight and repeat with the left leg (c). Beginner alternative: Place a chair next to you for support as you perform the same move as detailed above. Lower as far as you can go and return to standing. RELATED: 4 Lower Body Moves You Can Do in Front of the TV

Single-Leg Glute Bridges

How to: Lie on your back, arms at your sides with your palms facing up. Bend your left knee and bring your left foot flat on the ground, close to your butt. Your right leg should be straight and off the ground (a). Pushing through your left heel, lift your hips until your body forms a straight line from your upper body to your knee. You should feel your hamstrings and glutes doing most of the work (b). Hold the top position for a full second and return to the starting position. Repeat for 10 reps then switch legs (c). Beginner alternative: Need a little more grounding? Try a two-leg glute bridge, with both feet planted firmly for support. As in the above progression, you'll strengthen your core, glutes and hamstrings, all in one efficient, no-equipment move.

Side Plank Leg Raises

How to: Lie on your side and prop yourself up onto your left forearm, with the side of your left foot on the ground, right foot stacked on top of it. Your body should be in a straight line (a). Raise your right arm straight up towards the sky (see video demo here) (b). Next, lift your right leg up and hold for a second. Return to the starting side plank position and repeat (c). Beginner alternative: Take it down a notch with a simple side plank with the top hand placed on your hip. Hold for 20-30 seconds, and slowly work your way up to raising the top hand overhead. RELATED: 5 Planks, 10 Minutes: Your Ultimate Abs Workout Made it through all three workouts? These bodyweight circuits are simple (but not easy!) way to help you build strength and burn fat — and lose weight. Feel yourself progressing? Try this 20-minute MetCon workout on for size. Originally posted September 2015. Updated February 2018.  Read More HIIT It Hard with These 27 Beginner Workouts and Tips 50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core 5 Easy Arm Exercises for an Awesome 30-Minute Workout

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9 Ways to Torch Your Core in Every Workout http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/core-workout-strength-exercises/ Wed, 14 Feb 2018 12:15:39 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=65687 9 Ways to Get a Core Workout in Every Workout

[caption id="attachment_65699" align="alignnone" width="620"]9 Ways to Get a Core Workout in Every Workout Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

At the core of every movement is just that: your core. And while lots of times “core” and “abs” become synonymous, it’s not 100% correct to use them interchangeably. Your rectus abdominus, transverse abdominus and obliques do comprise your midsection, but those aren’t the only muscles involved. Your back, hips and glutes also provide that stable base you need for stepping forward and backward, jumping side-to-side or turning all about. So to get a serious core workout you need to work them all.

“Core strength and stability not only enhances physical and athletic performance, but also helps maintain and correct posture and form, and prevent injury,” says Andia Winslow, a Daily Burn Audio Workouts trainer. “Those who have an awareness of their core and ability to engage it properly also have enhanced proprioception — or a sense of the positions of their extremities, without actually seeing them.”

Just picture elite athlete’s movement, Winslow explains, and how rhythmic and easy they travel through space, often in several planes of motion at the same time. They can thank strong trunk muscles for that. “Core should be a focus in every workout,” Winslow says. “Workouts won’t be as effective without proper core engagement.”

That’s not to say crunches need a permanent place in your sweat sessions. You can easily sneak in added core challenges during other common exercises. “When folks elect to add difficulty to workouts, they often increase weight, repetition or duration. Another — and often more effective — way to increase the intensity is by altering stance, ground contact, and/or dynamic variance equipment [think: sand or water],” Winslow says. Shifting your weight, testing your balance, or focusing on sticking a landing, all engage your middle more.

Learn how to get a solid core workout in every strength session with these sneaky midsection-scorching strategies from Winslow.

RELATED: 50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core

Strength Tips: How to Work Your Core in Every Workout

[caption id="attachment_65700" align="alignnone" width="620"]Core Workout Challenges: Add Weight Overhead Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

1. Add weight overhead. 

Whether you’re doing squats or lunges, Winslow suggests pushing or holding a weight overhead — or even just keeping your arms straight up — to activate your abs and shoulders. These muscle groups have to work harder to keep your spine in a neutral position so you don’t over-arch, straining your low back. Translation: Put your hands in the air like you really care (about your core workout).

2. Hold your step-ups and pull-ups.

Stepping up onto a bench, chair or box requires you to use one leg, driving off your heel to reach the top. While balancing on one limb already works your core to keep you upright, Winslow explains that pausing at the top (with knee raised) will incorporate your midsection more. When you stand up, simply hold for a two- to five-second count, then go back down.

Same strategy holds (literally!) for chin-ups and pull-ups. By pausing with your chin at the bar, your core fires to keep you steady and in one solid line. Leg or arm day turned core workout.

RELATED: 6 Exercises for the Ultimate Back and Chest Workout

[caption id="attachment_65701" align="alignnone" width="620"]Core Workout Challenges: Stick a Single-Leg Box Jump Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

3. Stick a single-leg landing on box jumps.

To crank up the core work in a box jump, start by bringing the hop height down. Then, keep the explosive leap to one leg and really stick the landing. (Hold it at the top for one to three seconds before standing up and stepping off.) One full-body exercise at its finest.

4. Do a single-arm dumbbell press or fly.

Make your arm and ab routine go hand-in-hand. Moving one arm at a time in exercises like a dumbbell press or fly, drives your midsection to work against the rotation to keep your hips square and your back straight. This will work whether you’re standing or lying on your back. Lift your hips into a bridge and you target your glutes, too. So many muscles; so much less time.

RELATED: 5 Planks, 10 Minutes: Your Ultimate Abs Workout

[caption id="attachment_65702" align="alignnone" width="620"]Core Workout Challenges: Go for a Twist Photo: Daily Burn 365[/caption]

5. Go for a twist. 

We tend to rotate in multiple directions all day, from turning to give a fellow studio mate a high five to twisting around to chat with a co-worker. But to keep that movement safe, your core needs enough strength to prop you upright and protect the spine. Enter: rotational exercises to build stability. Try twisting your torso at the top of a step-up or the bottom of a front or side lunge, so your body learns to better handle those turns you take throughout the day.

6. Throw punches during wall sits.

Turn a static wall sit into a full-body exercise by getting your arms involved. Simply extend your arms out in front of you to turn on your abs and arms. Or throw some ‘bows to up the cardio element, too.

RELATED: 6 Plyometric Exercises for a No-Running Cardio Workout

[caption id="attachment_65703" align="alignnone" width="620"]Core Workout Challenges: Lift a Limb in Plank Photo: Daily Burn 365[/caption]

7. Lift a limb in planks.

It’s no secret that planks target your entire core. But pick up an arm, leg, or better yet both — and bam — a bigger burn. That’s because removing one base of support causes your abs, back muscles and legs to work harder to keep you in one straight line, Winslow says. This same principle holds true for push-ups, too. Pick one foot off the ground as you go and your middle will light up. Even tougher…a single-arm push-up.

8. Stand on one foot during arm exercises.

So you want to strengthen your shoulders or build your biceps? Well, you might as well get your core workout in as well. As you do shoulder presses, bicep curls or triceps extensions, stand on one leg. Not only will your abs and back work to keep you upright with a straight spine, the glutes in your standing leg will also go into overdrive to maintain stability. More muscles engaged equals more calories burned.

RELATED: This Is How to Get Toned Arms

9. Grab a sandbag.

Use any equipment that brings a varying dynamic (aka without a solid surface) and it forces you to get extra sweaty as you try to keep steady. For instance, as the sand in a sandbag moves around while you push, pull or throw it, the stability challenge skyrockets. The same goes for BOSU or stability balls.

Read More
Quick Lower Ab Exercises for a Stronger Core
Hate Crunches? 6 Better Core Exercises for Beginners
5 Stability Ball Exercises for a Crazy Strong Core

The post 9 Ways to Torch Your Core in Every Workout appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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9 Ways to Get a Core Workout in Every Workout

[caption id="attachment_65699" align="alignnone" width="620"]9 Ways to Get a Core Workout in Every Workout Photo: Twenty20[/caption] At the core of every movement is just that: your core. And while lots of times “core” and “abs” become synonymous, it’s not 100% correct to use them interchangeably. Your rectus abdominus, transverse abdominus and obliques do comprise your midsection, but those aren’t the only muscles involved. Your back, hips and glutes also provide that stable base you need for stepping forward and backward, jumping side-to-side or turning all about. So to get a serious core workout you need to work them all. “Core strength and stability not only enhances physical and athletic performance, but also helps maintain and correct posture and form, and prevent injury,” says Andia Winslow, a Daily Burn Audio Workouts trainer. “Those who have an awareness of their core and ability to engage it properly also have enhanced proprioception — or a sense of the positions of their extremities, without actually seeing them.” Just picture elite athlete’s movement, Winslow explains, and how rhythmic and easy they travel through space, often in several planes of motion at the same time. They can thank strong trunk muscles for that. “Core should be a focus in every workout,” Winslow says. “Workouts won’t be as effective without proper core engagement.” That’s not to say crunches need a permanent place in your sweat sessions. You can easily sneak in added core challenges during other common exercises. “When folks elect to add difficulty to workouts, they often increase weight, repetition or duration. Another — and often more effective — way to increase the intensity is by altering stance, ground contact, and/or dynamic variance equipment [think: sand or water],” Winslow says. Shifting your weight, testing your balance, or focusing on sticking a landing, all engage your middle more. Learn how to get a solid core workout in every strength session with these sneaky midsection-scorching strategies from Winslow. RELATED: 50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core

Strength Tips: How to Work Your Core in Every Workout

[caption id="attachment_65700" align="alignnone" width="620"]Core Workout Challenges: Add Weight Overhead Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

1. Add weight overhead. 

Whether you’re doing squats or lunges, Winslow suggests pushing or holding a weight overhead — or even just keeping your arms straight up — to activate your abs and shoulders. These muscle groups have to work harder to keep your spine in a neutral position so you don’t over-arch, straining your low back. Translation: Put your hands in the air like you really care (about your core workout).

2. Hold your step-ups and pull-ups.

Stepping up onto a bench, chair or box requires you to use one leg, driving off your heel to reach the top. While balancing on one limb already works your core to keep you upright, Winslow explains that pausing at the top (with knee raised) will incorporate your midsection more. When you stand up, simply hold for a two- to five-second count, then go back down. Same strategy holds (literally!) for chin-ups and pull-ups. By pausing with your chin at the bar, your core fires to keep you steady and in one solid line. Leg or arm day turned core workout. RELATED: 6 Exercises for the Ultimate Back and Chest Workout [caption id="attachment_65701" align="alignnone" width="620"]Core Workout Challenges: Stick a Single-Leg Box Jump Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

3. Stick a single-leg landing on box jumps.

To crank up the core work in a box jump, start by bringing the hop height down. Then, keep the explosive leap to one leg and really stick the landing. (Hold it at the top for one to three seconds before standing up and stepping off.) One full-body exercise at its finest.

4. Do a single-arm dumbbell press or fly.

Make your arm and ab routine go hand-in-hand. Moving one arm at a time in exercises like a dumbbell press or fly, drives your midsection to work against the rotation to keep your hips square and your back straight. This will work whether you’re standing or lying on your back. Lift your hips into a bridge and you target your glutes, too. So many muscles; so much less time. RELATED: 5 Planks, 10 Minutes: Your Ultimate Abs Workout [caption id="attachment_65702" align="alignnone" width="620"]Core Workout Challenges: Go for a Twist Photo: Daily Burn 365[/caption]

5. Go for a twist. 

We tend to rotate in multiple directions all day, from turning to give a fellow studio mate a high five to twisting around to chat with a co-worker. But to keep that movement safe, your core needs enough strength to prop you upright and protect the spine. Enter: rotational exercises to build stability. Try twisting your torso at the top of a step-up or the bottom of a front or side lunge, so your body learns to better handle those turns you take throughout the day.

6. Throw punches during wall sits.

Turn a static wall sit into a full-body exercise by getting your arms involved. Simply extend your arms out in front of you to turn on your abs and arms. Or throw some ‘bows to up the cardio element, too. RELATED: 6 Plyometric Exercises for a No-Running Cardio Workout [caption id="attachment_65703" align="alignnone" width="620"]Core Workout Challenges: Lift a Limb in Plank Photo: Daily Burn 365[/caption]

7. Lift a limb in planks.

It’s no secret that planks target your entire core. But pick up an arm, leg, or better yet both — and bam — a bigger burn. That’s because removing one base of support causes your abs, back muscles and legs to work harder to keep you in one straight line, Winslow says. This same principle holds true for push-ups, too. Pick one foot off the ground as you go and your middle will light up. Even tougher…a single-arm push-up.

8. Stand on one foot during arm exercises.

So you want to strengthen your shoulders or build your biceps? Well, you might as well get your core workout in as well. As you do shoulder presses, bicep curls or triceps extensions, stand on one leg. Not only will your abs and back work to keep you upright with a straight spine, the glutes in your standing leg will also go into overdrive to maintain stability. More muscles engaged equals more calories burned. RELATED: This Is How to Get Toned Arms

9. Grab a sandbag.

Use any equipment that brings a varying dynamic (aka without a solid surface) and it forces you to get extra sweaty as you try to keep steady. For instance, as the sand in a sandbag moves around while you push, pull or throw it, the stability challenge skyrockets. The same goes for BOSU or stability balls. Read More Quick Lower Ab Exercises for a Stronger Core Hate Crunches? 6 Better Core Exercises for Beginners 5 Stability Ball Exercises for a Crazy Strong Core

The post 9 Ways to Torch Your Core in Every Workout appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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5 Plank Variations to Get Hardcore Abs http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/plank-exercises-for-abs/ Tue, 13 Feb 2018 12:15:17 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=65626

[caption id="attachment_65692" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Plank Exercises for Hardcore Abs Photos: Daily Burn[/caption]

Planking in strange places might have been a social media fad of the mid 2000s, but doing plank exercises for abs as a means of strengthening your core? That’s here to stay. The trend did have one thing right — in order to perfect the plank, you need full-body engagement to create stiff-as-a-board stability. But to really work your entire body (no, it’s not just an ab exercise!) and blast more calories, you need to add a little movement to your planks. Goodbye plateau; hello all-over strength!

Before you take on new variations, make sure you can master holding a straight line from the crown of your head to your heels, with shoulders over elbows (or wrists if you're in a high plank), says Prince Brathwaite, a Daily Burn 365 trainer and founder of Trooper Fitness. “If you’re unable to keep your hips in line with your head and feet, then you should regress,” he says. Placing your knees on the ground is a good place to start. And if you can stop that straight line from breaking for one full minute, it’s time to switch it up.

Here, Brathwaite offers five ways to progress your plank exercises so you keep challenging your core — without results fading as quick as a fad.

RELATED: 5 Planks, 10 Minutes: Your Ultimate Abs Workout

Plank Exercises That Go Beyond the Basic

When holding a solid straight-body plank for 60 seconds feels as easy as lying on the couch, it’s time put your body to the movement test. Follow this line-up of five plank exercises from Brathwaite to keep it progressing — meaning your muscles will trample plateaus. As soon as one exercise feels easy, work on mastering the next.

[caption id="attachment_65680" align="alignnone" width="620"]Plank Exercises Progression: Step Out Plank GIFs: Daily Burn[/caption]

1. Step Out Plank

Step one: Add some movement to that isometric hold. By lifting a leg, you’re forced to work harder to keep your trunk and hips steady, counteracting the movement in your lower half.

How to: Start in a forearm plank position (a). Tap your right foot out to the side, a little wider than hip-width, then step it right back (b). Tap your left foot out to the side, a little wider than hip-width, then step it back (c). Continue alternating.

RELATED: 3 Plyometric Planks You Need to Try ASAP

Plank Exercises Progression: Arm Raise Plank

2. Arm Raise Plank 

Time to balance on three limps. Once again, your core has to fire to keep your body still as you pick up one arm, then the other.

How to: Start in a forearm plank position (a). Keeping your hips squared to the ground and lower half stable, lift your right arm straight up to shoulder height. Then lower it back down (b). Lift your left arm straight up to shoulder height, then place it back down (c). Continue switching arms.

Plank Exercises Progression: Arm and Leg Raise Plank

3. Arm and Leg Raise Plank

The anti-rotation test just took an even more difficult turn. “Naturally, your hips will want to twist to find the path of least resistance,” says Brathwaite. “Your job: Maintain parallel hips and minimal movement in your midsection.” Challenge, accepted.

How to: Start in a forearm plank position (a). Lift your left arm and right leg straight up to shoulder and hip height. Pause for a second, then lower them back to the starting position (b). Next, lift your right arm and left leg straight up to shoulder and hip height, pause, then place them back down (c). Continue alternating.

RELATED: 50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core

Plank Exercises Progression: Star Plank

4. Star Plank

As they say, one simple change can lead to big benefits — and a serious burn. Just by stepping your hands out an inch or two in front of your shoulders, you’ll really torch your core as you fight to stay stable.

How to: Start in a high push-up plank position (a). Step one hand a few inches in front of your shoulder, then the other hand — and hold it there. Your body should remain in one straight line, with full-body muscle engagement (b). Work on holding this position for 60 seconds without breaking form.

Plank Exercises Progression: High Low Star Plank

5. High Low Star Plank

Meet the star plank, but with extra star (err, sweat) power. Walking your hands forward and backward means even more muscles work (hello, shoulders and back) and you slash more calories.

How to: Start in a forearm plank position (a). Press up onto one hand as you step it out a few inches in front of your shoulder, then do the same on the other (b). Next, step one hand back and go back down onto your forearm, so your elbow is under your shoulder. Then repeat with the other arm (c). Continue stepping your hands forward and backward, going from forearm plank to star plank, and keeping your body in one straight line.

Read More
Ab Challenge: 5 Planks to Sculpt Your Core
Hate Crunches? 6 Better Core Exercises for Beginners
Quick Lower Ab Exercises for a Stronger Core

The post 5 Plank Variations to Get Hardcore Abs appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>

[caption id="attachment_65692" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Plank Exercises for Hardcore Abs Photos: Daily Burn[/caption] Planking in strange places might have been a social media fad of the mid 2000s, but doing plank exercises for abs as a means of strengthening your core? That’s here to stay. The trend did have one thing right — in order to perfect the plank, you need full-body engagement to create stiff-as-a-board stability. But to really work your entire body (no, it’s not just an ab exercise!) and blast more calories, you need to add a little movement to your planks. Goodbye plateau; hello all-over strength! Before you take on new variations, make sure you can master holding a straight line from the crown of your head to your heels, with shoulders over elbows (or wrists if you're in a high plank), says Prince Brathwaite, a Daily Burn 365 trainer and founder of Trooper Fitness. “If you’re unable to keep your hips in line with your head and feet, then you should regress,” he says. Placing your knees on the ground is a good place to start. And if you can stop that straight line from breaking for one full minute, it’s time to switch it up. Here, Brathwaite offers five ways to progress your plank exercises so you keep challenging your core — without results fading as quick as a fad. RELATED: 5 Planks, 10 Minutes: Your Ultimate Abs Workout

Plank Exercises That Go Beyond the Basic

When holding a solid straight-body plank for 60 seconds feels as easy as lying on the couch, it’s time put your body to the movement test. Follow this line-up of five plank exercises from Brathwaite to keep it progressing — meaning your muscles will trample plateaus. As soon as one exercise feels easy, work on mastering the next. [caption id="attachment_65680" align="alignnone" width="620"]Plank Exercises Progression: Step Out Plank GIFs: Daily Burn[/caption]

1. Step Out Plank

Step one: Add some movement to that isometric hold. By lifting a leg, you’re forced to work harder to keep your trunk and hips steady, counteracting the movement in your lower half. How to: Start in a forearm plank position (a). Tap your right foot out to the side, a little wider than hip-width, then step it right back (b). Tap your left foot out to the side, a little wider than hip-width, then step it back (c). Continue alternating. RELATED: 3 Plyometric Planks You Need to Try ASAP Plank Exercises Progression: Arm Raise Plank

2. Arm Raise Plank 

Time to balance on three limps. Once again, your core has to fire to keep your body still as you pick up one arm, then the other. How to: Start in a forearm plank position (a). Keeping your hips squared to the ground and lower half stable, lift your right arm straight up to shoulder height. Then lower it back down (b). Lift your left arm straight up to shoulder height, then place it back down (c). Continue switching arms. Plank Exercises Progression: Arm and Leg Raise Plank

3. Arm and Leg Raise Plank

The anti-rotation test just took an even more difficult turn. “Naturally, your hips will want to twist to find the path of least resistance,” says Brathwaite. “Your job: Maintain parallel hips and minimal movement in your midsection.” Challenge, accepted. How to: Start in a forearm plank position (a). Lift your left arm and right leg straight up to shoulder and hip height. Pause for a second, then lower them back to the starting position (b). Next, lift your right arm and left leg straight up to shoulder and hip height, pause, then place them back down (c). Continue alternating. RELATED: 50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core Plank Exercises Progression: Star Plank

4. Star Plank

As they say, one simple change can lead to big benefits — and a serious burn. Just by stepping your hands out an inch or two in front of your shoulders, you’ll really torch your core as you fight to stay stable. How to: Start in a high push-up plank position (a). Step one hand a few inches in front of your shoulder, then the other hand — and hold it there. Your body should remain in one straight line, with full-body muscle engagement (b). Work on holding this position for 60 seconds without breaking form. Plank Exercises Progression: High Low Star Plank

5. High Low Star Plank

Meet the star plank, but with extra star (err, sweat) power. Walking your hands forward and backward means even more muscles work (hello, shoulders and back) and you slash more calories. How to: Start in a forearm plank position (a). Press up onto one hand as you step it out a few inches in front of your shoulder, then do the same on the other (b). Next, step one hand back and go back down onto your forearm, so your elbow is under your shoulder. Then repeat with the other arm (c). Continue stepping your hands forward and backward, going from forearm plank to star plank, and keeping your body in one straight line. Read More Ab Challenge: 5 Planks to Sculpt Your Core Hate Crunches? 6 Better Core Exercises for Beginners Quick Lower Ab Exercises for a Stronger Core

The post 5 Plank Variations to Get Hardcore Abs appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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15 Home Workouts from the Fittest Trainers We Know http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/home-workouts-trainers/ Mon, 12 Feb 2018 12:15:41 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=65629 15 Home Workouts from the Fittest Trainers We Know

[caption id="attachment_65636" align="alignnone" width="620"]15 Home Workouts from the Fittest Trainers We Know Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

You’re traveling. You had a bad day at work. You’re beyond busy. It’s snowing outside. While these might sound like perfectly good reasons to take a rest day, leave it to trainers to find a way to push through. And deep down, you know you’ll be missing out on those health-boosting, feel-good vibes, too.

Their foolproof solution: working out right at home. And we found 15 trainers who’ll show you just how easy — and fun — it is to do it. From 20-minute HIIT workouts to 10-minute ab circuits, here are some of the best home workout ideas from the top fitness pros.

RELATED: 275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine

The 15 Best Home Workouts from Top Trainers

https://www.instagram.com/p/BdF1fcTl5qF/?taken-by=kaisafit

1. Kaisa Keranen

Certified trainer and movement coach
No dumbbells? No problem. Here, the Seattle-based sports performance coach shows us how to take your at-home workout to boiling temps with, yup, a cooking pot. From single-leg deadlifts to pistol squats to Russian twists, you’ll fire up your glutes, core, shoulders and arms. Hey, they don’t say six-packs are made in the kitchen for no reason. 

https://www.instagram.com/p/BdIVIzFhlUs/?taken-by=alexsilverfagan

2. Alex Silver-Fagan

Trainer and author of Get Strong for Women: Lift Heavy, Train Hard, See Results
Silver-Fagan might be best known for her gritty barbell workouts, but in this at-home flow, we see a softer side to the certified yogi. On your recovery days, get your om on and stretch things out with warrior III, eagle and dancer.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BRn--tkANKD/?taken-by=adamrosante

3. Adam Rosante

Trainer and founder of the People’s Bootcamp
Cold temps keeping your workouts indoors? It’s no excuse to take a snow day, according to Rosante. Complete with burpees, froggers and spiderman planks, consider this your winter bodyweight burner.

RELATED: The 25 Craziest Workout Excuses Trainers Have Ever Heard

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bb2X9rHBBoF/?taken-by=kirastokesfit

4. Kira Stokes

Celebrity trainer and creator of the Stoked Method
Want to squeeze in a workout while your slow cooker works its magic? “Your kitchen can transform into a gym,” Stokes says. Using the edge of a counter as a “barre,” Stokes shows Fuller House star Candace Bure how to do knee pulses and tricep push-ups. For bicep curls and shoulder presses, get creative and hold onto something heavy, like bottles of wine (no sips between sets, please!).

https://www.instagram.com/p/BYindLqA7DF/?taken-by=harleypasternak

5. Harley Pasternak

Celebrity trainer
No ab muscle goes untouched in this total-ab circuit. From your obliques (spider planks) to your low abs (pike planks), follow Pasternak’s lead to ignite every inch of your core.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BcFZImglDjq/?taken-by=bjgaddour

6. BJ Gaddour

Founder of TheDailyBJ.com and Bodyweight Burners trainer
Gaddour loves to maximize time and space at home with compound exercises. In this dumbbell workout, Gaddour combines step-ups with squats and bent-over rows with bicep curls and shoulder presses. Now, what to do with all that extra time on your hands?

RELATED: The 20 Worst People at the Gym, According to Trainers

https://www.instagram.com/p/BYeKqvoBcFb/?taken-by=seangarner

7. Sean Garner

Functional strength coach
Resistance bands may look pretty basic, but they’re one of the most powerful pieces of exercise equipment. Garner gets his kids in on band action with front raises, glute bridges and overhead presses. Just beware of the slingshot effect...

https://www.instagram.com/p/BaJ6zT7g1yn/?taken-by=anjagarcia

8. Anja Garcia

Daily Burn Undefeated trainer
Beach weather might feel like a lifetime ago, but Garcia’s bikini workout reminds us of good things to come! Get summer strong with this LA-based trainer’s decline push-ups, sumo squat jumps, hollow holds and more.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BcSo3K7nT3G/?taken-by=thebodycoach

9. Joe Wicks 

Personal trainer and founder of The Body Coach
The #Leanin15 trainer is best known for his quick and healthy dishes, but this ab circuit will have you cookin’ a six pack. Oblique crunches and side plank reach-throughs will keep your sides in check, while the ab roll-up will tighten your deep abdominis.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BbTK9f2hlJc/?taken-by=eshannz

10. Erika Shannon

Daily Burn 365 trainer
If you’re new to kickboxing, Shannon’s at-home workout is sure to get you hooked. The Power Cardio trainer begins this routine with jab-cross combos to work her arms, and then introduces squat crosses to strengthen her glutes. For an extra cardio push, she adds in jumping jacks and kicks between sets.

RELATED: 17 Secret Morning Habits of the Fittest People We Know

https://www.instagram.com/p/BQyMUgRAyFh/?taken-by=melissawoodhealth

11. Melissa Wood

Yoga and Pilates certified trainer
If you follow Woods on Instagram, you know that the yogi is all about mat work. But in this creative “treadmill” workout, Woods uses the cardio machine to do booty-shaping leg lifts and classic barre moves instead. Don’t have a treadmill at home? Use the back of a chair or the edge of your kitchen counter to help prop you up.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BbuHEU9AkAa/?taken-by=peterkrauswi

12. Peter Kraus & Bec Donlan

Founder of Peter Kraus Fitness Bootcamps; Booty Bands trainer at Project by Equinox
Bachelorette alum Kraus pairs up with Aussie fitness star Donlan to tag team this booty band workout you can do at home. From squat touchdowns to reverse lunges to deadlifts, you’ll work your entire lower body and posterior. But no resistance band workout is complete without a core finisher. Standing side crunches help sculpt your obliques and target love handles.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BdKwPWDH8tf/?taken-by=jess.glazer

13. Jess Glazer

Lead trainer at NYSC RedZone and founder of FITtrips
You don’t have to be at the gym to HIIT it hard — your hotel room will do! In this metabolism-boosting workout, Glazer shows us how to do explosive box jumps, plank to pikes and split squats — without leaving the couch.

RELATED: 17 Secret Morning Habits of the Fittest People We Know

https://www.instagram.com/p/BbKg-nNnykJ/?taken-by=melissaparisfitness

14. Melissa Paris

Founder of BYOBFit
A baby bump isn’t stopping Paris from whipping her core into shape. The kettlebell is one of the most challenging pieces of fitness equipment because its center is loaded. Her kettlebell workout takes you through alternating swings and strict presses, so you recruit your glutes as well as your ab muscles for stability and strength.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BYonHSxnUqU/?taken-by=greggcook

15. Gregg Cook

Daily Burn 365 trainer
Cook knows how to double down on time with his daughter: partner push-ups. Except his partner in crime gets coaching duties while dad does all the work! Ten reps later is a tired, but fit papa — and one amused child.

Read More
15 Genius Meal Prep Ideas from Top Trainers
How Trainers Stay on Top of Their Self-Care
8 Exercises Trainers Never Do (And What to Do Instead)

The post 15 Home Workouts from the Fittest Trainers We Know appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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15 Home Workouts from the Fittest Trainers We Know

[caption id="attachment_65636" align="alignnone" width="620"]15 Home Workouts from the Fittest Trainers We Know Photo: Twenty20[/caption] You’re traveling. You had a bad day at work. You’re beyond busy. It’s snowing outside. While these might sound like perfectly good reasons to take a rest day, leave it to trainers to find a way to push through. And deep down, you know you’ll be missing out on those health-boosting, feel-good vibes, too. Their foolproof solution: working out right at home. And we found 15 trainers who’ll show you just how easy — and fun — it is to do it. From 20-minute HIIT workouts to 10-minute ab circuits, here are some of the best home workout ideas from the top fitness pros. RELATED: 275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine

The 15 Best Home Workouts from Top Trainers

https://www.instagram.com/p/BdF1fcTl5qF/?taken-by=kaisafit

1. Kaisa Keranen

Certified trainer and movement coach No dumbbells? No problem. Here, the Seattle-based sports performance coach shows us how to take your at-home workout to boiling temps with, yup, a cooking pot. From single-leg deadlifts to pistol squats to Russian twists, you’ll fire up your glutes, core, shoulders and arms. Hey, they don’t say six-packs are made in the kitchen for no reason.  https://www.instagram.com/p/BdIVIzFhlUs/?taken-by=alexsilverfagan

2. Alex Silver-Fagan

Trainer and author of Get Strong for Women: Lift Heavy, Train Hard, See Results Silver-Fagan might be best known for her gritty barbell workouts, but in this at-home flow, we see a softer side to the certified yogi. On your recovery days, get your om on and stretch things out with warrior III, eagle and dancer. https://www.instagram.com/p/BRn--tkANKD/?taken-by=adamrosante

3. Adam Rosante

Trainer and founder of the People’s Bootcamp Cold temps keeping your workouts indoors? It’s no excuse to take a snow day, according to Rosante. Complete with burpees, froggers and spiderman planks, consider this your winter bodyweight burner. RELATED: The 25 Craziest Workout Excuses Trainers Have Ever Heard https://www.instagram.com/p/Bb2X9rHBBoF/?taken-by=kirastokesfit

4. Kira Stokes

Celebrity trainer and creator of the Stoked Method Want to squeeze in a workout while your slow cooker works its magic? “Your kitchen can transform into a gym,” Stokes says. Using the edge of a counter as a “barre,” Stokes shows Fuller House star Candace Bure how to do knee pulses and tricep push-ups. For bicep curls and shoulder presses, get creative and hold onto something heavy, like bottles of wine (no sips between sets, please!). https://www.instagram.com/p/BYindLqA7DF/?taken-by=harleypasternak

5. Harley Pasternak

Celebrity trainer No ab muscle goes untouched in this total-ab circuit. From your obliques (spider planks) to your low abs (pike planks), follow Pasternak’s lead to ignite every inch of your core. https://www.instagram.com/p/BcFZImglDjq/?taken-by=bjgaddour

6. BJ Gaddour

Founder of TheDailyBJ.com and Bodyweight Burners trainer Gaddour loves to maximize time and space at home with compound exercises. In this dumbbell workout, Gaddour combines step-ups with squats and bent-over rows with bicep curls and shoulder presses. Now, what to do with all that extra time on your hands? RELATED: The 20 Worst People at the Gym, According to Trainers https://www.instagram.com/p/BYeKqvoBcFb/?taken-by=seangarner

7. Sean Garner

Functional strength coach Resistance bands may look pretty basic, but they’re one of the most powerful pieces of exercise equipment. Garner gets his kids in on band action with front raises, glute bridges and overhead presses. Just beware of the slingshot effect... https://www.instagram.com/p/BaJ6zT7g1yn/?taken-by=anjagarcia

8. Anja Garcia

Daily Burn Undefeated trainer Beach weather might feel like a lifetime ago, but Garcia’s bikini workout reminds us of good things to come! Get summer strong with this LA-based trainer’s decline push-ups, sumo squat jumps, hollow holds and more. https://www.instagram.com/p/BcSo3K7nT3G/?taken-by=thebodycoach

9. Joe Wicks 

Personal trainer and founder of The Body Coach The #Leanin15 trainer is best known for his quick and healthy dishes, but this ab circuit will have you cookin’ a six pack. Oblique crunches and side plank reach-throughs will keep your sides in check, while the ab roll-up will tighten your deep abdominis. https://www.instagram.com/p/BbTK9f2hlJc/?taken-by=eshannz

10. Erika Shannon

Daily Burn 365 trainer If you’re new to kickboxing, Shannon’s at-home workout is sure to get you hooked. The Power Cardio trainer begins this routine with jab-cross combos to work her arms, and then introduces squat crosses to strengthen her glutes. For an extra cardio push, she adds in jumping jacks and kicks between sets. RELATED: 17 Secret Morning Habits of the Fittest People We Know https://www.instagram.com/p/BQyMUgRAyFh/?taken-by=melissawoodhealth

11. Melissa Wood

Yoga and Pilates certified trainer If you follow Woods on Instagram, you know that the yogi is all about mat work. But in this creative “treadmill” workout, Woods uses the cardio machine to do booty-shaping leg lifts and classic barre moves instead. Don’t have a treadmill at home? Use the back of a chair or the edge of your kitchen counter to help prop you up. https://www.instagram.com/p/BbuHEU9AkAa/?taken-by=peterkrauswi

12. Peter Kraus & Bec Donlan

Founder of Peter Kraus Fitness Bootcamps; Booty Bands trainer at Project by Equinox Bachelorette alum Kraus pairs up with Aussie fitness star Donlan to tag team this booty band workout you can do at home. From squat touchdowns to reverse lunges to deadlifts, you’ll work your entire lower body and posterior. But no resistance band workout is complete without a core finisher. Standing side crunches help sculpt your obliques and target love handles. https://www.instagram.com/p/BdKwPWDH8tf/?taken-by=jess.glazer

13. Jess Glazer

Lead trainer at NYSC RedZone and founder of FITtrips You don’t have to be at the gym to HIIT it hard — your hotel room will do! In this metabolism-boosting workout, Glazer shows us how to do explosive box jumps, plank to pikes and split squats — without leaving the couch. RELATED: 17 Secret Morning Habits of the Fittest People We Know https://www.instagram.com/p/BbKg-nNnykJ/?taken-by=melissaparisfitness

14. Melissa Paris

Founder of BYOBFit A baby bump isn’t stopping Paris from whipping her core into shape. The kettlebell is one of the most challenging pieces of fitness equipment because its center is loaded. Her kettlebell workout takes you through alternating swings and strict presses, so you recruit your glutes as well as your ab muscles for stability and strength. https://www.instagram.com/p/BYonHSxnUqU/?taken-by=greggcook

15. Gregg Cook

Daily Burn 365 trainer Cook knows how to double down on time with his daughter: partner push-ups. Except his partner in crime gets coaching duties while dad does all the work! Ten reps later is a tired, but fit papa — and one amused child. Read More 15 Genius Meal Prep Ideas from Top Trainers How Trainers Stay on Top of Their Self-Care 8 Exercises Trainers Never Do (And What to Do Instead)

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HIIT It Hard with These 27 Beginner Workouts and Tips http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/hiit-workouts-beginner-tips/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/hiit-workouts-beginner-tips/#respond Thu, 08 Feb 2018 16:15:28 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=58052 25 Beginner HIIT Workouts and Tips to Get in Your Best Shape Ever

[caption id="attachment_65611" align="alignnone" width="620"]27 Beginner HIIT Workouts and Tips to Get in Your Best Shape Ever Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Think of high-intensity interval training (aka HIIT workouts) — where you alternate short bursts of intense exercise and active recovery time — as the workout gift that keeps on giving. First, it’s designed to burn more calories and fat in less time, giving you that excuse-squashing way to squeeze in a sweat. Then, it revs up your heart rate and alters metabolic pathways so much so that you keep torching calories even after you stop moving. So it’s basically the go-to for anyone looking to get fit, strong and slim without dedicating hours to doing so. (Can anyone say no to that?)

The catch: You have to learn how to do it (and recognize whether you're pushing hard enough), give it your all and switch up your approach every now and then. To get you doing just that, we rounded up top resources for making your HIIT workout super effective, fun — and speedy. So whether you're a beginner exerciser or more advanced athlete, you'll HIIT it big with these tips.

RELATED: 50 Running Resources for Speed, Strength and Nutrition

What Is High-Intensity Interval Training (aka HIIT)?

[caption id="attachment_65605" align="alignnone" width="620"]HIIT Workouts: What is High-Intensity Interval Training? Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Before jumping into your first round of intervals, you’ll want a base of knowledge. After all knowing why exactly you’re busting your butt through those crazy-hard intervals will help motivate you to keep pushing forward. Here, some expert insight on the benefits of high-intensity interval training, plus how to make each routine work for you.

HIIT: What It Is and Why It Works

No Time? How Much HIIT You Need to Reap Benefits

7 Ways to Get Fit in Half the Time

EPOC: The Secret to Faster Fat Loss?

Daily Burn’s Inferno HR: Heart Rate Training, Evolved

Meditation Meets HIIT in New Mindful Fitness Approach

7 HIIT Mistakes You're Probably Making

Bodyweight HIIT Workouts: Anytime, Anywhere

[caption id="attachment_65607" align="alignnone" width="620"]HIIT Workouts: Bodyweight Workouts Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn 365[/caption]

One of the awesome benefits of interval training is that you can do it anywhere. These killer bodyweight workouts will rev up your metabolism, whether you’re at the gym, in your hotel or on the beach. No equipment necessary! And beginners, keep in mind they're still totally doable for you.

10-Minute Indoor and Outdoor HIIT Workouts

3 HIIT Workouts to Take to the Beach

HIIT It Hard with BJ Gaddour’s Bodyweight Burners

5 HIIT Exercises to Boost Your VO2 Max

3 Quick HIIT Workouts for Beginners

Plyometric Planks You Need to Try ASAP

3 Plyometric Moves That Turn Up the Burn

5 Exercises for the Perfect Beginner Bodyweight Workout

Cardio Workouts: HIIT and Run

[caption id="attachment_65608" align="alignnone" width="620"]HIIT Workouts: Cardio HIIT Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Beat cardio machine boredom and put some pep to your step with these interval-inspired cardio-centric workouts. You’ll push it on the treadmill, elliptical, rowing machine, air bike and even with the help of a jump rope.

20-Minute HIIT Treadmill Workout to Get Fit, Fast

The 30-Minute HIIT Jump Rope Workout

Air Bike: The HIIT Workout That’ll Leave You Breathless

3 Elliptical HIIT Workouts That Won’t Bore You to Death

3 Rowing Machine Workouts for Cardio and Strength

20-Minute Treadmill HIIT Workout to Crush Calories

HIIT Strength Workouts: More Fit Every Day

[caption id="attachment_65609" align="alignnone" width="620"]HIIT Workouts: Strength HIIT Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn 365[/caption]

These short but effective workouts combine weights and cardio bursts, so you get the best of both workout worlds. You’ll finish feeling breathless but oh so strong, thanks to a med ball, yoga-inspired routines and more.

Design Your Own HIIT Workout with This Perfect Formula

The 15-Minute Medicine Ball HIIT Workout

10-Minute Yoga HIIT Workout

HIIT Exercises to Get You Ready for Ski Season

Game On! The Sweet 16 HIIT Workout

5 Stretches You Should Never Skip Post-HIIT

Originally published April 2017. Updated February 2018. 

The post HIIT It Hard with These 27 Beginner Workouts and Tips appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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25 Beginner HIIT Workouts and Tips to Get in Your Best Shape Ever

[caption id="attachment_65611" align="alignnone" width="620"]27 Beginner HIIT Workouts and Tips to Get in Your Best Shape Ever Photo: Pond5[/caption] Think of high-intensity interval training (aka HIIT workouts) — where you alternate short bursts of intense exercise and active recovery time — as the workout gift that keeps on giving. First, it’s designed to burn more calories and fat in less time, giving you that excuse-squashing way to squeeze in a sweat. Then, it revs up your heart rate and alters metabolic pathways so much so that you keep torching calories even after you stop moving. So it’s basically the go-to for anyone looking to get fit, strong and slim without dedicating hours to doing so. (Can anyone say no to that?) The catch: You have to learn how to do it (and recognize whether you're pushing hard enough), give it your all and switch up your approach every now and then. To get you doing just that, we rounded up top resources for making your HIIT workout super effective, fun — and speedy. So whether you're a beginner exerciser or more advanced athlete, you'll HIIT it big with these tips. RELATED: 50 Running Resources for Speed, Strength and Nutrition

What Is High-Intensity Interval Training (aka HIIT)?

[caption id="attachment_65605" align="alignnone" width="620"]HIIT Workouts: What is High-Intensity Interval Training? Photo: Pond5[/caption] Before jumping into your first round of intervals, you’ll want a base of knowledge. After all knowing why exactly you’re busting your butt through those crazy-hard intervals will help motivate you to keep pushing forward. Here, some expert insight on the benefits of high-intensity interval training, plus how to make each routine work for you. HIIT: What It Is and Why It Works No Time? How Much HIIT You Need to Reap Benefits 7 Ways to Get Fit in Half the Time EPOC: The Secret to Faster Fat Loss? Daily Burn’s Inferno HR: Heart Rate Training, Evolved Meditation Meets HIIT in New Mindful Fitness Approach 7 HIIT Mistakes You're Probably Making

Bodyweight HIIT Workouts: Anytime, Anywhere

[caption id="attachment_65607" align="alignnone" width="620"]HIIT Workouts: Bodyweight Workouts Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn 365[/caption] One of the awesome benefits of interval training is that you can do it anywhere. These killer bodyweight workouts will rev up your metabolism, whether you’re at the gym, in your hotel or on the beach. No equipment necessary! And beginners, keep in mind they're still totally doable for you. 10-Minute Indoor and Outdoor HIIT Workouts 3 HIIT Workouts to Take to the Beach HIIT It Hard with BJ Gaddour’s Bodyweight Burners 5 HIIT Exercises to Boost Your VO2 Max 3 Quick HIIT Workouts for Beginners Plyometric Planks You Need to Try ASAP 3 Plyometric Moves That Turn Up the Burn 5 Exercises for the Perfect Beginner Bodyweight Workout

Cardio Workouts: HIIT and Run

[caption id="attachment_65608" align="alignnone" width="620"]HIIT Workouts: Cardio HIIT Photo: Pond5[/caption] Beat cardio machine boredom and put some pep to your step with these interval-inspired cardio-centric workouts. You’ll push it on the treadmill, elliptical, rowing machine, air bike and even with the help of a jump rope. 20-Minute HIIT Treadmill Workout to Get Fit, Fast The 30-Minute HIIT Jump Rope Workout Air Bike: The HIIT Workout That’ll Leave You Breathless 3 Elliptical HIIT Workouts That Won’t Bore You to Death 3 Rowing Machine Workouts for Cardio and Strength 20-Minute Treadmill HIIT Workout to Crush Calories

HIIT Strength Workouts: More Fit Every Day

[caption id="attachment_65609" align="alignnone" width="620"]HIIT Workouts: Strength HIIT Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn 365[/caption] These short but effective workouts combine weights and cardio bursts, so you get the best of both workout worlds. You’ll finish feeling breathless but oh so strong, thanks to a med ball, yoga-inspired routines and more. Design Your Own HIIT Workout with This Perfect Formula The 15-Minute Medicine Ball HIIT Workout 10-Minute Yoga HIIT Workout HIIT Exercises to Get You Ready for Ski Season Game On! The Sweet 16 HIIT Workout 5 Stretches You Should Never Skip Post-HIIT Originally published April 2017. Updated February 2018. 

The post HIIT It Hard with These 27 Beginner Workouts and Tips appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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7 Oblique Exercises to Target Your Love Handles http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/oblique-exercises-love-handles/ Tue, 06 Feb 2018 12:15:17 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=65392

[caption id="attachment_65402" align="alignnone" width="620"]7 Oblique Exercises to Target Your Love Handles Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn Power Cardio[/caption]

When it comes to getting rid of love handles, you’ll want to skip the waist training trend. More often than not, whittling your middle comes down to better nutrition paired with ab exercises that target the obliques.

CeCe Marizu, Daily Burn 365 trainer, says, “It’s important to build up both your internal and external obliques because they create a force that builds strength to allow muscle to take over the fatty areas everyone calls their love handles.”

Sculpting your oblique muscles will not only give you a more defined midsection, it will also help stabilize your core and support your back. “Your external obliques will help your trunk rotate, while your internal obliques also help with rotation but on a deeper level,” Marizu explains. Here’s the perfect workout to keep your sides in check and build total-core strength.

RELATED: 50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core

7 Ab Exercises to Target Your Love Handles

What’s best about the oblique exercises below is that they target more than just your love handles. They strengthen your entire posterior chain, too. “Dynamic exercises, like spiderman push-ups and side planks with a reach through, help with your love handles by building muscle. A lot of times we can be neglectful of our side bodies,” Marizu says.

Perform each move for 30 seconds and then take a 30-second break for as many rounds as possible. Marizu recommends doing these exercises three to five days a week. “You don't have to work long, but work smart,” Marizu says. That means putting a big emphasis on your diet. “Do your core work and show your love handles some love by eating right,” she says.

[caption id="attachment_65394" align="alignnone" width="620"]Ab Exercises to Target Your Love Handles: Side Plank with Reach Through GIF: Daily Burn[/caption]

1. Side Planks with Reach Through

How to: Lie on your right side and place your right hand firmly on the ground. Engaging your core, prop yourself up into a side plank. Stack your left foot over your right, so your body is in a straight line (a). Extend your left arm towards the ceiling and then lower your arm in front of you and bring it under your right hip (b). Bring your left arm back above your head (c).

[caption id="attachment_65395" align="alignnone" width="620"]Ab Exercises to Target Your Love Handles: Spiderman Crunch GIF: Chris Ryan / Life by Daily Burn[/caption]

2. Spiderman Crunch

How to: Get into push-up position with your shoulders directly over your hands (a). Lift your right foot a few inches off the ground and bring your right knee towards your right elbow as you lower your body into a push-up. Be sure your hips don’t drop and your back doesn’t arch (b). Return your right foot back to the starting position as you push yourself back up (c). Repeat on the left side.

[caption id="attachment_65396" align="alignnone" width="620"]Ab Exercises to Target Your Love Handles: The Saw GIF: Daily Burn Pilates[/caption]

3. The Saw

How to: Sit up on a mat with your legs extended in front of you. Spread them as wide as the mat (a). Form a “T” with your arms out to the sides and twist toward your right side, stretching your left hand towards your right foot. Pulse three times (b). Untwist yourself and return to center (c). Repeat on the left side. (For more Pilates ab exercises like this one, head here.)

RELATED: The Ab Moves You Aren’t Doing (But Should!)

[caption id="attachment_65398" align="alignnone" width="620"]Ab Exercises to Target Your Love Handles: Crab Reach GIF: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn[/caption]

4. Crab Reach

How to: Sit with your knees bent and feet flat on the ground in front of you and your right hand firmly on the ground behind you. Keep your left arm bent by your side (a). Lift your butt off the floor while extending your left arm behind you, reaching for your right side as you come into a reverse tabletop (b). Return to the starting position and repeat on the left side (c).

[caption id="attachment_65402" align="alignnone" width="620"]7 Oblique Exercises to Target Your Love Handles Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn Power Cardio[/caption]

5. Mountain Climbers Twist

How to: Place a plyo box in front of you and get into high plank position with both palms firmly on top of the box (a). With a flat back and abs engaged, lift your right foot and bring your right knee to your left elbow. Return to the starting position (b). Then, lift your left foot and bring your left knee to your right elbow. Return to the starting position, and continue alternating sides (c).

[caption id="attachment_65399" align="alignnone" width="620"]Ab Exercises to Target Your Love Handles: Side Plank with Knee Drive GIF: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn[/caption]

6. Side Plank with Knee Drive

How to: Lie on your right side and prop yourself up onto your right forearm. Stack your left foot over your right, so your body is in a straight line. Keep your left hand on your left hip (a). Engaging your core, drive your right knee up to your chest and repeat before switching to the other side (b). 

RELATED: 5 Mountain Climbers for Seriously Sculpted Abs

[caption id="attachment_65400" align="alignnone" width="620"]Ab Exercises to Target Your Love Handles: Giant Clam GIF: Life by Daily Burn[/caption]

7. Giant Clam

How to: Place your left forearm in the center of the BOSU ball (a). Raise your body up into a side plank with your left leg straight out to the side, and your right leg behind you, bent at 45 degrees. Raise your right arm up overhead and keep your hips lifted (b). Bring your right hand and left foot together, keeping your left leg straight (c).

Read More
5 Planks, 10 Minutes: Your Ultimate Abs Workout
5 Oblique Exercises to Sculpt Your Abs
7 No-Crunch Exercises for Six-Pack Abs

The post 7 Oblique Exercises to Target Your Love Handles appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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[caption id="attachment_65402" align="alignnone" width="620"]7 Oblique Exercises to Target Your Love Handles Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn Power Cardio[/caption] When it comes to getting rid of love handles, you’ll want to skip the waist training trend. More often than not, whittling your middle comes down to better nutrition paired with ab exercises that target the obliques. CeCe Marizu, Daily Burn 365 trainer, says, “It’s important to build up both your internal and external obliques because they create a force that builds strength to allow muscle to take over the fatty areas everyone calls their love handles.” Sculpting your oblique muscles will not only give you a more defined midsection, it will also help stabilize your core and support your back. “Your external obliques will help your trunk rotate, while your internal obliques also help with rotation but on a deeper level,” Marizu explains. Here’s the perfect workout to keep your sides in check and build total-core strength. RELATED: 50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core

7 Ab Exercises to Target Your Love Handles

What’s best about the oblique exercises below is that they target more than just your love handles. They strengthen your entire posterior chain, too. “Dynamic exercises, like spiderman push-ups and side planks with a reach through, help with your love handles by building muscle. A lot of times we can be neglectful of our side bodies,” Marizu says. Perform each move for 30 seconds and then take a 30-second break for as many rounds as possible. Marizu recommends doing these exercises three to five days a week. “You don't have to work long, but work smart,” Marizu says. That means putting a big emphasis on your diet. “Do your core work and show your love handles some love by eating right,” she says. [caption id="attachment_65394" align="alignnone" width="620"]Ab Exercises to Target Your Love Handles: Side Plank with Reach Through GIF: Daily Burn[/caption]

1. Side Planks with Reach Through

How to: Lie on your right side and place your right hand firmly on the ground. Engaging your core, prop yourself up into a side plank. Stack your left foot over your right, so your body is in a straight line (a). Extend your left arm towards the ceiling and then lower your arm in front of you and bring it under your right hip (b). Bring your left arm back above your head (c). [caption id="attachment_65395" align="alignnone" width="620"]Ab Exercises to Target Your Love Handles: Spiderman Crunch GIF: Chris Ryan / Life by Daily Burn[/caption]

2. Spiderman Crunch

How to: Get into push-up position with your shoulders directly over your hands (a). Lift your right foot a few inches off the ground and bring your right knee towards your right elbow as you lower your body into a push-up. Be sure your hips don’t drop and your back doesn’t arch (b). Return your right foot back to the starting position as you push yourself back up (c). Repeat on the left side. [caption id="attachment_65396" align="alignnone" width="620"]Ab Exercises to Target Your Love Handles: The Saw GIF: Daily Burn Pilates[/caption]

3. The Saw

How to: Sit up on a mat with your legs extended in front of you. Spread them as wide as the mat (a). Form a “T” with your arms out to the sides and twist toward your right side, stretching your left hand towards your right foot. Pulse three times (b). Untwist yourself and return to center (c). Repeat on the left side. (For more Pilates ab exercises like this one, head here.) RELATED: The Ab Moves You Aren’t Doing (But Should!) [caption id="attachment_65398" align="alignnone" width="620"]Ab Exercises to Target Your Love Handles: Crab Reach GIF: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn[/caption]

4. Crab Reach

How to: Sit with your knees bent and feet flat on the ground in front of you and your right hand firmly on the ground behind you. Keep your left arm bent by your side (a). Lift your butt off the floor while extending your left arm behind you, reaching for your right side as you come into a reverse tabletop (b). Return to the starting position and repeat on the left side (c). [caption id="attachment_65402" align="alignnone" width="620"]7 Oblique Exercises to Target Your Love Handles Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn Power Cardio[/caption]

5. Mountain Climbers Twist

How to: Place a plyo box in front of you and get into high plank position with both palms firmly on top of the box (a). With a flat back and abs engaged, lift your right foot and bring your right knee to your left elbow. Return to the starting position (b). Then, lift your left foot and bring your left knee to your right elbow. Return to the starting position, and continue alternating sides (c). [caption id="attachment_65399" align="alignnone" width="620"]Ab Exercises to Target Your Love Handles: Side Plank with Knee Drive GIF: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn[/caption]

6. Side Plank with Knee Drive

How to: Lie on your right side and prop yourself up onto your right forearm. Stack your left foot over your right, so your body is in a straight line. Keep your left hand on your left hip (a). Engaging your core, drive your right knee up to your chest and repeat before switching to the other side (b).  RELATED: 5 Mountain Climbers for Seriously Sculpted Abs [caption id="attachment_65400" align="alignnone" width="620"]Ab Exercises to Target Your Love Handles: Giant Clam GIF: Life by Daily Burn[/caption]

7. Giant Clam

How to: Place your left forearm in the center of the BOSU ball (a). Raise your body up into a side plank with your left leg straight out to the side, and your right leg behind you, bent at 45 degrees. Raise your right arm up overhead and keep your hips lifted (b). Bring your right hand and left foot together, keeping your left leg straight (c). Read More 5 Planks, 10 Minutes: Your Ultimate Abs Workout 5 Oblique Exercises to Sculpt Your Abs 7 No-Crunch Exercises for Six-Pack Abs

The post 7 Oblique Exercises to Target Your Love Handles appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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21 Squat Variations So You Never Get Bored http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/squat-challenge-exercises/ Mon, 05 Feb 2018 12:15:34 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=65409 Squat Challenge: 20 Exercises to Switch Up the Exercise

[caption id="attachment_65468" align="alignnone" width="620"]Squat Challenge: 20 Exercises to Switch Up the Exercise Photos: Daily Burn[/caption]

You can tell a lot about someone from how they perform a squat — more specifically, their body’s strength and weaknesses. The typically two-legged exercise requires learning how to efficiently use your glutes (not just your quads!), and properly activate and engage your core. You’ll also need enough hip and ankle mobility to drop it low — without leaning forward or lifting your heels. But it’s an especially functional move, considering how many times we sit down and stand up throughout the day. That’s why you’ll often see a squat challenge weaved into trainers’ workouts.

“The squat is a great lower body exercise that also incorporates your core musculature,” says Prince Brathwaite, a trainer on Daily Burn 365 and owner of Trooper Fitness in New York City. “Squats also burn lots of calories due to the fact that you engage several large muscle groups during the movement.” The exercise requires effort from your glutes, quads and hamstrings — aka the body’s biggest muscles, which produce that extra calorie burn.

Hold off on doing hundreds of basic bodyweight squats, though. The standard squat can get repetitive with a capital P for plateau. But try a new squat challenge more often and you’ll call on new muscles groups (not to mention brain waves!). “Our bodies are great at adapting to the stimulus we put on it. Eventually [a squat] will not have the same affect it did the first time you performed it — but we can keep the body guessing by changing up the way we do the exercise,” says Brathwaite.

From testing your core stability to getting your arms involved, these 21 squat variations provide the creativity and extra push you need to reach your goals as you drop it low.

RELATED: How Low Should You Squat? (And How to Improve It)

Step Up Your Squat Challenge with 21 Creative Variations

Don’t forget proper squat form as you crush these creative takes. Weight should stay in your heels as you lower your hips down and back toward the floor. Make sure to keep your chest up and shoulders down as you go. Then, inhale as you lower and exhale to stand for quality ab engagement. Ready, set, squat!

Squat Challenge: Box Squat Exercise

1. Box Squat

Master your squat form with this variation. Find a low chair, box or bench to lower your seat onto, then drive off your feet to stand back up.

Squat Challenge: Overhead Squat Exercise

2. Overhead Squat

Put your hands in the air if you want to fire up your core even more. You’ll target your abs and back muscles by simply lifting your arms by your ears, as you lower your hips and butt toward the floor.

Squat Challenge: Goblet Squat Exercise

3. Goblet Squat

There’s nothing like adding a little — or a lot — of weight to an exercise and seeing how much harder your muscles must work. Hold a heavy dumbbell at your chest to make your quads, glutes and hamstrings go into overdrive, while your upper body stabilizes the weight, too.

RELATED: How Strong Is Your Squat? Try This Trainer-Backed Test

Squat Challenge: Wide Stance Squat Exercise

4. Wide Stance Squat

Stepping your feet a little wider than hip-distance will allow you to get lower into your squat. Glutes and inner thighs, engaged!

Squat Challenge: Narrow Stance Squat Exercise

5. Narrow Stance Squat

Step your feet closer than hip-distance and you narrow your base of support, meaning your core works harder. Your thighs will also feel the burn.

Squat Challenge: Partial Squat Exercise

6. Partial Squat

Taking your squat from full to half range of motion will really get your lower body muscles humming. Research shows sprinkling in the partial variation can increase strength and muscle gains.

RELATED: 4 Moves for a Better Back Squat

Squat Challenge: Pulse Squat Exercise

7. Pulse Squat

Time to grind. Pulsing it low in a squat will fatigue your muscle fibers — fast. Smaller range of motion; greater muscle endurance gains.

Squat Challenge: Squat with Calf Raise Exercise

8. Squat with Calf Raise 

When you come up from the bottom of your squat, lift your heels to feel your lower legs (aka your calves) fire. Shaking means you’re doing it right.

Squat Challenge: Staggered Squat Exercise

9. Staggered Squat

Elevate the squat challenge for this off-balance exercise. Popping one toe puts most of the work on a single leg, meaning that leg has to work harder to move you down and up.

RELATED: 6 Squat Variations for Total-Body Strength

Squat Challenge: Pistol Squat to Box Exercise

10. Pistol Squat to Box

Go next-level on that staggered squat. This time, you’ll keep one leg totally lifted as you sit down on a box, chair or bench and stand back up. It’s a move that requires serious stability in your standing leg.

Squat Challenge: Squat to Knee Raise Exercise

11. Squat to Knee Raise

When you stand up from a squat, you’ll use your hip flexors and abs to lift your knee toward your chest. Try to bring your leg higher and move faster each time you come back to this variation to keep the squat challenge going.

Squat Challenge: Lunge to Squat Exercise

12. Lunge to Squat

Two main movement patterns in one, this exercise gets every part of your lower half firing. Stay low in your squat (so legs muscles remain engaged) as you step back into a lunge, alternating sides.

RELATED: 3 Workout Moves for Seriously Toned Thighs

Squat Challenge: Knee Get-Up Squat Exercise

13. Knee Get-Up Squat

Standing up off the floor gets easier the more we work on it. And this move hones in on just that. Again, keep your booty low to the ground to force your legs to work the entire time.

Squat Challenge: Split Squat to Lateral Raise Exercise

14. Split Squat to Lateral Raise

Time to lift some dumbbells and incorporate your arms. With one leg forward and one leg back, bend down so your knees hit 90 degrees, which targets your lower half. Meanwhile, you’ll raise your arms straight out to the sides to strengthen your shoulders.

Squat Challenge: Sumo Squat to Curl Exercise

15. Sumo Squat with Curls

Prepare to flex that bicep! Taking it to a sumo squat targets your inner thighs more, while adding a curl as you stand involves your arms. A full-body exercise at its finest.

RELATED: 5 Easy Arm Exercises for an Awesome 30-Minute Workout

Squat Challenge: Squat with Front Raise Exercise

16. Squat with Front Raise

You know you’ll feel this in your shoulders, but the secret scorcher is in your midsection. Use your core to keep your spine neutral, and remember to keep your shoulders down away from your ears for less tension in your neck.

Squat Challenge: Squat Thrust Exercise

17. Squat Thrust

Another move featuring two dumbbells, this one requires the power of your lower body to drive the weights overhead. You should feel this one in your core, as well as your legs, shoulders and even triceps.

Squat Challenge: Squat Jump Exercise

18. Squat Jump

This power player is a surefire way to rev your heart rate and get your fast-twitch muscle fibers involved for more speed and strength. Remember to land softly back down after each explosive jump up from your squat.

RELATED: 6 Killer Cardio Workouts That Don’t Involve Running

Squat Challenge: Smurf Jack Squat Exercise

19. Smurf Jack Squat

A fun take on a typical jumping jack, this full-body exercise comes with a side of cardio. Keep your butt down, chest up and move as quick as you can to torch more calories.

Squat Challenge: 180 Surfer Squat Exercise

20. 180 Surfer Squat

Add a twist while you pretend you’re hanging ten! Drop low, then explode up as you do a 180 degree turn and land with your feet staggered — just like you’d stand on a surfboard. If you’ve ever caught some waves, you know how much core stability this move requires.

Squat Challenge: Good Morning Squat Exercise

21. Good Morning Squat

An important move to master: the hip hinge. It calls for pushing your hips back and lowering your chest toward the ground with a flat back, abs engaged, weight in heels and just a slight bend in your knees. We promise you’ll feel this down the entire back of your body.

Read More
50 Butt Exercises to Sculpt Stronger Glutes
Ab Challenge: 5 Planks to Sculpt Your Core
HIIT It Hard with These 25 Workouts and Tips

The post 21 Squat Variations So You Never Get Bored appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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Squat Challenge: 20 Exercises to Switch Up the Exercise

[caption id="attachment_65468" align="alignnone" width="620"]Squat Challenge: 20 Exercises to Switch Up the Exercise Photos: Daily Burn[/caption]
You can tell a lot about someone from how they perform a squat — more specifically, their body’s strength and weaknesses. The typically two-legged exercise requires learning how to efficiently use your glutes (not just your quads!), and properly activate and engage your core. You’ll also need enough hip and ankle mobility to drop it low — without leaning forward or lifting your heels. But it’s an especially functional move, considering how many times we sit down and stand up throughout the day. That’s why you’ll often see a squat challenge weaved into trainers’ workouts. “The squat is a great lower body exercise that also incorporates your core musculature,” says Prince Brathwaite, a trainer on Daily Burn 365 and owner of Trooper Fitness in New York City. “Squats also burn lots of calories due to the fact that you engage several large muscle groups during the movement.” The exercise requires effort from your glutes, quads and hamstrings — aka the body’s biggest muscles, which produce that extra calorie burn. Hold off on doing hundreds of basic bodyweight squats, though. The standard squat can get repetitive with a capital P for plateau. But try a new squat challenge more often and you’ll call on new muscles groups (not to mention brain waves!). “Our bodies are great at adapting to the stimulus we put on it. Eventually [a squat] will not have the same affect it did the first time you performed it — but we can keep the body guessing by changing up the way we do the exercise,” says Brathwaite. From testing your core stability to getting your arms involved, these 21 squat variations provide the creativity and extra push you need to reach your goals as you drop it low. RELATED: How Low Should You Squat? (And How to Improve It)

Step Up Your Squat Challenge with 21 Creative Variations

Don’t forget proper squat form as you crush these creative takes. Weight should stay in your heels as you lower your hips down and back toward the floor. Make sure to keep your chest up and shoulders down as you go. Then, inhale as you lower and exhale to stand for quality ab engagement. Ready, set, squat! Squat Challenge: Box Squat Exercise

1. Box Squat

Master your squat form with this variation. Find a low chair, box or bench to lower your seat onto, then drive off your feet to stand back up. Squat Challenge: Overhead Squat Exercise

2. Overhead Squat

Put your hands in the air if you want to fire up your core even more. You’ll target your abs and back muscles by simply lifting your arms by your ears, as you lower your hips and butt toward the floor. Squat Challenge: Goblet Squat Exercise

3. Goblet Squat

There’s nothing like adding a little — or a lot — of weight to an exercise and seeing how much harder your muscles must work. Hold a heavy dumbbell at your chest to make your quads, glutes and hamstrings go into overdrive, while your upper body stabilizes the weight, too. RELATED: How Strong Is Your Squat? Try This Trainer-Backed Test Squat Challenge: Wide Stance Squat Exercise

4. Wide Stance Squat

Stepping your feet a little wider than hip-distance will allow you to get lower into your squat. Glutes and inner thighs, engaged! Squat Challenge: Narrow Stance Squat Exercise

5. Narrow Stance Squat

Step your feet closer than hip-distance and you narrow your base of support, meaning your core works harder. Your thighs will also feel the burn. Squat Challenge: Partial Squat Exercise

6. Partial Squat

Taking your squat from full to half range of motion will really get your lower body muscles humming. Research shows sprinkling in the partial variation can increase strength and muscle gains. RELATED: 4 Moves for a Better Back Squat Squat Challenge: Pulse Squat Exercise

7. Pulse Squat

Time to grind. Pulsing it low in a squat will fatigue your muscle fibers — fast. Smaller range of motion; greater muscle endurance gains. Squat Challenge: Squat with Calf Raise Exercise

8. Squat with Calf Raise 

When you come up from the bottom of your squat, lift your heels to feel your lower legs (aka your calves) fire. Shaking means you’re doing it right. Squat Challenge: Staggered Squat Exercise

9. Staggered Squat

Elevate the squat challenge for this off-balance exercise. Popping one toe puts most of the work on a single leg, meaning that leg has to work harder to move you down and up. RELATED: 6 Squat Variations for Total-Body Strength Squat Challenge: Pistol Squat to Box Exercise

10. Pistol Squat to Box

Go next-level on that staggered squat. This time, you’ll keep one leg totally lifted as you sit down on a box, chair or bench and stand back up. It’s a move that requires serious stability in your standing leg. Squat Challenge: Squat to Knee Raise Exercise

11. Squat to Knee Raise

When you stand up from a squat, you’ll use your hip flexors and abs to lift your knee toward your chest. Try to bring your leg higher and move faster each time you come back to this variation to keep the squat challenge going. Squat Challenge: Lunge to Squat Exercise

12. Lunge to Squat

Two main movement patterns in one, this exercise gets every part of your lower half firing. Stay low in your squat (so legs muscles remain engaged) as you step back into a lunge, alternating sides. RELATED: 3 Workout Moves for Seriously Toned Thighs Squat Challenge: Knee Get-Up Squat Exercise

13. Knee Get-Up Squat

Standing up off the floor gets easier the more we work on it. And this move hones in on just that. Again, keep your booty low to the ground to force your legs to work the entire time. Squat Challenge: Split Squat to Lateral Raise Exercise

14. Split Squat to Lateral Raise

Time to lift some dumbbells and incorporate your arms. With one leg forward and one leg back, bend down so your knees hit 90 degrees, which targets your lower half. Meanwhile, you’ll raise your arms straight out to the sides to strengthen your shoulders. Squat Challenge: Sumo Squat to Curl Exercise

15. Sumo Squat with Curls

Prepare to flex that bicep! Taking it to a sumo squat targets your inner thighs more, while adding a curl as you stand involves your arms. A full-body exercise at its finest. RELATED: 5 Easy Arm Exercises for an Awesome 30-Minute Workout Squat Challenge: Squat with Front Raise Exercise

16. Squat with Front Raise

You know you’ll feel this in your shoulders, but the secret scorcher is in your midsection. Use your core to keep your spine neutral, and remember to keep your shoulders down away from your ears for less tension in your neck. Squat Challenge: Squat Thrust Exercise

17. Squat Thrust

Another move featuring two dumbbells, this one requires the power of your lower body to drive the weights overhead. You should feel this one in your core, as well as your legs, shoulders and even triceps.

Squat Challenge: Squat Jump Exercise

18. Squat Jump

This power player is a surefire way to rev your heart rate and get your fast-twitch muscle fibers involved for more speed and strength. Remember to land softly back down after each explosive jump up from your squat. RELATED: 6 Killer Cardio Workouts That Don’t Involve Running Squat Challenge: Smurf Jack Squat Exercise

19. Smurf Jack Squat

A fun take on a typical jumping jack, this full-body exercise comes with a side of cardio. Keep your butt down, chest up and move as quick as you can to torch more calories. Squat Challenge: 180 Surfer Squat Exercise

20. 180 Surfer Squat

Add a twist while you pretend you’re hanging ten! Drop low, then explode up as you do a 180 degree turn and land with your feet staggered — just like you’d stand on a surfboard. If you’ve ever caught some waves, you know how much core stability this move requires. Squat Challenge: Good Morning Squat Exercise

21. Good Morning Squat

An important move to master: the hip hinge. It calls for pushing your hips back and lowering your chest toward the ground with a flat back, abs engaged, weight in heels and just a slight bend in your knees. We promise you’ll feel this down the entire back of your body. Read More 50 Butt Exercises to Sculpt Stronger Glutes Ab Challenge: 5 Planks to Sculpt Your Core HIIT It Hard with These 25 Workouts and Tips

The post 21 Squat Variations So You Never Get Bored appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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Quick Lower Ab Exercises for a Stronger Core http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/lower-ab-exercises-strong-core/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/lower-ab-exercises-strong-core/#respond Sat, 03 Feb 2018 13:00:33 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=54470 7 Lower Ab Exercises for a Stronger Core

[caption id="attachment_65336" align="alignnone" width="620"]7 Lower Ab Exercises for a Stronger Core Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn 365[/caption]

If there’s one major muscle group we don’t mind firing up during almost every workout, it’s our abs. And for good reason: Aesthetics aside, a strong midsection leads to proper body alignment, better balance and it can help alleviate lower back pain.

When it comes to targeting the bottom half of your trunk more specifically, there’s just one catch. Those “lower abs” people often refer to are known as the rectus abdominis, which run along your entire midsection (and help give that coveted flatter belly or six-pack look). So while you’ll be working the lower portion of your stomach, you’ll also be getting the upper half involved. That’s not a bad thing, though — you’re targeting your abdominals from every angle to really carve out some definition.

Tone up — from bottom to top and front to back — with these seven lower ab exercises. Then go ahead and consider yourself hardcore!

RELATED: The Truth About How to Lose Belly Fat

7 Lower Ab Exercises to Strengthen Your Core

Perform these seven moves in a row, with little to no the rest time in between, for a full midsection-centric workout. At the end of the circuit, take a 90-second break, then repeat two more times.

[caption id="attachment_65333" align="alignnone" width="620"]Lower Ab Exercises: Bear Crawls Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn 365[/caption]

1. Bear Crawls

How to: Start on all-fours, then lift your knees a few inches off the floor (a). Keeping your knees elevated, move your right hand and left foot one step forward (b). Then move your left hand and right foot one step forward (c). Keep walking forward or if you have limited space, step backward with opposite hands and feet (d). Repeat for 10 reps.
Pro tip: This move works your entire core, but to really target the deep transverse abdominis (which cinch your waist), make sure you draw your navel in and maintain a neutral spine.

[caption id="attachment_65334" align="alignnone" width="620"]Lower Ab Exercises: Straight Leg Lifts Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn 365[/caption]

2. Straight Leg Lifts

How to: Lie on your back with your hands underneath your butt or low back, whichever is more comfortable and will keep you from arching your back. Your legs should stay straight and your low back should remain against the floor throughout the entire exercise (a). Lift your feet toward the ceiling so your legs are perpendicular to the floor (b). Lower your feet back down, just a few inches off the floor (c). Continue to lift and lower for 10 reps.
Pro tip: Start with your head, neck and shoulders resting on the ground and when you’re ready to kick your ab workout into high gear, raise your shoulders and head off the floor.

RELATED: 7 TRX Exercises to Work Your Abs

[caption id="attachment_65335" align="alignnone" width="620"]Lower Ab Exercises: Bicycles Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn 365[/caption]

3. Bicycles

How to: Lie on your back, with your feet a few inches off the floor, toes pointed, and your head and shoulder blades lifted off the ground. Place your hands behind your head, elbows wide (a). Bring your right knee in toward your chest, as you lift your left shoulder blade higher off the ground and toward your knee (b). Straighten your right leg and lower your left shoulder, as you rotate and bring your left knee inward and your right shoulder up and toward your knee (c). Continue switching sides to complete 20 reps total (10 each side).
Pro tip: Make sure to lift and rotate your shoulders — not just your neck and head — to really fire up your obliques during this exercise. Keep a neutral pelvis, too.

[caption id="attachment_65336" align="alignnone" width="620"]Lower Ab Exercises: Mountain Climbers Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn 365[/caption]

4. Mountain Climbers

How to: Start in a high plank position, body in a straight line from head to toe and hands shoulder-width apart (a). Bring your right knee in toward your chest (b). Return it back to the floor and immediately bring your left knee to your chest (c). Continue switching legs to complete 10 reps on each side.
Pro tip: The faster you move (without wrecking your form), the more calories you burn, so get stepping to turn your workout into a seriously sweaty one!

RELATED: 5 Killer Mountain Climbers for Seriously Sculpted Abs

[caption id="attachment_65337" align="alignnone" width="620"]Lower Ab Exercises: Dead Bug Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn 365[/caption]

5. Dead Bug

How to: Lie on your back. Lift your legs and bend your knees 90 degrees so your shins are parallel to the floor. Lift arms straight above you (a). Lower your left arm toward the floor behind you (elbow straight), as you lower your right foot to just above the floor (knee bent) (b). Return to start (c). Lower your right arm toward the floor behind you and your left foot to just above the floor (d). Return to start and continue alternating, so you do 10 reps on each side.
Pro tip: As for most of the moves on this list, focus on drawing your belly button toward the floor so you maintain a neutral pelvis and keep your low back in contact with the floor. This will help you best target more muscles.

[caption id="attachment_65338" align="alignnone" width="620"]Lower Ab Exercises: Modified V-Up Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn 365[/caption]

6. Modified V-Ups

How to: Sit down on the floor, knees bent and feet flat. Lean your upper body backward, so it’s about 45 degrees from the floor (a). Bring your knees into your chest, shins parallel to the floor and arms straight in front of you (b). Extend your legs straight out so your feet reach just a few inches off the floor (c). Bring your knees back into your chest and repeat for 10 reps.
Pro tip: Intensify this exercise by keeping your knees straight as you lift your legs and as you lower them, slowly drop your upper body back toward the floor as well. You’ll complete a full V sit-up with this approach that targets your entire stomach.

RELATED: Ab Challenge: 5 Planks to Sculpt Your Core

[caption id="attachment_65339" align="alignnone" width="620"]Lower Ab Exercises: Forearm Side Plank Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn 365[/caption]

7. Forearm Side Plank

How to: From your side, place your forearm on the ground, elbow in line with shoulder and other hand on your hip (a). Stagger your feet and lift your hips up so your body is in a straight diagonal line (b). Hold this position for 30 seconds, then switch sides.
Pro tip: Planks are one of the best exercises to work the deep inner muscles of your abdominal wall, helping to keep your trunk stable. Want to make your plank even more challenging? Try one of these five variations.

For more creative exercises that work major muscle groups, sign up for Daily Burn 365. You'll get a new workout every day. 

Originally published December 2016. Updated January 2018. 

Read More
50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core
5 Oblique Exercises to Sculpt Your Abs
Hate Crunches? 6 Better Core Exercises for Beginners

The post Quick Lower Ab Exercises for a Stronger Core appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
7 Lower Ab Exercises for a Stronger Core

[caption id="attachment_65336" align="alignnone" width="620"]7 Lower Ab Exercises for a Stronger Core Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn 365[/caption] If there’s one major muscle group we don’t mind firing up during almost every workout, it’s our abs. And for good reason: Aesthetics aside, a strong midsection leads to proper body alignment, better balance and it can help alleviate lower back pain. When it comes to targeting the bottom half of your trunk more specifically, there’s just one catch. Those “lower abs” people often refer to are known as the rectus abdominis, which run along your entire midsection (and help give that coveted flatter belly or six-pack look). So while you’ll be working the lower portion of your stomach, you’ll also be getting the upper half involved. That’s not a bad thing, though — you’re targeting your abdominals from every angle to really carve out some definition. Tone up — from bottom to top and front to back — with these seven lower ab exercises. Then go ahead and consider yourself hardcore! RELATED: The Truth About How to Lose Belly Fat

7 Lower Ab Exercises to Strengthen Your Core

Perform these seven moves in a row, with little to no the rest time in between, for a full midsection-centric workout. At the end of the circuit, take a 90-second break, then repeat two more times. [caption id="attachment_65333" align="alignnone" width="620"]Lower Ab Exercises: Bear Crawls Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn 365[/caption]

1. Bear Crawls

How to: Start on all-fours, then lift your knees a few inches off the floor (a). Keeping your knees elevated, move your right hand and left foot one step forward (b). Then move your left hand and right foot one step forward (c). Keep walking forward or if you have limited space, step backward with opposite hands and feet (d). Repeat for 10 reps. Pro tip: This move works your entire core, but to really target the deep transverse abdominis (which cinch your waist), make sure you draw your navel in and maintain a neutral spine. [caption id="attachment_65334" align="alignnone" width="620"]Lower Ab Exercises: Straight Leg Lifts Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn 365[/caption]

2. Straight Leg Lifts

How to: Lie on your back with your hands underneath your butt or low back, whichever is more comfortable and will keep you from arching your back. Your legs should stay straight and your low back should remain against the floor throughout the entire exercise (a). Lift your feet toward the ceiling so your legs are perpendicular to the floor (b). Lower your feet back down, just a few inches off the floor (c). Continue to lift and lower for 10 reps. Pro tip: Start with your head, neck and shoulders resting on the ground and when you’re ready to kick your ab workout into high gear, raise your shoulders and head off the floor. RELATED: 7 TRX Exercises to Work Your Abs [caption id="attachment_65335" align="alignnone" width="620"]Lower Ab Exercises: Bicycles Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn 365[/caption]

3. Bicycles

How to: Lie on your back, with your feet a few inches off the floor, toes pointed, and your head and shoulder blades lifted off the ground. Place your hands behind your head, elbows wide (a). Bring your right knee in toward your chest, as you lift your left shoulder blade higher off the ground and toward your knee (b). Straighten your right leg and lower your left shoulder, as you rotate and bring your left knee inward and your right shoulder up and toward your knee (c). Continue switching sides to complete 20 reps total (10 each side). Pro tip: Make sure to lift and rotate your shoulders — not just your neck and head — to really fire up your obliques during this exercise. Keep a neutral pelvis, too. [caption id="attachment_65336" align="alignnone" width="620"]Lower Ab Exercises: Mountain Climbers Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn 365[/caption]

4. Mountain Climbers

How to: Start in a high plank position, body in a straight line from head to toe and hands shoulder-width apart (a). Bring your right knee in toward your chest (b). Return it back to the floor and immediately bring your left knee to your chest (c). Continue switching legs to complete 10 reps on each side. Pro tip: The faster you move (without wrecking your form), the more calories you burn, so get stepping to turn your workout into a seriously sweaty one! RELATED: 5 Killer Mountain Climbers for Seriously Sculpted Abs [caption id="attachment_65337" align="alignnone" width="620"]Lower Ab Exercises: Dead Bug Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn 365[/caption]

5. Dead Bug

How to: Lie on your back. Lift your legs and bend your knees 90 degrees so your shins are parallel to the floor. Lift arms straight above you (a). Lower your left arm toward the floor behind you (elbow straight), as you lower your right foot to just above the floor (knee bent) (b). Return to start (c). Lower your right arm toward the floor behind you and your left foot to just above the floor (d). Return to start and continue alternating, so you do 10 reps on each side. Pro tip: As for most of the moves on this list, focus on drawing your belly button toward the floor so you maintain a neutral pelvis and keep your low back in contact with the floor. This will help you best target more muscles. [caption id="attachment_65338" align="alignnone" width="620"]Lower Ab Exercises: Modified V-Up Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn 365[/caption]

6. Modified V-Ups

How to: Sit down on the floor, knees bent and feet flat. Lean your upper body backward, so it’s about 45 degrees from the floor (a). Bring your knees into your chest, shins parallel to the floor and arms straight in front of you (b). Extend your legs straight out so your feet reach just a few inches off the floor (c). Bring your knees back into your chest and repeat for 10 reps. Pro tip: Intensify this exercise by keeping your knees straight as you lift your legs and as you lower them, slowly drop your upper body back toward the floor as well. You’ll complete a full V sit-up with this approach that targets your entire stomach. RELATED: Ab Challenge: 5 Planks to Sculpt Your Core [caption id="attachment_65339" align="alignnone" width="620"]Lower Ab Exercises: Forearm Side Plank Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn 365[/caption]

7. Forearm Side Plank

How to: From your side, place your forearm on the ground, elbow in line with shoulder and other hand on your hip (a). Stagger your feet and lift your hips up so your body is in a straight diagonal line (b). Hold this position for 30 seconds, then switch sides. Pro tip: Planks are one of the best exercises to work the deep inner muscles of your abdominal wall, helping to keep your trunk stable. Want to make your plank even more challenging? Try one of these five variations. For more creative exercises that work major muscle groups, sign up for Daily Burn 365. You'll get a new workout every day.  Originally published December 2016. Updated January 2018.  Read More 50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core 5 Oblique Exercises to Sculpt Your Abs Hate Crunches? 6 Better Core Exercises for Beginners

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10 Upper-Body Exercises to Master the Perfect Pull-Up http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/upper-body-exercises-pull-ups/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/upper-body-exercises-pull-ups/#respond Thu, 01 Feb 2018 13:15:24 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=61035

[caption id="attachment_65455" align="alignnone" width="620"]10 Upper-Body Exercises to Master the Perfect Pull-Up Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

The pull-up is the original badass move. Sure, there are plenty of ways to show off just how strong you are, but the pull-up is unmatched. It demands back, shoulder, arm strength, not to mention a strong core, too. But if you finally want to learn how to nail one (or 10), you might be intimidated by the challenge. And we’re not going to lie to you: It takes work.

“You’re moving your whole bodyweight on your hands, which is something you typically don’t do. It’s like learning to walk,” says Mark Ribeiro, a certified personal trainer at the Fhitting Room in New York City. (You might know him from his turn on American Ninja Warrior.)

RELATED: How to Do a Pull-Up (Or Add More Reps)

Rather than training pull-ups solo, we tapped Ribeiro to show us how to successfully advance to the real deal by working all the necessary upper-body muscles. Don’t get frustrated if you can’t do one clean (meaning your don’t use your knees to swing up) unassisted pull-up right away, Ribeiro says. It can take a few months, especially for someone who doesn’t do bodyweight exercises.

But the payoff is bragging rights. To help you get there, here are 10 best exercises from Ribeiro that’ll boost your workouts from the ground up.

RELATED: 8 Arm Exercises You Haven’t Done Before

Upper Body Strength Training Plan for Perfect Pull-ups

You can perform all 10 of the following exercises in a single strength training session. Or, mix and match the moves, like the hollow and hanging hold on one day, and the bent-over row and hinged row the next day. Ribeiro recommends men and women devote at least two days a week, eventually progressing to three days. For each exercise, perform two to three sets AMRAP style, until your form starts to break.

[caption id="attachment_61058" align="alignnone" width="620"]Moves to Master a Pull-Up: Hollow Hold Photos: Courtesy of the Fhitting Room[/caption]

1. Hollow Hold

This is where you practice the proper pull-up position, so you engage both your core and back and don’t make the mistake of pushing your hips forward when hanging.

How to: Lie your back on the floor with your arms extended by your ears (a). Lift your legs off the ground and your arms overhead simultaneously to hold a hollow position (b).

Moves to Master a Pull-Up: Hanging Hold

2. Hanging Hold

This pose helps you practice the bottom of the movement, as well as build grip strength. This eccentric phase of the pull-up is all about lowering down with control.

How to: Dead hang (relax shoulders and lats) from a bar (a). Pull your shoulders down and squeeze your lats into a reverse shrug (b).

[caption id="attachment_61061" align="alignnone" width="620"]Moves to Master a Pull-Up: Bent-Over Row GIFs: Courtesy of the Fhitting Room[/caption]

3. Bent-Over Row

Here, you’ll engage your lats and biceps to give you a full range of motion on the pull.

How to: Lunge your left foot forward, and your right foot behind you (a). Hold a dumbbell in your right hand with your left elbow resting on your knee (b). Pull the weight up to your chest, bending your elbow to 90 degrees (b). Maintain a tight core throughout the movement to stay stable (c).

RELATED: Your 10-Minute Total-Body Dumbbell Workout

Moves to Master a Pull-Up: Hinged Row

4. Hinged Row

Similar to a bent-over row, this move requires you to use two hands simultaneously, which is more accurate to a pull-up.

How to: Hold a dumbbell in each hand. Bend over slightly with your knees slightly bent and your back straight (a). Pull dumbbells into your chest and slowly release them back down (b).

Moves to Master a Pull-Up: Deep Low Row

5. Deep Low Row

With this move, your bodyweight provides the resistance. You’ll learn how to engage your back while pulling. This will also improve grip strength to hold onto the bar throughout the exercise. Ribeiro uses TRX straps here, but if you can’t get a hold of a pair for your strength workouts, use a bar on a squat rack.

How to: Hold two TRX handles with your palms facing in (or holding a bar with both hands). Lean back and walk feet forward so that your body is at a 45-degree angle with the floor (a). Engage your core to stabilize your spine, and pull your chest into your hands (b).

Moves to Master a Pull-Up: Bridged Row

6. Bridged Row

Engaging your biceps and lats, this is the next step up to getting accustomed to using your full bodyweight. Again, if needed, use a squat rack bar. Be sure to keep your back straight as you pull your body towards your hands for best results.

How to: Position a block or step in front of the TRX straps. Sit down under the handles and grab them. Walk your feet onto the block — you should be hovering horizontally over the floor (a). With arms in front of your chest, pull your body up to your hands (b).

RELATED: 5 Total-Body Moves to Take Your TRX Training Up a Notch

Moves to Master a Pull-Up: Lat Pull Down

7. Lat Pull Down

Similar to the motion of a pull-up, this move engages your back. Keep your core tight as you pull the bands down to ensure you aren’t arching your back.

How to: Loop a resistance band around a bar overhead. Grip each side with one hand and sit on the floor. (a). Pull your hands down toward your chest and release the band slowly to extend your hands up overhead (b). Do a high number of reps (more than 15) to work your full range of motion (c).

Moves to Master a Pull-Up: Assisted Pull-Up

8. Assisted Pull-Up

You’re almost there! Loop a band around an overhead bar like in the lat pull down or use a pull-up machine.

How to: Holding onto the bar in that hollow position you practiced earlier, pull yourself up to bring your chin to the bar (a). Keep your legs together and engage your core to prevent arching your back (b). Think quality over quantity here — performing sets of 10 reps.

RELATED: 5 Badass Resistance Band Exercises for Total-Body Strength

Moves to Master a Pull-Up: Negatives

9. Negatives

This move focuses on the bottom portion of a pull-up and engages your back using your full bodyweight. If you can’t hold it at the top yet, that’s OK! (Upper-body strength can take some time to build.) It simply means you need more practice with the other exercises in this routine.

How to: Use a box to help you get up to an overhead bar. Start at the top with your chin to the bar (a). Hold for second and then lower down with control (b). Yes, these are meant to be tough — so aim for sets of three to five reps.

Moves to Master a Pull-Up: Push Press

10. Push Press Negative

This move will help strengthen your back without having to do a pull motion.

How to: Grab a dumbbell in each hand and bring them up to your shoulders (a). Bend your knees and lift the weights over your head (b). Slowly lower yourself towards the ground (c). Perform sets of three to five reps. Again, remember quality over quantity is best here (as with all your workout routines!).

Originally published August 2017. Updated February 2018. 

Read More:
6 Exercises for the Ultimate Back and Chest Workout
8 Arm Exercises You Haven't Done Before
5 Planks, 10 Minutes: Your Ultimate Ab Workout

The post 10 Upper-Body Exercises to Master the Perfect Pull-Up appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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[caption id="attachment_65455" align="alignnone" width="620"]10 Upper-Body Exercises to Master the Perfect Pull-Up Photo: Twenty20[/caption] The pull-up is the original badass move. Sure, there are plenty of ways to show off just how strong you are, but the pull-up is unmatched. It demands back, shoulder, arm strength, not to mention a strong core, too. But if you finally want to learn how to nail one (or 10), you might be intimidated by the challenge. And we’re not going to lie to you: It takes work. “You’re moving your whole bodyweight on your hands, which is something you typically don’t do. It’s like learning to walk,” says Mark Ribeiro, a certified personal trainer at the Fhitting Room in New York City. (You might know him from his turn on American Ninja Warrior.) RELATED: How to Do a Pull-Up (Or Add More Reps) Rather than training pull-ups solo, we tapped Ribeiro to show us how to successfully advance to the real deal by working all the necessary upper-body muscles. Don’t get frustrated if you can’t do one clean (meaning your don’t use your knees to swing up) unassisted pull-up right away, Ribeiro says. It can take a few months, especially for someone who doesn’t do bodyweight exercises. But the payoff is bragging rights. To help you get there, here are 10 best exercises from Ribeiro that’ll boost your workouts from the ground up. RELATED: 8 Arm Exercises You Haven’t Done Before

Upper Body Strength Training Plan for Perfect Pull-ups

You can perform all 10 of the following exercises in a single strength training session. Or, mix and match the moves, like the hollow and hanging hold on one day, and the bent-over row and hinged row the next day. Ribeiro recommends men and women devote at least two days a week, eventually progressing to three days. For each exercise, perform two to three sets AMRAP style, until your form starts to break. [caption id="attachment_61058" align="alignnone" width="620"]Moves to Master a Pull-Up: Hollow Hold Photos: Courtesy of the Fhitting Room[/caption]

1. Hollow Hold

This is where you practice the proper pull-up position, so you engage both your core and back and don’t make the mistake of pushing your hips forward when hanging. How to: Lie your back on the floor with your arms extended by your ears (a). Lift your legs off the ground and your arms overhead simultaneously to hold a hollow position (b). Moves to Master a Pull-Up: Hanging Hold

2. Hanging Hold

This pose helps you practice the bottom of the movement, as well as build grip strength. This eccentric phase of the pull-up is all about lowering down with control. How to: Dead hang (relax shoulders and lats) from a bar (a). Pull your shoulders down and squeeze your lats into a reverse shrug (b). [caption id="attachment_61061" align="alignnone" width="620"]Moves to Master a Pull-Up: Bent-Over Row GIFs: Courtesy of the Fhitting Room[/caption]

3. Bent-Over Row

Here, you’ll engage your lats and biceps to give you a full range of motion on the pull. How to: Lunge your left foot forward, and your right foot behind you (a). Hold a dumbbell in your right hand with your left elbow resting on your knee (b). Pull the weight up to your chest, bending your elbow to 90 degrees (b). Maintain a tight core throughout the movement to stay stable (c). RELATED: Your 10-Minute Total-Body Dumbbell Workout Moves to Master a Pull-Up: Hinged Row

4. Hinged Row

Similar to a bent-over row, this move requires you to use two hands simultaneously, which is more accurate to a pull-up. How to: Hold a dumbbell in each hand. Bend over slightly with your knees slightly bent and your back straight (a). Pull dumbbells into your chest and slowly release them back down (b). Moves to Master a Pull-Up: Deep Low Row

5. Deep Low Row

With this move, your bodyweight provides the resistance. You’ll learn how to engage your back while pulling. This will also improve grip strength to hold onto the bar throughout the exercise. Ribeiro uses TRX straps here, but if you can’t get a hold of a pair for your strength workouts, use a bar on a squat rack. How to: Hold two TRX handles with your palms facing in (or holding a bar with both hands). Lean back and walk feet forward so that your body is at a 45-degree angle with the floor (a). Engage your core to stabilize your spine, and pull your chest into your hands (b). Moves to Master a Pull-Up: Bridged Row

6. Bridged Row

Engaging your biceps and lats, this is the next step up to getting accustomed to using your full bodyweight. Again, if needed, use a squat rack bar. Be sure to keep your back straight as you pull your body towards your hands for best results. How to: Position a block or step in front of the TRX straps. Sit down under the handles and grab them. Walk your feet onto the block — you should be hovering horizontally over the floor (a). With arms in front of your chest, pull your body up to your hands (b). RELATED: 5 Total-Body Moves to Take Your TRX Training Up a Notch Moves to Master a Pull-Up: Lat Pull Down

7. Lat Pull Down

Similar to the motion of a pull-up, this move engages your back. Keep your core tight as you pull the bands down to ensure you aren’t arching your back. How to: Loop a resistance band around a bar overhead. Grip each side with one hand and sit on the floor. (a). Pull your hands down toward your chest and release the band slowly to extend your hands up overhead (b). Do a high number of reps (more than 15) to work your full range of motion (c). Moves to Master a Pull-Up: Assisted Pull-Up

8. Assisted Pull-Up

You’re almost there! Loop a band around an overhead bar like in the lat pull down or use a pull-up machine. How to: Holding onto the bar in that hollow position you practiced earlier, pull yourself up to bring your chin to the bar (a). Keep your legs together and engage your core to prevent arching your back (b). Think quality over quantity here — performing sets of 10 reps. RELATED: 5 Badass Resistance Band Exercises for Total-Body Strength Moves to Master a Pull-Up: Negatives

9. Negatives

This move focuses on the bottom portion of a pull-up and engages your back using your full bodyweight. If you can’t hold it at the top yet, that’s OK! (Upper-body strength can take some time to build.) It simply means you need more practice with the other exercises in this routine. How to: Use a box to help you get up to an overhead bar. Start at the top with your chin to the bar (a). Hold for second and then lower down with control (b). Yes, these are meant to be tough — so aim for sets of three to five reps. Moves to Master a Pull-Up: Push Press

10. Push Press Negative

This move will help strengthen your back without having to do a pull motion. How to: Grab a dumbbell in each hand and bring them up to your shoulders (a). Bend your knees and lift the weights over your head (b). Slowly lower yourself towards the ground (c). Perform sets of three to five reps. Again, remember quality over quantity is best here (as with all your workout routines!). Originally published August 2017. Updated February 2018.  Read More: 6 Exercises for the Ultimate Back and Chest Workout 8 Arm Exercises You Haven't Done Before 5 Planks, 10 Minutes: Your Ultimate Ab Workout

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5 Oblique Exercises to Sculpt Your Abs http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/oblique-exercises-ab-workout/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/oblique-exercises-ab-workout/#comments Tue, 30 Jan 2018 16:30:58 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=41795 5 Oblique Exercises to Sculpt Your Abs

[caption id="attachment_65258" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Oblique Exercises to Sculpt Your Abs Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Chances are the center of your midsection gets a little more love than the rest. Both men and women are guilty of skipping oblique exercises to focus on what’s front and center: your rectus abdominal muscles, aka the “six-pack.” However, exercising your obliques (located on either side of the abdomen between your hip flexors and your lats), will translate to a sleeker midsection — not to mention a stronger, more stabilized core. So if tighter abs are on your wish list, it’s time to address the obliques.

“Sports that involve any sort of twisting or balance control call on your obliques for strength and stability,” says Matthew Wert, M.D, an Orthopedic Surgeon and Director of Sports Medicine at New York Methodist Hospital. These key stabilizing muscles are also directly tied to your powerhouse. "They help athletes balance and are recruited in many sport-specific movements that allow the extremities to connect your power through your core,” adds Wert.

Think of your core as a tall building and your obliques as the strong, concrete pillars holding it up. Weak obliques equal a weak core foundation. By increasing oblique and abdominal strength, you will keep your “building” from falling down. You’ll also become more explosive (without putting on unwanted added muscle bulk), Wert says, and address mobility issues, too. Game on!

RELATED: 7 No-Crunch Exercises for Six-Pack Abs

The Best Oblique Exercises for a Hard Core Workout

Oblique Exercises: Bird Dog Crunches

1. Bird Dog Crunches

How to: Start on all fours, placing your hands flat on the ground directly beneath your shoulders, and your knees beneath your hips with a flat back position (a). Engage your core and drive your right arm straight out from your shoulder, while your left leg drives straight back from your hip, keeping both parallel to the floor throughout the “reach” portion of this movement (b). Squeeze your right arm and left leg back to the original starting position and hold for second before starting the second rep (c). Repeat this movement for 10 reps without setting your right arm or left leg on the ground. Then switch to the left arm/right leg combo. Complete 3-4 sets of 10 reps on each side with 30 seconds rest between each set.

Beginner modification: Reach with only your arm at first. Then as you become more comfortable, reach with just your leg before you graduate to the full movement.

Oblique Exercises: Single-Leg Side Plank with Leg Raise

2. Single-Leg Side Plank with Leg Raise

How to: Lie down on your right side, stacking your feet, knees, hips and shoulders over one another in a straight line (a). Prop yourself up on your right elbow and engage your right oblique and hip flexor to maintain this rigid position. Reach your left arm straight up, directly over your shoulder (b). Next, lift your left leg straight up about 6-12 inches, while keeping your foot flexed directly forward. Hold this position for 10-15 seconds, keeping your core rigid while working on “lengthening” your body throughout the entire movement (c). Repeat the same sequence on your left side. Complete 3-4 sets on each side with 30 seconds rest between each set.

Beginner Alternative: Try a simple side plank exercise with the top hand placed on your hip. Then work on raising your arm directly above your head. Finally, try and hold your top leg at full extension for a second. Continue to work in this format until you can extend your leg for 10-15 seconds on each side.

RELATED: 5 Planks to Sculpt Your Core for Summer

Oblique Exercises: Spiderman Crunches

3. Spiderman Crunch

How to: Assume a push-up position, palms planted firmly on the ground. Maintain a straight line from your shoulders to your heels by engaging your core muscles (a). Lift your right leg a couple inches off the ground and bring your right knee towards your right elbow as you lower into a push-up (b). Return your right leg back to the ground as you push yourself back up. Repeat on the left side (c). Alternate legs for 3-4 sets of 10 reps with 30 seconds rest between each set.

Beginner Alternative: Start in the push-up position and alternate lifting your feet up off the ground a few inches with a straight leg and hold each rep for a few seconds. As you make progress, start to bend your knee slightly and bring it towards your elbow.

Oblique Exercises: Side Plank Swipers

4. Side Plank Swipers

How to: Start by lying on your right side, stacking your feet, knees, hips and shoulders over one another in a straight line (a). Prop yourself up on your right elbow; engage your right oblique and hip flexor to maintain this rigid position; stretch your left arm out past your head so it is in line with your body (b). Keeping your left arm straight, swipe it directly over your body towards your left hip and squeeze your left side as hard as you can while holding for a  second. Your right hip will drop slightly during this contraction phase, but try to keep the hips stacked over one another and off the ground (c). Reach back to the original starting position and repeat for 4 additional reps before switching to your left side (d). Do 3-4 sets of 5 reps per side with 30 seconds rest between each set.

Beginner Alternative: Work on a simple side plank hold while contracting the hips towards the floor and back up in a “side crunch.” It's best to try and keep the hips elevated off the floor the whole time then work on the arm extension portion by itself before combining the two into a full contraction.

RELATED: 7 Kick-Butt Burpee Variations You’ll Love to Hate

Oblique Exercises: Single Leg Toe Touches

5. Single-Leg Toe Touches

How to: Lie down on your back with your legs flat against the floor and arms extended above your head (a). Lift your left leg up with your foot directly over your hip and a slight knee bend. Try to keep your left leg engaged in this position for the entire movement (b). Tuck your chin towards your chest, reach your right arm towards your left foot by contracting your core and hold for a second (c). Return to the original starting position while keeping your foot and hand elevated off the ground. Repeat for 4 additional reps before switching to your right leg and left arm (d). Complete 3-4 sets of 5 reps per side with 30 seconds rest between sets.

Beginner Alternative: Work from the same position on your back, but bend your knee at a 90-degree angle halfway towards your chest. Touch your elbow to the opposite knee. As you become more familiar with this movement, try to progress to the full range of motion by straightening your leg a little more with each workout until your foot is directly over your hip.

Originally published July 2015. Updated January 2018.

For the best no-equipment workouts you can do at home, head to DailyBurn.com to try it free for 30 days.

Read More
5 Pilates Exercises to Strengthen Your Deep Abs
50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core
5 No-Equipment Back Exercises You Need in Your Life

The post 5 Oblique Exercises to Sculpt Your Abs appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
5 Oblique Exercises to Sculpt Your Abs

[caption id="attachment_65258" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Oblique Exercises to Sculpt Your Abs Photo: Pond5[/caption] Chances are the center of your midsection gets a little more love than the rest. Both men and women are guilty of skipping oblique exercises to focus on what’s front and center: your rectus abdominal muscles, aka the “six-pack.” However, exercising your obliques (located on either side of the abdomen between your hip flexors and your lats), will translate to a sleeker midsection — not to mention a stronger, more stabilized core. So if tighter abs are on your wish list, it’s time to address the obliques. “Sports that involve any sort of twisting or balance control call on your obliques for strength and stability,” says Matthew Wert, M.D, an Orthopedic Surgeon and Director of Sports Medicine at New York Methodist Hospital. These key stabilizing muscles are also directly tied to your powerhouse. "They help athletes balance and are recruited in many sport-specific movements that allow the extremities to connect your power through your core,” adds Wert. Think of your core as a tall building and your obliques as the strong, concrete pillars holding it up. Weak obliques equal a weak core foundation. By increasing oblique and abdominal strength, you will keep your “building” from falling down. You’ll also become more explosive (without putting on unwanted added muscle bulk), Wert says, and address mobility issues, too. Game on! RELATED: 7 No-Crunch Exercises for Six-Pack Abs

The Best Oblique Exercises for a Hard Core Workout

Oblique Exercises: Bird Dog Crunches

1. Bird Dog Crunches

How to: Start on all fours, placing your hands flat on the ground directly beneath your shoulders, and your knees beneath your hips with a flat back position (a). Engage your core and drive your right arm straight out from your shoulder, while your left leg drives straight back from your hip, keeping both parallel to the floor throughout the “reach” portion of this movement (b). Squeeze your right arm and left leg back to the original starting position and hold for second before starting the second rep (c). Repeat this movement for 10 reps without setting your right arm or left leg on the ground. Then switch to the left arm/right leg combo. Complete 3-4 sets of 10 reps on each side with 30 seconds rest between each set. Beginner modification: Reach with only your arm at first. Then as you become more comfortable, reach with just your leg before you graduate to the full movement. Oblique Exercises: Single-Leg Side Plank with Leg Raise

2. Single-Leg Side Plank with Leg Raise

How to: Lie down on your right side, stacking your feet, knees, hips and shoulders over one another in a straight line (a). Prop yourself up on your right elbow and engage your right oblique and hip flexor to maintain this rigid position. Reach your left arm straight up, directly over your shoulder (b). Next, lift your left leg straight up about 6-12 inches, while keeping your foot flexed directly forward. Hold this position for 10-15 seconds, keeping your core rigid while working on “lengthening” your body throughout the entire movement (c). Repeat the same sequence on your left side. Complete 3-4 sets on each side with 30 seconds rest between each set. Beginner Alternative: Try a simple side plank exercise with the top hand placed on your hip. Then work on raising your arm directly above your head. Finally, try and hold your top leg at full extension for a second. Continue to work in this format until you can extend your leg for 10-15 seconds on each side. RELATED: 5 Planks to Sculpt Your Core for Summer Oblique Exercises: Spiderman Crunches

3. Spiderman Crunch

How to: Assume a push-up position, palms planted firmly on the ground. Maintain a straight line from your shoulders to your heels by engaging your core muscles (a). Lift your right leg a couple inches off the ground and bring your right knee towards your right elbow as you lower into a push-up (b). Return your right leg back to the ground as you push yourself back up. Repeat on the left side (c). Alternate legs for 3-4 sets of 10 reps with 30 seconds rest between each set. Beginner Alternative: Start in the push-up position and alternate lifting your feet up off the ground a few inches with a straight leg and hold each rep for a few seconds. As you make progress, start to bend your knee slightly and bring it towards your elbow. Oblique Exercises: Side Plank Swipers

4. Side Plank Swipers

How to: Start by lying on your right side, stacking your feet, knees, hips and shoulders over one another in a straight line (a). Prop yourself up on your right elbow; engage your right oblique and hip flexor to maintain this rigid position; stretch your left arm out past your head so it is in line with your body (b). Keeping your left arm straight, swipe it directly over your body towards your left hip and squeeze your left side as hard as you can while holding for a  second. Your right hip will drop slightly during this contraction phase, but try to keep the hips stacked over one another and off the ground (c). Reach back to the original starting position and repeat for 4 additional reps before switching to your left side (d). Do 3-4 sets of 5 reps per side with 30 seconds rest between each set. Beginner Alternative: Work on a simple side plank hold while contracting the hips towards the floor and back up in a “side crunch.” It's best to try and keep the hips elevated off the floor the whole time then work on the arm extension portion by itself before combining the two into a full contraction. RELATED: 7 Kick-Butt Burpee Variations You’ll Love to Hate Oblique Exercises: Single Leg Toe Touches

5. Single-Leg Toe Touches

How to: Lie down on your back with your legs flat against the floor and arms extended above your head (a). Lift your left leg up with your foot directly over your hip and a slight knee bend. Try to keep your left leg engaged in this position for the entire movement (b). Tuck your chin towards your chest, reach your right arm towards your left foot by contracting your core and hold for a second (c). Return to the original starting position while keeping your foot and hand elevated off the ground. Repeat for 4 additional reps before switching to your right leg and left arm (d). Complete 3-4 sets of 5 reps per side with 30 seconds rest between sets. Beginner Alternative: Work from the same position on your back, but bend your knee at a 90-degree angle halfway towards your chest. Touch your elbow to the opposite knee. As you become more familiar with this movement, try to progress to the full range of motion by straightening your leg a little more with each workout until your foot is directly over your hip. Originally published July 2015. Updated January 2018. For the best no-equipment workouts you can do at home, head to DailyBurn.com to try it free for 30 days. Read More 5 Pilates Exercises to Strengthen Your Deep Abs 50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core 5 No-Equipment Back Exercises You Need in Your Life

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50 Butt Exercises to Sculpt Stronger Glutes http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/50-butt-exercises-strong-glutes/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/50-butt-exercises-strong-glutes/#respond Wed, 24 Jan 2018 16:15:56 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=59531 50 Butt Exercises to Sculpt Stronger Glutes

[caption id="attachment_59591" align="alignnone" width="620"]50 Butt Exercises to Sculpt Stronger Glutes Photo: Ryan Kelly / Barre Harmony[/caption]

Coveting a better behind isn’t just about aesthetics. A strong and sculpted butt is the secret to improving speed, power and overall sports performance, while also decreasing your risk of injury. After all, your glutes (made up of the gluteus minimus, gluteus medius and gluteus maximus) are the largest and strongest muscles in your body.

So how do you build a stronger backside? Squats are a good place to start. But if you really want to get your booty rock solid, it’s a good idea to incorporate weights, resistance bands, stability balls and even foam rollers into your glute workout. Here are 50 butt exercises that will help you think outside of the box when it comes to squats, lunges, glute bridges, leg lifts and more.

Butt Exercises: Squats, Lunges, Glute Bridges, Leg Lifts and More

Squat Low

Whether you love or hate ‘em, squats are one of the best butt exercises for strengthening your backside. Experts say that if you want to run faster, jump higher and lift heavier, squatting low is the way to go. They might look easy, but prepare to work when you add a barbell, slam ball or heel raise to the mix. These squat variations not only add some power to your jumps and kicks, but they also help improve your knee stability and range of motion. So how low can you go? Try these exercises to find out.

[caption id="attachment_59175" align="alignnone" width="620"]Butt Exercises: Squat to Press Exercise GIF: Daily Burn Power Cardio[/caption]

1. Dumbbell Squat to Press

The beauty of compound exercise really shines through with this squat thruster. Using power from your glutes and lower body, you’ll press the dumbbells up overhead in one continuous movement.

Butt Exercises: Bulgarian Squat Exercise

2. Bulgarian Squat with Slam Ball

Want to amp up your split squat? Try balancing on a slam ball. Engaging your core will help keep your foot from rolling off the ball and move with control. Consider it a must-do if you want a workout that offers core strengthening and a butt lift.

Butt Exercises: Squat Press Exercise

3. Landmine Squat Press

Riding the line between free weights and fixed machines, the landmine is a great way to practice proper form with the squat. Feet should be hip-distance apart and the weight in your heels. Holding onto the landmine with both hands will help keep your chest upright while squatting.

Butt Exercises: Back Squat Exercise

4. Back Squat

Want to nail a badass move with the barbell? The back squat is a good start. Here, you want to sit your body straight down, weight in your heels, while keeping your chest and back upright. Check out more tips on how to nail this move here.

Butt Exercises: Lateral Pistol Squat Exercise

5. Lateral Pistol Squats on Rower

Aside from getting in a killer cardio workout, the rower can work your booty in surprising ways. This lateral pistol squat not only ignites your glutes, but also your inner thighs and quads.

[caption id="attachment_57238" align="alignnone" width="620"]Butt Exercises: Sumo Squat Exercise Photo: Ryan Kelly / Barre Harmony[/caption]

6. Sumo Squat

This barre-inspired bodyweight squat gives you the benefits of isometric exercise without putting pressure on your joints. You’ll not only get your glutes in gear, but your hamstrings and inner thighs, too.

[caption id="attachment_58999" align="alignnone" width="620"]Butt Exercises: Squat Jump Tap Exercise GIF: Daily Burn Power Cardio[/caption]

7. Squat Jump Tap

If you want to train like LeBron (or, ahem, Steph Curry), you’ll get a taste with this basketball-inspired move. As you jump up from the squat position, bring your legs together and pencil your arms up with the ball in your hands. It's one of the best exercises for increasing power.

8. Tricep Extension Squat

You’ll give your triceps some TLC in this squat with extension. As you squat down, swing your arms slightly behind your hips. And then as you stand up straight, extend your arms overhead. Feel free to use a pair of dumbbells to add some weight.

Butt Exercises: Pencil Squat Exercise

9. Pencil Squat

If you’re someone who gets confused about know what to do with your arms in a squat, this move is for you. Reaching your hands up will help you focus on height, while getting your heart rate up, too.

Butt Exercises: Side-to-Side BOSU Squat Exercise

10. Side to Side Squats with Bosu Ball

Testing your agility and coordination, these side-to-side squats will force you to get lower and move more precisely as you tap each foot on the BOSU ball. It's a sneaky way to add in some core work, too.

[caption id="attachment_53508" align="alignnone" width="620"]Butt Exercises: Deep Squat with Heel Raise Exercise Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn 365[/caption]

11. Deep Squat with Heel Raise

Reminiscent of chair pose in yoga, the heel raise will get your calves and quads burning, as well as your back and shoulders. If you want to make it more challenging, alternate heel raises.

[caption id="attachment_22163" align="alignnone" width="620"]Butt Exercises: Front Squat Exercise Photo: Pond5[/caption]

12. Front Squat

Unlike a back squat where you place the barbell across your shoulders and lats, the barbell goes across your collarbone and in front of your body. This will force you to recruit more muscles in your core to maintain proper form.

[caption id="attachment_55643" align="alignnone" width="620"]Butt Exercises: Diagonal Squat Thrust Exercise GIF: Daily Burn 365[/caption]

13. Diagonal Squat Thrust

A variation of the burpee, you’ll jump your feet forward from plank position to a diagonal squat with your hips squared to the front.

Next Up: Lunges

The post 50 Butt Exercises to Sculpt Stronger Glutes appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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50 Butt Exercises to Sculpt Stronger Glutes

[caption id="attachment_59591" align="alignnone" width="620"]50 Butt Exercises to Sculpt Stronger Glutes Photo: Ryan Kelly / Barre Harmony[/caption]

Coveting a better behind isn’t just about aesthetics. A strong and sculpted butt is the secret to improving speed, power and overall sports performance, while also decreasing your risk of injury. After all, your glutes (made up of the gluteus minimus, gluteus medius and gluteus maximus) are the largest and strongest muscles in your body.

So how do you build a stronger backside? Squats are a good place to start. But if you really want to get your booty rock solid, it’s a good idea to incorporate weights, resistance bands, stability balls and even foam rollers into your glute workout. Here are 50 butt exercises that will help you think outside of the box when it comes to squats, lunges, glute bridges, leg lifts and more.

Butt Exercises: Squats, Lunges, Glute Bridges, Leg Lifts and More

Squat Low

Whether you love or hate ‘em, squats are one of the best butt exercises for strengthening your backside. Experts say that if you want to run faster, jump higher and lift heavier, squatting low is the way to go. They might look easy, but prepare to work when you add a barbell, slam ball or heel raise to the mix. These squat variations not only add some power to your jumps and kicks, but they also help improve your knee stability and range of motion. So how low can you go? Try these exercises to find out. [caption id="attachment_59175" align="alignnone" width="620"]Butt Exercises: Squat to Press Exercise GIF: Daily Burn Power Cardio[/caption]

1. Dumbbell Squat to Press

The beauty of compound exercise really shines through with this squat thruster. Using power from your glutes and lower body, you’ll press the dumbbells up overhead in one continuous movement. Butt Exercises: Bulgarian Squat Exercise

2. Bulgarian Squat with Slam Ball

Want to amp up your split squat? Try balancing on a slam ball. Engaging your core will help keep your foot from rolling off the ball and move with control. Consider it a must-do if you want a workout that offers core strengthening and a butt lift. Butt Exercises: Squat Press Exercise

3. Landmine Squat Press

Riding the line between free weights and fixed machines, the landmine is a great way to practice proper form with the squat. Feet should be hip-distance apart and the weight in your heels. Holding onto the landmine with both hands will help keep your chest upright while squatting.

Butt Exercises: Back Squat Exercise

4. Back Squat

Want to nail a badass move with the barbell? The back squat is a good start. Here, you want to sit your body straight down, weight in your heels, while keeping your chest and back upright. Check out more tips on how to nail this move here.

Butt Exercises: Lateral Pistol Squat Exercise

5. Lateral Pistol Squats on Rower

Aside from getting in a killer cardio workout, the rower can work your booty in surprising ways. This lateral pistol squat not only ignites your glutes, but also your inner thighs and quads. [caption id="attachment_57238" align="alignnone" width="620"]Butt Exercises: Sumo Squat Exercise Photo: Ryan Kelly / Barre Harmony[/caption]

6. Sumo Squat

This barre-inspired bodyweight squat gives you the benefits of isometric exercise without putting pressure on your joints. You’ll not only get your glutes in gear, but your hamstrings and inner thighs, too. [caption id="attachment_58999" align="alignnone" width="620"]Butt Exercises: Squat Jump Tap Exercise GIF: Daily Burn Power Cardio[/caption]

7. Squat Jump Tap

If you want to train like LeBron (or, ahem, Steph Curry), you’ll get a taste with this basketball-inspired move. As you jump up from the squat position, bring your legs together and pencil your arms up with the ball in your hands. It's one of the best exercises for increasing power.

8. Tricep Extension Squat

You’ll give your triceps some TLC in this squat with extension. As you squat down, swing your arms slightly behind your hips. And then as you stand up straight, extend your arms overhead. Feel free to use a pair of dumbbells to add some weight. Butt Exercises: Pencil Squat Exercise

9. Pencil Squat

If you’re someone who gets confused about know what to do with your arms in a squat, this move is for you. Reaching your hands up will help you focus on height, while getting your heart rate up, too. Butt Exercises: Side-to-Side BOSU Squat Exercise

10. Side to Side Squats with Bosu Ball

Testing your agility and coordination, these side-to-side squats will force you to get lower and move more precisely as you tap each foot on the BOSU ball. It's a sneaky way to add in some core work, too. [caption id="attachment_53508" align="alignnone" width="620"]Butt Exercises: Deep Squat with Heel Raise Exercise Photo: Ryan Kelly / Daily Burn 365[/caption]

11. Deep Squat with Heel Raise

Reminiscent of chair pose in yoga, the heel raise will get your calves and quads burning, as well as your back and shoulders. If you want to make it more challenging, alternate heel raises. [caption id="attachment_22163" align="alignnone" width="620"]Butt Exercises: Front Squat Exercise Photo: Pond5[/caption]

12. Front Squat

Unlike a back squat where you place the barbell across your shoulders and lats, the barbell goes across your collarbone and in front of your body. This will force you to recruit more muscles in your core to maintain proper form. [caption id="attachment_55643" align="alignnone" width="620"]Butt Exercises: Diagonal Squat Thrust Exercise GIF: Daily Burn 365[/caption]

13. Diagonal Squat Thrust

A variation of the burpee, you’ll jump your feet forward from plank position to a diagonal squat with your hips squared to the front.

Next Up: Lunges

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The Olympic-Inspired Bodyweight Workout http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/olympics-bodyweight-workout-infographic/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/olympics-bodyweight-workout-infographic/#comments Mon, 22 Jan 2018 13:00:11 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=24377 Olympic Workout

[caption id="attachment_65087" align="alignnone" width="620"]Olympic-Inspired Bodyweight Workout Illustration: Tantika Tivorat[/caption]

Not headed to PyeongChang this year? We've got 10 ways you can still get in on the action! This Olympic-inspired bodyweight workout features exercises borrowed from the top winter sports on display. Because who can watch the Olympic Games and not be inspired to move?

This 15-minute bodyweight workout will alternate between training your core, legs, back and arms — all from your living room floor. No dumbbells, snowboards or slopes required! So clear off some space in front of the TV and get ready to channel your inner Olympian. After all, 2022 is just around the corner…

RELATED: 20 Questions with Olympic Skier Gus Kenworthy

15-Minute Olympic-Inspired Bodyweight Workout

15-Minute Olympic Bodyweight Workout

The Basic Bodyweight Exercises

Perform each of the following bodyweight exercises for 30 seconds, followed by a 15-second rest. Continue the circuit all the way through, then repeat a second time. Feeling ready for the world stage? Reduce your rest to 10 seconds (or skip it completely!) for an even greater challenge.

1. Skaters

Bound side to side like (you guessed it) a speed skater to get your heart rate up, while working your glutes, quads and calves. Be sure to keep your hips back and your chest tall, and land with control.

2. Mountain Climbers

These belly fat-torching ab exercises demand stability from your shoulders and core, while providing plyometric benefits from the quick knee drives. Just remember to maintain proper plank form with your shoulders directly over your wrists throughout the entire movement.

3. Jump Squats

It's time to rev up your glute engines! Recruit the muscles in your glutes, quads and core to avoid collapsing your knees and ankles inward.

4. Plank

Hate crunches? The plank is the ultimate core exercise. The isometric hold challenges you to use every inch of your abdominals, from your rectus abdominis to your obliques, to stay stabilized.

5. Lateral Jumps

Take your standard jump squat side to side to improve your hip mobility and flexibility, while firing up your inner and outer thighs, hamstrings and core muscles, too.

6. High Knees

You know the drill! Get those legs up to waist-height, and crank up the intensity, while still landing softly on the balls of your feet.

7. Rotation Jumps

How do snowboarders and skiers land their jumps exactly? It's this heart-pumping move. Drive from your heels, jump off the ground to complete a 180-twist, and then drop back down to a squat.

8. Tricep Dips

If beasting push-ups is your goal, then you better work those triceps! These dips also give some TLC to your upper back and core. Bend your knees if you need to modify.

9. Pistol Squats

You bet you'll see this move in every figure skater's routine. This seriously impressive exercise is a true test of bodyweight strength. To help you balance, hang onto a band or chair and focus on driving through the heel.

10. Yoga Push-Ups

Also known as a chaturanga push-up, you'll keep your elbows anchored closer to your body as you lower yourself to the floor. (Hello, triceps and core!) Your upper body should shift slightly forward as you descend. And your arms should form a 90-degree angle as you lower down from plank position.

To watch the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, tune into NBC starting Friday, February 9 for the Opening Ceremonies.

Originally published February 2014. Updated January 2018.

Read More
5 Easy Exercises for a 30-Minute Arm Workout
50 Ab Exercises for a Stronger Core
3 Quick HIIT Workouts for Beginners

The post The Olympic-Inspired Bodyweight Workout appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
Olympic Workout

[caption id="attachment_65087" align="alignnone" width="620"]Olympic-Inspired Bodyweight Workout Illustration: Tantika Tivorat[/caption] Not headed to PyeongChang this year? We've got 10 ways you can still get in on the action! This Olympic-inspired bodyweight workout features exercises borrowed from the top winter sports on display. Because who can watch the Olympic Games and not be inspired to move? This 15-minute bodyweight workout will alternate between training your core, legs, back and arms — all from your living room floor. No dumbbells, snowboards or slopes required! So clear off some space in front of the TV and get ready to channel your inner Olympian. After all, 2022 is just around the corner… RELATED: 20 Questions with Olympic Skier Gus Kenworthy

15-Minute Olympic-Inspired Bodyweight Workout

15-Minute Olympic Bodyweight Workout

The Basic Bodyweight Exercises

Perform each of the following bodyweight exercises for 30 seconds, followed by a 15-second rest. Continue the circuit all the way through, then repeat a second time. Feeling ready for the world stage? Reduce your rest to 10 seconds (or skip it completely!) for an even greater challenge.

1. Skaters

Bound side to side like (you guessed it) a speed skater to get your heart rate up, while working your glutes, quads and calves. Be sure to keep your hips back and your chest tall, and land with control.

2. Mountain Climbers

These belly fat-torching ab exercises demand stability from your shoulders and core, while providing plyometric benefits from the quick knee drives. Just remember to maintain proper plank form with your shoulders directly over your wrists throughout the entire movement.

3. Jump Squats

It's time to rev up your glute engines! Recruit the muscles in your glutes, quads and core to avoid collapsing your knees and ankles inward.

4. Plank

Hate crunches? The plank is the ultimate core exercise. The isometric hold challenges you to use every inch of your abdominals, from your rectus abdominis to your obliques, to stay stabilized.

5. Lateral Jumps

Take your standard jump squat side to side to improve your hip mobility and flexibility, while firing up your inner and outer thighs, hamstrings and core muscles, too.

6. High Knees

You know the drill! Get those legs up to waist-height, and crank up the intensity, while still landing softly on the balls of your feet.

7. Rotation Jumps

How do snowboarders and skiers land their jumps exactly? It's this heart-pumping move. Drive from your heels, jump off the ground to complete a 180-twist, and then drop back down to a squat.

8. Tricep Dips

If beasting push-ups is your goal, then you better work those triceps! These dips also give some TLC to your upper back and core. Bend your knees if you need to modify.

9. Pistol Squats

You bet you'll see this move in every figure skater's routine. This seriously impressive exercise is a true test of bodyweight strength. To help you balance, hang onto a band or chair and focus on driving through the heel.

10. Yoga Push-Ups

Also known as a chaturanga push-up, you'll keep your elbows anchored closer to your body as you lower yourself to the floor. (Hello, triceps and core!) Your upper body should shift slightly forward as you descend. And your arms should form a 90-degree angle as you lower down from plank position. To watch the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, tune into NBC starting Friday, February 9 for the Opening Ceremonies. Originally published February 2014. Updated January 2018. Read More 5 Easy Exercises for a 30-Minute Arm Workout 50 Ab Exercises for a Stronger Core 3 Quick HIIT Workouts for Beginners

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5 No-Equipment Back Exercises You Need in Your Life http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/no-equipment-back-exercises/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/no-equipment-back-exercises/#comments Sun, 21 Jan 2018 16:15:51 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=39887 5 No-Equipment Back Exercises You Need in Your Life

[caption id="attachment_50398" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 No-Equipment Back Exercises Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Hunching over laptops and smartphones for hours on end does your back no favors. In fact, it’s one of the biggest — and most important — muscle groups we’re guilty of ignoring in our workouts. And the issue isn’t just aesthetics (though a toned back can help you look better in that suit or strapless dress). “Back strengthening exercises are crucial to maintaining functional movement and preventing back injuries for all populations,” says Matthew Wert, M.D., an Orthopedic Surgeon and Director of Sports Medicine at New York Methodist Hospital.

Your back is used in nearly every movement you perform throughout the day, from bending over to tie your shoes, to carrying your backpack or purse. However, the back (particularly the lower back) is one of the most commonly injured parts of the body for all age groups, according to Wert. “Workplace exercises and back health maintenance are crucial. Because although a desk job may seem relatively easy on the body, maintaining a sitting position for long periods of time strains the back and places pressure on our discs,” says Wert.

RELATED: 5 Standing Desk Stretches to Relieve Stress Now

Your job: Make your posterior a priority, Wert says. In addition to getting up and moving around at least once every 60 minutes, get back to basics with a few strengthening bodyweight moves and stretches. The five back exercises below are best for targeting the lats, rhomboids and lumbar muscles in your lower back. You'll also get a good workout for those spinal erector muscles that surround, stabilize and support the spine. The best part? No heavy weights or workout equipment are needed!

The 5 Best Bodyweight Back Exercises

Back Exercises: Reverse Snow Angel

1. Reverse Snow Angels

How to: Position yourself facedown on the ground with arms at your sides and palms facing down. Peel your shoulders and hands a few inches off the ground by pinching your scapulae together and engaging your lats and rhomboids in your mid-back (a). Keeping your head facing down, in a slow, controlled motion, bring your arms up past your shoulders and up to your ears until your thumbs meet directly above your head (b). Then, bring your arms back to the starting position. The key here is keeping the arms straight and elbows locked through the entire movement to engage your lats and shoulders (c). Repeat for 3 sets of 5 reps, with 30-60 seconds of rest between sets.

Beginner modification: Move the arms only halfway so that they are even with your shoulders. Then return to the original starting position.

RELATED: 7 No Crunch Exercises for Six-Pack Abs

Back Exercises: Dolphin Kick Back Exercise

2. Dolphin Kick

How to: Position yourself face down on a bench so that the crease of your hip is at the end of the bench. Your feet should be resting on the ground with your hands firmly engaged on the underside of the bench for support (a). Straighten out your legs while raising them up while engaging your abdominals, glutes, hips and spinal erectors in your lower back. Your toes should be pointed away from your body and above your head at the top of the movement (b). Hold this static position for 5 seconds by firmly engaging nearly every muscle in your body. Then drop the feet slightly below the bench and contracting again for 4 additional reps (c). Repeat for 3 sets of 5 reps, with 30-60 seconds of rest between sets.

Beginner modification: Move the hips slightly further up the bench so the trunk is better supported.

Back Exercises: Superman Back Exercise

3. Superman

How to: Lie facedown with your chin on the ground and eyes at a neutral gaze. Your ankles should be touching with toes pointed under you (a). Reach your arms straight out above your shoulders so your palms are resting flat on the floor. Engage your back, glutes and shoulders to pull yourself a few inches off the ground (b). Your arms and legs should remain fully contracted so that your hands and feet are elevated to the same relative height at the top of the static hold position. Hold this position while fully engaging your body to “fly” like the man of steel (c). Repeat for 3 reps with a 15-30 second static hold, and 30-60 seconds rest between sets.

Beginner modification: Perform an “Aquaman” by raising and lowering the opposite arm and leg simultaneously in the same fashion as the “Superman.” Hold for 5 seconds, and shoot for 3 sets of 10 reps with a 1-minute rest.

RELATED: The Body-Sculpting TRX Abs Workout

Back Exercises: Hip Hinge Back Exercise

4. Hip Hinge (aka Good Mornings)

How to: Stand up straight with your hands on your hips. Your feet should be slightly wider than your hips and firmly planted on the ground. Start the movement by engaging your core, pushing your ribs down and pulling your shoulders slightly back with a neutral neck position (a). Bend forward at the waist in a slow and controlled manner while keeping your shoulders in line with your hips (b). Keep your back, glutes and hamstrings engaged throughout the exercise. Bend forward until you are parallel, or just above parallel to the floor, before bringing yourself back up to the starting position and repeating (c). Note: A common error to this exercise is rounding the back, resulting in a loss of the neutral spine position. Form is crucial to this exercise and should be replicated perfectly on each rep to avoid injury and get the most out of the exercise. Repeat for 3 sets of 10-15 reps, with a 30-60 second rest between sets.

Beginner modification: Perform seated good mornings instead. Sit in a chair with your shoulders over your hips, legs bent at a 45-degree angle. Plant your feet firmly underneath your knees, hands on your hips. Engage your core and slightly pull your shoulders back, then proceed to bend forward to a 45-degree angle before coming back to the starting position.

RELATED: The Beginner's Guide to Pistol Squats

Back Exercises: Nose and Toes Against the Wall

5. Nose and Toes Against the Wall

How to: Up for a real challenge? Even experienced gym rats should proceed with caution. For this advanced move, you’ll start in a push-up position with your feet against the wall (a). Next, walk your feet up the wall while keeping your core tight, hips flexed and spine neutral (b). Place your palms firmly on the ground just outside shoulder width as you begin to inch your hands toward the wall. The top of the position will be reached when just your nose and toes touch the wall with firm hand placement on the floor and rigid core for a “hollow body” position (c). Upon completion, safely come down by walking your hands away from the wall and bringing your feet down in a controlled manner (d). Repeat for 3 reps with a 15-30 second static hold, and 30-60 seconds rest between sets.

Beginner modification: Stand with your back against a wall with feet spread apart wide. Bend your knees and place your hands firmly on the floor, slightly wider than your shoulders. Straighten out your legs to just a “soft knee” and begin to walk your hands in towards your feet, head in neutral alignment with your spine. Actively push your glutes to the ceiling as your core and back remain rigid and your shoulders open up. You may notice a good stretch, too. Who says you can’t get strong and mobile at the same time?

Originally posted May 2015. Updated January 2018.

Read More
275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine
How to Fix Text Neck and Improve Your Posture
8 Ways to Amp Up Your Bodyweight Workout

The post 5 No-Equipment Back Exercises You Need in Your Life appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
5 No-Equipment Back Exercises You Need in Your Life

[caption id="attachment_50398" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 No-Equipment Back Exercises Photo: Pond5[/caption] Hunching over laptops and smartphones for hours on end does your back no favors. In fact, it’s one of the biggest — and most important — muscle groups we’re guilty of ignoring in our workouts. And the issue isn’t just aesthetics (though a toned back can help you look better in that suit or strapless dress). “Back strengthening exercises are crucial to maintaining functional movement and preventing back injuries for all populations,” says Matthew Wert, M.D., an Orthopedic Surgeon and Director of Sports Medicine at New York Methodist Hospital. Your back is used in nearly every movement you perform throughout the day, from bending over to tie your shoes, to carrying your backpack or purse. However, the back (particularly the lower back) is one of the most commonly injured parts of the body for all age groups, according to Wert. “Workplace exercises and back health maintenance are crucial. Because although a desk job may seem relatively easy on the body, maintaining a sitting position for long periods of time strains the back and places pressure on our discs,” says Wert. RELATED: 5 Standing Desk Stretches to Relieve Stress Now Your job: Make your posterior a priority, Wert says. In addition to getting up and moving around at least once every 60 minutes, get back to basics with a few strengthening bodyweight moves and stretches. The five back exercises below are best for targeting the lats, rhomboids and lumbar muscles in your lower back. You'll also get a good workout for those spinal erector muscles that surround, stabilize and support the spine. The best part? No heavy weights or workout equipment are needed!

The 5 Best Bodyweight Back Exercises

Back Exercises: Reverse Snow Angel

1. Reverse Snow Angels

How to: Position yourself facedown on the ground with arms at your sides and palms facing down. Peel your shoulders and hands a few inches off the ground by pinching your scapulae together and engaging your lats and rhomboids in your mid-back (a). Keeping your head facing down, in a slow, controlled motion, bring your arms up past your shoulders and up to your ears until your thumbs meet directly above your head (b). Then, bring your arms back to the starting position. The key here is keeping the arms straight and elbows locked through the entire movement to engage your lats and shoulders (c). Repeat for 3 sets of 5 reps, with 30-60 seconds of rest between sets. Beginner modification: Move the arms only halfway so that they are even with your shoulders. Then return to the original starting position. RELATED: 7 No Crunch Exercises for Six-Pack Abs Back Exercises: Dolphin Kick Back Exercise

2. Dolphin Kick

How to: Position yourself face down on a bench so that the crease of your hip is at the end of the bench. Your feet should be resting on the ground with your hands firmly engaged on the underside of the bench for support (a). Straighten out your legs while raising them up while engaging your abdominals, glutes, hips and spinal erectors in your lower back. Your toes should be pointed away from your body and above your head at the top of the movement (b). Hold this static position for 5 seconds by firmly engaging nearly every muscle in your body. Then drop the feet slightly below the bench and contracting again for 4 additional reps (c). Repeat for 3 sets of 5 reps, with 30-60 seconds of rest between sets. Beginner modification: Move the hips slightly further up the bench so the trunk is better supported. Back Exercises: Superman Back Exercise

3. Superman

How to: Lie facedown with your chin on the ground and eyes at a neutral gaze. Your ankles should be touching with toes pointed under you (a). Reach your arms straight out above your shoulders so your palms are resting flat on the floor. Engage your back, glutes and shoulders to pull yourself a few inches off the ground (b). Your arms and legs should remain fully contracted so that your hands and feet are elevated to the same relative height at the top of the static hold position. Hold this position while fully engaging your body to “fly” like the man of steel (c). Repeat for 3 reps with a 15-30 second static hold, and 30-60 seconds rest between sets. Beginner modification: Perform an “Aquaman” by raising and lowering the opposite arm and leg simultaneously in the same fashion as the “Superman.” Hold for 5 seconds, and shoot for 3 sets of 10 reps with a 1-minute rest. RELATED: The Body-Sculpting TRX Abs Workout Back Exercises: Hip Hinge Back Exercise

4. Hip Hinge (aka Good Mornings)

How to: Stand up straight with your hands on your hips. Your feet should be slightly wider than your hips and firmly planted on the ground. Start the movement by engaging your core, pushing your ribs down and pulling your shoulders slightly back with a neutral neck position (a). Bend forward at the waist in a slow and controlled manner while keeping your shoulders in line with your hips (b). Keep your back, glutes and hamstrings engaged throughout the exercise. Bend forward until you are parallel, or just above parallel to the floor, before bringing yourself back up to the starting position and repeating (c). Note: A common error to this exercise is rounding the back, resulting in a loss of the neutral spine position. Form is crucial to this exercise and should be replicated perfectly on each rep to avoid injury and get the most out of the exercise. Repeat for 3 sets of 10-15 reps, with a 30-60 second rest between sets. Beginner modification: Perform seated good mornings instead. Sit in a chair with your shoulders over your hips, legs bent at a 45-degree angle. Plant your feet firmly underneath your knees, hands on your hips. Engage your core and slightly pull your shoulders back, then proceed to bend forward to a 45-degree angle before coming back to the starting position. RELATED: The Beginner's Guide to Pistol Squats Back Exercises: Nose and Toes Against the Wall

5. Nose and Toes Against the Wall

How to: Up for a real challenge? Even experienced gym rats should proceed with caution. For this advanced move, you’ll start in a push-up position with your feet against the wall (a). Next, walk your feet up the wall while keeping your core tight, hips flexed and spine neutral (b). Place your palms firmly on the ground just outside shoulder width as you begin to inch your hands toward the wall. The top of the position will be reached when just your nose and toes touch the wall with firm hand placement on the floor and rigid core for a “hollow body” position (c). Upon completion, safely come down by walking your hands away from the wall and bringing your feet down in a controlled manner (d). Repeat for 3 reps with a 15-30 second static hold, and 30-60 seconds rest between sets. Beginner modification: Stand with your back against a wall with feet spread apart wide. Bend your knees and place your hands firmly on the floor, slightly wider than your shoulders. Straighten out your legs to just a “soft knee” and begin to walk your hands in towards your feet, head in neutral alignment with your spine. Actively push your glutes to the ceiling as your core and back remain rigid and your shoulders open up. You may notice a good stretch, too. Who says you can’t get strong and mobile at the same time? Originally posted May 2015. Updated January 2018. Read More 275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine How to Fix Text Neck and Improve Your Posture 8 Ways to Amp Up Your Bodyweight Workout

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Olympic Preview: Meet 3 Team USA Skiing Hopefuls http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/2018-winter-olympics-preview-skiing/ Thu, 18 Jan 2018 12:15:07 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=64920 Olympic Preview: Meet 3 Team USA Skiing Hopefuls

[caption id="attachment_64929" align="alignnone" width="620"]Olympic Preview: Meet 3 Team USA Skiing Hopefuls Photo courtesy of The North Face[/caption]

Consider your favorite activity of all time — the one you could do all day, every day. Then imagine being #blessed enough to spin that into your dream job. That’s exactly how freeskiers Maddie Bowman, Aaron Blunck and Devin Logan feel about spending time on the slopes. It’s not a 9-to-5 for The North Face-sponsored athletes — it’s a lifestyle. As they put it, they’re just three ski bums turned Olympic medalists who want to laugh with their friends down the mountain.

And they do — right before speeding off to vie for another spot on the podium. This year, that competitive stage will be in PyeongChang for the 2018 Winter Olympics. (They’ll find out the final Team USA roster on January 22.) But these three skiers have already earned top medals, a few times over. California native, Bowman, 24, snagged gold at the 2014 Olympics in halfpipe and four from the X Games. Vermonter turned Utah resident, Logan, 24 — who competes in both halfpipe and slopestyle — won silver in Sochi. And Blunck, a 21-year-old from Colorado, won gold at the 2017 Winter X Games in the men’s superpipe.

While the hardware provides a little incentive to work harder, Bowman, Blunck and Logan still gush that it’s their love for the sport that really keeps them going. Here’s a glimpse into their lives, on and off the snow, and why they’re stoked to hang at the start gate of the 2018 Olympic Games.

RELATED: 20 Questions with Olympic Skier Gus Kenworthy

Olympic Hopefuls Talk Fitness, Nerves and Their Passion for Skiing

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bd0WsBGgnLX/

On their love of skiing...

Maddie Bowman: “I love it because, honestly, it’s the place where I feel I can be myself. It’s very freeing and challenging — and there’s just nowhere I’d rather be. We’re all just ski bums at heart. I think I’d be doing this even if it wasn’t my career. I know I’ll be a skier for the rest of my life. That really makes me happy.”

Aaron Blunck: “I never expected to be a pro skier. Obviously I had dreams as a kid. I loved skiing. I started at 18 months old. But it wasn't that I was doing it because I needed to get to the next level... At the end of the day, there’s really nothing better than sliding down the snow as fast as you can and flying through the air. It’s the closest thing to being a bird that you could do.”

Devin Logan: “The friends I made through skiing are my closest friends. It’s just a level you connect on — being outside and being silly, going fast. All I wanted to do was be Picabo Street and go fast and not have poles. It’s that freedom that not a lot of people can get. You can express yourself in different ways. You can just fly and get away from everything… The wind in your hair is the best therapy you can get.”

RELATED: 8 Signs You’re Way Too Stressed (And How to Deal)

On doing it for family…

DL: “My brothers went to a ski academy five months out of the year, so I followed in their footsteps. [My family] believes in tough love. My brothers were always saying, ‘You're doing this trick and you're doing it now or else you're not eating.’ So I definitely progressed quickly and then started going to bigger competitions and realizing that my skill level was above norm... The biggest thing was the approval of my brothers. [My relationship with them] made me who I am today. It made me tough in this sport — which is a tough one. You definitely take some hits.”

AB: “Just like Devin's brother, my older brother kind of paved the path for me in skiing and every sport I did with him. I’m still always super thankful I grew up skiing with him because, I don't get to ski with him all the time, but when I do, it's typically the best days out of my year. He's always someone who's cared about not necessarily me as a skier, but me as a person.”

RELATED: 21 Signs You’ve Found Your Fitness Swole Mate 

On what their gym sessions look like...

DL: “A main focus in our sport is the landing. We try to focus on the hips to take the impact off our knees. And you need to be ready for single-leg landings... I’ve gotten a little bit more gym time to buckle down, get strong, and help me get through the season. In the last year or two that's what I've focused on and I've really felt a difference. [It’s helped me] make it through the whole season, feeling good and strong. Competing in two events takes a lot out of you.”

MB: “We do a lot of lifting, like back squats, front squats, deadlifts, cleans and then core work. With lifting, we’re not trying to max out. Being powerful is the most important thing.”

AB: “I do a lot of cardio and more bodyweight exercises, just because we don’t want to be the biggest.”

RELATED: 275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine

https://www.instagram.com/p/BTAA0g4Fq81/

On their favorite way to cross-train…

MB: “I am an activity addict. I like to go mountain biking or go to the beach or go out on the boat. Then in the winter, I go to the gym...When we're not skiing or training for an event, we’re still skiing, whether it's just around the resort, or hiking and then skiing.”

AB: “I mountain bike, as well as skateboard, and then I recently got into running. It’s cool getting out of my comfort zone, because I’ve never trained for running before. Now that I have a trainer, she actually helps me with my mechanics — like learning how to have less impact on my heels, ankles and knees.... I’ve also recently started doing hill sprints, which is brutal. I’d almost rather do that than a 10-mile jog, though, because it’s only 500 yards up a hill. You get back a lot quicker.”

DL: “I actually just bought a road bike. I’ve been getting into that for cardio, and I’ve been getting into running a little bit, too. I’m definitely not a long-distance runner. I try to ride the bike for 20 minutes, then run a mile and get back on the bike.... But also, I’m a big proponent of sleep and rest. I’m always go, go, go, so when I get the time, I just sit. I’ve learned now, over the past few years, that the best recovery for me and my body is to rest. I know deep down I need to physically just rest my body because the next day, it will be even better.”

On coming back from injuries...

MB: “I've had two major knee surgeries... And you just try to do as much as you can with the rest of your body while you're waiting. I think that really helps you when you start going back to the gym. You have to start out doing small movements, like learning how to do a squat... Then, when you take your first step again, you’re like, ‘This is the best day of my life.' You do take those things for granted [when you’re not injured], but when you get back, it’s a big realization of, ‘Wow, walking is pretty awesome.’”

DL: “The injury was an eye-opening experience that the gym is a crucial part of our sport to maintain strength and overall abilities. It's kind of a shocking realization when you get hurt and then your life is the gym. Mentally, it's exhausting. You try to do something that seems normal, like walking, and you can't for a little bit. It takes a lot of mentally strengthening... Slowing down is super hard for me. I had to occupy my time with other things.”

AB: “I have such a hard time taking myself out and it’s come to the point where — Devin has done it to me a couple times — she’s come up and said, ‘You need to stop skiing.’ I've had some back issues for a few years now, and doing core exercises has been the best thing I could have ever done. I swear to it now. I do it every single day, even if it's really quick, like a set of 50 crunches and push-ups, and a two-minute plank.”

RELATED: 50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core

https://www.instagram.com/p/BYMtrRClW9c/

On what it’s like right before a big run...

MB: “I think we still get nervous, but for me personally, I like to just keep it light and fun at the top of the halfpipe and joke around and chat with people. Everyone’s super nice and fun up there... You’re up there with all your friends and you’re genuinely happy to see everybody and talk. It’s nice.”

AB: “I definitely found out that the more I mess around and joke about things [at the start], the better off I am.”

DL: “I mean, the nerves have definitely calmed down, but they're still there. I think it just means you're still passionate about it. You still care. You still want to do well. But I express it, again, in a fun, joking way. I also have to listen to music when I ski. Either you have that pump-up song [often DMX], or you're too pumped up and you need to calm it down a little right before your run. So I'm up there listening to music, most likely singing out loud, being tone deaf, hurting everyone's ears. But again, I just can’t think about it too much. When you’re relaxed, you perform better.”

The Opening Ceremonies for the 2018 PyeongChang Olympic Games will air on Friday, February 9 on NBC

Read More
Inside the Mind of an Ultrarunner: Meet Dylan Bowman
8 Exercises Trainers Never Do (And What to Do Instead)
The 10-Minute Rowing Workout This Olympian Swears By

The post Olympic Preview: Meet 3 Team USA Skiing Hopefuls appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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Olympic Preview: Meet 3 Team USA Skiing Hopefuls

[caption id="attachment_64929" align="alignnone" width="620"]Olympic Preview: Meet 3 Team USA Skiing Hopefuls Photo courtesy of The North Face[/caption] Consider your favorite activity of all time — the one you could do all day, every day. Then imagine being #blessed enough to spin that into your dream job. That’s exactly how freeskiers Maddie Bowman, Aaron Blunck and Devin Logan feel about spending time on the slopes. It’s not a 9-to-5 for The North Face-sponsored athletes — it’s a lifestyle. As they put it, they’re just three ski bums turned Olympic medalists who want to laugh with their friends down the mountain. And they do — right before speeding off to vie for another spot on the podium. This year, that competitive stage will be in PyeongChang for the 2018 Winter Olympics. (They’ll find out the final Team USA roster on January 22.) But these three skiers have already earned top medals, a few times over. California native, Bowman, 24, snagged gold at the 2014 Olympics in halfpipe and four from the X Games. Vermonter turned Utah resident, Logan, 24 — who competes in both halfpipe and slopestyle — won silver in Sochi. And Blunck, a 21-year-old from Colorado, won gold at the 2017 Winter X Games in the men’s superpipe. While the hardware provides a little incentive to work harder, Bowman, Blunck and Logan still gush that it’s their love for the sport that really keeps them going. Here’s a glimpse into their lives, on and off the snow, and why they’re stoked to hang at the start gate of the 2018 Olympic Games. RELATED: 20 Questions with Olympic Skier Gus Kenworthy

Olympic Hopefuls Talk Fitness, Nerves and Their Passion for Skiing

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bd0WsBGgnLX/

On their love of skiing...

Maddie Bowman: “I love it because, honestly, it’s the place where I feel I can be myself. It’s very freeing and challenging — and there’s just nowhere I’d rather be. We’re all just ski bums at heart. I think I’d be doing this even if it wasn’t my career. I know I’ll be a skier for the rest of my life. That really makes me happy.” Aaron Blunck: “I never expected to be a pro skier. Obviously I had dreams as a kid. I loved skiing. I started at 18 months old. But it wasn't that I was doing it because I needed to get to the next level... At the end of the day, there’s really nothing better than sliding down the snow as fast as you can and flying through the air. It’s the closest thing to being a bird that you could do.” Devin Logan: “The friends I made through skiing are my closest friends. It’s just a level you connect on — being outside and being silly, going fast. All I wanted to do was be Picabo Street and go fast and not have poles. It’s that freedom that not a lot of people can get. You can express yourself in different ways. You can just fly and get away from everything… The wind in your hair is the best therapy you can get.” RELATED: 8 Signs You’re Way Too Stressed (And How to Deal)

On doing it for family…

DL: “My brothers went to a ski academy five months out of the year, so I followed in their footsteps. [My family] believes in tough love. My brothers were always saying, ‘You're doing this trick and you're doing it now or else you're not eating.’ So I definitely progressed quickly and then started going to bigger competitions and realizing that my skill level was above norm... The biggest thing was the approval of my brothers. [My relationship with them] made me who I am today. It made me tough in this sport — which is a tough one. You definitely take some hits.” AB: “Just like Devin's brother, my older brother kind of paved the path for me in skiing and every sport I did with him. I’m still always super thankful I grew up skiing with him because, I don't get to ski with him all the time, but when I do, it's typically the best days out of my year. He's always someone who's cared about not necessarily me as a skier, but me as a person.” RELATED: 21 Signs You’ve Found Your Fitness Swole Mate 

On what their gym sessions look like...

DL: “A main focus in our sport is the landing. We try to focus on the hips to take the impact off our knees. And you need to be ready for single-leg landings... I’ve gotten a little bit more gym time to buckle down, get strong, and help me get through the season. In the last year or two that's what I've focused on and I've really felt a difference. [It’s helped me] make it through the whole season, feeling good and strong. Competing in two events takes a lot out of you.” MB: “We do a lot of lifting, like back squats, front squats, deadlifts, cleans and then core work. With lifting, we’re not trying to max out. Being powerful is the most important thing.” AB: “I do a lot of cardio and more bodyweight exercises, just because we don’t want to be the biggest.” RELATED: 275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine https://www.instagram.com/p/BTAA0g4Fq81/

On their favorite way to cross-train…

MB: “I am an activity addict. I like to go mountain biking or go to the beach or go out on the boat. Then in the winter, I go to the gym...When we're not skiing or training for an event, we’re still skiing, whether it's just around the resort, or hiking and then skiing.” AB: “I mountain bike, as well as skateboard, and then I recently got into running. It’s cool getting out of my comfort zone, because I’ve never trained for running before. Now that I have a trainer, she actually helps me with my mechanics — like learning how to have less impact on my heels, ankles and knees.... I’ve also recently started doing hill sprints, which is brutal. I’d almost rather do that than a 10-mile jog, though, because it’s only 500 yards up a hill. You get back a lot quicker.” DL: “I actually just bought a road bike. I’ve been getting into that for cardio, and I’ve been getting into running a little bit, too. I’m definitely not a long-distance runner. I try to ride the bike for 20 minutes, then run a mile and get back on the bike.... But also, I’m a big proponent of sleep and rest. I’m always go, go, go, so when I get the time, I just sit. I’ve learned now, over the past few years, that the best recovery for me and my body is to rest. I know deep down I need to physically just rest my body because the next day, it will be even better.”

On coming back from injuries...

MB: “I've had two major knee surgeries... And you just try to do as much as you can with the rest of your body while you're waiting. I think that really helps you when you start going back to the gym. You have to start out doing small movements, like learning how to do a squat... Then, when you take your first step again, you’re like, ‘This is the best day of my life.' You do take those things for granted [when you’re not injured], but when you get back, it’s a big realization of, ‘Wow, walking is pretty awesome.’” DL: “The injury was an eye-opening experience that the gym is a crucial part of our sport to maintain strength and overall abilities. It's kind of a shocking realization when you get hurt and then your life is the gym. Mentally, it's exhausting. You try to do something that seems normal, like walking, and you can't for a little bit. It takes a lot of mentally strengthening... Slowing down is super hard for me. I had to occupy my time with other things.” AB: “I have such a hard time taking myself out and it’s come to the point where — Devin has done it to me a couple times — she’s come up and said, ‘You need to stop skiing.’ I've had some back issues for a few years now, and doing core exercises has been the best thing I could have ever done. I swear to it now. I do it every single day, even if it's really quick, like a set of 50 crunches and push-ups, and a two-minute plank.” RELATED: 50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core https://www.instagram.com/p/BYMtrRClW9c/

On what it’s like right before a big run...

MB: “I think we still get nervous, but for me personally, I like to just keep it light and fun at the top of the halfpipe and joke around and chat with people. Everyone’s super nice and fun up there... You’re up there with all your friends and you’re genuinely happy to see everybody and talk. It’s nice.” AB: “I definitely found out that the more I mess around and joke about things [at the start], the better off I am.” DL: “I mean, the nerves have definitely calmed down, but they're still there. I think it just means you're still passionate about it. You still care. You still want to do well. But I express it, again, in a fun, joking way. I also have to listen to music when I ski. Either you have that pump-up song [often DMX], or you're too pumped up and you need to calm it down a little right before your run. So I'm up there listening to music, most likely singing out loud, being tone deaf, hurting everyone's ears. But again, I just can’t think about it too much. When you’re relaxed, you perform better.” The Opening Ceremonies for the 2018 PyeongChang Olympic Games will air on Friday, February 9 on NBC Read More Inside the Mind of an Ultrarunner: Meet Dylan Bowman 8 Exercises Trainers Never Do (And What to Do Instead) The 10-Minute Rowing Workout This Olympian Swears By

The post Olympic Preview: Meet 3 Team USA Skiing Hopefuls appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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How Exercise Changed These 7 People’s Lives http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/inspiring-stories-fitness-motivation/ Wed, 17 Jan 2018 12:15:50 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=64876 Fitness Motivation: 7 Inspiring Stories of How Exercise Changed 7 Lives

[caption id="attachment_64888" align="alignnone" width="620"]Fitness Motivation: 7 Inspiring Stories of How Exercise Changed These 7 Lives Photos (clockwise from top left): Stephanie Laska / PowerBar, Heather Laptolo / Michael Lambert, Mike Ergo / Tony Svensson, Krista Meinert[/caption]

Exercise has countless benefits. Of course, there’s the weight loss and muscle gains — the aesthetic changes that people tend to notice the most. Then, there’s the physiological advantages of better sleep, more energy, disease prevention and enhanced immunity. Finally comes the mental side — a boost in self-confidence, a new joy for life, and even a drive for stronger social connections. All of these powerful pay-offs can come from taking it just one step at a time. And these seven women and men provide living proof.

Let their inspiring stories of struggles and triumph, heartbreak and resilience drive you to sign up for that 5K you’re nervous about, to take that strength class you’ve always wanted to, or even just to take a walk outside this afternoon. All you need is a little reminder about how good it can feel — for your body and mind — to keep moving forward.

RELATED: 9 Ways to Find Workout Motivation (Every Damn Day)

7 Inspiring Stories on How Exercise Can Change a Life

[caption id="attachment_64889" align="alignnone" width="620"]Inspiring Stories for Fitness Motivation: Stephanie Laska Photo Courtesy of PowerBar[/caption]

1. Stephanie Laska: Small Steps, Big Benefits

“Exercise for me is not about running a marathon, it’s about those daily decisions to just go outside.”

Growing up, Stephanie Laska, 44, never worked out. She chose music class over P.E., and had Kool-Aid and Froot Loops every day. It wasn’t until her 40s, weighing around 300 pounds, that she decided she need a lifestyle reboot. A few simple diet changes, like dropping sugary soda and limiting beer and desserts, helped her lose 50 pounds. But she quickly hit a plateau and knew it was time to start moving.

“The details [of a workout schedule] stressed me out at first,” says the Californian. “When do you exercise? Who takes the kids to school? Who makes dinner?” After a few months of putting it off, she decided to just walk. Not long after, when she was walking her typical route around a tennis court, she decided to pick it up and run the length of one side. Then, she ran two sides, then three, then a full loop, until she ran her first mile in 2014.

“I was keeping it a secret at this point and I remember taking my kids to the park one day. They were on the bikes and got far ahead of me, so I decided to run to catch up,” Laska recalls. “The look on my daughter’s face when she saw me running was like she saw Santa Claus.” That’s when Laska started taking her one-mile jogs up to a 5k, 10k, half-marathon and eventually, marathon distance.

Laska ran her first 26.2 in 2015, scoring first place in her age group. She completed her second this past fall in NYC, as a member of the PowerBar Clean Start team, just one year after having major surgery.

“What motivated me to keep going was that it wasn’t as hard as I made it out to be,” says Laska, who lost a total of 140 pounds and has kept it off for four years now. “People tend to make these huge decisions — like joining a gym or signing up for bootcamp — but I just made a tiny choice to take a walk around the block. I always try to remind myself that those little decisions snowball, positive or negative.”

The idea of taking life one step at a time has led Laska to make more time for herself, and say no to responsibilities that don’t improve her well-being. This has also improved her relationships with her husband and kids and even brought on a promotion at work, she says. “People always ask the hardest thing about losing weight, and I respond that it was saying no to buttered popcorn at the movies,” Laska says. “Exercise for me is not about running a marathon, it’s about those daily decisions to just go outside.”

RELATED: Why I Started Running — And Never Stopped

Click HERE to Read Mike Ergo's Story of Resilience Post-Military

The post How Exercise Changed These 7 People’s Lives appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
Fitness Motivation: 7 Inspiring Stories of How Exercise Changed 7 Lives

[caption id="attachment_64888" align="alignnone" width="620"]Fitness Motivation: 7 Inspiring Stories of How Exercise Changed These 7 Lives Photos (clockwise from top left): Stephanie Laska / PowerBar, Heather Laptolo / Michael Lambert, Mike Ergo / Tony Svensson, Krista Meinert[/caption] Exercise has countless benefits. Of course, there’s the weight loss and muscle gains — the aesthetic changes that people tend to notice the most. Then, there’s the physiological advantages of better sleep, more energy, disease prevention and enhanced immunity. Finally comes the mental side — a boost in self-confidence, a new joy for life, and even a drive for stronger social connections. All of these powerful pay-offs can come from taking it just one step at a time. And these seven women and men provide living proof. Let their inspiring stories of struggles and triumph, heartbreak and resilience drive you to sign up for that 5K you’re nervous about, to take that strength class you’ve always wanted to, or even just to take a walk outside this afternoon. All you need is a little reminder about how good it can feel — for your body and mind — to keep moving forward. RELATED: 9 Ways to Find Workout Motivation (Every Damn Day)

7 Inspiring Stories on How Exercise Can Change a Life

[caption id="attachment_64889" align="alignnone" width="620"]Inspiring Stories for Fitness Motivation: Stephanie Laska Photo Courtesy of PowerBar[/caption]

1. Stephanie Laska: Small Steps, Big Benefits

“Exercise for me is not about running a marathon, it’s about those daily decisions to just go outside.”
Growing up, Stephanie Laska, 44, never worked out. She chose music class over P.E., and had Kool-Aid and Froot Loops every day. It wasn’t until her 40s, weighing around 300 pounds, that she decided she need a lifestyle reboot. A few simple diet changes, like dropping sugary soda and limiting beer and desserts, helped her lose 50 pounds. But she quickly hit a plateau and knew it was time to start moving. “The details [of a workout schedule] stressed me out at first,” says the Californian. “When do you exercise? Who takes the kids to school? Who makes dinner?” After a few months of putting it off, she decided to just walk. Not long after, when she was walking her typical route around a tennis court, she decided to pick it up and run the length of one side. Then, she ran two sides, then three, then a full loop, until she ran her first mile in 2014. “I was keeping it a secret at this point and I remember taking my kids to the park one day. They were on the bikes and got far ahead of me, so I decided to run to catch up,” Laska recalls. “The look on my daughter’s face when she saw me running was like she saw Santa Claus.” That’s when Laska started taking her one-mile jogs up to a 5k, 10k, half-marathon and eventually, marathon distance. Laska ran her first 26.2 in 2015, scoring first place in her age group. She completed her second this past fall in NYC, as a member of the PowerBar Clean Start team, just one year after having major surgery. “What motivated me to keep going was that it wasn’t as hard as I made it out to be,” says Laska, who lost a total of 140 pounds and has kept it off for four years now. “People tend to make these huge decisions — like joining a gym or signing up for bootcamp — but I just made a tiny choice to take a walk around the block. I always try to remind myself that those little decisions snowball, positive or negative.” The idea of taking life one step at a time has led Laska to make more time for herself, and say no to responsibilities that don’t improve her well-being. This has also improved her relationships with her husband and kids and even brought on a promotion at work, she says. “People always ask the hardest thing about losing weight, and I respond that it was saying no to buttered popcorn at the movies,” Laska says. “Exercise for me is not about running a marathon, it’s about those daily decisions to just go outside.” RELATED: Why I Started Running — And Never Stopped Click HERE to Read Mike Ergo's Story of Resilience Post-Military

The post How Exercise Changed These 7 People’s Lives appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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8 Exercises Trainers Never Do (And What to Do Instead) http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/worst-strength-exercises-trainer-tips/ Mon, 15 Jan 2018 16:15:45 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=64783

[caption id="attachment_64798" align="alignnone" width="620"]8 Strength Exercises Trainers Never Do (And What to Do Instead) Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

Heading into the gym with a solid workout plan is a surefire way to have a successful, efficient sweat session. But figuring out exactly what strength exercises to do can get a little tricky. While certain exercises (think biceps curls and crunches) seem like easy, familiar choices, they’re not always the best bet for seeing results. In fact, just because everyone’s doing a certain move, doesn’t mean it’s even safe.

“It's important to measure the risk-to-benefit ratio of any exercise,” says Susie Crossland-Dwyer, strength and run coach and founder of Studio S in Cincinnati, OH. She tends to avoid exercises that target a single muscle or muscle group and moves that carry little benefit with high risk of injury. So what are the strength exercises trainers never do? Here are eight for starters, plus recommendations for safer, more effective substitutions.

RELATED: The 7 Best Strength Exercises You’re Not Doing

Strength Exercises You Should Skip and What To Do Instead

1. Skip: Crunches

Old news that still rings true: Crunches aren’t nearly as effective as other core exercises. Yet people still continue to do them. “A lot of exercise enthusiasts do crunches ad nauseam without really increasing their core strength,” says Crossland-Dwyer. What’s worse is the move can lead to neck or back pain and sometimes hip issues.

Substitution: Pilates Roll-Up

Unlike a traditional crunch, this move targets deeper layers of your abs, which will increase your stability and improve your posture.

How to: Lie on your back with your legs extended and your arms overhead, palms facing one another (a). Slowly roll up, making a C-shape with your spine as you do. Your abs should be pulled in and engaged during the entire movement, creating a hollowing feeling through the low abdominals (b). Continue to roll forward into a stretch, while keeping your shoulders down, away from your ears (c). Hold the stretch for about 10 seconds, then roll back to start and repeat.

2. Skip: Hip Abductor Machine

“People often think that machines make it easier to perform the exercise movement and manipulate the body because they look user-friendly,” says Nikki Snow, a Les Mills International trainer based in Chicago. But strength exercises on hip abductor machines often aren’t as beneficial as moves with free weights or even just your bodyweight. “The abductor machine — aka thigh master machine — packs a big burn, but there are more effective exercises that can isolate the side glutes and hips safe and effectively.”

Substitution: Sumo Squat

This squat variation, with your legs wide apart, targets your inner thighs like none other.

How to: Stand with legs a few steps wider than hip-width apart, toes turned out. Hold a dumbbell in each hand at your hips (a). Lower your hips down and back until your thighs are parallel to the floor (b). Stand back up and repeat.

RELATED: 50 Butt Exercises to Sculpt Stronger Glutes

3. Skip: Weighted Standing Side Bends

Holding a dumbbell on one side of your body during side bends “puts the spine in a compromised position, and it’s hard to maintain alignment to isolate the obliques properly,” says Snow. “It’s easy to use momentum and rock side to side, which can put strain on the lower back and decrease isolation in the targeted muscle group.”

Substitution: Side Plank with Hip Lift

“This move isolates the obliques and strengthens shoulders and surrounding core muscles very effectively,” Snow says.

How to: Lie on your side and prop yourself up on your forearm and elbow. Your feet, hips and shoulders should align. Extend your top arm toward the ceiling (a). Lift your hips off the ground and up toward the ceiling. Hips should stay stacked, with body in one straight line (b). Lower your hips a few inches toward the floor, then lift back up to a straight side plank, using your abs to move you (c). Repeat.

4. Skip: Leg Press

The leg press can be fun, because you can typically lift more weight on the machine than you can handle on a standing squat, so you feel extra-powerful. But that increased weight is part of the problem, says Greg Justice, MA, owner of AYC Health and Fitness in Kansas City, KS. “The biggest problem I see with the leg press is the inclination to put too much weight on the machine, potentially causing the pelvis to rotate away from the back rest as you lower the weight. This can cause a herniated disc.” Plus, using the leg press takes stability out of the equation, forcing your quads to do most of the work, without hitting the hamstrings or glutes, says Crossland-Dwyer.

Substitution: Bulgarian Split Squat

“With split squats, you start with stabilizing the body before going through the range of motion,” Justice explains. “You need to engage the whole body throughout the entire process, and that transfers to real life movements or recreational sports.”

How to: Stand with your back facing a bench or box. Put one foot on top of the bench. Make sure you’re far enough away from the bench so you can create a 90-degree bend in your front knee (a). Bend your front knee to lower your back knee toward the ground, and aim to get your front thigh parallel to the floor (b). Push through the heel of your front foot to return to the starting position, keeping your chest up, eyes forward and shoulders back (c). Repeat.

RELATED: How Strong Is Your Squat? Try This Trainer-Backed Test

[caption id="attachment_64799" align="alignnone" width="620"]Worst Strength Exercises, According to Trainers: Russian Twist (Instead Do Plank Hip Dips) Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

5. Skip: Russian Twist

This core workout move, in which you sit on the floor and twist from side to side (usually holding a weight), is a popular one. While it might seem more functional than a crunch, it’s not necessarily better. “Recent research has shown that Russian twists are more harmful than beneficial,” says James Thomas, a Les Mills national trainer based in New York City. “Combining the compression and flexion of this movement with rotation places a lot of pressure on the spinal disc, excessive compression of the lumbar spine, and movement of disc fluid.”

Substitution: Forearm Plank with Hip Dips

Planks target your entire core while keeping the spine in a safe, neutral position. Add a side-to-side motion and you also get deep into the side of your abs, aka your oblique muscles.

How to: Bring your elbows directly under your shoulders pressing both forearms into the floor. Keeping feet hip-distance apart, extend legs behind you as you bring your body off the ground. Your body should from a straight line from head to heel as you keep your chin tucked in, squeeze your abs tight, and tailbone tucked (a). When you’re steady, slowly drop your left hip toward the floor (b). Bring your hips back toward neutral, and continue through the middle to drop your right hip toward the floor (c). Continue alternating.

6. Skip: Behind-the-Head Military Press

This move is a common one with body builders, but it’s far from the safest way to gain muscle in your upper body. “It puts undue stress on most people’s shoulders — even if you were just doing the movement with a broomstick,” says Mike Donavanik, CSCS, a personal trainer based in Los Angeles. “Most people lack the shoulder mobility, strength, posture and stabilization to do this correctly.” As a result, the movement pattern gets messed up, other muscles start compensating, and you could walk away with an upper body injury.

Substitution: Arnold Press

You’ll work through a full range of motion with this exercise, nixing excess stress on your shoulder joints. Plus, it uses dumbbells rather than a barbell, so each arm and shoulder joint has to work independently of the other, says Donavanik. “If you have any mobility or strength issues on one side, you’ll figure it out pretty quickly this way.”

How to: Start standing with one dumbbell in each hand, elbows bent and palms facing you with dumbbells held at just above collarbone level (don’t let the weights rest on your body) (a). Open your arms out to the sides, bringing your palms to face forward (c). Then, press the dumbbells up overhead. Palms should face away from you by the time you reach the top of the motion (d). Lower back down the way you went up and repeat.

RELATED: 8 Arm Exercises You Haven’t Done Before

7. Skip: Smith Machine Squat

The Smith machine holds the barbell in place while you move up and down. “It makes you move in a straight line. But while this might sound good, it’s not natural for the barbell to travel in a perfectly straight line,” explains Scarlett MacFarlane, a CrossFit level 2 trainer at Brick in New York City. “The body naturally deviates to a small degree, especially taking into account each person's different anatomical needs. So this can be potentially unnatural for the knees, hips or lower back.” The machine can also hinder your range of motion, meaning you don’t get all the strengthening benefits you could with free weights.

Substitution: Front Squat

This strength exercise will allow your body to naturally go up and down to maximize results.

How to: Stand with feet shoulder-width apart, holding a barbell (or two dumbbells) against your body at the front of your chest, palms facing up (if using a barbell) (a). Keeping your weight in your heels to mid-sole, send your hips back and down with your chest up and back flat. Lower until your hips are below your knees (b). Keeping your core tight, return to the starting position (c).

8. Skip: Kipping Pull-Up

These swinging pull-ups —  the ones you see CrossFitters busting out like nobody’s business — do look cool. And the momentum you generate while moving your body forward and back allows you to do more reps than traditional pull-ups. But there’s a catch. You’re putting your shoulders at risk if they aren’t strong enough to support the swinging force. “Most people just don't have the muscular strength and shoulder mobility to do these safely,” says Justice.

Substitution: Traditional Pull-Up

A regular pull-up is one of the best moves you can do for your upper body. It’s a true compound exercise, working muscles in your back, shoulders, and arms at once, says Justice.

How to:  Grab onto a bar with an overhand grip (palms facing away from you), hands shoulder width apart (a). Starting with your arms straightened, pull yourself upward until chin is over the bar. Don't arch your back or swing; instead bend your knees and cross your feet (b). Then lower to start and repeat. (Can’t do a pull-up without swinging? Check out these exercises to get you there, then check out this how-to for working up to full range of motion.)

Read More
The 20 Worst People at the Gym, According to Trainers
6 Common TRX Mistakes (And How to Fix Them)
275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine

The post 8 Exercises Trainers Never Do (And What to Do Instead) appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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[caption id="attachment_64798" align="alignnone" width="620"]8 Strength Exercises Trainers Never Do (And What to Do Instead) Photo: Twenty20[/caption] Heading into the gym with a solid workout plan is a surefire way to have a successful, efficient sweat session. But figuring out exactly what strength exercises to do can get a little tricky. While certain exercises (think biceps curls and crunches) seem like easy, familiar choices, they’re not always the best bet for seeing results. In fact, just because everyone’s doing a certain move, doesn’t mean it’s even safe. “It's important to measure the risk-to-benefit ratio of any exercise,” says Susie Crossland-Dwyer, strength and run coach and founder of Studio S in Cincinnati, OH. She tends to avoid exercises that target a single muscle or muscle group and moves that carry little benefit with high risk of injury. So what are the strength exercises trainers never do? Here are eight for starters, plus recommendations for safer, more effective substitutions. RELATED: The 7 Best Strength Exercises You’re Not Doing

Strength Exercises You Should Skip and What To Do Instead

1. Skip: Crunches

Old news that still rings true: Crunches aren’t nearly as effective as other core exercises. Yet people still continue to do them. “A lot of exercise enthusiasts do crunches ad nauseam without really increasing their core strength,” says Crossland-Dwyer. What’s worse is the move can lead to neck or back pain and sometimes hip issues. Substitution: Pilates Roll-Up Unlike a traditional crunch, this move targets deeper layers of your abs, which will increase your stability and improve your posture. How to: Lie on your back with your legs extended and your arms overhead, palms facing one another (a). Slowly roll up, making a C-shape with your spine as you do. Your abs should be pulled in and engaged during the entire movement, creating a hollowing feeling through the low abdominals (b). Continue to roll forward into a stretch, while keeping your shoulders down, away from your ears (c). Hold the stretch for about 10 seconds, then roll back to start and repeat.

2. Skip: Hip Abductor Machine

“People often think that machines make it easier to perform the exercise movement and manipulate the body because they look user-friendly,” says Nikki Snow, a Les Mills International trainer based in Chicago. But strength exercises on hip abductor machines often aren’t as beneficial as moves with free weights or even just your bodyweight. “The abductor machine — aka thigh master machine — packs a big burn, but there are more effective exercises that can isolate the side glutes and hips safe and effectively.” Substitution: Sumo Squat This squat variation, with your legs wide apart, targets your inner thighs like none other. How to: Stand with legs a few steps wider than hip-width apart, toes turned out. Hold a dumbbell in each hand at your hips (a). Lower your hips down and back until your thighs are parallel to the floor (b). Stand back up and repeat. RELATED: 50 Butt Exercises to Sculpt Stronger Glutes

3. Skip: Weighted Standing Side Bends

Holding a dumbbell on one side of your body during side bends “puts the spine in a compromised position, and it’s hard to maintain alignment to isolate the obliques properly,” says Snow. “It’s easy to use momentum and rock side to side, which can put strain on the lower back and decrease isolation in the targeted muscle group.” Substitution: Side Plank with Hip Lift “This move isolates the obliques and strengthens shoulders and surrounding core muscles very effectively,” Snow says. How to: Lie on your side and prop yourself up on your forearm and elbow. Your feet, hips and shoulders should align. Extend your top arm toward the ceiling (a). Lift your hips off the ground and up toward the ceiling. Hips should stay stacked, with body in one straight line (b). Lower your hips a few inches toward the floor, then lift back up to a straight side plank, using your abs to move you (c). Repeat.

4. Skip: Leg Press

The leg press can be fun, because you can typically lift more weight on the machine than you can handle on a standing squat, so you feel extra-powerful. But that increased weight is part of the problem, says Greg Justice, MA, owner of AYC Health and Fitness in Kansas City, KS. “The biggest problem I see with the leg press is the inclination to put too much weight on the machine, potentially causing the pelvis to rotate away from the back rest as you lower the weight. This can cause a herniated disc.” Plus, using the leg press takes stability out of the equation, forcing your quads to do most of the work, without hitting the hamstrings or glutes, says Crossland-Dwyer. Substitution: Bulgarian Split Squat “With split squats, you start with stabilizing the body before going through the range of motion,” Justice explains. “You need to engage the whole body throughout the entire process, and that transfers to real life movements or recreational sports.” How to: Stand with your back facing a bench or box. Put one foot on top of the bench. Make sure you’re far enough away from the bench so you can create a 90-degree bend in your front knee (a). Bend your front knee to lower your back knee toward the ground, and aim to get your front thigh parallel to the floor (b). Push through the heel of your front foot to return to the starting position, keeping your chest up, eyes forward and shoulders back (c). Repeat. RELATED: How Strong Is Your Squat? Try This Trainer-Backed Test [caption id="attachment_64799" align="alignnone" width="620"]Worst Strength Exercises, According to Trainers: Russian Twist (Instead Do Plank Hip Dips) Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

5. Skip: Russian Twist

This core workout move, in which you sit on the floor and twist from side to side (usually holding a weight), is a popular one. While it might seem more functional than a crunch, it’s not necessarily better. “Recent research has shown that Russian twists are more harmful than beneficial,” says James Thomas, a Les Mills national trainer based in New York City. “Combining the compression and flexion of this movement with rotation places a lot of pressure on the spinal disc, excessive compression of the lumbar spine, and movement of disc fluid.” Substitution: Forearm Plank with Hip Dips Planks target your entire core while keeping the spine in a safe, neutral position. Add a side-to-side motion and you also get deep into the side of your abs, aka your oblique muscles. How to: Bring your elbows directly under your shoulders pressing both forearms into the floor. Keeping feet hip-distance apart, extend legs behind you as you bring your body off the ground. Your body should from a straight line from head to heel as you keep your chin tucked in, squeeze your abs tight, and tailbone tucked (a). When you’re steady, slowly drop your left hip toward the floor (b). Bring your hips back toward neutral, and continue through the middle to drop your right hip toward the floor (c). Continue alternating.

6. Skip: Behind-the-Head Military Press

This move is a common one with body builders, but it’s far from the safest way to gain muscle in your upper body. “It puts undue stress on most people’s shoulders — even if you were just doing the movement with a broomstick,” says Mike Donavanik, CSCS, a personal trainer based in Los Angeles. “Most people lack the shoulder mobility, strength, posture and stabilization to do this correctly.” As a result, the movement pattern gets messed up, other muscles start compensating, and you could walk away with an upper body injury. Substitution: Arnold Press You’ll work through a full range of motion with this exercise, nixing excess stress on your shoulder joints. Plus, it uses dumbbells rather than a barbell, so each arm and shoulder joint has to work independently of the other, says Donavanik. “If you have any mobility or strength issues on one side, you’ll figure it out pretty quickly this way.” How to: Start standing with one dumbbell in each hand, elbows bent and palms facing you with dumbbells held at just above collarbone level (don’t let the weights rest on your body) (a). Open your arms out to the sides, bringing your palms to face forward (c). Then, press the dumbbells up overhead. Palms should face away from you by the time you reach the top of the motion (d). Lower back down the way you went up and repeat. RELATED: 8 Arm Exercises You Haven’t Done Before

7. Skip: Smith Machine Squat

The Smith machine holds the barbell in place while you move up and down. “It makes you move in a straight line. But while this might sound good, it’s not natural for the barbell to travel in a perfectly straight line,” explains Scarlett MacFarlane, a CrossFit level 2 trainer at Brick in New York City. “The body naturally deviates to a small degree, especially taking into account each person's different anatomical needs. So this can be potentially unnatural for the knees, hips or lower back.” The machine can also hinder your range of motion, meaning you don’t get all the strengthening benefits you could with free weights. Substitution: Front Squat This strength exercise will allow your body to naturally go up and down to maximize results. How to: Stand with feet shoulder-width apart, holding a barbell (or two dumbbells) against your body at the front of your chest, palms facing up (if using a barbell) (a). Keeping your weight in your heels to mid-sole, send your hips back and down with your chest up and back flat. Lower until your hips are below your knees (b). Keeping your core tight, return to the starting position (c).

8. Skip: Kipping Pull-Up

These swinging pull-ups —  the ones you see CrossFitters busting out like nobody’s business — do look cool. And the momentum you generate while moving your body forward and back allows you to do more reps than traditional pull-ups. But there’s a catch. You’re putting your shoulders at risk if they aren’t strong enough to support the swinging force. “Most people just don't have the muscular strength and shoulder mobility to do these safely,” says Justice. Substitution: Traditional Pull-Up A regular pull-up is one of the best moves you can do for your upper body. It’s a true compound exercise, working muscles in your back, shoulders, and arms at once, says Justice. How to:  Grab onto a bar with an overhand grip (palms facing away from you), hands shoulder width apart (a). Starting with your arms straightened, pull yourself upward until chin is over the bar. Don't arch your back or swing; instead bend your knees and cross your feet (b). Then lower to start and repeat. (Can’t do a pull-up without swinging? Check out these exercises to get you there, then check out this how-to for working up to full range of motion.) Read More The 20 Worst People at the Gym, According to Trainers 6 Common TRX Mistakes (And How to Fix Them) 275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine

The post 8 Exercises Trainers Never Do (And What to Do Instead) appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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Push Through Any Workout with These Trainer Mantras http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/trainer-mantras-positive-self-talk/ Fri, 12 Jan 2018 12:15:52 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=64691

[caption id="attachment_64724" align="alignnone" width="620"]Push Through Any Workout with These Trainer Mantras Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

We’ve all been there: You’re at the end of a workout class when the instructor says you have another set of burpees to do. Your muscles and your mind want to scream “no” as soon as the words come out of her mouth. You can’t possibly push through another cardio set...except you can. And you should.

Even some of the toughest trainers — ones who barrel through sprints and hoist heavy weights like they’re lighter than shaker bottles — play this mind game. And it all comes down to mental toughness and a few motivating mantras. So next time you’re up against a round of squat jumps or your last 50 meters of a 5K, channel these mental tricks from our top fitness pros. The only question you’ll have left to ask yourself: Can you handle the ego boost you’ll feel at the finish?

RELATED: 19 Positive Affirmations That’ll Change the Way You Think

13 Mantras Top Trainers Use to Boost Their Mental Toughness

1. “How we do anything is how we do everything.”

“The way we practice is the way we perform, so in moments of fatigue it’s a great reminder that even now — especially now — I need to give my best. The mantra motivates me to give 100 percent even when I’m tired or don’t feel like it. And these are the moments that help form my habits and shape my mentality as an athlete.” —Milan Costich founder of PREVAIL boxing

2. “Do more than expected.”

“My main mental focus while training and pushing through my last rep always circles back to what was embedded in me as a professional athlete. The importance of finishing is something I’ve carried with me not just in training but in life. I constantly remind myself of what I’ve accomplished simply by doing a little more than expected. Holding myself to that standard doesn’t change with how I train myself. Chasing greatness in all things is a mentality for me... a way of life. What you achieve is dictated by how you respond when you’re being challenged the most.” —Curtis Williams, owner of Training C.A.M.P. and former NFL player

RELATED: Meditation Meets HIIT in New Mindful Fitness Approach

3. “Think of how good you’ll feel.”

“Sometimes when I struggle with motivation, whether it's finishing a workout or even just getting to the gym in the first place, I try and tell myself, ‘Just think of how good you'll feel when you're done.’ Remembering the feeling of finishing a workout strong or pushing myself to do more than I thought I could always gets me through and keeps me coming back time and time again!” —Nora Minno, trainer on Daily Burn 365

4. “Let’s go!”

“Some days are just a struggle! But that doesn’t mean I give up; it means I have to get creative. The mind is the most creative and powerful muscle so I can either let the blues take over or I can shift my attitude and make it happen. My mantra ‘let’s go!’ is so simple but it really pumps me up. I also dance it out. I do just a little movement, side to side, shake out my hands and take a deep breath — all while repeating ‘let’s go!’” —Astrid Swan, celebrity trainer

RELATED: 9 Ways to Find Workout Motivation (Every Damn Day)

5. “Gratitude and competition.”

“On days where I want to stop the workout, I’ll think about how grateful I am to have a strong, healthy body, and how lucky I am that I get to choose the gift of exercise. It’s not a punishment. On the other hand, I am very motivated by competition. So on days when I take class, I'll take a mental note of who I think is a better athlete than me, and he/she will be my mental competition. It makes me work harder and it also makes it more fun for me.” —Ashley Borden, celebrity trainer

6. “I’ve got this.”

“I repeat this passionately — and with conviction. I also take a moment before a truly challenging moment, set or interval, and visualize the experience as clearly and authentically as possible. For example, seeing myself perform each rep of a set and vividly imagining what it will feel like, especially the last couple reps. I see and feel the struggle and myself successful in overcoming it. I actually feel my nervous system start working. I think that feeling is so important. Then during the movement, I focus all attention and energy on the muscles working and imagining them bursting with power. I also make sure to be fully in it until the very last second — like, bar back in the rack — before shifting my focus.” —Gregg Cook, trainer on Daily Burn 365

RELATED: 7 Trainer Quotes That Will Instantly Boost Your Confidence

[caption id="attachment_64700" align="alignnone" width="620"]13 Mantras Trainers Use to Push Through Tough Workouts Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

7. “Pain is only temporary.”

“With about 25 percent of my workouts dedicated to restoration, mobility and flexibility, the remaining 75 percent is all-out, like hill sprints, trail runs and kettlebell training. When I’m in these very challenging zones my mindset shifts to survival mood. And one thing that I always repeat in my mind is the pain I’m feeling right now won’t last forever. If I can hold on for just a few more seconds, I can reap the rewards. Pushing our bodies beyond what we thought we were capable of is simply one of the most satisfying things we can do in life.” —Nick Malizia, Master Trainer at Burn 60

8. “This is when change happens.”

“Change lies just on the other side of feeling uncomfortable. True change really begins when things get a little bit tough and you're able to work through that. [When you push] through a final 2 to 5 reps or 10 to 20 seconds past that uncomfortable point — keep in mind, during that time your body is adapting. However, it's also important to remember that if you begin to compromise your form, it is time to shut it down, reset, and then try again.” —Jason Walsh, owner and founder of Rise Nation

RELATED: 19 Reasons to Work Out (Beyond the Perfect Body)

9. “You’re stronger than this.”

“I repeat this to myself when I need to power through something tough. And it works just as well outside the gym in all areas of life. Also, I focus on the sensation of my breath as it comes and goes. It centers me and helps direct my energy and power into the challenge at hand.” —Adam Rosante, celebrity trainer and strength and conditioning coach

10. “I can.”

“It only takes trying it a few times to realize how motivating mantras really are. It tricks your brain into believing something is true. Think: ‘I will not give up!’ ‘I can and I will!’ Or, ‘I am strong, I am powerful!’ Another strategy that works is to imagine you are performing, and all eyes are on you. Visualize those cheering fans across the finish line. I guarantee you will push harder, sweat more, and even perfect your form! And when in doubt, crank up that music. Fast heart-pumping tunes have been shown to bring workouts to the next level.” —Jessica Schatz, master Pilates instructor

RELATED: The 25 Craziest Workout Excuses Trainers Have Ever Heard

11. “Are you a quitter?”

“I ask myself things that challenge my integrity towards my values. Things like, ‘What kind of man are you?’, ‘Are you a quitter?’ ‘Are you serious about what you set out to do?’ ‘Are you a mover and shaker or what?’ Those work for me, because I would never want to let myself down under those circumstances. My recommendation for everyone is to think about the things you value and tie them into the task in front of you. But it has to tie into your values.” —Prince Brathwaite, trainer on Daily Burn 365 and CEO and founder of Trooper Fitness

12. “Superhero.”

“I repeat mantras to myself when struggling with a workout or looking to push through it. I focus on single words and some of my go-tos include: ‘Strong. Capable. Badass. Superhero.’” —Emily Schromm, trainer and CrossFit coach

RELATED: 275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine

13. “Don’t quit on me.”

“My drive and commitment is the foundation to my overall success. Pushing the boundaries is something all too familiar and something I'm faced with every day. Some mental tricks I use to get through an extra tough workout including repeating, ‘Don’t quit on me,’ ‘Don’t cheat yourself; treat yourself,’ and ‘Work for it.’” —Corey Caillet, celebrity trainer on Revenge Body 

Read More
4 Science-Backed Ways to Motivate Yourself to Work Out
Get Sculpted Shoulders With These 5 Exercises
Just Not Feeling It Today? 33 Sources of Workout Motivation

The post Push Through Any Workout with These Trainer Mantras appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>

[caption id="attachment_64724" align="alignnone" width="620"]Push Through Any Workout with These Trainer Mantras Photo: Twenty20[/caption] We’ve all been there: You’re at the end of a workout class when the instructor says you have another set of burpees to do. Your muscles and your mind want to scream “no” as soon as the words come out of her mouth. You can’t possibly push through another cardio set...except you can. And you should. Even some of the toughest trainers — ones who barrel through sprints and hoist heavy weights like they’re lighter than shaker bottles — play this mind game. And it all comes down to mental toughness and a few motivating mantras. So next time you’re up against a round of squat jumps or your last 50 meters of a 5K, channel these mental tricks from our top fitness pros. The only question you’ll have left to ask yourself: Can you handle the ego boost you’ll feel at the finish? RELATED: 19 Positive Affirmations That’ll Change the Way You Think

13 Mantras Top Trainers Use to Boost Their Mental Toughness

1. “How we do anything is how we do everything.”

“The way we practice is the way we perform, so in moments of fatigue it’s a great reminder that even now — especially now — I need to give my best. The mantra motivates me to give 100 percent even when I’m tired or don’t feel like it. And these are the moments that help form my habits and shape my mentality as an athlete.” —Milan Costich founder of PREVAIL boxing

2. “Do more than expected.”

“My main mental focus while training and pushing through my last rep always circles back to what was embedded in me as a professional athlete. The importance of finishing is something I’ve carried with me not just in training but in life. I constantly remind myself of what I’ve accomplished simply by doing a little more than expected. Holding myself to that standard doesn’t change with how I train myself. Chasing greatness in all things is a mentality for me... a way of life. What you achieve is dictated by how you respond when you’re being challenged the most.” —Curtis Williams, owner of Training C.A.M.P. and former NFL player RELATED: Meditation Meets HIIT in New Mindful Fitness Approach

3. “Think of how good you’ll feel.”

“Sometimes when I struggle with motivation, whether it's finishing a workout or even just getting to the gym in the first place, I try and tell myself, ‘Just think of how good you'll feel when you're done.’ Remembering the feeling of finishing a workout strong or pushing myself to do more than I thought I could always gets me through and keeps me coming back time and time again!” —Nora Minno, trainer on Daily Burn 365

4. “Let’s go!”

“Some days are just a struggle! But that doesn’t mean I give up; it means I have to get creative. The mind is the most creative and powerful muscle so I can either let the blues take over or I can shift my attitude and make it happen. My mantra ‘let’s go!’ is so simple but it really pumps me up. I also dance it out. I do just a little movement, side to side, shake out my hands and take a deep breath — all while repeating ‘let’s go!’” —Astrid Swan, celebrity trainer RELATED: 9 Ways to Find Workout Motivation (Every Damn Day)

5. “Gratitude and competition.”

“On days where I want to stop the workout, I’ll think about how grateful I am to have a strong, healthy body, and how lucky I am that I get to choose the gift of exercise. It’s not a punishment. On the other hand, I am very motivated by competition. So on days when I take class, I'll take a mental note of who I think is a better athlete than me, and he/she will be my mental competition. It makes me work harder and it also makes it more fun for me.” —Ashley Borden, celebrity trainer

6. “I’ve got this.”

“I repeat this passionately — and with conviction. I also take a moment before a truly challenging moment, set or interval, and visualize the experience as clearly and authentically as possible. For example, seeing myself perform each rep of a set and vividly imagining what it will feel like, especially the last couple reps. I see and feel the struggle and myself successful in overcoming it. I actually feel my nervous system start working. I think that feeling is so important. Then during the movement, I focus all attention and energy on the muscles working and imagining them bursting with power. I also make sure to be fully in it until the very last second — like, bar back in the rack — before shifting my focus.” —Gregg Cook, trainer on Daily Burn 365 RELATED: 7 Trainer Quotes That Will Instantly Boost Your Confidence [caption id="attachment_64700" align="alignnone" width="620"]13 Mantras Trainers Use to Push Through Tough Workouts Photo: Twenty20[/caption]

7. “Pain is only temporary.”

“With about 25 percent of my workouts dedicated to restoration, mobility and flexibility, the remaining 75 percent is all-out, like hill sprints, trail runs and kettlebell training. When I’m in these very challenging zones my mindset shifts to survival mood. And one thing that I always repeat in my mind is the pain I’m feeling right now won’t last forever. If I can hold on for just a few more seconds, I can reap the rewards. Pushing our bodies beyond what we thought we were capable of is simply one of the most satisfying things we can do in life.” —Nick Malizia, Master Trainer at Burn 60

8. “This is when change happens.”

“Change lies just on the other side of feeling uncomfortable. True change really begins when things get a little bit tough and you're able to work through that. [When you push] through a final 2 to 5 reps or 10 to 20 seconds past that uncomfortable point — keep in mind, during that time your body is adapting. However, it's also important to remember that if you begin to compromise your form, it is time to shut it down, reset, and then try again.” —Jason Walsh, owner and founder of Rise Nation RELATED: 19 Reasons to Work Out (Beyond the Perfect Body)

9. “You’re stronger than this.”

“I repeat this to myself when I need to power through something tough. And it works just as well outside the gym in all areas of life. Also, I focus on the sensation of my breath as it comes and goes. It centers me and helps direct my energy and power into the challenge at hand.” —Adam Rosante, celebrity trainer and strength and conditioning coach

10. “I can.”

“It only takes trying it a few times to realize how motivating mantras really are. It tricks your brain into believing something is true. Think: ‘I will not give up!’ ‘I can and I will!’ Or, ‘I am strong, I am powerful!’ Another strategy that works is to imagine you are performing, and all eyes are on you. Visualize those cheering fans across the finish line. I guarantee you will push harder, sweat more, and even perfect your form! And when in doubt, crank up that music. Fast heart-pumping tunes have been shown to bring workouts to the next level.” —Jessica Schatz, master Pilates instructor RELATED: The 25 Craziest Workout Excuses Trainers Have Ever Heard

11. “Are you a quitter?”

“I ask myself things that challenge my integrity towards my values. Things like, ‘What kind of man are you?’, ‘Are you a quitter?’ ‘Are you serious about what you set out to do?’ ‘Are you a mover and shaker or what?’ Those work for me, because I would never want to let myself down under those circumstances. My recommendation for everyone is to think about the things you value and tie them into the task in front of you. But it has to tie into your values.” —Prince Brathwaite, trainer on Daily Burn 365 and CEO and founder of Trooper Fitness

12. “Superhero.”

“I repeat mantras to myself when struggling with a workout or looking to push through it. I focus on single words and some of my go-tos include: ‘Strong. Capable. Badass. Superhero.’” —Emily Schromm, trainer and CrossFit coach RELATED: 275 Bodyweight Exercises to Shake Up Your Workout Routine

13. “Don’t quit on me.”

“My drive and commitment is the foundation to my overall success. Pushing the boundaries is something all too familiar and something I'm faced with every day. Some mental tricks I use to get through an extra tough workout including repeating, ‘Don’t quit on me,’ ‘Don’t cheat yourself; treat yourself,’ and ‘Work for it.’” —Corey Caillet, celebrity trainer on Revenge Body  Read More 4 Science-Backed Ways to Motivate Yourself to Work Out Get Sculpted Shoulders With These 5 Exercises Just Not Feeling It Today? 33 Sources of Workout Motivation

The post Push Through Any Workout with These Trainer Mantras appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/best-ab-exercises-core-workout/ http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/best-ab-exercises-core-workout/#respond Thu, 11 Jan 2018 16:15:51 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=59957 50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core

[caption id="attachment_59968" align="alignnone" width="620"]50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core Photo: Ryan Kelly / Barre Harmony[/caption]

The goal of ab exercises isn’t all about sculpting a six-pack or chiseling your middle. The core of every day movements comes from just that — your core. You need a solid midsection to stand upright, stay steady on your feet and twist and turn sans injury. (Though scoring flat abs is certainly a sweet bonus!)

So how do you land a stronger core? Work it from every angle and switch up your routine often. That’s where these 50 anything-but-boring abs exercises come in. They’ll skyrocket your strength and stability — and help you score that toned midsection in the meantime. Say hello to going hardcore.

RELATED: 50 Butt Exercises to Sculpt Stronger Glutes

Take Your Core Workout Beyond Crunches and Sit-Ups

Planks

When it comes to improving core stability, the plank has your back (and your front!). By working your transverse abdominis — the deep core muscles that wrap around your middle — as well as your back, shoulders and glutes (yes, you should activate your butt, too), you get a full body burn in one isometric movement. But the best thing about planks: You can continuously switch them up and make your muscles work even more. Check out these creative twists on a typical plank routine and you’ll see what we mean.

50 Ab Exercises: Spiderman Crunch

1. Spiderman Plank 

Get total-body toned with this amped up plank. While performing a triceps push-up, bring your knee to the outside of your elbow, and switch sides on the next rep. Don’t drop or pike your hips through the entire move — your body should stay in a straight line from shoulders to ankles.

[caption id="attachment_53637" align="alignnone" width="620"]50 Ab Exercises: Sphinx to Forearm Plank Photo courtesy of CorePower Yoga[/caption]

2. Sphinx to Forearm Plank

A slight twist on a high-low plank move, you’ll flow from a yoga sphinx pose (similar to a baby cobra) into a forearm plank. Try to minimize movement in your hips as you go.

50 Ab Exercises: Around the Clock Planks

3. Reach Around the Clock Planks

A regular plank is tough in itself. But balancing on one arm? Talk about taking this core challenge up a notch.

[caption id="attachment_52461" align="alignnone" width="620"]50 Ab Exercises: Army Crawl Side Planks GIF: Daily Burn 365[/caption]

4. Army Crawl Side Planks

Take your abs workout to P.E. class and army crawl your way across the mat. Stay low in a strong forearm plank as you slither your arms and legs forward. Then finish with a side plank to target your obliques.

50 Ab Exercises: TRX Plank to Pike

5. TRX Plank to Pike

Talk about tough! This pike-up plank offers a gymnastic element to build strength in your lower abs. The higher you pike, the harder the exercise...and the stronger your core.

6. Push-Up

Ask most fitness experts to break down the basics of a push-up and they’ll tell you it’s a moving plank. So learn how to master that solid, isometric position before you move onto the push-up part. When you do, you’ll build muscle in your entire upper body.

50 Ab Exercises: Side Plank with Leg Raise on a Foam Roller

7. Side Plank with Leg Raise

Foam rollers not only loosen up your fascia, they also add a stabilization challenge to ab exercises. In this side plank variation, you’ll feel your midsection fighting to keep your body steady.

50 Ab Exercises: The Snake Plank

8. The Snake 

A chaturanga-inspired exercise often done on a reformer, you’ll take this move to the mat. Your obliques work to bring you upright, as the rest of your core stays tight to move you through the middle.

9. Starfish

Do three moves for the work of one! This combination exercise not only targets your obliques and transverse abdominis, but also your hips and lats. A triple threat you’ll want to keep tackling.

[caption id="attachment_55642" align="alignnone" width="620"]50 Ab Exercises: Plank Jack to Tuck Jump GIF: Daily Burn 365[/caption]

10. Plank Jacks to Tuck Jump

Crush a core workout while also squeezing in some cardio. This two-for-one move will rev your heart rate, as you reach new calorie-torching heights. From the jack to the jump, it's one quick ab-strengthening routine.

11. Ab Roller

Skip the infomercial-inspired equipment and grab a towel for this “rolling” move. As you slide the towel forward on the floor, you’ll sculpt your stomach. Just don’t forget to keep your pelvis in a neutral position.

50 Ab Exercises: Giant Clam on a BOSU Ball

12. Giant Clam

BOSU balls work great for bettering your balance — and improving your core stability. This take on a conventional clamshell further challenges your abs, as you aim to keep your hips lifted.

13. Rotating Renegade Row

Chisel your core by mixing a push-up, row and T raise. Your midsection muscles work to keep your body in one long line, as you flow through the three-move mash-up.

50 Ab Exercises: Plank Knee Tucks on a Rower

14. Knee Tucks

Rowers aren’t reserved for cardio — though this will get your heart pumping. Hold a solid plank as you use your lower abs to drive both knees into your chest, without dropping or raising your hips.

Next Up: Crunches and Sit-Ups

The post 50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core

[caption id="attachment_59968" align="alignnone" width="620"]50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core Photo: Ryan Kelly / Barre Harmony[/caption] The goal of ab exercises isn’t all about sculpting a six-pack or chiseling your middle. The core of every day movements comes from just that — your core. You need a solid midsection to stand upright, stay steady on your feet and twist and turn sans injury. (Though scoring flat abs is certainly a sweet bonus!) So how do you land a stronger core? Work it from every angle and switch up your routine often. That’s where these 50 anything-but-boring abs exercises come in. They’ll skyrocket your strength and stability — and help you score that toned midsection in the meantime. Say hello to going hardcore. RELATED: 50 Butt Exercises to Sculpt Stronger Glutes

Take Your Core Workout Beyond Crunches and Sit-Ups

Planks

When it comes to improving core stability, the plank has your back (and your front!). By working your transverse abdominis — the deep core muscles that wrap around your middle — as well as your back, shoulders and glutes (yes, you should activate your butt, too), you get a full body burn in one isometric movement. But the best thing about planks: You can continuously switch them up and make your muscles work even more. Check out these creative twists on a typical plank routine and you’ll see what we mean. 50 Ab Exercises: Spiderman Crunch

1. Spiderman Plank 

Get total-body toned with this amped up plank. While performing a triceps push-up, bring your knee to the outside of your elbow, and switch sides on the next rep. Don’t drop or pike your hips through the entire move — your body should stay in a straight line from shoulders to ankles. [caption id="attachment_53637" align="alignnone" width="620"]50 Ab Exercises: Sphinx to Forearm Plank Photo courtesy of CorePower Yoga[/caption]

2. Sphinx to Forearm Plank

A slight twist on a high-low plank move, you’ll flow from a yoga sphinx pose (similar to a baby cobra) into a forearm plank. Try to minimize movement in your hips as you go.

50 Ab Exercises: Around the Clock Planks

3. Reach Around the Clock Planks

A regular plank is tough in itself. But balancing on one arm? Talk about taking this core challenge up a notch. [caption id="attachment_52461" align="alignnone" width="620"]50 Ab Exercises: Army Crawl Side Planks GIF: Daily Burn 365[/caption]

4. Army Crawl Side Planks

Take your abs workout to P.E. class and army crawl your way across the mat. Stay low in a strong forearm plank as you slither your arms and legs forward. Then finish with a side plank to target your obliques. 50 Ab Exercises: TRX Plank to Pike

5. TRX Plank to Pike

Talk about tough! This pike-up plank offers a gymnastic element to build strength in your lower abs. The higher you pike, the harder the exercise...and the stronger your core.

6. Push-Up

Ask most fitness experts to break down the basics of a push-up and they’ll tell you it’s a moving plank. So learn how to master that solid, isometric position before you move onto the push-up part. When you do, you’ll build muscle in your entire upper body. 50 Ab Exercises: Side Plank with Leg Raise on a Foam Roller

7. Side Plank with Leg Raise

Foam rollers not only loosen up your fascia, they also add a stabilization challenge to ab exercises. In this side plank variation, you’ll feel your midsection fighting to keep your body steady. 50 Ab Exercises: The Snake Plank

8. The Snake 

A chaturanga-inspired exercise often done on a reformer, you’ll take this move to the mat. Your obliques work to bring you upright, as the rest of your core stays tight to move you through the middle.

9. Starfish

Do three moves for the work of one! This combination exercise not only targets your obliques and transverse abdominis, but also your hips and lats. A triple threat you’ll want to keep tackling. [caption id="attachment_55642" align="alignnone" width="620"]50 Ab Exercises: Plank Jack to Tuck Jump GIF: Daily Burn 365[/caption]

10. Plank Jacks to Tuck Jump

Crush a core workout while also squeezing in some cardio. This two-for-one move will rev your heart rate, as you reach new calorie-torching heights. From the jack to the jump, it's one quick ab-strengthening routine.

11. Ab Roller

Skip the infomercial-inspired equipment and grab a towel for this “rolling” move. As you slide the towel forward on the floor, you’ll sculpt your stomach. Just don’t forget to keep your pelvis in a neutral position. 50 Ab Exercises: Giant Clam on a BOSU Ball

12. Giant Clam

BOSU balls work great for bettering your balance — and improving your core stability. This take on a conventional clamshell further challenges your abs, as you aim to keep your hips lifted.

13. Rotating Renegade Row

Chisel your core by mixing a push-up, row and T raise. Your midsection muscles work to keep your body in one long line, as you flow through the three-move mash-up.

50 Ab Exercises: Plank Knee Tucks on a Rower

14. Knee Tucks

Rowers aren’t reserved for cardio — though this will get your heart pumping. Hold a solid plank as you use your lower abs to drive both knees into your chest, without dropping or raising your hips.

Next Up: Crunches and Sit-Ups

The post 50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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20 Questions With Olympic Skier Gus Kenworthy http://dailyburn.com/life/fitness/gus-kenworthy-skier-winter-olympics/ Tue, 09 Jan 2018 12:15:17 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=64688 Gus Kenworthy Olympic Freestyle Skier

[caption id="attachment_64703" align="alignnone" width="620"]20 Questions With Gus Kenworthy Olympic Skier Photo: 24 Hour Fitness[/caption]

Even if you didn’t grow up skiing double black diamonds, you probably know the name Gus Kenworthy, after making headlines as the first openly gay man to compete in the Winter Olympics. And if you’re planning to watch the 2018 Winter Olympics, the seven-time world champion and Olympic silver medalist is the guy you want to watch in PyeongChang.

Also worth noting: Kenworthy is impossibly fit (2017 ESPN Body Issue proof here). And when the Telluride-native isn’t on the slopes, he’s most likely at the squat rack. So it’s no surprise that 24 Hour Fitness tapped Kenworthy (among other U.S. Olympic medalists) as inspiration for their new Team USA Bootcamp program. The high-intensity interval training class, which launched on January 1, features training techniques stolen straight from the pros. Think: functional bodyweight training, metabolic conditioning and burns-so-good plyometrics.

Daily Burn posted up next to Kenworthy for the pre-PyeongChang kick-off class, then grilled the 26-year-old slopestyle star on his hopes, fears, fitness routine and what’s in his fridge. (Hint: a whole lot of hot sauce.)

RELATED: The Olympics-Inspired Bodyweight Workout [INFOGRAPHIC]

https://www.instagram.com/p/BL4IhiZjAuK/

20 Questions with Freestyle Skier Gus Kenworthy

First time on skis… “I was three years old. My family moved to a small ski town, and my mom learned to ski at the same time as me and my brothers. My first skiing memory was riding up the chairlift with my mom. I would fall asleep in her lap, and then she'd wake me up at the top, and say, ‘Wake up, we're going!’ We’d do the run, then get back on the chairlift and I'd fall asleep again.”

Signature trick… “The double cork 1080 blunt grab, or the ‘dub cork, 10 blunt’ for short. It's not the most technical trick ever, but it's one of my favorites and probably most recognizable for me. Double cork basically means I'm going off axis, flipping twice; 1080 means that I'm spinning three times; and a blunt grab is just where you do a tail grab, but you're right on the very, very end of your skis.”

Greatest athletic achievement… “My silver medal in Sochi in slopestyle. That was the inaugural event — the first time our sport had ever been in the Games. I landed a run that I was really proud of, and got silver. The guy who got first and the guy who got third were also American, so it was the third sweep in U.S. history. The whole thing, it's still surreal.”

Hours on the slopes… “During the winter, I ski about five days a week, usually 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. It's not an insane amount of hours, but it's just a lot of work in those hours — grinding, trying new tricks, pushing, hustling, taking falls.”

Hours in the gym… “My workouts are between one and two hours, six days a week.”

Leg day workout… “I'll only do four exercises — each for three sets, 10 to 15 reps. For example, I’ll do back squats, then a leg press or a leg extension, a calf raise, and then a sissy squat or something for hamstrings.”

RELATED: 9 Reasons to Never Skip Leg Day

[caption id="attachment_64706" align="alignnone" width="620"]Gus Kenworthy Workout - Winter Olympics 2018 Photo: 24 Hour Fitness[/caption]

Exercise you love… “My favorite exercise is bench press. It's so meathead, I know. But it's been my favorite thing — ever since I blew my knee out a few years ago and couldn’t do legs, so I started doing everything else. I really got into working out, and started training with my brother. He was in the military, and I was so scrawny. I couldn't do a single rep, with the bar and a plate on each side. I was doing 10 reps, just with the bar, and it was so embarrassing how nothing it was. And so now, to do a full set of 10 at 205, or 225, it feels so cool. That's the exercise I've seen the most progress with by far.”

Exercise you love to hate… “Squats and deadlifts. I always dread doing them, but I know they’re important for my sport. I always feel really good about it afterwards. And it feels cool to move a lot of weight.”

Favorite cross-training workout… “We used to jump on the trampoline a lot. We actually don't do it that much anymore, but growing up, so many of the tricks I learned on skis, I first learned on the trampoline. That was the most fun cross-training I did as a kid, when I was first getting into the sport.”

RELATED: The 15 Most Underrated Exercises, According to Trainers

The one thing that's always in your fridge… “My sponsor Monster makes a Java Monster that I really like in the morning. And then, otherwise…it's basically a lot of hot sauces! I never make food at home because I travel so much, so I just always eat out or order in. Yeah, it's pretty much just condiments — it's bad.”

Go-to cheat meal… “Mint chocolate chip ice cream.”

Healthy airport snack… “Almonds or any sort of trail mix.”

Fancy juice or protein shake… “Both! I love fancy cold-pressed green juice, and I have a protein shake after every workout.”

RELATED: 15 Deliciously Healthy Green Smoothie Recipes

Secret talent… “After skiing I want to get into acting. I wish I could say I'm a super-talented actor, but — you know what, I going with it. I'm putting it out there in the universe.”

https://www.instagram.com/p/BbSQKmAAeOJ/

Signature celebration move… “I raise my hands out to the sides, like a ‘say something’ kind of thing. It’s kind of cocky, I know. But some people wave their poles around or throw a fist in the air, and I feel like mine is a little subtler.”

All-time hero… “My mom. She raised my brothers and I. She's so generous with her time, and definitely sacrificed a lot to take me around to ski competitions and hockey games and everything else when I was a kid.”

Motivational mantra… “One thing that I've been telling myself, especially in recent years, is: ‘This one thing doesn't define me.’ I have to remind myself of that, because I get caught up in feeling that I'm going to disappoint people if I don't do well. I want to be successful in skiing, and in so many things. But whether or not I win an event is not really going to change my life in that many ways. Whether I land that run, or I don't land that run. Whether I get on the podium, or I don't. My family is still going to be at the bottom, supporting me. I have such good friends and I have sponsors that are going to stand by me. I have so much to be appreciative of.”

RELATED: 19 Positive Affirmations That Will Change the Way You Think

The one thing that scares you… “Being alone, like literally. I have a house in Denver, and I used to have friends living in the guest rooms. But since [last] January, it's just been me. I love horror movies and crime shows, but then I'll be in my bed alone at night and I'll hear a creak downstairs, and get so freaked out.”

What excites you most about the 2018 Games… “Well first, I'll be most excited if I get to go. We still have a selection event [on January 15th], but I’m hopeful. Also, the last Games, none of my family made it. It was really last-minute when the team was announced and really expensive, so my family couldn't afford it. This time around, my mom wouldn't miss it for the world. I also have some amazing Olympic sponsors that are going to help make it easier for my family. That's what I'm most excited for, to have all my family there.”

Olympic goal… “Olympic gold. I think that's the same for everybody. But right now, I'm just focusing on making the team. I competed in two disciplines at the last Games. I just narrowly missed going for both of them. This time around, I'd really like to go for both, especially the one that I missed out on last time [halfpipe]. I'd like to get a medal in both my disciplines.”

Follow Gus Kenworthy’s road to the 2018 PyeongChang Olympic Games via Instagram (@guskenworthy) and Twitter (@guskenworthy). The Opening Ceremonies will air on Friday, February 9 on NBC. To try the Team USA Bootcamp, head to 24 Hour Fitness clubs nationwide.

Read More
3 Quick HIIT Workouts for Beginners
What Happens to Your Body When You Skip the Gym
11 Healthy Homemade Protein Bar Recipes

The post 20 Questions With Olympic Skier Gus Kenworthy appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

]]>
Gus Kenworthy Olympic Freestyle Skier

[caption id="attachment_64703" align="alignnone" width="620"]20 Questions With Gus Kenworthy Olympic Skier Photo: 24 Hour Fitness[/caption] Even if you didn’t grow up skiing double black diamonds, you probably know the name Gus Kenworthy, after making headlines as the first openly gay man to compete in the Winter Olympics. And if you’re planning to watch the 2018 Winter Olympics, the seven-time world champion and Olympic silver medalist is the guy you want to watch in PyeongChang. Also worth noting: Kenworthy is impossibly fit (2017 ESPN Body Issue proof here). And when the Telluride-native isn’t on the slopes, he’s most likely at the squat rack. So it’s no surprise that 24 Hour Fitness tapped Kenworthy (among other U.S. Olympic medalists) as inspiration for their new Team USA Bootcamp program. The high-intensity interval training class, which launched on January 1, features training techniques stolen straight from the pros. Think: functional bodyweight training, metabolic conditioning and burns-so-good plyometrics. Daily Burn posted up next to Kenworthy for the pre-PyeongChang kick-off class, then grilled the 26-year-old slopestyle star on his hopes, fears, fitness routine and what’s in his fridge. (Hint: a whole lot of hot sauce.) RELATED: The Olympics-Inspired Bodyweight Workout [INFOGRAPHIC] https://www.instagram.com/p/BL4IhiZjAuK/

20 Questions with Freestyle Skier Gus Kenworthy

First time on skis… “I was three years old. My family moved to a small ski town, and my mom learned to ski at the same time as me and my brothers. My first skiing memory was riding up the chairlift with my mom. I would fall asleep in her lap, and then she'd wake me up at the top, and say, ‘Wake up, we're going!’ We’d do the run, then get back on the chairlift and I'd fall asleep again.” Signature trick… “The double cork 1080 blunt grab, or the ‘dub cork, 10 blunt’ for short. It's not the most technical trick ever, but it's one of my favorites and probably most recognizable for me. Double cork basically means I'm going off axis, flipping twice; 1080 means that I'm spinning three times; and a blunt grab is just where you do a tail grab, but you're right on the very, very end of your skis.” Greatest athletic achievement… “My silver medal in Sochi in slopestyle. That was the inaugural event — the first time our sport had ever been in the Games. I landed a run that I was really proud of, and got silver. The guy who got first and the guy who got third were also American, so it was the third sweep in U.S. history. The whole thing, it's still surreal.” Hours on the slopes… “During the winter, I ski about five days a week, usually 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. It's not an insane amount of hours, but it's just a lot of work in those hours — grinding, trying new tricks, pushing, hustling, taking falls.” Hours in the gym… “My workouts are between one and two hours, six days a week.” Leg day workout… “I'll only do four exercises — each for three sets, 10 to 15 reps. For example, I’ll do back squats, then a leg press or a leg extension, a calf raise, and then a sissy squat or something for hamstrings.” RELATED: 9 Reasons to Never Skip Leg Day [caption id="attachment_64706" align="alignnone" width="620"]Gus Kenworthy Workout - Winter Olympics 2018 Photo: 24 Hour Fitness[/caption] Exercise you love… “My favorite exercise is bench press. It's so meathead, I know. But it's been my favorite thing — ever since I blew my knee out a few years ago and couldn’t do legs, so I started doing everything else. I really got into working out, and started training with my brother. He was in the military, and I was so scrawny. I couldn't do a single rep, with the bar and a plate on each side. I was doing 10 reps, just with the bar, and it was so embarrassing how nothing it was. And so now, to do a full set of 10 at 205, or 225, it feels so cool. That's the exercise I've seen the most progress with by far.” Exercise you love to hate… “Squats and deadlifts. I always dread doing them, but I know they’re important for my sport. I always feel really good about it afterwards. And it feels cool to move a lot of weight.” Favorite cross-training workout… “We used to jump on the trampoline a lot. We actually don't do it that much anymore, but growing up, so many of the tricks I learned on skis, I first learned on the trampoline. That was the most fun cross-training I did as a kid, when I was first getting into the sport.” RELATED: The 15 Most Underrated Exercises, According to Trainers The one thing that's always in your fridge… “My sponsor Monster makes a Java Monster that I really like in the morning. And then, otherwise…it's basically a lot of hot sauces! I never make food at home because I travel so much, so I just always eat out or order in. Yeah, it's pretty much just condiments — it's bad.” Go-to cheat meal… “Mint chocolate chip ice cream.” Healthy airport snack… “Almonds or any sort of trail mix.” Fancy juice or protein shake… “Both! I love fancy cold-pressed green juice, and I have a protein shake after every workout.” RELATED: 15 Deliciously Healthy Green Smoothie Recipes Secret talent… “After skiing I want to get into acting. I wish I could say I'm a super-talented actor, but — you know what, I going with it. I'm putting it out there in the universe.” https://www.instagram.com/p/BbSQKmAAeOJ/ Signature celebration move… “I raise my hands out to the sides, like a ‘say something’ kind of thing. It’s kind of cocky, I know. But some people wave their poles around or throw a fist in the air, and I feel like mine is a little subtler.” All-time hero… “My mom. She raised my brothers and I. She's so generous with her time, and definitely sacrificed a lot to take me around to ski competitions and hockey games and everything else when I was a kid.” Motivational mantra… “One thing that I've been telling myself, especially in recent years, is: ‘This one thing doesn't define me.’ I have to remind myself of that, because I get caught up in feeling that I'm going to disappoint people if I don't do well. I want to be successful in skiing, and in so many things. But whether or not I win an event is not really going to change my life in that many ways. Whether I land that run, or I don't land that run. Whether I get on the podium, or I don't. My family is still going to be at the bottom, supporting me. I have such good friends and I have sponsors that are going to stand by me. I have so much to be appreciative of.” RELATED: 19 Positive Affirmations That Will Change the Way You Think The one thing that scares you… “Being alone, like literally. I have a house in Denver, and I used to have friends living in the guest rooms. But since [last] January, it's just been me. I love horror movies and crime shows, but then I'll be in my bed alone at night and I'll hear a creak downstairs, and get so freaked out.” What excites you most about the 2018 Games… “Well first, I'll be most excited if I get to go. We still have a selection event [on January 15th], but I’m hopeful. Also, the last Games, none of my family made it. It was really last-minute when the team was announced and really expensive, so my family couldn't afford it. This time around, my mom wouldn't miss it for the world. I also have some amazing Olympic sponsors that are going to help make it easier for my family. That's what I'm most excited for, to have all my family there.” Olympic goal… “Olympic gold. I think that's the same for everybody. But right now, I'm just focusing on making the team. I competed in two disciplines at the last Games. I just narrowly missed going for both of them. This time around, I'd really like to go for both, especially the one that I missed out on last time [halfpipe]. I'd like to get a medal in both my disciplines.” Follow Gus Kenworthy’s road to the 2018 PyeongChang Olympic Games via Instagram (@guskenworthy) and Twitter (@guskenworthy). The Opening Ceremonies will air on Friday, February 9 on NBC. To try the Team USA Bootcamp, head to 24 Hour Fitness clubs nationwide. Read More 3 Quick HIIT Workouts for Beginners What Happens to Your Body When You Skip the Gym 11 Healthy Homemade Protein Bar Recipes

The post 20 Questions With Olympic Skier Gus Kenworthy appeared first on Life by Daily Burn.

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