Life by DailyBurn » Diet & Nutrition http://dailyburn.com/life A better you, for life. Wed, 02 Sep 2015 16:19:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.4 8 Next-Level Lunch Boxes That Make Meal Prep Easy http://dailyburn.com/life/health/back-to-school-lunch-boxes-healthy-lunch/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/back-to-school-lunch-boxes-healthy-lunch/#comments Thu, 27 Aug 2015 11:15:08 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=42933 8 Next-Level Lunchboxes That Make Meal Prep Easy

8 Next-Level Lunchboxes That Make Meal Prep Easy

Whether you want to admit it or not, it’s back-to-school season. That usually involves shopping for brand new supplies, but it can also include a slew of healthy new resolutions to get you on track after a summer’s worth of treats (post-grads, we're looking at you, too!). And while you may already be kicking off your day with guilt-free breakfast, it’s lunch that seems to fall to the wayside. With endless delivery options and limited time to prep and pack (not to mention actually wolf it down at your desk), it’s easy to find yourself with a lunch that’s pretty lackluster.

But the consequences of ignoring lunch — aside from the hanger that’ll belabor you — are no joke: Purchasing a midday meal at work or school can be expensive, and unhealthy. A 2013 study from Visa found that buying lunch twice a week adds up to roughly $936 a year. Holy food bills, right? (P.S. Here’s an easy way to save $43 a month.)

RELATED: 12 Brilliant Meal Prep Ideas to Free Up Your Time

Just a little foresight can help you save money and calories. And now that you’ll have the extra cash you won’t be spending on takeout, treat yourself to a brand-new lunch box. With a thermos perfect for soup, a takeout box that’s ideal for pad thai and more, here are eight new ways to carry your midday meal to the office in style.

8 New Lunch Boxes to Inspire Healthy Eating

Lunchbots Bento Lunch Box

1. Bento or Bust
Feel like nibbling on a few small meals throughout the day instead of having one big lunch? Skip the excess Tupperware (but pack all the goodies) and go for the Lunchbots Bento Box. The sleek, metal design has three separate sections to keep your 3 p.m. strawberries from getting too cozy with your chicken stir-fry. ($35; lunchbots.com)

BNTO Lunch Box

2. Seal the Deal
Layering salad or yogurt parfaits in a mason jar seems like a great idea before work, except for when you break it out of the fridge — and everything’s super soggy. Enter the BNTO by cuppow, a jar adaptor that will keep your granola (dressing, or whatever) separate from your yogurt ‘till you’re ready to chow down. ($10; cuppow.com)

RELATED: 12 Energy Bites Recipes That Taste Just Like Dessert

Takeout Lunch Box

3. Takeout Fake-Out
Is it just us, or does food taste better when it comes straight from a takeout box? Transport your homemade Asian-style zoodles to work with this nifty tote from DCI, which is made from food-grade silicone. It’s microwave- and dishwasher-safe, so no need to stress about reheating or cleaning. ($19; dcigift.com)

Thermos Lunch Box

4. Souped Up
Winter is coming, but this steel Thermos Pot will keep a cozy soup, like our butternut squash recipe, hot for up to six hours. Best of all, you’ll never be without a spoon (or forget where you put that spoon) since the stainless steel spoon that magnetizes to the side of the thermos. ($42; food52.com)

 Safe Happy Family Lunch Box

5. Zip to It

If you’re worried about the cleanliness of your eating space (#nojudgment), the Safe & Happy Family Lunch Box is actually a sack that unzips to become a placement, making outdoor picnics a breeze. Stash some snacks, like protein rice krispies, homemade Larabars or chocolate chip protein bars and enjoy without worrying about making a mess. ($25; safehappyfamily.com)

RELATED: 9 Delicious Watermelon Recipes

 OXO Lunch Box

6. It’s All in the Layers
It’s business on the bottom, party on the top with this two-level, leak-proof container from OXO. It’s ideal for packing all your sandwich components separately so you’ll never deal with a soggy sandwich again. Four locking tabs create an airtight seal. ($15; oxo.com, available October 2015)

 Tiffin Lunch Box

7. Sweet Charity
Purchase this fair trade Tiffin (a tin commonly used to carry food in India) and you’ll have a chic, conscious way to BYO spicy shrimp wraps for lunch. It’s crafted by Noah’s Ark International Exports, an organization in Moradebad, India that works to promote independent artisans. ($24; tenthousandvillages.com)

Salad Bowl Lunch Box

8. Top It Off
Dressed salads are difficult to bring to the office and they’re even more difficult to enjoy after soaking in your homemade vinaigrette all morning. Avoid the problem altogether with the Pret a Paquet Salad Pack, which has a dressing cup that snaps into the lid for spill-proof storage. An insulated sleeve will keep your kale salad fresh if you can’t slip your lunch into a fridge immediately. ($25; pretapaquet.com)

The post 8 Next-Level Lunch Boxes That Make Meal Prep Easy appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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8 Next-Level Lunchboxes That Make Meal Prep Easy

8 Next-Level Lunchboxes That Make Meal Prep Easy Whether you want to admit it or not, it’s back-to-school season. That usually involves shopping for brand new supplies, but it can also include a slew of healthy new resolutions to get you on track after a summer’s worth of treats (post-grads, we're looking at you, too!). And while you may already be kicking off your day with guilt-free breakfast, it’s lunch that seems to fall to the wayside. With endless delivery options and limited time to prep and pack (not to mention actually wolf it down at your desk), it’s easy to find yourself with a lunch that’s pretty lackluster. But the consequences of ignoring lunch — aside from the hanger that’ll belabor you — are no joke: Purchasing a midday meal at work or school can be expensive, and unhealthy. A 2013 study from Visa found that buying lunch twice a week adds up to roughly $936 a year. Holy food bills, right? (P.S. Here’s an easy way to save $43 a month.) RELATED: 12 Brilliant Meal Prep Ideas to Free Up Your Time Just a little foresight can help you save money and calories. And now that you’ll have the extra cash you won’t be spending on takeout, treat yourself to a brand-new lunch box. With a thermos perfect for soup, a takeout box that’s ideal for pad thai and more, here are eight new ways to carry your midday meal to the office in style.

8 New Lunch Boxes to Inspire Healthy Eating

Lunchbots Bento Lunch Box 1. Bento or Bust Feel like nibbling on a few small meals throughout the day instead of having one big lunch? Skip the excess Tupperware (but pack all the goodies) and go for the Lunchbots Bento Box. The sleek, metal design has three separate sections to keep your 3 p.m. strawberries from getting too cozy with your chicken stir-fry. ($35; lunchbots.com) BNTO Lunch Box 2. Seal the Deal Layering salad or yogurt parfaits in a mason jar seems like a great idea before work, except for when you break it out of the fridge — and everything’s super soggy. Enter the BNTO by cuppow, a jar adaptor that will keep your granola (dressing, or whatever) separate from your yogurt ‘till you’re ready to chow down. ($10; cuppow.com) RELATED: 12 Energy Bites Recipes That Taste Just Like Dessert Takeout Lunch Box 3. Takeout Fake-Out Is it just us, or does food taste better when it comes straight from a takeout box? Transport your homemade Asian-style zoodles to work with this nifty tote from DCI, which is made from food-grade silicone. It’s microwave- and dishwasher-safe, so no need to stress about reheating or cleaning. ($19; dcigift.com) Thermos Lunch Box 4. Souped Up Winter is coming, but this steel Thermos Pot will keep a cozy soup, like our butternut squash recipe, hot for up to six hours. Best of all, you’ll never be without a spoon (or forget where you put that spoon) since the stainless steel spoon that magnetizes to the side of the thermos. ($42; food52.com)  Safe Happy Family Lunch Box 5. Zip to It If you’re worried about the cleanliness of your eating space (#nojudgment), the Safe & Happy Family Lunch Box is actually a sack that unzips to become a placement, making outdoor picnics a breeze. Stash some snacks, like protein rice krispies, homemade Larabars or chocolate chip protein bars and enjoy without worrying about making a mess. ($25; safehappyfamily.com) RELATED: 9 Delicious Watermelon Recipes  OXO Lunch Box 6. It’s All in the Layers It’s business on the bottom, party on the top with this two-level, leak-proof container from OXO. It’s ideal for packing all your sandwich components separately so you’ll never deal with a soggy sandwich again. Four locking tabs create an airtight seal. ($15; oxo.com, available October 2015)  Tiffin Lunch Box 7. Sweet Charity Purchase this fair trade Tiffin (a tin commonly used to carry food in India) and you’ll have a chic, conscious way to BYO spicy shrimp wraps for lunch. It’s crafted by Noah’s Ark International Exports, an organization in Moradebad, India that works to promote independent artisans. ($24; tenthousandvillages.com) Salad Bowl Lunch Box 8. Top It Off Dressed salads are difficult to bring to the office and they’re even more difficult to enjoy after soaking in your homemade vinaigrette all morning. Avoid the problem altogether with the Pret a Paquet Salad Pack, which has a dressing cup that snaps into the lid for spill-proof storage. An insulated sleeve will keep your kale salad fresh if you can’t slip your lunch into a fridge immediately. ($25; pretapaquet.com)

The post 8 Next-Level Lunch Boxes That Make Meal Prep Easy appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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Why You Should Rethink Ground Beef at Your Next BBQ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/news-ground-beef-burgers-consumer-reports-082615/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/news-ground-beef-burgers-consumer-reports-082615/#comments Wed, 26 Aug 2015 17:15:24 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=42974 Why You Should Rethink Ground Beef at Your Next BBQ

[caption id="attachment_42977" align="alignnone" width="620"]Why You Should Rethink Ground Beef at Your Next BBQ Photo: Pond5[/caption]

If you’re like many Americans right now, you’ve probably got a package of ground beef (or two) sitting in your fridge, waiting to be tossed on the grill for one of your last barbecues of summer. But a new study from Consumer Reports is revealing some disturbing new information about what might be lurking in your burger meat — and it’s not pretty.

RELATED: You’ll Never Guess How Many Processed Foods Americans Consume

We’ll warn you now: You might not want to read this while eating your lunch. In a test of more than 300 packages of ground beef (that’s 1,832 quarter-pounders to you), researchers found that every single one contained bacteria indicating fecal contamination. (Yup, we mean poop.) Plus, 20 percent of the samples contained C. perfringens, a type of bacteria that is linked to a whopping one million food poisoning cases every year, according to Consumer Reports.

In what might seem like good news, only one percent of the samples contained salmonella. But Urvashi Rangan, Ph.D., executive director of the Center for Food Safety and Sustainability at Consumer Reports says, “Extrapolate that to the billions of pounds of ground beef we eat every year, and that’s a lot of burgers with the potential to make you sick.”

RELATED: Can This Device Save You From Food Poisoning?

Get Smart About Buying Ground Beef

But hey, we’re not suggesting you give up ground beef for good. (If you want to, though, here’s an awesome veggie burger recipe to get you started). You just need to wise up about what you’re purchasing — like what to look for on the labels — and pay attention when you’re dining out, too.

“We suggest that you choose what’s labeled ‘grass-fed organic beef’ whenever you can,” Rangan said in a press release. Consumer Reports found that ground beef from conventionally raised cows (the ones that eat grain and soy, and receive lots of antibiotics to prevent disease) are more likely to contain bacteria than beef from sustainably raised animals. But, it can still be a guessing game to a degree. “There’s no way to tell by looking at a package of meat or smelling it whether it has harmful bacteria or not,” Rangan adds.

RELATED: The Dirty Dozen: What to Buy Organic

You might also want to avoid ordering burgers rare or medium-rare (cooked to a temperature under 160° F). Whereas bacteria generally live only on the surface of a cut of steak (where it can be easily cooked off), it can linger even in the middle of ground beef. That means it needs to be cooked more thoroughly to kill off the bad stuff.

The moral of the story: Shop for ground beef with care — and be sure to cook it to at least medium temperature (or order it to the same). And while you’re at it, check out these seven grilling tips for a healthier summer barbecue, too.

The post Why You Should Rethink Ground Beef at Your Next BBQ appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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Why You Should Rethink Ground Beef at Your Next BBQ

[caption id="attachment_42977" align="alignnone" width="620"]Why You Should Rethink Ground Beef at Your Next BBQ Photo: Pond5[/caption] If you’re like many Americans right now, you’ve probably got a package of ground beef (or two) sitting in your fridge, waiting to be tossed on the grill for one of your last barbecues of summer. But a new study from Consumer Reports is revealing some disturbing new information about what might be lurking in your burger meat — and it’s not pretty. RELATED: You’ll Never Guess How Many Processed Foods Americans Consume We’ll warn you now: You might not want to read this while eating your lunch. In a test of more than 300 packages of ground beef (that’s 1,832 quarter-pounders to you), researchers found that every single one contained bacteria indicating fecal contamination. (Yup, we mean poop.) Plus, 20 percent of the samples contained C. perfringens, a type of bacteria that is linked to a whopping one million food poisoning cases every year, according to Consumer Reports. In what might seem like good news, only one percent of the samples contained salmonella. But Urvashi Rangan, Ph.D., executive director of the Center for Food Safety and Sustainability at Consumer Reports says, “Extrapolate that to the billions of pounds of ground beef we eat every year, and that’s a lot of burgers with the potential to make you sick.” RELATED: Can This Device Save You From Food Poisoning?

Get Smart About Buying Ground Beef

But hey, we’re not suggesting you give up ground beef for good. (If you want to, though, here’s an awesome veggie burger recipe to get you started). You just need to wise up about what you’re purchasing — like what to look for on the labels — and pay attention when you’re dining out, too. “We suggest that you choose what’s labeled ‘grass-fed organic beef’ whenever you can,” Rangan said in a press release. Consumer Reports found that ground beef from conventionally raised cows (the ones that eat grain and soy, and receive lots of antibiotics to prevent disease) are more likely to contain bacteria than beef from sustainably raised animals. But, it can still be a guessing game to a degree. “There’s no way to tell by looking at a package of meat or smelling it whether it has harmful bacteria or not,” Rangan adds. RELATED: The Dirty Dozen: What to Buy Organic You might also want to avoid ordering burgers rare or medium-rare (cooked to a temperature under 160° F). Whereas bacteria generally live only on the surface of a cut of steak (where it can be easily cooked off), it can linger even in the middle of ground beef. That means it needs to be cooked more thoroughly to kill off the bad stuff. The moral of the story: Shop for ground beef with care — and be sure to cook it to at least medium temperature (or order it to the same). And while you’re at it, check out these seven grilling tips for a healthier summer barbecue, too.

The post Why You Should Rethink Ground Beef at Your Next BBQ appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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5 Tips for Setting a Totally Doable Weight Loss Goal http://dailyburn.com/life/health/healthy-weight-loss-goals/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/healthy-weight-loss-goals/#comments Tue, 25 Aug 2015 11:15:08 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=42787 5 Tips for Setting a Totally Doable Weight Loss Goal

[caption id="attachment_42790" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Tips for Setting Weight Loss Goals Photo: Pond5[/caption]

We’re not going to lie: Losing weight isn’t easy, and it isn’t always fun (so long, office cupcakes). But that doesn’t mean you should just toss your scale and give up before you’ve even begun. “The most important thing is to set goals that are achievable,” says Heather Mangieri, RD, CSSD, spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

That means instead of gunning for a big, scary “goal weight” that seems so far in the future you can barely imagine it, set tinier targets instead. “Thinking about your final goal can be so overwhelming you go on shut-down,” Mangieri says. “It’s all about setting small goals, and figuring out what you want to do to get there.”

RELATED: How This Man Lost 100 Pounds, One Small Change at a Time

So stop picturing what you’re going to look like a year from now (you’ll get there eventually!) — and start imagining how much better you’ll feel when you forego that side of fries for veggies instead. Here’s how to do it.

5 Ways to Set Smarter Weight Loss Goals

[caption id="attachment_42791" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Tips for Setting Weight Loss Goals Photo: Pond5[/caption]

1. Think short-term.
It may seem counterintuitive, but don’t get bogged down by the fact that you have 10, 20, 50 or even 100 pounds to lose. “When I’m working with a client, it’s about figuring out where you want to be next week, not in two years,” Mangieri says.

If you’ve got a long road ahead, create a mini goal of losing five to 10 percent of your body weight first, says Lisa Cimperman, RD, LD, and clinical dietician at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland. “Setting short-term milestones and building on them helps keep you focused on your progress, not how far you still have to go,” she adds.

RELATED: My Wedding Photos Were My Weight Loss Wake Up Call

It’s also helpful to think about not just what you want to lose, but what you want to gain — whether that’s more energy, better self-confidence or a longer life, Cimperman says. “Often, these goals are far more motivating than the number on the scale.”

2. Figure out your diet strategy.
Time to come up with a game plan for your eats. “Usually, for weight loss, there is some kind of dietary change that needs to happen,” Mangieri says. In other words, hopping on the treadmill won’t compensate for a diet full of processed foods.

RELATED: How to Detox the Healthy Way: 16 Recipes You’ll Love

The good news: You don’t need to give up carbs for good, commit to a vegan lifestyle, or swear off alcohol for months to lose weight. “I think the biggest mistake [people make] is thinking that they have to make a drastic change in their eating,” Mangieri says. “You might see a difference on the scale [by doing that], but it will be short-lived if you don’t make lifestyle changes and adopt them as part of your new life.”

“The journey is more important than the actual reaching of the goal."

Instead, Mangieri likes people to make small tweaks to address the weak spots in their diet (like drinking soda, or eating too much sugar). “Some clients… I’m giving very short goals like stop drinking juice or sugar-sweetened beverages, or replace them with water,” Mangieri says. “Other clients, if they’ve have already made a lot of changes, we might look at portion sizes. It really depends on where they are what their current eating habits.”

RELATED: What RDs Really Eat: DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan

3. Work on your fitness.
While exercise alone won’t get you to your goal weight, setting fitness goals along the way might help keep you motivated, Cimperman says. “Maybe you want to train for a 5K, or run a 10 minute mile, or improve your strength,” she says. “These things are measurable and typically involve a deadline for completion.”

Plus, they’ll help you feel more committed to leading a healthy lifestyle. “The journey is more important than the actual reaching of the goal, because it’s is the piece that teaches you the behaviors and new habits you need to maintain the goal,” Mangieri says. “We do know through research and studies that activity is a critical part of maintaining weight loss.”

4. Don’t expect to lose 10 pounds a week.
While TV shows may depict people shedding crazy amounts of weight in a week, that’s not actually reality for most folks. “We’re looking at one to two pounds a week, depending on how much weight somebody has to lose,” Mangieri says, and it could be even less than that. (Half a pound still counts!)

RELATED: The 10 Biggest Diet Mistakes, According to Experts

If you’re losing at a more drastic rate, it might feel good for a while, but you could eventually end up plateauing — or gaining it all back, Mangieri says. “[That] can set in feelings of failure and depression,” she says. “Once that mood change happens you start to see other behaviors kick in that are not helping them reach their goal.” 

5. Track your successes.
Don’t forget to take time to revel in all the hard work you’re doing — and how it’s paying off. “Use a notebook and pen or any of the many apps to track your food intake and activity,” Cimperman says. “Studies show that people who do this are more likely to stick with their plan,”

Plus, plotting your weight loss over several months, can help remind you how well you’re doing — even on an off week. “It helps people see even though I might not have lost a pound this week, or even gained a pound, overall my pattern of weight loss is looking pretty good.”

Feeling motivated? Check out these six weight loss success stories to give you that final push you need to get started.

The post 5 Tips for Setting a Totally Doable Weight Loss Goal appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
5 Tips for Setting a Totally Doable Weight Loss Goal

[caption id="attachment_42790" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Tips for Setting Weight Loss Goals Photo: Pond5[/caption] We’re not going to lie: Losing weight isn’t easy, and it isn’t always fun (so long, office cupcakes). But that doesn’t mean you should just toss your scale and give up before you’ve even begun. “The most important thing is to set goals that are achievable,” says Heather Mangieri, RD, CSSD, spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That means instead of gunning for a big, scary “goal weight” that seems so far in the future you can barely imagine it, set tinier targets instead. “Thinking about your final goal can be so overwhelming you go on shut-down,” Mangieri says. “It’s all about setting small goals, and figuring out what you want to do to get there.” RELATED: How This Man Lost 100 Pounds, One Small Change at a Time So stop picturing what you’re going to look like a year from now (you’ll get there eventually!) — and start imagining how much better you’ll feel when you forego that side of fries for veggies instead. Here’s how to do it.

5 Ways to Set Smarter Weight Loss Goals

[caption id="attachment_42791" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Tips for Setting Weight Loss Goals Photo: Pond5[/caption] 1. Think short-term. It may seem counterintuitive, but don’t get bogged down by the fact that you have 10, 20, 50 or even 100 pounds to lose. “When I’m working with a client, it’s about figuring out where you want to be next week, not in two years,” Mangieri says. If you’ve got a long road ahead, create a mini goal of losing five to 10 percent of your body weight first, says Lisa Cimperman, RD, LD, and clinical dietician at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland. “Setting short-term milestones and building on them helps keep you focused on your progress, not how far you still have to go,” she adds. RELATED: My Wedding Photos Were My Weight Loss Wake Up Call It’s also helpful to think about not just what you want to lose, but what you want to gain — whether that’s more energy, better self-confidence or a longer life, Cimperman says. “Often, these goals are far more motivating than the number on the scale.” 2. Figure out your diet strategy. Time to come up with a game plan for your eats. “Usually, for weight loss, there is some kind of dietary change that needs to happen,” Mangieri says. In other words, hopping on the treadmill won’t compensate for a diet full of processed foods. RELATED: How to Detox the Healthy Way: 16 Recipes You’ll Love The good news: You don’t need to give up carbs for good, commit to a vegan lifestyle, or swear off alcohol for months to lose weight. “I think the biggest mistake [people make] is thinking that they have to make a drastic change in their eating,” Mangieri says. “You might see a difference on the scale [by doing that], but it will be short-lived if you don’t make lifestyle changes and adopt them as part of your new life.”
“The journey is more important than the actual reaching of the goal."
Instead, Mangieri likes people to make small tweaks to address the weak spots in their diet (like drinking soda, or eating too much sugar). “Some clients… I’m giving very short goals like stop drinking juice or sugar-sweetened beverages, or replace them with water,” Mangieri says. “Other clients, if they’ve have already made a lot of changes, we might look at portion sizes. It really depends on where they are what their current eating habits.” RELATED: What RDs Really Eat: DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan 3. Work on your fitness. While exercise alone won’t get you to your goal weight, setting fitness goals along the way might help keep you motivated, Cimperman says. “Maybe you want to train for a 5K, or run a 10 minute mile, or improve your strength,” she says. “These things are measurable and typically involve a deadline for completion.” Plus, they’ll help you feel more committed to leading a healthy lifestyle. “The journey is more important than the actual reaching of the goal, because it’s is the piece that teaches you the behaviors and new habits you need to maintain the goal,” Mangieri says. “We do know through research and studies that activity is a critical part of maintaining weight loss.” 4. Don’t expect to lose 10 pounds a week. While TV shows may depict people shedding crazy amounts of weight in a week, that’s not actually reality for most folks. “We’re looking at one to two pounds a week, depending on how much weight somebody has to lose,” Mangieri says, and it could be even less than that. (Half a pound still counts!) RELATED: The 10 Biggest Diet Mistakes, According to Experts If you’re losing at a more drastic rate, it might feel good for a while, but you could eventually end up plateauing — or gaining it all back, Mangieri says. “[That] can set in feelings of failure and depression,” she says. “Once that mood change happens you start to see other behaviors kick in that are not helping them reach their goal.”  5. Track your successes. Don’t forget to take time to revel in all the hard work you’re doing — and how it’s paying off. “Use a notebook and pen or any of the many apps to track your food intake and activity,” Cimperman says. “Studies show that people who do this are more likely to stick with their plan,” Plus, plotting your weight loss over several months, can help remind you how well you’re doing — even on an off week. “It helps people see even though I might not have lost a pound this week, or even gained a pound, overall my pattern of weight loss is looking pretty good.” Feeling motivated? Check out these six weight loss success stories to give you that final push you need to get started.

The post 5 Tips for Setting a Totally Doable Weight Loss Goal appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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Are You Addicted to Sugar? Here’s How to Break the Cycle http://dailyburn.com/life/health/sugar-addiction-detox/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/sugar-addiction-detox/#comments Mon, 24 Aug 2015 15:15:48 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=42775 Are You Addicted to Sugar? Here’s How to Break the Cycle

[caption id="attachment_42780" align="alignnone" width="620"]Are You Addicted to Sugar? Here’s How to Break the Cycle Photo: Pond5[/caption]

It’s 3 p.m., and the sugar cravings are relentless. I’ve tried satisfying them with a handful of fresh blueberries and some chocolate-covered espresso beans that I found in the back of my desk drawer. But I’m still struggling not to sabotage my withdrawal progress with a chocolate shake from In-N-Out Burger. I fantasize about the sugar hitting my bloodstream and soothing my nerves. Instead, I stand in my pantry brainstorming possible alternatives: A pinch of coconut. A spoonful of raspberry jam. A swig of maple syrup.

I’m in really bad shape.

We all know about the negative effects of sugar. (The list keeps growing: Weight gain, increased blood pressure and cholesterol levels — plus a higher risk for diabetes, cancer and heart disease.) So like many others, I’ve forced myself to get used to drinking my iced coffee black and watch out for added sugar in my pasta sauce and yogurt. But in a quest to lose 10 pounds, I’ve pledged to go cold turkey.

RELATED: Your 5-Day Detox Plan

"It’s not uncommon to find yourself feeling like a mess a day or so into a sugar detox."

Although some experts recommend scaling down your sugar fix over time, registered dietician Carole Bartolotto believes that cutting it out altogether is the best way to get through a detox. “It’s worse for some people than others,” she says. “I personally can’t do moderation. If I take one bite, it sets me up to want more. But it really helps to remember that the cravings eventually do go away.”

Despite my best efforts, a week later, during my first Sunday “cheat” day, I find myself at a party, tempted by mango-basil and strawberry-mint mojitos. And then there’s the red velvet gluten-free cupcake with cream cheese frosting that the hostess bought just for me. I give in. But the sugar urges don’t end when the party does. The next morning I have to fight off a craving for cronuts.

RELATED: The 30-Second Trick That Might Stop Your Food Cravings

Sugar, An Addiction, Really?

My overwhelming sugar cravings make sense when you consider that research shows you can actually get hooked on the sweet stuff. Scientists have found that sugar is addictive and stimulates the same pleasure centers of the brain as cocaine or heroin. Just like those hard-core drugs, getting off sugar leads to withdrawal and cravings, requiring an actual detox process to wean off. (Read How to Do A Sugar Detox Without Going Crazy here.)

It’s not uncommon to find yourself feeling like a mess a day or so into a sugar detox. Princeton researchers who fed rats sugar water discovered that they ended up bingeing on it. When the rats were deprived, their feel-good brain chemical dopamine dropped, and they suffered from anxiety and the shakes. Except for headaches, I’ve had all the classic withdrawal symptoms: the blah mood, anxiety, fatigue — and daydreams of bathing in a pool of Cinnabon frosting.

Hooked on the Taste

If you had any doubts about the ability of sugar to wreak havoc on your tastebuds, consider this study as evidence. Bartolotto asked 20 people from Kaiser Permanente’s California facilities to cut out all added sugars and artificial sweeteners for two weeks. As a result, their tolerance for that sweet taste completely changed. A whopping 95 percent of subjects reported that the foods and drinks they used to consume now tasted “too sweet.” Over half reported that the intense cravings stopped after two to three days, and 87 percent no longer felt withdrawal effects after six days.

RELATED: Is Sugar Worse Than Salt When It Comes to Your Heart?

Another advantage of detoxing: You’ll reset your palate, Bartolotto says. Not only will you require less sugar to feel satisfied (the recommended amount is six teaspoons per day for women and nine teaspoons for men), you’ll appreciate the flavors of food more, she says.

Here’s how to manage your cravings and get to the other side of your detox.

4 Ways to Fight Your Sugar Addiction

[caption id="attachment_42783" align="alignnone" width="620"]Are You Addicted to Sugar? Here’s How to Break the Cycle Photo: Pond5[/caption]

1. Sub whole fruit for sweets.
Fruit contains fructose, which is metabolized differently than gummi bears — and it’s still a satisfying treat. But be careful to restrict your intake to a few servings a day. Eating too much has been linked to increased belly fat, which increases your chance of type 2 diabetes. Also, go easy on grapes or cherries, which have high sugar content, says Bartoletto. Some patients can’t stop popping them, she says.

2. Ditch artificial sweeteners.
Although diet soda or sugar-free gum has been known to help many dieters get through a rough patch, Bartoletto advises cutting out aspartame, sucralose, saccharine — even stevia — since large amounts can make you desire sweet food. “It actually changes your palate, so you need more and more to feel satisfied,” she says. Perhaps that’s why this Purdue study found a link between increased consumption of the fake stuff and weight gain.

RELATED: Are Artificial Sweeteners Wrecking Your Diet?

3. Clean house.
That means getting rid of any sugary temptations at home and work (including that old Halloween candy). “We can't control all the environments we're in, but we want to control the ones we can,” explains Adam Gilbert, a weight loss coach who founded the program My Body Tutor. “We don't get bonus points for using hero-like willpower.”

RELATED: 6 DIY Kitchen Projects to Clean Up Your Eating Habits

4. Create a backup plan.
If sugar cravings feel uncontrollable, think proactively about what kind of distraction will help you overcome them. “Eat a piece of fruit. Go for a walk. Listen to some music. Call or text a friend. Read a fun article,” offers Gilbert. “Knowing what we're going to do ahead of time is what makes all the difference.”

5. Manage your magnesium levels.
Craving chocolate in particular? Research shows this reaction may be particularly common among people deficient in the mineral magnesium (ask your doctor to check your levels). Head off cravings by eating plenty of magnesium-rich dark leafy greens, tofu, legumes and nuts. (Check out this list.)

RELATED: Is a Magnesium Deficiency Secretly Harming Your Health?

You know what ultimately helped me? Actually eating the chocolate I was craving. Yep, I resorted to one of the oldest dieting tricks out there: Indulging in a square of super dark chocolate. By the third day, the cravings had stopped, and I enjoyed the food on my program — including a decadent fresh peach — rather than wishing for a processed sugar bomb. I also had more energy and didn’t struggle as much through my yoga class. As for my next cheat day… I resolved that it would be sugar-free.

The post Are You Addicted to Sugar? Here’s How to Break the Cycle appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
Are You Addicted to Sugar? Here’s How to Break the Cycle

[caption id="attachment_42780" align="alignnone" width="620"]Are You Addicted to Sugar? Here’s How to Break the Cycle Photo: Pond5[/caption] It’s 3 p.m., and the sugar cravings are relentless. I’ve tried satisfying them with a handful of fresh blueberries and some chocolate-covered espresso beans that I found in the back of my desk drawer. But I’m still struggling not to sabotage my withdrawal progress with a chocolate shake from In-N-Out Burger. I fantasize about the sugar hitting my bloodstream and soothing my nerves. Instead, I stand in my pantry brainstorming possible alternatives: A pinch of coconut. A spoonful of raspberry jam. A swig of maple syrup. I’m in really bad shape. We all know about the negative effects of sugar. (The list keeps growing: Weight gain, increased blood pressure and cholesterol levels — plus a higher risk for diabetes, cancer and heart disease.) So like many others, I’ve forced myself to get used to drinking my iced coffee black and watch out for added sugar in my pasta sauce and yogurt. But in a quest to lose 10 pounds, I’ve pledged to go cold turkey. RELATED: Your 5-Day Detox Plan
"It’s not uncommon to find yourself feeling like a mess a day or so into a sugar detox."
Although some experts recommend scaling down your sugar fix over time, registered dietician Carole Bartolotto believes that cutting it out altogether is the best way to get through a detox. “It’s worse for some people than others,” she says. “I personally can’t do moderation. If I take one bite, it sets me up to want more. But it really helps to remember that the cravings eventually do go away.” Despite my best efforts, a week later, during my first Sunday “cheat” day, I find myself at a party, tempted by mango-basil and strawberry-mint mojitos. And then there’s the red velvet gluten-free cupcake with cream cheese frosting that the hostess bought just for me. I give in. But the sugar urges don’t end when the party does. The next morning I have to fight off a craving for cronuts. RELATED: The 30-Second Trick That Might Stop Your Food Cravings

Sugar, An Addiction, Really?

My overwhelming sugar cravings make sense when you consider that research shows you can actually get hooked on the sweet stuff. Scientists have found that sugar is addictive and stimulates the same pleasure centers of the brain as cocaine or heroin. Just like those hard-core drugs, getting off sugar leads to withdrawal and cravings, requiring an actual detox process to wean off. (Read How to Do A Sugar Detox Without Going Crazy here.) It’s not uncommon to find yourself feeling like a mess a day or so into a sugar detox. Princeton researchers who fed rats sugar water discovered that they ended up bingeing on it. When the rats were deprived, their feel-good brain chemical dopamine dropped, and they suffered from anxiety and the shakes. Except for headaches, I’ve had all the classic withdrawal symptoms: the blah mood, anxiety, fatigue — and daydreams of bathing in a pool of Cinnabon frosting.

Hooked on the Taste

If you had any doubts about the ability of sugar to wreak havoc on your tastebuds, consider this study as evidence. Bartolotto asked 20 people from Kaiser Permanente’s California facilities to cut out all added sugars and artificial sweeteners for two weeks. As a result, their tolerance for that sweet taste completely changed. A whopping 95 percent of subjects reported that the foods and drinks they used to consume now tasted “too sweet.” Over half reported that the intense cravings stopped after two to three days, and 87 percent no longer felt withdrawal effects after six days. RELATED: Is Sugar Worse Than Salt When It Comes to Your Heart? Another advantage of detoxing: You’ll reset your palate, Bartolotto says. Not only will you require less sugar to feel satisfied (the recommended amount is six teaspoons per day for women and nine teaspoons for men), you’ll appreciate the flavors of food more, she says. Here’s how to manage your cravings and get to the other side of your detox.

4 Ways to Fight Your Sugar Addiction

[caption id="attachment_42783" align="alignnone" width="620"]Are You Addicted to Sugar? Here’s How to Break the Cycle Photo: Pond5[/caption] 1. Sub whole fruit for sweets. Fruit contains fructose, which is metabolized differently than gummi bears — and it’s still a satisfying treat. But be careful to restrict your intake to a few servings a day. Eating too much has been linked to increased belly fat, which increases your chance of type 2 diabetes. Also, go easy on grapes or cherries, which have high sugar content, says Bartoletto. Some patients can’t stop popping them, she says. 2. Ditch artificial sweeteners. Although diet soda or sugar-free gum has been known to help many dieters get through a rough patch, Bartoletto advises cutting out aspartame, sucralose, saccharine — even stevia — since large amounts can make you desire sweet food. “It actually changes your palate, so you need more and more to feel satisfied,” she says. Perhaps that’s why this Purdue study found a link between increased consumption of the fake stuff and weight gain. RELATED: Are Artificial Sweeteners Wrecking Your Diet? 3. Clean house. That means getting rid of any sugary temptations at home and work (including that old Halloween candy). “We can't control all the environments we're in, but we want to control the ones we can,” explains Adam Gilbert, a weight loss coach who founded the program My Body Tutor. “We don't get bonus points for using hero-like willpower.” RELATED: 6 DIY Kitchen Projects to Clean Up Your Eating Habits 4. Create a backup plan. If sugar cravings feel uncontrollable, think proactively about what kind of distraction will help you overcome them. “Eat a piece of fruit. Go for a walk. Listen to some music. Call or text a friend. Read a fun article,” offers Gilbert. “Knowing what we're going to do ahead of time is what makes all the difference.” 5. Manage your magnesium levels. Craving chocolate in particular? Research shows this reaction may be particularly common among people deficient in the mineral magnesium (ask your doctor to check your levels). Head off cravings by eating plenty of magnesium-rich dark leafy greens, tofu, legumes and nuts. (Check out this list.) RELATED: Is a Magnesium Deficiency Secretly Harming Your Health? You know what ultimately helped me? Actually eating the chocolate I was craving. Yep, I resorted to one of the oldest dieting tricks out there: Indulging in a square of super dark chocolate. By the third day, the cravings had stopped, and I enjoyed the food on my program — including a decadent fresh peach — rather than wishing for a processed sugar bomb. I also had more energy and didn’t struggle as much through my yoga class. As for my next cheat day… I resolved that it would be sugar-free.

The post Are You Addicted to Sugar? Here’s How to Break the Cycle appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
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You Could Save $43 a Month by Cutting Food Waste http://dailyburn.com/life/health/food-waste-earth-day-tips/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/food-waste-earth-day-tips/#comments Sun, 23 Aug 2015 13:15:58 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=39398 You Could Save $43 a Month by Cutting Food Waste

[caption id="attachment_39402" align="alignnone" width="620"]You Could Save $43 a Month by Cutting Food Waste Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Is your refrigerator crisper a graveyard of spoiled produce and expired goods? Those squandered products add up — and fast. According to the Natural Resources Defense Council, the average American family throws out up to $43 worth of food each month. That’s approximately 20 pounds of food per family, which results in roughly $2,000 worth of wasted food per year for a family of four.

If you’re more concerned with whether your apples are organic than using your kale before it wilts, you’re certainly not alone. The issue of food waste has historically gotten less attention than other aspects of the food systems, says JoAnne Berkenkamp, senior advocate for the Food and Agriculture Program at the Natural Resources Defense Council. “Fortunately, as eaters have become more concerned about where their food comes from and how it is produced, I see them becoming more open to questions about what happens when we throw food out.”

RELATED: How to Eat Healthy for Less Than $4 a Day

Food waste has become a hot topic on social media and many food industry and government leaders are taking it upon themselves to address the issue, Berkenkamp says. Of note: MSNBC has a documentary airing on April 22 called “Just Eat It: A Food Waste Story.” And prominent chef Dan Barber recently transformed his award-winning NYC restaurant Blue Hill into “WastEd,” a one-month pop-up shop serving dishes made from typically discarded foods, like cucumber butts and vegetable pulp left after juicing. Currently, a whopping 40 percent of the food that’s produced is wasted in the U.S., says Berkenkamp.

Food Waste: A Costly Problem

What happens when we toss that uneaten grub to the curb, anyway? First of all, lots of resources — such as the water, energy, chemicals and resulting pollution that go into food production and transportation — are going into food that never gets eaten. “The wasted food is a major source of carbon emissions,” says Dawn Undurraga, M.S., R.D., nutritionist at the Environmental Working Group. The discarded edibles decompose in landfills and emit methane, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change. Undurraga estimates that reducing food waste could save 25 percent of all freshwater used in the U.S.

"Up to 20 percent of produce is wasted because of cosmetic reasons."

Plus, Berkenkamp points out that using food more efficiently will be crucial for feeding the world as the global population increases in the coming decades. Projections suggest the Earth will have nine billion inhabitants by 2050. (The current global population is roughly 7.2 billion.) “Here in the U.S., reducing food losses by just 15 percent would be enough food to feed more than 25 million Americans every year,” she says. “We need to find innovative ways to feed people without putting too much strain on our land, water and soil.”

With 40 percent of food waste occurring in American homes, consumers are a big part of the problem. But luckily, they’re also a big part of the solution, Berkenkamp and Undurraga say. With savvy shopping skills and strategies for using up scraps, you can minimize your own food waste and save a few bucks in the process.

[caption id="attachment_39404" align="alignnone" width="620"]You Could Save $43 a Month by Cutting Food Waste Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Use It, Don’t Lose It

Luckily, cutting down on food waste doesn’t mean you’ll have to scarf down a salad every time you see some vegetables on the verge of spoiling. “Simple steps can make a big difference,” says Berkenkamp. Where to start? These seven tips will help put you in charge of your waste (and wallet!).

1. Make your shopping basket realistic.
“The easiest way to cut down is to only buy as much as you can eat,” says Undurraga. A good strategy is to take 10 minutes to make a list of the meals you’ll eat before you head to the store. If you know you have events or social activities after work, resist the urge to buy perishable items in bulk if you won’t be able to use them up before they go bad.

RELATED: 20 Gadgets to Make Healthy Cooking Easy

2. Learn label lingo.
You might be surprised to learn that “use by” and “sell by” dates are not federally regulated, meaning they don’t necessarily indicate safety or freshness. Undurraga recommends smelling products before tossing them, especially if only the “sell by” date has passed; that date is meant for the retailer, not the consumer. Plus, studies show that lots of foods can be consumed past their expiration date. For specific product information on shelf life and “when-to-toss” tips, head to StillTasty.com.

3. Write an inventory.
Push aside the wedding invitations or school report cards decorating your fridge to make room for a whiteboard that keeps track of what’s inside. This will help you remember those farmers’ market strawberries before they stink up your top shelf. Undurraga says she ranks her produce to keep track of what needs to be eaten first.

4. Reuse those leftovers.
Constantly tossing last week’s linguini? According to the NRDC, one-third of all household waste is caused by Americans cooking or serving too much food. By putting any uneaten meals front and center in your fridge, you’ll be more likely to see and remember to use them, says Undurraga. So stop hiding those takeout boxes in the back! They could be tomorrow’s lunch.

5. Freeze, please.
When using all your produce before it goes bad just isn’t possible, Undurraga suggests preserving fruits and vegetables in the freezer as a last resort. Putting leftover soups and stews in the freezer is also a great way to keep them for later if you cooked in bulk and your taste buds are getting bored.

RELATED: 12 DIY Kitchen Projects to Clean Up Your Eating Habits

6. Give ugly produce some love.
Picture-perfect fruits and vegetables may look good on Instagram, but their not-so-shapely peers will taste just as good. (And will be just as nutritious!) EndFoodWaste.org estimates that up to 20 percent of produce is wasted because of cosmetic reasons. Lots of disfigured produce gets tossed before it even makes it to most supermarkets and grocery stores, so show your support for the uglies by shopping at local farmers markets. Even better: Be an ugly activist by tagging your quirky food photos #loveuglyfood.

7. Embrace the empty fridge.
If you’re depressed every time you’ve got barren fridge shelves staring back at you, don’t be. In fact, it’s a sign that you’re being efficient and eating everything you buy. “A well-managed fridge is an empty fridge,” says Undurraga. “Meal planning will definitely help you stop collecting too much.” Plus, it adds up to money in the bank, too.

How do you prevent food waste? Share your tips in the comments below.

Originally posted April 2015. Updated August 2015. 

 

The post You Could Save $43 a Month by Cutting Food Waste appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
You Could Save $43 a Month by Cutting Food Waste

[caption id="attachment_39402" align="alignnone" width="620"]You Could Save $43 a Month by Cutting Food Waste Photo: Pond5[/caption] Is your refrigerator crisper a graveyard of spoiled produce and expired goods? Those squandered products add up — and fast. According to the Natural Resources Defense Council, the average American family throws out up to $43 worth of food each month. That’s approximately 20 pounds of food per family, which results in roughly $2,000 worth of wasted food per year for a family of four. If you’re more concerned with whether your apples are organic than using your kale before it wilts, you’re certainly not alone. The issue of food waste has historically gotten less attention than other aspects of the food systems, says JoAnne Berkenkamp, senior advocate for the Food and Agriculture Program at the Natural Resources Defense Council. “Fortunately, as eaters have become more concerned about where their food comes from and how it is produced, I see them becoming more open to questions about what happens when we throw food out.” RELATED: How to Eat Healthy for Less Than $4 a Day Food waste has become a hot topic on social media and many food industry and government leaders are taking it upon themselves to address the issue, Berkenkamp says. Of note: MSNBC has a documentary airing on April 22 called “Just Eat It: A Food Waste Story.” And prominent chef Dan Barber recently transformed his award-winning NYC restaurant Blue Hill into “WastEd,” a one-month pop-up shop serving dishes made from typically discarded foods, like cucumber butts and vegetable pulp left after juicing. Currently, a whopping 40 percent of the food that’s produced is wasted in the U.S., says Berkenkamp.

Food Waste: A Costly Problem

What happens when we toss that uneaten grub to the curb, anyway? First of all, lots of resources — such as the water, energy, chemicals and resulting pollution that go into food production and transportation — are going into food that never gets eaten. “The wasted food is a major source of carbon emissions,” says Dawn Undurraga, M.S., R.D., nutritionist at the Environmental Working Group. The discarded edibles decompose in landfills and emit methane, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change. Undurraga estimates that reducing food waste could save 25 percent of all freshwater used in the U.S.
"Up to 20 percent of produce is wasted because of cosmetic reasons."
Plus, Berkenkamp points out that using food more efficiently will be crucial for feeding the world as the global population increases in the coming decades. Projections suggest the Earth will have nine billion inhabitants by 2050. (The current global population is roughly 7.2 billion.) “Here in the U.S., reducing food losses by just 15 percent would be enough food to feed more than 25 million Americans every year,” she says. “We need to find innovative ways to feed people without putting too much strain on our land, water and soil.” With 40 percent of food waste occurring in American homes, consumers are a big part of the problem. But luckily, they’re also a big part of the solution, Berkenkamp and Undurraga say. With savvy shopping skills and strategies for using up scraps, you can minimize your own food waste and save a few bucks in the process. [caption id="attachment_39404" align="alignnone" width="620"]You Could Save $43 a Month by Cutting Food Waste Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Use It, Don’t Lose It

Luckily, cutting down on food waste doesn’t mean you’ll have to scarf down a salad every time you see some vegetables on the verge of spoiling. “Simple steps can make a big difference,” says Berkenkamp. Where to start? These seven tips will help put you in charge of your waste (and wallet!). 1. Make your shopping basket realistic. “The easiest way to cut down is to only buy as much as you can eat,” says Undurraga. A good strategy is to take 10 minutes to make a list of the meals you’ll eat before you head to the store. If you know you have events or social activities after work, resist the urge to buy perishable items in bulk if you won’t be able to use them up before they go bad. RELATED: 20 Gadgets to Make Healthy Cooking Easy 2. Learn label lingo. You might be surprised to learn that “use by” and “sell by” dates are not federally regulated, meaning they don’t necessarily indicate safety or freshness. Undurraga recommends smelling products before tossing them, especially if only the “sell by” date has passed; that date is meant for the retailer, not the consumer. Plus, studies show that lots of foods can be consumed past their expiration date. For specific product information on shelf life and “when-to-toss” tips, head to StillTasty.com. 3. Write an inventory. Push aside the wedding invitations or school report cards decorating your fridge to make room for a whiteboard that keeps track of what’s inside. This will help you remember those farmers’ market strawberries before they stink up your top shelf. Undurraga says she ranks her produce to keep track of what needs to be eaten first. 4. Reuse those leftovers. Constantly tossing last week’s linguini? According to the NRDC, one-third of all household waste is caused by Americans cooking or serving too much food. By putting any uneaten meals front and center in your fridge, you’ll be more likely to see and remember to use them, says Undurraga. So stop hiding those takeout boxes in the back! They could be tomorrow’s lunch. 5. Freeze, please. When using all your produce before it goes bad just isn’t possible, Undurraga suggests preserving fruits and vegetables in the freezer as a last resort. Putting leftover soups and stews in the freezer is also a great way to keep them for later if you cooked in bulk and your taste buds are getting bored. RELATED: 12 DIY Kitchen Projects to Clean Up Your Eating Habits 6. Give ugly produce some love. Picture-perfect fruits and vegetables may look good on Instagram, but their not-so-shapely peers will taste just as good. (And will be just as nutritious!) EndFoodWaste.org estimates that up to 20 percent of produce is wasted because of cosmetic reasons. Lots of disfigured produce gets tossed before it even makes it to most supermarkets and grocery stores, so show your support for the uglies by shopping at local farmers markets. Even better: Be an ugly activist by tagging your quirky food photos #loveuglyfood. 7. Embrace the empty fridge. If you’re depressed every time you’ve got barren fridge shelves staring back at you, don’t be. In fact, it’s a sign that you’re being efficient and eating everything you buy. “A well-managed fridge is an empty fridge,” says Undurraga. “Meal planning will definitely help you stop collecting too much.” Plus, it adds up to money in the bank, too. How do you prevent food waste? Share your tips in the comments below. Originally posted April 2015. Updated August 2015.   

The post You Could Save $43 a Month by Cutting Food Waste appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
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How Bad Is Your Happy Hour? Try This Alcohol Calculator http://dailyburn.com/life/health/news-alcohol-calculator-happy-hour-082015/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/news-alcohol-calculator-happy-hour-082015/#comments Fri, 21 Aug 2015 15:15:23 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=42823 How Bad Is Your Happy Hour? Try This Alcohol Calculator

[caption id="attachment_42829" align="alignnone" width="620"]How Bad Is Your Happy Hour? Try This Alcohol Calculator Photo: Pond5[/caption]

We all love a good happy hour, but it can be tough to tell how those cocktails are really affecting your body — aside from getting you tipsy. Now, a new alcohol calculator built by the folks at alcoholic.org can help you see the real effects of tossing back a few drinks. (We swear it’s more interesting than it is a buzz kill!)

RELATED: How Bad Is Booze, Really? 6 Crazy Facts About Drinking Alcohol

The Alcohol Calculator You’ve Been Waiting For

Simply input your height, weight and gender, plus the amount you typically drink (and yes, be honest). Before you can even say “whiskey and coke,” you’ll be presented with stats and charts detailing the number of calories you’re consuming, your blood alcohol concentration (BAC) over the course of the night and how much exercise you’ll need to do to burn all those liquid cals off.

We crunched the numbers for a variety of drinks, based on the height and weight of the average woman (5’3”, 166 pounds) and man (5’8”, 195 pounds) in the U.S. Guys, if you consume four beers over the course of two hours, you’ll be be downing about 556 calories. (Plus, you’ll likely exceed a BAC of .08, so no driving allowed). The next day, you’ll need to run more than four miles, or do about more than two hours of yoga to burn it all off.

[caption id="attachment_42826" align="alignnone" width="620"]How Bad Is Your Happy Hour? Try This Alcohol Calculator Photo: Alcoholic.org[/caption]

RELATED: Will a Post-Workout Beer Affect Muscle Growth?

And ladies, if you drink three martinis in one night, not only will you probably be hungover the next day (ouch), but you’ll also be imbibing a whopping 885 calories. That’s going to take 10 miles of walking to undo (not counting the effects it can have on your body — like stressing out your liver over time, and irritating your esophagus and stomach, according to the team behind alcoholic.org).

[caption id="attachment_42825" align="alignnone" width="620"]The Alcohol Calculator Photo: Alcoholic.org[/caption]

Now it’s your turn to put your numbers to the test. Plug in your typical happy hour or boozy brunch favorites to see where you stand — it might make you rethink some of your go-to drinks. (Or at least motivate you to hit the gym extra hard the next day.) Luckily, we’ve got a list of 150-calorie cocktails you’ll love, if you decide it’s time to cut back — at least on the calories.

The post How Bad Is Your Happy Hour? Try This Alcohol Calculator appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
How Bad Is Your Happy Hour? Try This Alcohol Calculator

[caption id="attachment_42829" align="alignnone" width="620"]How Bad Is Your Happy Hour? Try This Alcohol Calculator Photo: Pond5[/caption] We all love a good happy hour, but it can be tough to tell how those cocktails are really affecting your body — aside from getting you tipsy. Now, a new alcohol calculator built by the folks at alcoholic.org can help you see the real effects of tossing back a few drinks. (We swear it’s more interesting than it is a buzz kill!) RELATED: How Bad Is Booze, Really? 6 Crazy Facts About Drinking Alcohol

The Alcohol Calculator You’ve Been Waiting For

Simply input your height, weight and gender, plus the amount you typically drink (and yes, be honest). Before you can even say “whiskey and coke,” you’ll be presented with stats and charts detailing the number of calories you’re consuming, your blood alcohol concentration (BAC) over the course of the night and how much exercise you’ll need to do to burn all those liquid cals off. We crunched the numbers for a variety of drinks, based on the height and weight of the average woman (5’3”, 166 pounds) and man (5’8”, 195 pounds) in the U.S. Guys, if you consume four beers over the course of two hours, you’ll be be downing about 556 calories. (Plus, you’ll likely exceed a BAC of .08, so no driving allowed). The next day, you’ll need to run more than four miles, or do about more than two hours of yoga to burn it all off. [caption id="attachment_42826" align="alignnone" width="620"]How Bad Is Your Happy Hour? Try This Alcohol Calculator Photo: Alcoholic.org[/caption] RELATED: Will a Post-Workout Beer Affect Muscle Growth? And ladies, if you drink three martinis in one night, not only will you probably be hungover the next day (ouch), but you’ll also be imbibing a whopping 885 calories. That’s going to take 10 miles of walking to undo (not counting the effects it can have on your body — like stressing out your liver over time, and irritating your esophagus and stomach, according to the team behind alcoholic.org). [caption id="attachment_42825" align="alignnone" width="620"]The Alcohol Calculator Photo: Alcoholic.org[/caption] Now it’s your turn to put your numbers to the test. Plug in your typical happy hour or boozy brunch favorites to see where you stand — it might make you rethink some of your go-to drinks. (Or at least motivate you to hit the gym extra hard the next day.) Luckily, we’ve got a list of 150-calorie cocktails you’ll love, if you decide it’s time to cut back — at least on the calories.

The post How Bad Is Your Happy Hour? Try This Alcohol Calculator appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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The 10 Best Healthy Meals at the Airport http://dailyburn.com/life/health/best-healthy-meals-airport/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/best-healthy-meals-airport/#comments Wed, 19 Aug 2015 11:15:14 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=42588 flying-health-featured

[caption id="attachment_42656" align="alignnone" width="620"]10 Healthy Airport Meals Photo: Pond5[/caption]

So you’re in the habit of making healthy meals at home, but then you hit the airport and suddenly everything’s up in the air. There’s a veritable siren call of bad choices every time you step foot in the terminal or buckle your seatbelt on the plane. But somewhere wedged between all the fried and fatty foods, healthier meal options do exist out there. (Emoji hands to the sky.)

RELATED: 9 Scary Salads With Over 1,000 Calories (and Healthier Swaps!)

To help you travel like a pro, we asked a couple of top nutritionists to share their picks for the best all-around meals you can get at the airport. None will break your calorie bank or pack too much fat, yet all will provide you with key nutrients to keep you satiated from lift off to landing.

10 Healthy Meals at the Airport

[caption id="attachment_42592" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthy Airport Meals: Dunkin' Donuts Veggie Egg White Flatbread Photo: Courtesy of Dunkin' Donuts[/caption]

1. Dunkin’ Donuts Egg White Veggie Flatbread
The Skinny: 280 cal, 9 g fat (4.5 g sat fat), 4 g fiber, 15 g protein, 690 mg sodium

Hit the line at Dunkin’ for this breakfast, which is portably nestled in a multigrain flatbread. Ashley Harris, MS, RD, a registered dietician The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, says it’s rich in protein to help you feel satisfied throughout the day. “While the 690 milligrams of sodium may seem high, it’s an appropriate amount for a meal — and one of the lower sodium breakfast-sandwich options you’ll find out there.”

[caption id="attachment_42605" align="alignnone" width="620"]10 Healthy Meals at the Airport: Nuts and Apple Photos: Pond5Pond5[/caption]

2. Lightly Salted Nuts and Apple
The Skinny: 280 cal, 15 g fat (1.5 g sat fat), 6 g fiber, 7 g protein, 125 mg sodium

Pop open a small bag or tin of sunflower seeds, almonds or cashews (ideally about a quarter-cup portion size), then pair it with an apple for a kiosk-curated “mini meal.” “The complex carbs provide energy, while the protein helps you balance blood sugars and feel full,” Harris says. “Nuts are a great source of healthy proteins. Stick to roughly a quarter-cup to keep calories low, adding a piece of fruit for the perfect amount of energy from carbohydrates,” she says.

RELATED: The 25 Best Foodie Instagram Accounts to Follow

[caption id="attachment_42594" align="alignnone" width="620"]10 Healthy Meals at the Airport: Starbucks Blueberry Whole-Grain Oatmeal Photo: Courtesy of Starbucks[/caption]

3. Starbucks Hearty Blueberry Whole-Grain Oatmeal
The Skinny: 290 cal, 2.5 g fat (1/2 g sat fat), 5 g fiber, 5 g protein, 125 mg sodium

Head over to Starbucks if you’ve got a 6 a.m. flight straight into a big meeting. This breakfast contains steel-cut oats and fresh fruit, both sources of complex carbs that provide a slow release of energy to keep you powered up all day long. “[This breakfast] also contains almonds, which are a great source of heart-healthy fat,” Harris says. While coffee isn’t required, we recommend it — because, travel.

[caption id="attachment_42649" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthy Meals at the Airport: Mcdonalds Southwestern Grilled Chicken Salad Photo: Courtesy of McDonald's[/caption]

4. McDonalds Southwest Salad with Grilled Chicken
The Skinny: 330 cal, 11 g fat (1/2 g sat fat), 7 g fiber, 32g  protein, 890 mg sodium

When it’s looking like McD’s is one of your only choices, turn your attention to the salad menu — but don’t be swayed by the fat-laden Bacon Ranch Salad with Crispy Chicken. Lauren Popeck, RD, a dietitian at Orlando Health, says her personal favorite is the Southwest-style option, made with a mix of nutrient-dense greens. Pro tip: Hold the dressing in lieu of a squeeze of lime to save at least 100 calories and six grams fat. 

RELATED: 8 Quick and Easy Egg Sandwiches

[caption id="attachment_42654" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthy Meals Airport Larabar Milk Photo: Courtesy of Larabar (left); Pond5 (right)[/caption]

5. Larabar and Nonfat Milk
The Skinny: 340 cal, 8 g fat (1/2 g sat fat), 4 g fiber, 19 g protein, 170 mg sodium

Rushed mornings call for quick bites. First, hit up a coffee shop for a small, 12-ounce cup of milk, then grab a bar you can trust. “Look for natural bars with no added sugar, such a Larabar or Go Raw bar,” Popeck says, which are both chockfull of good-for-you nutrients. (Or, if you're really on it, make these homemade three-ingredient Larabars in advance!) The extra 14 grams of protein from the milk helps boost your bar into a more substantial snack.

[caption id="attachment_42648" align="alignnone" width="621"]Healthy Meals Airport Au Bon Pain Photos: Courtesy of Au Bon Pain[/caption]

6. Au Bon Pain Southwest Tortilla Soup and Classic Chicken Salad Sandwich
The Skinny: 350 cal, 13 g fat (3 g sat fat), 2 g fiber, 15 g protein, 1240 mg sodium

Grab lunch at ABP by starting with a small serving of the Tortilla Soup, which Popeck likes to pair with one of the chain’s half-sandwiches. (Ask for it on whole-wheat multigrain bread for bonus points.) “The half-sandwich portion contributes 230 calories, 480 mg sodium, 12 grams protein and only one gram saturated fat.” 

RELATED: Peach Homemade Greek Yogurt Recipe

[caption id="attachment_42609" align="alignnone" width="621"]Healthy Meals Airport Mcdonalds Parfait Kind Bar Photos: Courtesy of McDonald's (left); KIND (right)[/caption]

7. McDonald’s Fruit & Yogurt Parfait and KIND Bar
The Skinny:
350 cal, 17 g fat (4.5 g sat fat), 8g fiber, 10 g protein, 205 mg sodium

Believe it or not, this McDonald’s parfait isn’t a secret calorie bomb, says Harris. “[Its] made of fresh fruit and calcium-rich yogurt. And at just 150 calories, a parfait is a perfect healthy option to keep you going.” Make it a meal by grabbing yourself a KIND bar from a newsstand like Hudson News, says Harris. Try flavors like Dark Chocolate Nuts and Sea Salt or Madagascar Vanilla Almond to keep sugar in check — each measures in at under five grams per bar.

[caption id="attachment_42601" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthy Airport Meals Sabra Hummus Pretzels Photo: Courtesy of Sabra[/caption]

8. Sabra Pretzel and Hummus Pack
The Skinny: 380 cal, 20 g fat (3 g sat fat), 8 g fiber, 9 g protein, 860 mg sodium

Is this the most well-rounded meal? Definitely not. But Sabra’s Pretzel and Hummus pack provides such a great balance of carbs and healthy, plant-based protein, it can replace a meal while you’re on the road, says Harris. “It’s higher in calories and sodium than most foods I would recommend as a snack, but that’s why it’s a great ‘mini meal’ choice if you have limited options,” she explains.

RELATED: Homemade Hummus With Olives

[caption id="attachment_42596" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthy Airport Meals Starbucks Protein Bistro Box Photo: Courtesy of Starbucks[/caption]

9. Starbucks Protein Bistro Box
The Skinny: 380 cal, 19 g fat (6 g sat fat), 5 g fiber, 13 g protein, 470 mg sodium

Look away from the pastry shelf and pick up this well-balanced to-go box with a hard-boiled egg, sliced apple, a bunch of grapes, and white Cheddar cheese, served with multigrain muesli bread and peanut butter. “You get fresh fruit, whole grains, healthy fats and protein to fill you up, while keeping saturated fat, calories and sodium in check,” says Popeck. And what’s not to love about the cute bento box presentation packed with sweet, salty and savory flavors?

[caption id="attachment_42599" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthiest Airport Meals: Chilis Margarita Grill Bowl Photo: Courtesy of Chili's[/caption]

10. Chilis “Lighter Choice” Margarita Grilled Chicken
The Skinny: 580 cal, 13 g fat (2.5 g sat fat), 7 g fiber, 51 g protein, 2430 mg sodium

This one comes with delicious black beans, rice and pico de gallo — but Popeck recommends making some adjustments. You’ll get 190 calories and 31 grams protein without the sides, so start with the chicken and pico. Use the beans and rice sparingly and you’ll cut back on calories and sodium — always a challenge when you eat out. “If you choose this dish” says Popeck, “remember to balance the high sodium with plenty of fresh fruits, veggies and other naturally high-water foods as soon as you land.” (And grab a water bottle for your flight; the low humidity in the cabin is generally dehydrating.)

The post The 10 Best Healthy Meals at the Airport appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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flying-health-featured

[caption id="attachment_42656" align="alignnone" width="620"]10 Healthy Airport Meals Photo: Pond5[/caption] So you’re in the habit of making healthy meals at home, but then you hit the airport and suddenly everything’s up in the air. There’s a veritable siren call of bad choices every time you step foot in the terminal or buckle your seatbelt on the plane. But somewhere wedged between all the fried and fatty foods, healthier meal options do exist out there. (Emoji hands to the sky.) RELATED: 9 Scary Salads With Over 1,000 Calories (and Healthier Swaps!) To help you travel like a pro, we asked a couple of top nutritionists to share their picks for the best all-around meals you can get at the airport. None will break your calorie bank or pack too much fat, yet all will provide you with key nutrients to keep you satiated from lift off to landing.

10 Healthy Meals at the Airport

[caption id="attachment_42592" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthy Airport Meals: Dunkin' Donuts Veggie Egg White Flatbread Photo: Courtesy of Dunkin' Donuts[/caption] 1. Dunkin’ Donuts Egg White Veggie Flatbread The Skinny: 280 cal, 9 g fat (4.5 g sat fat), 4 g fiber, 15 g protein, 690 mg sodium Hit the line at Dunkin’ for this breakfast, which is portably nestled in a multigrain flatbread. Ashley Harris, MS, RD, a registered dietician The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, says it’s rich in protein to help you feel satisfied throughout the day. “While the 690 milligrams of sodium may seem high, it’s an appropriate amount for a meal — and one of the lower sodium breakfast-sandwich options you’ll find out there.” [caption id="attachment_42605" align="alignnone" width="620"]10 Healthy Meals at the Airport: Nuts and Apple Photos: Pond5Pond5[/caption] 2. Lightly Salted Nuts and Apple The Skinny: 280 cal, 15 g fat (1.5 g sat fat), 6 g fiber, 7 g protein, 125 mg sodium Pop open a small bag or tin of sunflower seeds, almonds or cashews (ideally about a quarter-cup portion size), then pair it with an apple for a kiosk-curated “mini meal.” “The complex carbs provide energy, while the protein helps you balance blood sugars and feel full,” Harris says. “Nuts are a great source of healthy proteins. Stick to roughly a quarter-cup to keep calories low, adding a piece of fruit for the perfect amount of energy from carbohydrates,” she says. RELATED: The 25 Best Foodie Instagram Accounts to Follow [caption id="attachment_42594" align="alignnone" width="620"]10 Healthy Meals at the Airport: Starbucks Blueberry Whole-Grain Oatmeal Photo: Courtesy of Starbucks[/caption] 3. Starbucks Hearty Blueberry Whole-Grain Oatmeal The Skinny: 290 cal, 2.5 g fat (1/2 g sat fat), 5 g fiber, 5 g protein, 125 mg sodium Head over to Starbucks if you’ve got a 6 a.m. flight straight into a big meeting. This breakfast contains steel-cut oats and fresh fruit, both sources of complex carbs that provide a slow release of energy to keep you powered up all day long. “[This breakfast] also contains almonds, which are a great source of heart-healthy fat,” Harris says. While coffee isn’t required, we recommend it — because, travel. [caption id="attachment_42649" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthy Meals at the Airport: Mcdonalds Southwestern Grilled Chicken Salad Photo: Courtesy of McDonald's[/caption] 4. McDonalds Southwest Salad with Grilled Chicken The Skinny: 330 cal, 11 g fat (1/2 g sat fat), 7 g fiber, 32g  protein, 890 mg sodium When it’s looking like McD’s is one of your only choices, turn your attention to the salad menu — but don’t be swayed by the fat-laden Bacon Ranch Salad with Crispy Chicken. Lauren Popeck, RD, a dietitian at Orlando Health, says her personal favorite is the Southwest-style option, made with a mix of nutrient-dense greens. Pro tip: Hold the dressing in lieu of a squeeze of lime to save at least 100 calories and six grams fat.  RELATED: 8 Quick and Easy Egg Sandwiches [caption id="attachment_42654" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthy Meals Airport Larabar Milk Photo: Courtesy of Larabar (left); Pond5 (right)[/caption] 5. Larabar and Nonfat Milk The Skinny: 340 cal, 8 g fat (1/2 g sat fat), 4 g fiber, 19 g protein, 170 mg sodium Rushed mornings call for quick bites. First, hit up a coffee shop for a small, 12-ounce cup of milk, then grab a bar you can trust. “Look for natural bars with no added sugar, such a Larabar or Go Raw bar,” Popeck says, which are both chockfull of good-for-you nutrients. (Or, if you're really on it, make these homemade three-ingredient Larabars in advance!) The extra 14 grams of protein from the milk helps boost your bar into a more substantial snack. [caption id="attachment_42648" align="alignnone" width="621"]Healthy Meals Airport Au Bon Pain Photos: Courtesy of Au Bon Pain[/caption] 6. Au Bon Pain Southwest Tortilla Soup and Classic Chicken Salad Sandwich The Skinny: 350 cal, 13 g fat (3 g sat fat), 2 g fiber, 15 g protein, 1240 mg sodium Grab lunch at ABP by starting with a small serving of the Tortilla Soup, which Popeck likes to pair with one of the chain’s half-sandwiches. (Ask for it on whole-wheat multigrain bread for bonus points.) “The half-sandwich portion contributes 230 calories, 480 mg sodium, 12 grams protein and only one gram saturated fat.”  RELATED: Peach Homemade Greek Yogurt Recipe [caption id="attachment_42609" align="alignnone" width="621"]Healthy Meals Airport Mcdonalds Parfait Kind Bar Photos: Courtesy of McDonald's (left); KIND (right)[/caption] 7. McDonald’s Fruit & Yogurt Parfait and KIND Bar The Skinny: 350 cal, 17 g fat (4.5 g sat fat), 8g fiber, 10 g protein, 205 mg sodium Believe it or not, this McDonald’s parfait isn’t a secret calorie bomb, says Harris. “[Its] made of fresh fruit and calcium-rich yogurt. And at just 150 calories, a parfait is a perfect healthy option to keep you going.” Make it a meal by grabbing yourself a KIND bar from a newsstand like Hudson News, says Harris. Try flavors like Dark Chocolate Nuts and Sea Salt or Madagascar Vanilla Almond to keep sugar in check — each measures in at under five grams per bar. [caption id="attachment_42601" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthy Airport Meals Sabra Hummus Pretzels Photo: Courtesy of Sabra[/caption] 8. Sabra Pretzel and Hummus Pack The Skinny: 380 cal, 20 g fat (3 g sat fat), 8 g fiber, 9 g protein, 860 mg sodium Is this the most well-rounded meal? Definitely not. But Sabra’s Pretzel and Hummus pack provides such a great balance of carbs and healthy, plant-based protein, it can replace a meal while you’re on the road, says Harris. “It’s higher in calories and sodium than most foods I would recommend as a snack, but that’s why it’s a great ‘mini meal’ choice if you have limited options,” she explains. RELATED: Homemade Hummus With Olives [caption id="attachment_42596" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthy Airport Meals Starbucks Protein Bistro Box Photo: Courtesy of Starbucks[/caption] 9. Starbucks Protein Bistro Box The Skinny: 380 cal, 19 g fat (6 g sat fat), 5 g fiber, 13 g protein, 470 mg sodium Look away from the pastry shelf and pick up this well-balanced to-go box with a hard-boiled egg, sliced apple, a bunch of grapes, and white Cheddar cheese, served with multigrain muesli bread and peanut butter. “You get fresh fruit, whole grains, healthy fats and protein to fill you up, while keeping saturated fat, calories and sodium in check,” says Popeck. And what’s not to love about the cute bento box presentation packed with sweet, salty and savory flavors? [caption id="attachment_42599" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthiest Airport Meals: Chilis Margarita Grill Bowl Photo: Courtesy of Chili's[/caption] 10. Chilis “Lighter Choice” Margarita Grilled Chicken The Skinny: 580 cal, 13 g fat (2.5 g sat fat), 7 g fiber, 51 g protein, 2430 mg sodium This one comes with delicious black beans, rice and pico de gallo — but Popeck recommends making some adjustments. You’ll get 190 calories and 31 grams protein without the sides, so start with the chicken and pico. Use the beans and rice sparingly and you’ll cut back on calories and sodium — always a challenge when you eat out. “If you choose this dish” says Popeck, “remember to balance the high sodium with plenty of fresh fruits, veggies and other naturally high-water foods as soon as you land.” (And grab a water bottle for your flight; the low humidity in the cabin is generally dehydrating.)

The post The 10 Best Healthy Meals at the Airport appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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6 Everyday Habits That Are Making You Bloated http://dailyburn.com/life/health/bloated-gas-stomach-habits/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/bloated-gas-stomach-habits/#comments Mon, 17 Aug 2015 11:15:31 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=42528 6 Everyday Habits That Are Making You Bloated

[caption id="attachment_42531" align="alignnone" width="620"]6 Everyday Habits That Are Making You Bloated Photo: Pond5[/caption]

“I swear my pants weren’t this tight earlier today.” We’ve all said it at one time or another. That’s because bloating is one of the most common — and obvious — stomach complaints around, says David T. Rubin, M.D., fellow of the American College of Gastroenterology and chief of gastroenterology, hepatology, and nutrition at The University of Chicago Medicine. Many of his patients even snap “bloating selfies” to show how much their waistlines fluctuate throughout the day. (We won’t blame you if you keep those off Facebook.)

RELATED: How Fast Can You Banish Bloat?

Before you swear off baked beans for good, bloating, which is nothing more than excess air and gas trapped in your digestive tract (primarily in your 20-foot-long small intestines) comes down to way more than what you eat, he says. Check out these six small things that might be having a surprisingly big impact on your waistline.

6 Things Secretly Making You Bloated

[caption id="attachment_42533" align="alignnone" width="620"]6 Everyday Habits That Are Making You Bloated Photo: Pond5[/caption]

1. You Love Chewing Gum
Bad news for Orbitz addicts: If your tummy is feeling the effects, it might be time to limit those minty-fresh sticks. “A lot of people chew gum to keep them from eating between meals, but when you chew gum, you unwittingly swallow some air,” says registered dietitian nutritionist Bonnie Taub-Dix, R.D.N. That excess air intake can make your intestines feel like a balloon animal. Plus, most gums contain sugar alcohols, which can cause gas and bloating as well, she says. Even sugar-free sticks generally contain sorbitol, which can cause a ton of stomach issues, bloating included, according to Rubin.

RELATED: The Bitter Truth About Sugar and Its Effects on Our Health

2. You’re Scarfing Your Food
Here’s yet another legit reason to start eating more mindfully (aka: slowly). “Digestion starts in the mouth, not in the stomach,” says nutritionist Rania Batayneh, M.P.H., author of The One One One Diet: The Simple 1:1:1 Formula for Fast and Sustained Weight Loss. With every chew, you not only crush each bite into more easily digestible bits, but that food mingles with saliva and specialized enzymes that break down your food upon impact. When you inhale your food, you largely miss out on that process, meaning your stomach has to work overtime to digest your food, leading to gas. Plus, you literally inhale air, she says. Slow down and don’t forget to chew.

"Many packaged foods are fortified with a form of fiber that’s especially hard on the stomach."

RELATED: 5 Ways to Stop Stress Eating from Taking Over Your Brain

3. You Love Drinking Through a Straw
A colorful straw might make your morning smoothie even more Instagram-worthy, but it isn’t doing your body any favors. “Every time you sip through a straw, air comes up before the liquid,” says Taub-Dix, owner of Better Than Dieting nutrition consultancy and author of Read It Before You Eat It. Even reusable water bottles with built-in straws can cause problems. Sip straight from the lid during your next workout to save your stomach any unnecessary discomfort.

4. You’re Snoring Up a Storm
Do you feel bloated first thing in the morning? “Then you are probably snoring or at least mouth-breathing in your sleep,” says Rubin, who notes that most people who suffer from sleep apnea also struggle with a.m. bloating. Tomorrow morning, look at your stomach. If it seems bigger than when you went to bed, consider scheduling an appointment with a sleep doc to figure out a way to curb snoring for good.

RELATED: 9 Ways to Fall Asleep Faster (Without Counting Sheep)

5. You’re Feasting on Fiber
Yes, fiber can help you feel full and lose weight, in addition to promoting heart health. But before you down a bowl of fortified cereal, some chia seed pudding and a mega-serving of Brussels sprouts, take pause. Ramping up your fiber intake all at once can cause a lot of bloating, Taub-Dix says. Instead, focus on increasing it gradually, over a number of weeks. This will give your belly more time to adjust and produce the enzymes necessary to pass fiber through your system without trouble. You’ll also want to make sure you’re getting your fiber from whole, unprocessed foods like veggies, fruits and whole grains. Many packaged foods are fortified with inulin (aka chicory root), a form of fiber that’s especially hard on the stomach, according to research published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

RELATED: How to Detox the Healthy Way: 16 Recipes You’ll Love

6. You’re Stressed 24/7
What evil does stress not cause? While the hormones can aggravate your digestive system and cause gas and bloating, stress can also prompt people to rush through meals at their desks, skip much-needed bathroom breaks and suck in air during anxiety attacks, Batayneh says. One way to cope: Try to manage your stressors using cognitive behavior therapy or relaxation therapy. Both can help prevent and relieve bloating, according to research published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology. 

Over time, these mini changes may help keep your body bloat-free. Need to erase water weight, pronto? Here’s how to do it.

The post 6 Everyday Habits That Are Making You Bloated appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
6 Everyday Habits That Are Making You Bloated

[caption id="attachment_42531" align="alignnone" width="620"]6 Everyday Habits That Are Making You Bloated Photo: Pond5[/caption] “I swear my pants weren’t this tight earlier today.” We’ve all said it at one time or another. That’s because bloating is one of the most common — and obvious — stomach complaints around, says David T. Rubin, M.D., fellow of the American College of Gastroenterology and chief of gastroenterology, hepatology, and nutrition at The University of Chicago Medicine. Many of his patients even snap “bloating selfies” to show how much their waistlines fluctuate throughout the day. (We won’t blame you if you keep those off Facebook.) RELATED: How Fast Can You Banish Bloat? Before you swear off baked beans for good, bloating, which is nothing more than excess air and gas trapped in your digestive tract (primarily in your 20-foot-long small intestines) comes down to way more than what you eat, he says. Check out these six small things that might be having a surprisingly big impact on your waistline.

6 Things Secretly Making You Bloated

[caption id="attachment_42533" align="alignnone" width="620"]6 Everyday Habits That Are Making You Bloated Photo: Pond5[/caption] 1. You Love Chewing Gum Bad news for Orbitz addicts: If your tummy is feeling the effects, it might be time to limit those minty-fresh sticks. “A lot of people chew gum to keep them from eating between meals, but when you chew gum, you unwittingly swallow some air,” says registered dietitian nutritionist Bonnie Taub-Dix, R.D.N. That excess air intake can make your intestines feel like a balloon animal. Plus, most gums contain sugar alcohols, which can cause gas and bloating as well, she says. Even sugar-free sticks generally contain sorbitol, which can cause a ton of stomach issues, bloating included, according to Rubin. RELATED: The Bitter Truth About Sugar and Its Effects on Our Health 2. You’re Scarfing Your Food Here’s yet another legit reason to start eating more mindfully (aka: slowly). “Digestion starts in the mouth, not in the stomach,” says nutritionist Rania Batayneh, M.P.H., author of The One One One Diet: The Simple 1:1:1 Formula for Fast and Sustained Weight Loss. With every chew, you not only crush each bite into more easily digestible bits, but that food mingles with saliva and specialized enzymes that break down your food upon impact. When you inhale your food, you largely miss out on that process, meaning your stomach has to work overtime to digest your food, leading to gas. Plus, you literally inhale air, she says. Slow down and don’t forget to chew.
"Many packaged foods are fortified with a form of fiber that’s especially hard on the stomach."
RELATED: 5 Ways to Stop Stress Eating from Taking Over Your Brain 3. You Love Drinking Through a Straw A colorful straw might make your morning smoothie even more Instagram-worthy, but it isn’t doing your body any favors. “Every time you sip through a straw, air comes up before the liquid,” says Taub-Dix, owner of Better Than Dieting nutrition consultancy and author of Read It Before You Eat It. Even reusable water bottles with built-in straws can cause problems. Sip straight from the lid during your next workout to save your stomach any unnecessary discomfort. 4. You’re Snoring Up a Storm Do you feel bloated first thing in the morning? “Then you are probably snoring or at least mouth-breathing in your sleep,” says Rubin, who notes that most people who suffer from sleep apnea also struggle with a.m. bloating. Tomorrow morning, look at your stomach. If it seems bigger than when you went to bed, consider scheduling an appointment with a sleep doc to figure out a way to curb snoring for good. RELATED: 9 Ways to Fall Asleep Faster (Without Counting Sheep) 5. You’re Feasting on Fiber Yes, fiber can help you feel full and lose weight, in addition to promoting heart health. But before you down a bowl of fortified cereal, some chia seed pudding and a mega-serving of Brussels sprouts, take pause. Ramping up your fiber intake all at once can cause a lot of bloating, Taub-Dix says. Instead, focus on increasing it gradually, over a number of weeks. This will give your belly more time to adjust and produce the enzymes necessary to pass fiber through your system without trouble. You’ll also want to make sure you’re getting your fiber from whole, unprocessed foods like veggies, fruits and whole grains. Many packaged foods are fortified with inulin (aka chicory root), a form of fiber that’s especially hard on the stomach, according to research published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association. RELATED: How to Detox the Healthy Way: 16 Recipes You’ll Love 6. You’re Stressed 24/7 What evil does stress not cause? While the hormones can aggravate your digestive system and cause gas and bloating, stress can also prompt people to rush through meals at their desks, skip much-needed bathroom breaks and suck in air during anxiety attacks, Batayneh says. One way to cope: Try to manage your stressors using cognitive behavior therapy or relaxation therapy. Both can help prevent and relieve bloating, according to research published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology.  Over time, these mini changes may help keep your body bloat-free. Need to erase water weight, pronto? Here’s how to do it.

The post 6 Everyday Habits That Are Making You Bloated appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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What RDs Really Eat: DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan http://dailyburn.com/life/health/meal-plan-nutritionist-nora-minno/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/meal-plan-nutritionist-nora-minno/#comments Fri, 14 Aug 2015 11:15:51 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=42329 What RDs Really Eat: DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan

What a Dietitian Eats in a Day

This story was developed in collaboration with DailyBurn Fitness/Nutrition Coach Nora Minno. To find more workouts and healthy recipes head to DailyBurn.com.

Wish you could take a peek at the real eating habits of the people around you? We looked into what DailyBurn Fitness/Nutrition Coach Nora Minno eats in a day — and let’s just say she definitely practices what she preaches.

It turns out the secret to eating super healthy isn’t crazy hard, either. For Minno, a registered dietitian, it’s all about consciously making an effort to squeeze tons of nutrients into her daily meal plan. “I want to make sure I’m getting a variety of fruits and vegetables, and most importantly, vitamins and minerals that I know will help my body function properly not only in the short term, but in the long term,” she says.

RELATED: The 10 Biggest Diet Mistakes, According to Experts

Just as important: Making sure her choices are budget friendly — not an easy feat in New York City, where $1 pizza joints abound. “If you want to spend all your money on health foods, you can, but you shouldn’t have to in order to eat well.” Buying food in bulk and prepping it early in the week helps keep her spending on track.

And guess what: Even dietitians need to pay attention to portion control. “What I did for myself and often recommend to clients is in the beginning being really strict with measuring, getting out measuring cups, knowing what a quarter cup looks like, what an ounce looks like,” Minno says. “And after just a couple weeks of doing it, you can start to eyeball it and know what your body needs.”

For some serious food inspiration, here’s what Minno eats in a typical day. Feel free to unleash your inner copycat.

What a Dietitian Eats in a Day

[caption id="attachment_42338" align="alignnone" width="620"]DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan: Matcha Berry Smoothie Photo by Nora Minno[/caption]

Breakfast: Matcha Berry Smoothie

Make it: Blend 1/2 cup frozen organic blueberries, 1/2 cup frozen organic strawberries, 1/2 banana, 8 oz. unsweetened coconut milk, 1 tablespoon ground flax seeds, 1 teaspoon matcha powder, 1 serving Fuel-6 protein powder.

Quick tip: “I was always against smoothies as a meal because I believed they wouldn’t fill me up,” Minno says. But by packing her blender full of superfoods like matcha and berries, she found a shake that’s both tasty and filling. “I chose coconut milk as a base because you can buy it unsweetened and it’s very low-calorie.

RELATED: 9 Healthy Breakfast Recipes Ready in 15 Minutes or Less

[caption id="attachment_42344" align="alignnone" width="620"]DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan: Yogurt Snack Photo by Nora Minno[/caption]

Snack: Greek Yogurt and Apple 

Quick tip: We hate to break it to you, but yogurt can be a secret sugar bomb. “I tend to choose Greek yogurt because it is higher in protein and lower in sugar,” Minno says. “Look for yogurts with less than 10 grams of sugar,” she advises.

[caption id="attachment_42346" align="alignnone" width="620"]DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan: Kale and Brussels Sprouts Salad Photo by Nora Minno[/caption]

Lunch: Kale and Brussels Sprout Salad

Make it: Combine 1 1/2 cups shredded kale and Brussels sprouts, 1/4 cup garbanzo beans, 1/4 cup quinoa, 1/4 cup multi-colored chopped peppers, 1/4 cup shaved red cabbage.

Quick tip: Portion control doesn’t have to be boring. Mix it up by blending your food groups together in a brightly colored salad. “It doesn’t have to look like a perfect plate cut into portions,” Minno says. “For me this is a balanced meal.” Plus, kale and Brussels don’t wilt as easily as some of the more watery lettuces, so you can prep a bunch and eat them for the entire week, she says.

RELATED: 7 Healthy Lunch Ideas Your Friends Will Want to Steal

[caption id="attachment_42347" align="alignnone" width="620"]DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan: Tomato Mozzarella Snack Photo by Nora Minno[/caption]

Snack: Tomato and Mozzarella

Quick tip: This simple snack is low in sugar and high in protein and vitamins — not to mention that it’s super refreshing. “The tomatoes and cheese come from a local farm in New Jersey and the basil was grown right in my back yard!” Minno says. 

[caption id="attachment_42349" align="alignnone" width="620"]DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan: Salmon Dinner Photo by Nora Minno[/caption]

Dinner: Sesame-Crusted Salmon with Health Slaw

Ingredients
For the salmon:
2 6 oz. filets of wild salmon
4 tablespoons black sesame seeds
1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 teaspoon olive oil

For the health slaw:
1/4 cup shredded white cabbage
1/4 cup shredded red cabbage
1/4 cup shredded broccoli
1/4 cup shredded carrots
1/4 cup chopped Shitake mushrooms
1 tablespoons slivered almonds
3 tablespoons Sesame Ginger Dressing (brand of your choice)
1 tablespoon lemon juice

Preparation
Preheat oven to 450°F. Line rimmed baking sheet with foil. Place filets skin side down on baking sheet. For marinade whisk together soy sauce, lemon juice, and olive oil in a small mixing bowl. Drizzle marinade over fish and let sit for at least 30 min (can be done up to 2 hours ahead of time). When fish is finished marinating, using fingers, cover top of filets in black sesame seeds. Bake in oven for 15 to 20 min or until opaque in center. While the salmon bakes, combine all health slaw ingredients (white cabbage, red cabbage, broccoli, carrots, mushrooms, almonds) in large mixing bowl. Toss with dressing and lemon juice.

Quick tip: Though she doesn’t eat any meat, Minno gets protein from fresh fish and plant-based sources. After all, she needs it to fuel her through her favorite high-intensity interval training workouts. “I used black sesame seeds for fun flavor and texture, but they also have fiber and healthy fats,” she says.

RELATED: 30-Minute Meals for Quick, Healthy Dinner Ideas

[caption id="attachment_42365" align="alignnone" width="620"]What RDs Really Eat: DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan Photo by Nora Minno[/caption]

Dessert: Cherries

Quick tip: This sweet fruit is the ideal dessert for after-dinner snackers, Minno says. “Cherries you have to work for and think about,” she says. “You have to take off the stems, work around the pits and you know how much you’ve eaten because you can see the pits in the bowl.”

The post What RDs Really Eat: DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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What RDs Really Eat: DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan

What a Dietitian Eats in a Day This story was developed in collaboration with DailyBurn Fitness/Nutrition Coach Nora Minno. To find more workouts and healthy recipes head to DailyBurn.com. Wish you could take a peek at the real eating habits of the people around you? We looked into what DailyBurn Fitness/Nutrition Coach Nora Minno eats in a day — and let’s just say she definitely practices what she preaches. It turns out the secret to eating super healthy isn’t crazy hard, either. For Minno, a registered dietitian, it’s all about consciously making an effort to squeeze tons of nutrients into her daily meal plan. “I want to make sure I’m getting a variety of fruits and vegetables, and most importantly, vitamins and minerals that I know will help my body function properly not only in the short term, but in the long term,” she says. RELATED: The 10 Biggest Diet Mistakes, According to Experts Just as important: Making sure her choices are budget friendly — not an easy feat in New York City, where $1 pizza joints abound. “If you want to spend all your money on health foods, you can, but you shouldn’t have to in order to eat well.” Buying food in bulk and prepping it early in the week helps keep her spending on track. And guess what: Even dietitians need to pay attention to portion control. “What I did for myself and often recommend to clients is in the beginning being really strict with measuring, getting out measuring cups, knowing what a quarter cup looks like, what an ounce looks like,” Minno says. “And after just a couple weeks of doing it, you can start to eyeball it and know what your body needs.” For some serious food inspiration, here’s what Minno eats in a typical day. Feel free to unleash your inner copycat.

What a Dietitian Eats in a Day

[caption id="attachment_42338" align="alignnone" width="620"]DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan: Matcha Berry Smoothie Photo by Nora Minno[/caption]

Breakfast: Matcha Berry Smoothie

Make it: Blend 1/2 cup frozen organic blueberries, 1/2 cup frozen organic strawberries, 1/2 banana, 8 oz. unsweetened coconut milk, 1 tablespoon ground flax seeds, 1 teaspoon matcha powder, 1 serving Fuel-6 protein powder. Quick tip: “I was always against smoothies as a meal because I believed they wouldn’t fill me up,” Minno says. But by packing her blender full of superfoods like matcha and berries, she found a shake that’s both tasty and filling. “I chose coconut milk as a base because you can buy it unsweetened and it’s very low-calorie. RELATED: 9 Healthy Breakfast Recipes Ready in 15 Minutes or Less [caption id="attachment_42344" align="alignnone" width="620"]DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan: Yogurt Snack Photo by Nora Minno[/caption]

Snack: Greek Yogurt and Apple 

Quick tip: We hate to break it to you, but yogurt can be a secret sugar bomb. “I tend to choose Greek yogurt because it is higher in protein and lower in sugar,” Minno says. “Look for yogurts with less than 10 grams of sugar,” she advises. [caption id="attachment_42346" align="alignnone" width="620"]DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan: Kale and Brussels Sprouts Salad Photo by Nora Minno[/caption]

Lunch: Kale and Brussels Sprout Salad

Make it: Combine 1 1/2 cups shredded kale and Brussels sprouts, 1/4 cup garbanzo beans, 1/4 cup quinoa, 1/4 cup multi-colored chopped peppers, 1/4 cup shaved red cabbage. Quick tip: Portion control doesn’t have to be boring. Mix it up by blending your food groups together in a brightly colored salad. “It doesn’t have to look like a perfect plate cut into portions,” Minno says. “For me this is a balanced meal.” Plus, kale and Brussels don’t wilt as easily as some of the more watery lettuces, so you can prep a bunch and eat them for the entire week, she says. RELATED: 7 Healthy Lunch Ideas Your Friends Will Want to Steal [caption id="attachment_42347" align="alignnone" width="620"]DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan: Tomato Mozzarella Snack Photo by Nora Minno[/caption]

Snack: Tomato and Mozzarella

Quick tip: This simple snack is low in sugar and high in protein and vitamins — not to mention that it’s super refreshing. “The tomatoes and cheese come from a local farm in New Jersey and the basil was grown right in my back yard!” Minno says.  [caption id="attachment_42349" align="alignnone" width="620"]DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan: Salmon Dinner Photo by Nora Minno[/caption]

Dinner: Sesame-Crusted Salmon with Health Slaw

Ingredients For the salmon: 2 6 oz. filets of wild salmon 4 tablespoons black sesame seeds 1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 teaspoon olive oil For the health slaw: 1/4 cup shredded white cabbage 1/4 cup shredded red cabbage 1/4 cup shredded broccoli 1/4 cup shredded carrots 1/4 cup chopped Shitake mushrooms 1 tablespoons slivered almonds 3 tablespoons Sesame Ginger Dressing (brand of your choice) 1 tablespoon lemon juice Preparation Preheat oven to 450°F. Line rimmed baking sheet with foil. Place filets skin side down on baking sheet. For marinade whisk together soy sauce, lemon juice, and olive oil in a small mixing bowl. Drizzle marinade over fish and let sit for at least 30 min (can be done up to 2 hours ahead of time). When fish is finished marinating, using fingers, cover top of filets in black sesame seeds. Bake in oven for 15 to 20 min or until opaque in center. While the salmon bakes, combine all health slaw ingredients (white cabbage, red cabbage, broccoli, carrots, mushrooms, almonds) in large mixing bowl. Toss with dressing and lemon juice. Quick tip: Though she doesn’t eat any meat, Minno gets protein from fresh fish and plant-based sources. After all, she needs it to fuel her through her favorite high-intensity interval training workouts. “I used black sesame seeds for fun flavor and texture, but they also have fiber and healthy fats,” she says. RELATED: 30-Minute Meals for Quick, Healthy Dinner Ideas [caption id="attachment_42365" align="alignnone" width="620"]What RDs Really Eat: DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan Photo by Nora Minno[/caption]

Dessert: Cherries

Quick tip: This sweet fruit is the ideal dessert for after-dinner snackers, Minno says. “Cherries you have to work for and think about,” she says. “You have to take off the stems, work around the pits and you know how much you’ve eaten because you can see the pits in the bowl.”

The post What RDs Really Eat: DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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You Can Now Have Salad in… Outer Space? http://dailyburn.com/life/health/news-salad-lettuce-outer-space-081115/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/news-salad-lettuce-outer-space-081115/#comments Tue, 11 Aug 2015 18:15:24 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=42489 lettuce-space-featured

[caption id="attachment_42502" align="alignnone" width="620"]Salad in Outer Space Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Perhaps we take our daily salads for granted — the satisfying crunch of kale, the crispness of a freshly plucked radish, you know, all the hallmarks of a good meal. (If you’re not smiling with salad, then you’re just not doing it right.) But in outer space, fruits and veggies aren’t just a rare commodity, they’re also an important part of keeping the astronauts grounded, in a dietary sense.

RELATED: 7 Fit and Healthy Salad Recipes

When you’re holed up in a rocket ship, not unlike Scott Kelly, whose year-long mission in space is being documented by Time, having the creature comforts of home can play an important role in one’s mental and physical health. However, the on-board food options aren’t necessarily the most palatable. (Example A: Check out the taco Kelly whipped up to celebrate Cinco de Mayo.) In fact, astronaut fare is usually pretty far from tasty, considering everything in their traditional food supply has been freeze-dried and prepackaged.

But all that's about to change.

Yesterday, Kelly and his colleagues aboard the International Space Station (ISS) were treated to a fresh surprise: red romaine lettuce. Initiated by NASA’s Veggie project, it took 33 days for the head to grow, and just one evening aboard the ISS to eat. The crew chose to have their greens (errrr...reds) served up with a simple balsamic vinaigrette. And just as we’d imagine one would feel after months away from salad, astronaut Kjell Lingreden told Mission Control in Houston it was "awesome, tastes good.”

RELATED: 9 Quick and Easy Salad Dressing Recipes

Check out more from the ISS in the video above — and don’t be surprised when you’re craving something fresh and crunchy you can really grab a hold of.

The post You Can Now Have Salad in… Outer Space? appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
lettuce-space-featured

[caption id="attachment_42502" align="alignnone" width="620"]Salad in Outer Space Photo: Pond5[/caption] Perhaps we take our daily salads for granted — the satisfying crunch of kale, the crispness of a freshly plucked radish, you know, all the hallmarks of a good meal. (If you’re not smiling with salad, then you’re just not doing it right.) But in outer space, fruits and veggies aren’t just a rare commodity, they’re also an important part of keeping the astronauts grounded, in a dietary sense. RELATED: 7 Fit and Healthy Salad Recipes When you’re holed up in a rocket ship, not unlike Scott Kelly, whose year-long mission in space is being documented by Time, having the creature comforts of home can play an important role in one’s mental and physical health. However, the on-board food options aren’t necessarily the most palatable. (Example A: Check out the taco Kelly whipped up to celebrate Cinco de Mayo.) In fact, astronaut fare is usually pretty far from tasty, considering everything in their traditional food supply has been freeze-dried and prepackaged. But all that's about to change. Yesterday, Kelly and his colleagues aboard the International Space Station (ISS) were treated to a fresh surprise: red romaine lettuce. Initiated by NASA’s Veggie project, it took 33 days for the head to grow, and just one evening aboard the ISS to eat. The crew chose to have their greens (errrr...reds) served up with a simple balsamic vinaigrette. And just as we’d imagine one would feel after months away from salad, astronaut Kjell Lingreden told Mission Control in Houston it was "awesome, tastes good.” RELATED: 9 Quick and Easy Salad Dressing Recipes Check out more from the ISS in the video above — and don’t be surprised when you’re craving something fresh and crunchy you can really grab a hold of.

The post You Can Now Have Salad in… Outer Space? appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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Is FATwater the New Bulletproof Coffee? http://dailyburn.com/life/health/bulletproof-coffee-fatwater-dave-asprey/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/bulletproof-coffee-fatwater-dave-asprey/#comments Fri, 07 Aug 2015 18:15:04 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=42390 Is FATwater the New Bulletproof Coffee?

[caption id="attachment_42395" align="alignnone" width="620"]Is FATwater the New Bulletproof Coffee? Photo: FATwater[/caption]

You’ve tried coconut waters, vitamin waters, maple waters and more. But now, there’s a new H2O hitting the shelves, and its name — FATwater — might throw you for a loop.

Created by none other than Dave Asprey, biohacker, author and the brains behind Bulletproof coffee, FATwater hit shelves earlier this summer. And if you’re already hooked on the energizing (and filling) effects of mixing butter into your morning brew, this new beverage might intrigue you.

RELATED: Bulletproof Coffee and the Case for Butter as a Health Food

A fusion of water and oil, FATwater is made with Asprey’s special mix of Bulletproof XCT Oil, which is derived from the same types of fat found in coconut oil. “FATwater leverages the power of fat from coconuts to drive hydration in a new way and disrupt an industry addicted to sugary drinks,” Asprey said in a press release. “When you take control of your hydration, you perform better.” In short, the drink claims to energize you without raising your blood sugar levels.

Watching your weight? Despite its name, each 16-ounce bottle of FATwater only contains 20 calories and two grams of fat. The jury’s still out on whether this drink really offers any healthy benefits — but Asprey’s committed to giving fatty foods a healthy makeover. After all, he lost more than 100 pounds by introducing healthy fats into his diet — and limiting bad stuff like trans fats and sugar.

Want more ideas for ways to stay fueled this summer? Check out these 10 Ways to Stay Hydrated (That Aren’t Water).

The post Is FATwater the New Bulletproof Coffee? appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
Is FATwater the New Bulletproof Coffee?

[caption id="attachment_42395" align="alignnone" width="620"]Is FATwater the New Bulletproof Coffee? Photo: FATwater[/caption] You’ve tried coconut waters, vitamin waters, maple waters and more. But now, there’s a new H2O hitting the shelves, and its name — FATwater — might throw you for a loop. Created by none other than Dave Asprey, biohacker, author and the brains behind Bulletproof coffee, FATwater hit shelves earlier this summer. And if you’re already hooked on the energizing (and filling) effects of mixing butter into your morning brew, this new beverage might intrigue you. RELATED: Bulletproof Coffee and the Case for Butter as a Health Food A fusion of water and oil, FATwater is made with Asprey’s special mix of Bulletproof XCT Oil, which is derived from the same types of fat found in coconut oil. “FATwater leverages the power of fat from coconuts to drive hydration in a new way and disrupt an industry addicted to sugary drinks,” Asprey said in a press release. “When you take control of your hydration, you perform better.” In short, the drink claims to energize you without raising your blood sugar levels. Watching your weight? Despite its name, each 16-ounce bottle of FATwater only contains 20 calories and two grams of fat. The jury’s still out on whether this drink really offers any healthy benefits — but Asprey’s committed to giving fatty foods a healthy makeover. After all, he lost more than 100 pounds by introducing healthy fats into his diet — and limiting bad stuff like trans fats and sugar. Want more ideas for ways to stay fueled this summer? Check out these 10 Ways to Stay Hydrated (That Aren’t Water).

The post Is FATwater the New Bulletproof Coffee? appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
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The Health Benefits of Sprouted Foods (Plus DIY Recipe) http://dailyburn.com/life/health/sprouted-benefits-how-to-make-sprouts/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/sprouted-benefits-how-to-make-sprouts/#comments Fri, 07 Aug 2015 11:00:31 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=38059 How to Make Sprouts: Sprouted Mung Beans

[caption id="attachment_38069" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Make Sprouts: Sprouted Mung Beans Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Remember back in elementary school when you stuck kidney beans in a jar with a damp paper towel and watched them grow little green tails?

Well, the science experiment is back. Just take a look around your health food store. You can now buy sprouted chia seeds, beans and almonds to replace your regular old staples. You may even find pastas, breads and tortilla chips made from sprouted flours. Go ahead and Google “sprouted grains” and you’ll find countless videos of DIY-ers teaching you how to make sprouts at home, too.

RELATED: 12 DIY Kitchen Projects to Clean Up Your Eating Habits

The sprouts industry is growing fast. One research firm projects that sprouted grains sales could reach $250 million by 2018, compared to the $30 million per year that they’re bringing in today.

But are there really benefits to eating these little shoots?

Why Sprouted Foods Might Be Better for You

It turns out turning regular old grains into sprouts can have some pretty intriguing nutritional benefits. When seeds hang out in water, they germinate, causing their outer layers to split open, allowing a young shoot to blossom. When this happens, the newly emerging sprout consumes some of the grain’s starches, thereby altering the food’s nutritional content, says nutritionist Alexandra Caspero, R.D., owner of Delicious Knowledge nutrition coaching. The same is true for sprouted seeds, legumes or nuts.

"The clients that I do have sprouting their grains report better digestion."

Here’s the good part: Because there’s less starch in each sprouted grain, the proportion of protein and fiber within each seedling becomes higher, she says. That means they automatically have a lower glycemic index than their non-sprouted counterparts. In one Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism study, sprouted-grain breads triggered a lower blood sugar response and greater influx of GLP-1 — a satiety hormone — in the body, compared to both white and whole-grain breads with the same carbohydrate content.

Meanwhile, sprouting grains also causes their levels of vitamins and minerals, including vitamin D, to increase, explains Gang Guo, director of wheat research and quality for Ardent Mills, and a member of the American Association of Cereal Chemists. Sprouted rye even increases its folate content up to 3.8-fold, according to research in The Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry.

RELATED: 5 Healthier Ways to Detox (That Aren't Juice Cleanses)

Soaking and sprouting grains also partially degrades counterproductive anti-nutrients, like phytic acid. Phytic acid can inhibit absorption of some minerals including iron and zinc, Caspero says. That’s why sprouting is beneficial for people like vegetarians who are low in iron or zinc (which are both more abundant in animal-based foods).

Soaking whole grains and legumes also degrades another anti-nutrient called raffinose. A carbohydrate that produces gas in the lower intestines, raffinose is the culprit responsible for the, “Beans, Beans, the Magical Fruit,” song, Guo says. “The clients that I do have sprouting their grains report better digestion and a decrease in side effects of eating too many legumes, like gas,” Caspero adds.

You Might Be Sprouting Bacteria, Too

Though there are many benefits to sprouted foods, it can be risky to start growing your own sprouts at home. “Sprouting increases the nutrients but also potential toxins,” Caspero says. “Raw foodists tend to sprout beans and grains to make them edible without cooking, but there are some cautions to eating them raw.”

RELATED: How Bad for You Is Your Favorite Junk Food? Find Out Here

While eating any produce raw carries some risk, sprouted foods have a bit more baggage. The warm and humid conditions in which seeds need to germinate to grow sprouts are also ideal for growing bacteria, including salmonella, listeria and E. coli, says U.S. Food and Drug Administration spokesperson Jason Strachman Miller.

For that reason, the FDA has issued two guidance documents to help the food industry produce sprouted foods more safely. “While many sprouters have adopted the recommendations in the FDA’s Sprout Guides, that is not universal and outbreaks associated with sprouts have continued to occur,” Miller says. (Between 1996 and 2014, more than 40 reported foodborne illness outbreaks have been linked to raw and lightly cooked sprouts.) “The FDA is now developing a Produce Safety regulation that would make many of the recommendations in our sprout guidance mandatory for most producers,” he says.

Still, if you choose to sprout yourself, you can all but eliminate any risk of food-borne illnesses by following our super-sanitary guide.

[caption id="attachment_38071" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Make Sprouts: Sprouted Mung Beans, Chickpeas, Azuki Beans Photo: Pond5[/caption]

How to Make Sprouts at Home

When it comes to sprouting, you have a lot of options. Raw almonds, black beans, buckwheat, mung beans, groats, lentils, quinoa, wild rice, wheat berries, millet, barley, amaranth, kamut, radish seeds, alfalfa, adzuki beans and chickpeas, are all good options, according to Caspero. However, any nuts that have been pasteurized and irradiated, even if they are listed as raw, will not sprout. You also can’t sprout flax seeds, she says.

RELATED: 12 Brilliant Meal Prep Ideas to Free Up Your Time

The University of California Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources recommends buying certified pathogen-free seed, such as those from Burpee Seed Co. and Sprout People. Once you’ve chosen your seeds, here’s how to sprout them.

  1. Heat your seeds on the stove for five minutes in a solution of three percent hydrogen peroxide, preheated to 140 degrees, recommends UC Davis. You can purchase the hydrogen peroxide from your local drug store. Use your kitchen thermometer to achieve the right temp.
  1. Rinse the seeds in running tap water for one minute, and place them in a sanitized sprouting container. A mason jar will work well, Caspero says. To sanitize the jar, soaked in 3⁄4 cup of bleach per gallon of water for at least five minutes, then rinse it with clean water.
  1. Fill the sprouting container with enough water that it covers the seeds, plus one inch. Skim off and throw away any floating seeds and debris, the UC Davis guide recommends.
  1. Cover the mouth of the jar with a piece of cheesecloth, and screw the outside ring of the lid onto the jar to secure the cheesecloth, Caspero says.
  1. Place the container away from areas of food preparation, pets, and busy areas of the house. Depending on what you are sprouting, the soaking times will vary anywhere from three to 12 hours, she says.
  1. Now drain, pouring the water out through the cheesecloth. Then run fresh water through the lid and shake to rinse thoroughly. Drain and repeat again. Continue to rinse and drain two times a day until the food is done sprouting. The sprouts should be ready in one to four days.
  1. Enjoy sprouted foods within two to three days. Cook them before eating to kill any bacteria that may have snuck in during the sprouting process, she says.

For more information on growing sprouted foods safely, check out the FDA's guide

Originally posted March 2015. Updated August 2015. 

The post The Health Benefits of Sprouted Foods (Plus DIY Recipe) appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
How to Make Sprouts: Sprouted Mung Beans

[caption id="attachment_38069" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Make Sprouts: Sprouted Mung Beans Photo: Pond5[/caption] Remember back in elementary school when you stuck kidney beans in a jar with a damp paper towel and watched them grow little green tails? Well, the science experiment is back. Just take a look around your health food store. You can now buy sprouted chia seeds, beans and almonds to replace your regular old staples. You may even find pastas, breads and tortilla chips made from sprouted flours. Go ahead and Google “sprouted grains” and you’ll find countless videos of DIY-ers teaching you how to make sprouts at home, too. RELATED: 12 DIY Kitchen Projects to Clean Up Your Eating Habits The sprouts industry is growing fast. One research firm projects that sprouted grains sales could reach $250 million by 2018, compared to the $30 million per year that they’re bringing in today. But are there really benefits to eating these little shoots?

Why Sprouted Foods Might Be Better for You

It turns out turning regular old grains into sprouts can have some pretty intriguing nutritional benefits. When seeds hang out in water, they germinate, causing their outer layers to split open, allowing a young shoot to blossom. When this happens, the newly emerging sprout consumes some of the grain’s starches, thereby altering the food’s nutritional content, says nutritionist Alexandra Caspero, R.D., owner of Delicious Knowledge nutrition coaching. The same is true for sprouted seeds, legumes or nuts.
"The clients that I do have sprouting their grains report better digestion."
Here’s the good part: Because there’s less starch in each sprouted grain, the proportion of protein and fiber within each seedling becomes higher, she says. That means they automatically have a lower glycemic index than their non-sprouted counterparts. In one Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism study, sprouted-grain breads triggered a lower blood sugar response and greater influx of GLP-1 — a satiety hormone — in the body, compared to both white and whole-grain breads with the same carbohydrate content. Meanwhile, sprouting grains also causes their levels of vitamins and minerals, including vitamin D, to increase, explains Gang Guo, director of wheat research and quality for Ardent Mills, and a member of the American Association of Cereal Chemists. Sprouted rye even increases its folate content up to 3.8-fold, according to research in The Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry. RELATED: 5 Healthier Ways to Detox (That Aren't Juice Cleanses) Soaking and sprouting grains also partially degrades counterproductive anti-nutrients, like phytic acid. Phytic acid can inhibit absorption of some minerals including iron and zinc, Caspero says. That’s why sprouting is beneficial for people like vegetarians who are low in iron or zinc (which are both more abundant in animal-based foods). Soaking whole grains and legumes also degrades another anti-nutrient called raffinose. A carbohydrate that produces gas in the lower intestines, raffinose is the culprit responsible for the, “Beans, Beans, the Magical Fruit,” song, Guo says. “The clients that I do have sprouting their grains report better digestion and a decrease in side effects of eating too many legumes, like gas,” Caspero adds.

You Might Be Sprouting Bacteria, Too

Though there are many benefits to sprouted foods, it can be risky to start growing your own sprouts at home. “Sprouting increases the nutrients but also potential toxins,” Caspero says. “Raw foodists tend to sprout beans and grains to make them edible without cooking, but there are some cautions to eating them raw.” RELATED: How Bad for You Is Your Favorite Junk Food? Find Out Here While eating any produce raw carries some risk, sprouted foods have a bit more baggage. The warm and humid conditions in which seeds need to germinate to grow sprouts are also ideal for growing bacteria, including salmonella, listeria and E. coli, says U.S. Food and Drug Administration spokesperson Jason Strachman Miller. For that reason, the FDA has issued two guidance documents to help the food industry produce sprouted foods more safely. “While many sprouters have adopted the recommendations in the FDA’s Sprout Guides, that is not universal and outbreaks associated with sprouts have continued to occur,” Miller says. (Between 1996 and 2014, more than 40 reported foodborne illness outbreaks have been linked to raw and lightly cooked sprouts.) “The FDA is now developing a Produce Safety regulation that would make many of the recommendations in our sprout guidance mandatory for most producers,” he says. Still, if you choose to sprout yourself, you can all but eliminate any risk of food-borne illnesses by following our super-sanitary guide. [caption id="attachment_38071" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Make Sprouts: Sprouted Mung Beans, Chickpeas, Azuki Beans Photo: Pond5[/caption]

How to Make Sprouts at Home

When it comes to sprouting, you have a lot of options. Raw almonds, black beans, buckwheat, mung beans, groats, lentils, quinoa, wild rice, wheat berries, millet, barley, amaranth, kamut, radish seeds, alfalfa, adzuki beans and chickpeas, are all good options, according to Caspero. However, any nuts that have been pasteurized and irradiated, even if they are listed as raw, will not sprout. You also can’t sprout flax seeds, she says. RELATED: 12 Brilliant Meal Prep Ideas to Free Up Your Time The University of California Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources recommends buying certified pathogen-free seed, such as those from Burpee Seed Co. and Sprout People. Once you’ve chosen your seeds, here’s how to sprout them.
  1. Heat your seeds on the stove for five minutes in a solution of three percent hydrogen peroxide, preheated to 140 degrees, recommends UC Davis. You can purchase the hydrogen peroxide from your local drug store. Use your kitchen thermometer to achieve the right temp.
  1. Rinse the seeds in running tap water for one minute, and place them in a sanitized sprouting container. A mason jar will work well, Caspero says. To sanitize the jar, soaked in 3⁄4 cup of bleach per gallon of water for at least five minutes, then rinse it with clean water.
  1. Fill the sprouting container with enough water that it covers the seeds, plus one inch. Skim off and throw away any floating seeds and debris, the UC Davis guide recommends.
  1. Cover the mouth of the jar with a piece of cheesecloth, and screw the outside ring of the lid onto the jar to secure the cheesecloth, Caspero says.
  1. Place the container away from areas of food preparation, pets, and busy areas of the house. Depending on what you are sprouting, the soaking times will vary anywhere from three to 12 hours, she says.
  1. Now drain, pouring the water out through the cheesecloth. Then run fresh water through the lid and shake to rinse thoroughly. Drain and repeat again. Continue to rinse and drain two times a day until the food is done sprouting. The sprouts should be ready in one to four days.
  1. Enjoy sprouted foods within two to three days. Cook them before eating to kill any bacteria that may have snuck in during the sprouting process, she says.
For more information on growing sprouted foods safely, check out the FDA's guide Originally posted March 2015. Updated August 2015. 

The post The Health Benefits of Sprouted Foods (Plus DIY Recipe) appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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10 Ways to Stay Hydrated (That Aren’t Water) http://dailyburn.com/life/health/healthy-foods-stay-hydrated-without-water/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/healthy-foods-stay-hydrated-without-water/#comments Thu, 06 Aug 2015 15:15:59 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=30203 Spring Cleanse Salad

10 Ways to Stay Hydrated (That Aren't Water)

When it comes to a sweaty workout, we love a water break reward as much as the next fitness fiend. But as the mercury rises, it’s more important than ever to focus on our fluids all day long. After all, water is the most essential nutrient our system needs.

“Our bodies are made up of more than half water and we use it for pretty much every bodily function — from regulating body temperature to removing waste to lubricating joints to carrying oxygen to the cells.” says Rachel Berman, a registered dietician and director of About.com Health. “That’s why you feel so fatigued, dizzy and moody when you’re dehydrated.” 

While it’s true a tall glass of water is the best known way to stay hydrated, there are plenty of alternative options if you don’t like the taste of tap or couldn’t be bothered with bottled water. Sure, you can infuse plain ol’ drinking water with flavorful fruits like lemons and raspberries. But you can also reach for some of these water-rich foods and fluids that keep the H2O balance just right — and won’t require so many trips to the water cooler!

RELATED: 5 Healthier Ways to Detox (That Aren't Juice Cleanses) 

Eat It Up

Who says you can’t have your water — and eat it, too? According to the Institute of Medicine’s recommendations we should eat 20 percent of our daily water intake. Soup, yogurt and oatmeal are all great fluid-filled foods, but these summer-friendly fruits and veggies can also help with hydration. Next time you’re feeling thirsty, pile these on your plate.

[caption id="attachment_29239" align="alignnone" width="620"]Watermelon Cucumber Bites Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

1. Watermelon
In the world of thirst quenchers, watermelon weighs in as a major contender. Based on its name, it’s no surprise this fruit is made up of 92 percent water! But its salt, calcium and magnesium is what makes it ideal for rehydration, according to a 2009 study at the University of Aberdeen Medical School. The summertime staple is also a good source of potassium, vitamin A and vitamin C.

2. Celery
This often-overlooked veggie is way more than chicken wing garnish! Celery stalks are about 95 percent water, high in fiber and rich in minerals including potassium and vitamin K. Keep in mind, “they’re not packed with nutrients, but that’s also because they’re not calorie-dense,” says Berman. “Plus, it’s nice to add a bit of crunch [for texture].”

RELATED: 12 DIY Kitchen Hacks to Clean Up Your Eating Habits

3. Cucumbers
No matter how you slice ‘em and dice ‘em, cucumbers keep cool at the number one spot on the list of water-logged fruits and vegetables. Composed of 96 percent water, cukes have no saturated fat or cholesterol, and are very high in vitamin K, vitamin B6 and iron. Cucumber and melon bites, anyone?

4. Strawberries
Even without the shortcake, strawberries are a sweet treat perfect for staying hydrated. They are 92 percent water (the most of any berry) and are loaded with fiber and vitamin C — as if you needed an excuse to sip on this refreshing summer cocktail!

[caption id="attachment_27441" align="alignnone" width="620"]Spring Cleanse Salad Photo by Renee Blair[/caption]

5. Lettuce
Iceberg lettuce may be 96 percent water, but it’s not known for much else in the nutrition department. Richer salad greens and sandwich toppers including butterhead, romaine and spinach are more well-rounded choices and still up your hydration. Need some inspiration? Start with these creative, healthy salads.

RELATED: 16 Detoxifying Recipes You'll Actually Love

Drink It Down

Most beverages (non-alcoholic, of course) will help contribute to your daily water intake. But here are five drinks that will give you some extra benefits, too. Yes, even coffee!

6. Fat-free or skim milk
Everyone knows milk is an excellent source of calcium that will keep your bones in tip-top shape. But research also shows milk is better than water and sports drinks for rehydration and recovery after exercise (yup, especially chocolate milk). Just be sure to choose a slimmed-down carton since the fat in whole milk can delay fluid replacement.

[caption id="attachment_30210" align="alignnone" width="620"]Serrano Pineapple Papaya Chia Smoothie Photo: Janie Hoffman / Mamma Chia[/caption]

7. Smoothies
Can’t choose just one hydrating option? Slurping down a DIY smoothie is a great way to combine your favorite flavors into one nutritionally-packed glass. “And it only takes seconds to scarf down!” says Berman. Try drinking your fruits and veggies with these healthy (and tasty) green smoothie recipes.

8. Sports drinks
Sugar and sodium are good things when it comes to sports drinks! In addition to the electrolytes and protein included in most on the market, the sugar and sodium can bring your body back to balance faster than water after a grueling workout lasting over 90 minutes. For shorter workouts, sports drinks may just mean a lot of extra carbs you don’t need.  To cut some calories (and save some money), make your own sports drinks at home.

9. Coconut water
There’s a reason people go nuts for this tropical drink. Unlike sports beverages, coconut water is low in carbohydrates, while still rich in potassium. And its unsweetened varieties can be very hydrating (assuming you like its unique taste). According to a study in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, the all-natural beverage is effective in rehydrating after light exercise. But for more rigorous sweat sessions, the low-sodium drink does come up short in replenishing the salt your body loses.

[caption id="attachment_15715" align="alignnone" width="620"]Iced Coffee Cubes Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

10. Coffee
Isn’t coffee a diuretic? Well, yes, but a recent study in PLOS ONE debunks the myth that it also causes dehydration. Not only will your daily cup contribute to your water needs, coffee can also give you a sharper memory, boost athletic endurance and performance, and reduce the risk of many serious ailments including diabetes and heart disease.

How Much Water Do We Really Need?

Whether you eat it or drink it, don’t stop ‘til you get enough. According to Berman that’s not as simple as the old-school “eight glasses a day” rule we were all taught.

“It’s not the recommendation,” she says. “But it’s also not that far off. For women, it’s about 11 cups and for men it’s about 15 cups. But remember, that includes 20 percent from food.”

When you’re exercising, you should be sipping even more for optimal performance, Berman adds. “It’s variable based on your bodyweight and how intense you’re working out, but the American College of Sports Medicine recommends 16 to 20 ounces at least four hours before exercise and three to eight ounces every 15 minutes during exercise (especially in hot temperatures).”

RELATED: A Runner's Guide to Hydration (and How Not to Overdo It)

If you’re working out at a high intensity, Berman says to weigh yourself before and after exercise to get a more accurate idea of how much water you’re losing. “For every pound lost, you’re supposed to drink 20 to 24 ounces,” she says. “It’s a good mental trigger to remind yourself to keep drinking.”

Most of us need this reminder, as we may not even realize we’re dehydrated — until it’s too late. While common signs of dehydration include fatigue, headaches, nausea and dizziness, Berman says the best (and easiest) way to see if you’re getting enough water is to take a peek at your pee.

“Your urine should be a pale yellow color,” she says. “If it’s darker than that, drink some water. If you’re not getting up and running to the bathroom every hour, you’re not drinking enough. That’s the telltale sign.”

Originally posted on July 24, 2014. Updated August 2015. 

The post 10 Ways to Stay Hydrated (That Aren’t Water) appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
Spring Cleanse Salad

10 Ways to Stay Hydrated (That Aren't Water) When it comes to a sweaty workout, we love a water break reward as much as the next fitness fiend. But as the mercury rises, it’s more important than ever to focus on our fluids all day long. After all, water is the most essential nutrient our system needs. “Our bodies are made up of more than half water and we use it for pretty much every bodily function — from regulating body temperature to removing waste to lubricating joints to carrying oxygen to the cells.” says Rachel Berman, a registered dietician and director of About.com Health. “That’s why you feel so fatigued, dizzy and moody when you’re dehydrated.”  While it’s true a tall glass of water is the best known way to stay hydrated, there are plenty of alternative options if you don’t like the taste of tap or couldn’t be bothered with bottled water. Sure, you can infuse plain ol’ drinking water with flavorful fruits like lemons and raspberries. But you can also reach for some of these water-rich foods and fluids that keep the H2O balance just right — and won’t require so many trips to the water cooler! RELATED: 5 Healthier Ways to Detox (That Aren't Juice Cleanses) 

Eat It Up

Who says you can’t have your water — and eat it, too? According to the Institute of Medicine’s recommendations we should eat 20 percent of our daily water intake. Soup, yogurt and oatmeal are all great fluid-filled foods, but these summer-friendly fruits and veggies can also help with hydration. Next time you’re feeling thirsty, pile these on your plate. [caption id="attachment_29239" align="alignnone" width="620"]Watermelon Cucumber Bites Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption] 1. Watermelon In the world of thirst quenchers, watermelon weighs in as a major contender. Based on its name, it’s no surprise this fruit is made up of 92 percent water! But its salt, calcium and magnesium is what makes it ideal for rehydration, according to a 2009 study at the University of Aberdeen Medical School. The summertime staple is also a good source of potassium, vitamin A and vitamin C. 2. Celery This often-overlooked veggie is way more than chicken wing garnish! Celery stalks are about 95 percent water, high in fiber and rich in minerals including potassium and vitamin K. Keep in mind, “they’re not packed with nutrients, but that’s also because they’re not calorie-dense,” says Berman. “Plus, it’s nice to add a bit of crunch [for texture].” RELATED: 12 DIY Kitchen Hacks to Clean Up Your Eating Habits 3. Cucumbers No matter how you slice ‘em and dice ‘em, cucumbers keep cool at the number one spot on the list of water-logged fruits and vegetables. Composed of 96 percent water, cukes have no saturated fat or cholesterol, and are very high in vitamin K, vitamin B6 and iron. Cucumber and melon bites, anyone? 4. Strawberries Even without the shortcake, strawberries are a sweet treat perfect for staying hydrated. They are 92 percent water (the most of any berry) and are loaded with fiber and vitamin C — as if you needed an excuse to sip on this refreshing summer cocktail! [caption id="attachment_27441" align="alignnone" width="620"]Spring Cleanse Salad Photo by Renee Blair[/caption] 5. Lettuce Iceberg lettuce may be 96 percent water, but it’s not known for much else in the nutrition department. Richer salad greens and sandwich toppers including butterhead, romaine and spinach are more well-rounded choices and still up your hydration. Need some inspiration? Start with these creative, healthy salads. RELATED: 16 Detoxifying Recipes You'll Actually Love

Drink It Down

Most beverages (non-alcoholic, of course) will help contribute to your daily water intake. But here are five drinks that will give you some extra benefits, too. Yes, even coffee! 6. Fat-free or skim milk Everyone knows milk is an excellent source of calcium that will keep your bones in tip-top shape. But research also shows milk is better than water and sports drinks for rehydration and recovery after exercise (yup, especially chocolate milk). Just be sure to choose a slimmed-down carton since the fat in whole milk can delay fluid replacement. [caption id="attachment_30210" align="alignnone" width="620"]Serrano Pineapple Papaya Chia Smoothie Photo: Janie Hoffman / Mamma Chia[/caption] 7. Smoothies Can’t choose just one hydrating option? Slurping down a DIY smoothie is a great way to combine your favorite flavors into one nutritionally-packed glass. “And it only takes seconds to scarf down!” says Berman. Try drinking your fruits and veggies with these healthy (and tasty) green smoothie recipes. 8. Sports drinks Sugar and sodium are good things when it comes to sports drinks! In addition to the electrolytes and protein included in most on the market, the sugar and sodium can bring your body back to balance faster than water after a grueling workout lasting over 90 minutes. For shorter workouts, sports drinks may just mean a lot of extra carbs you don’t need.  To cut some calories (and save some money), make your own sports drinks at home. 9. Coconut water There’s a reason people go nuts for this tropical drink. Unlike sports beverages, coconut water is low in carbohydrates, while still rich in potassium. And its unsweetened varieties can be very hydrating (assuming you like its unique taste). According to a study in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, the all-natural beverage is effective in rehydrating after light exercise. But for more rigorous sweat sessions, the low-sodium drink does come up short in replenishing the salt your body loses. [caption id="attachment_15715" align="alignnone" width="620"]Iced Coffee Cubes Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption] 10. Coffee Isn’t coffee a diuretic? Well, yes, but a recent study in PLOS ONE debunks the myth that it also causes dehydration. Not only will your daily cup contribute to your water needs, coffee can also give you a sharper memory, boost athletic endurance and performance, and reduce the risk of many serious ailments including diabetes and heart disease.

How Much Water Do We Really Need?

Whether you eat it or drink it, don’t stop ‘til you get enough. According to Berman that’s not as simple as the old-school “eight glasses a day” rule we were all taught. “It’s not the recommendation,” she says. “But it’s also not that far off. For women, it’s about 11 cups and for men it’s about 15 cups. But remember, that includes 20 percent from food.” When you’re exercising, you should be sipping even more for optimal performance, Berman adds. “It’s variable based on your bodyweight and how intense you’re working out, but the American College of Sports Medicine recommends 16 to 20 ounces at least four hours before exercise and three to eight ounces every 15 minutes during exercise (especially in hot temperatures).” RELATED: A Runner's Guide to Hydration (and How Not to Overdo It) If you’re working out at a high intensity, Berman says to weigh yourself before and after exercise to get a more accurate idea of how much water you’re losing. “For every pound lost, you’re supposed to drink 20 to 24 ounces,” she says. “It’s a good mental trigger to remind yourself to keep drinking.” Most of us need this reminder, as we may not even realize we’re dehydrated — until it’s too late. While common signs of dehydration include fatigue, headaches, nausea and dizziness, Berman says the best (and easiest) way to see if you’re getting enough water is to take a peek at your pee. “Your urine should be a pale yellow color,” she says. “If it’s darker than that, drink some water. If you’re not getting up and running to the bathroom every hour, you’re not drinking enough. That’s the telltale sign.” Originally posted on July 24, 2014. Updated August 2015. 

The post 10 Ways to Stay Hydrated (That Aren’t Water) appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
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The Beginner’s Guide to Using Protein Powder http://dailyburn.com/life/health/how-to-use-protein-powder/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/how-to-use-protein-powder/#comments Wed, 22 Jul 2015 15:00:17 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=30330 Black Forest Protein Shake

The Beginner's Guide to Using Protein Powder

Walk into any gym nowadays, and you’re just as likely to hear the rattling of a shaker bottle as the clanking of weights. Powders, bars and other supplements have become so ingrained in our culture that it’s hard to imagine not following up a great workout with a shake of some sort (and sometimes even mid-workout). Protein powder is, in many ways, leading the supplement charge. Created by various sources — from whey to soy to pea — and popping up everywhere from GNC’s to neighborhood grocery stores, the popular supplement has cemented its place in our minds and in our diets.

Regardless of whether you’re an elite athlete or just a weekend warrior, chances are you have a tub of protein powder sitting somewhere in your house. At the very least, you’ve gulped down a shake at one point or another — maybe even a smoothie. But do you really know what’s inside your protein powder or how it should be used to give you the biggest advantage and best results? To help you more effectively decide how, when and if you should use this supplement, we created this beginner guide, answering the most popular questions about protein powder.

RELATED: 9 Healthy Homemade Protein Bar Recipes

Protein Powder Primer: The Whys and What’s

Many gym-goers grab a tub and start adding shakes to their diet without first considering why or if they need protein powder at all. As Brian St. Pierre, sports dietitian and nutrition coach at Precision Nutrition, puts it, the most obvious reason to supplement with protein powder is to reach your protein intake goal for the day. However, they aren't absolutely needed. “If you can meet your protein needs with whole foods, that’s fine,” says St. Pierre. If you find yourself taking in a quality whole-food source of protein three to four times a day, generally a gram of protein per pound of body weight, you might not even need the powder fallback. But, when you’re crunched for time, protein supplements can be your biggest ally.

Although the labels may claim otherwise, the various tubs are more equal than you think. At the heart of all protein powders is just what one would assume (or hope) — protein — whether it's from whey, hemp, soy, or elsewhere. Still, you might see terms like "hydrolyzed" and “cutting edge” to spruce up bottles. St. Pierre argues that the pursuit of better and faster digesting protein powders may be frivolous in the grand scheme of things (research agrees). "A lot of companies will push for getting you to pay big bucks for grass fed whey or cold-filtered whey," St. Pierre says. "These could be things that make them better, but how much better is up for debate."

RELATED: How to Choose the Best Protein Powder for You

So, if spending more doesn't necessarily make a protein powder better, what should consumers look for when shopping the supplement aisle? St. Pierre recommends first looking for a reputable company that has good manufacturing practices (they'll often advertise that on the label). He also suggests buyers vet out various products using third-party certifying brands like Informed Choice. Certifying companies buy actual products off of store shelves (just like a normal buyer) and run tests to make sure the bottle contains what the label advertises.

After narrowing your protein search down to a handful of brands, it's time to investigate the nutritional facts. While the numbers and words may sound foreign, St. Pierre recommends just looking at a handful of characteristics. He likes a protein powder that is relatively low in fat and carbs.

[caption id="attachment_22549" align="alignnone" width="620"]Black Forest Protein Shake Photo and Recipe: Perry Santanachote[/caption]

When to Mix It Up

So, you've done your research and brought home a tub of high-quality protein powder. What now? Figuring out the best times to supplement can be difficult. Here are the two most common uses for protein powder during the day and specific applications for each.

1. Meal Replacement

When you're rushing out the door late for work in the morning, the last thing you have time for is to make a quick breakfast to kickstart your day. That's one scenario where protein shakes can come in handy. In general, St Pierre recommends adding in a source of vegetables, a serving or two of fruit and some healthy fats alongside a scoop or two of protein powder. In fact, he and the team at Precision Nutrition have coined a term for these massive meal-replacers — "super shakes." These shakes can be used in place of a meal or in addition to a regular meal when trying to gain weight. Here's their recommend recipe for both men and women:

Men
2 scoops of protein powder
1-2 cups of vegetables (like spinach, which doesn't affect the taste)
2 handfuls of fruit (fresh or frozen)
2 tablespoons of healthy fat (a nut butter or seed for example)
Mixer (almond milk, regular milk, water — your choice)

Women
1 scoop of protein powder
1 cup of vegetables
1 handful of fruit
1 tablespoon of healthy fat
Mixer (almond milk, regular milk, water — your choice)

These recipes bring up another topic of concern — gender differences. Workout supplements are often viewed as a male-dominated industry, but protein powders are also effective for women. St. Pierre points out, however, that women have different nutritional needs than men. In general, they need less protein per pound of bodyweight (primarily due to differences in body composition). For that reason, St. Pierre initially recommends for females to use one scoop instead of two. However, he's quick to admit that the “cut in half” lesson isn’t the definitive solution. "It’s not that women need exactly half as much as men...Ultimately, it’s just giving you a framework to start something. You can adjust it from there based on your needs," says St. Pierre.

RELATED: What 25 Grams of Protein Actually Looks Like

Gender differences aside, if these shakes are so nutrient-dense, why shouldn't you just blend up a shaker bottle for each meal and ditch cooking (and dirty dishes) for good? St. Pierre cautions that although the shakes are great, they still aren't the same as whole food. "There is more nutrients inherent to whole foods then there ever will be in a powder," he says. You can also sometimes lose nutritional value drinking your nutrients and vitamins instead of eating them. For that reason, he recommends supplementing with no more than two shakes in one day (even that is pushing it). The key is to use shakes in a pinch and rely on whole food sources for the rest of your meals.

[caption id="attachment_41747" align="alignnone" width="620"]Chocolate Protein Powder Photo: Pond5[/caption]

2. Post-Workout

With the advent of the post-workout window — a thin slice of time to intake nutrients after a workout for the biggest benefit — protein shakes and shaker bottles became a necessity for a gym trip. If you didn't slug a shake before you walked out the door, the notion went, you were compromising recovery time and crippling the benefits you could reap from your workout. Protein supplementation post-workout has been shown to be beneficial, particularly in helping individuals recover after a tough session and potentially increase muscle and strength gain. However, the post-exercise window may have been a bit overblown. St. Pierre acknowledges that post-workout nutrition is important but not as much as you may have previously thought. "Basically, it’s not a bad thing to have a shake right after you work out, but you don’t have to,” he explains. “Don’t drive yourself crazy thinking that you’ve wasted a workout because you didn’t have a shake right after working out.”

RELATED: 15 Unexpected Protein Powder Recipes

So, how should post-workout shakes fit into your nutrition? It's really up to personal preference. Previously, protein shakes were thought to digest faster in the stomach than whole foods providing muscle-building nutrients to the recovering muscles quicker. St. Pierre explains that new research indicates this isn’t the case. Now, he advises clients use whatever is most convenient. "If you want to have a shake, that’s cool. If you want to make a whole food meal, that’s more than OK, too. Either approach is valid, so it’s personal preference," says the coach. Stomach sensitivity may also play a role as well. Some individuals have a harder time taking in whole food directly after a workout. In those cases, a shake would be a proper substitution to get in a quick dose of protein.

Protein powders have seemingly become a necessity for an active lifestyle right alongside high-tech fitness trackers and cutting-edge footwear. Although protein shakes may be a convenient way to take in calories, it doesn't mean that they’re always the best option. Whole food sources are still your best bet for getting vital nutrients. The takeaway is to build your diet with a base of solid food and use protein powder as a — you guessed it — supplement when it’s healthy and convenient.

Originally posted July 2014. Updated July 2015. 

The post The Beginner’s Guide to Using Protein Powder appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
Black Forest Protein Shake

The Beginner's Guide to Using Protein Powder Walk into any gym nowadays, and you’re just as likely to hear the rattling of a shaker bottle as the clanking of weights. Powders, bars and other supplements have become so ingrained in our culture that it’s hard to imagine not following up a great workout with a shake of some sort (and sometimes even mid-workout). Protein powder is, in many ways, leading the supplement charge. Created by various sources — from whey to soy to pea — and popping up everywhere from GNC’s to neighborhood grocery stores, the popular supplement has cemented its place in our minds and in our diets. Regardless of whether you’re an elite athlete or just a weekend warrior, chances are you have a tub of protein powder sitting somewhere in your house. At the very least, you’ve gulped down a shake at one point or another — maybe even a smoothie. But do you really know what’s inside your protein powder or how it should be used to give you the biggest advantage and best results? To help you more effectively decide how, when and if you should use this supplement, we created this beginner guide, answering the most popular questions about protein powder. RELATED: 9 Healthy Homemade Protein Bar Recipes

Protein Powder Primer: The Whys and What’s

Many gym-goers grab a tub and start adding shakes to their diet without first considering why or if they need protein powder at all. As Brian St. Pierre, sports dietitian and nutrition coach at Precision Nutrition, puts it, the most obvious reason to supplement with protein powder is to reach your protein intake goal for the day. However, they aren't absolutely needed. “If you can meet your protein needs with whole foods, that’s fine,” says St. Pierre. If you find yourself taking in a quality whole-food source of protein three to four times a day, generally a gram of protein per pound of body weight, you might not even need the powder fallback. But, when you’re crunched for time, protein supplements can be your biggest ally. Although the labels may claim otherwise, the various tubs are more equal than you think. At the heart of all protein powders is just what one would assume (or hope) — protein — whether it's from whey, hemp, soy, or elsewhere. Still, you might see terms like "hydrolyzed" and “cutting edge” to spruce up bottles. St. Pierre argues that the pursuit of better and faster digesting protein powders may be frivolous in the grand scheme of things (research agrees). "A lot of companies will push for getting you to pay big bucks for grass fed whey or cold-filtered whey," St. Pierre says. "These could be things that make them better, but how much better is up for debate." RELATED: How to Choose the Best Protein Powder for You So, if spending more doesn't necessarily make a protein powder better, what should consumers look for when shopping the supplement aisle? St. Pierre recommends first looking for a reputable company that has good manufacturing practices (they'll often advertise that on the label). He also suggests buyers vet out various products using third-party certifying brands like Informed Choice. Certifying companies buy actual products off of store shelves (just like a normal buyer) and run tests to make sure the bottle contains what the label advertises. After narrowing your protein search down to a handful of brands, it's time to investigate the nutritional facts. While the numbers and words may sound foreign, St. Pierre recommends just looking at a handful of characteristics. He likes a protein powder that is relatively low in fat and carbs. [caption id="attachment_22549" align="alignnone" width="620"]Black Forest Protein Shake Photo and Recipe: Perry Santanachote[/caption]

When to Mix It Up

So, you've done your research and brought home a tub of high-quality protein powder. What now? Figuring out the best times to supplement can be difficult. Here are the two most common uses for protein powder during the day and specific applications for each.

1. Meal Replacement

When you're rushing out the door late for work in the morning, the last thing you have time for is to make a quick breakfast to kickstart your day. That's one scenario where protein shakes can come in handy. In general, St Pierre recommends adding in a source of vegetables, a serving or two of fruit and some healthy fats alongside a scoop or two of protein powder. In fact, he and the team at Precision Nutrition have coined a term for these massive meal-replacers — "super shakes." These shakes can be used in place of a meal or in addition to a regular meal when trying to gain weight. Here's their recommend recipe for both men and women:

Men 2 scoops of protein powder 1-2 cups of vegetables (like spinach, which doesn't affect the taste) 2 handfuls of fruit (fresh or frozen) 2 tablespoons of healthy fat (a nut butter or seed for example) Mixer (almond milk, regular milk, water — your choice)

Women 1 scoop of protein powder 1 cup of vegetables 1 handful of fruit 1 tablespoon of healthy fat Mixer (almond milk, regular milk, water — your choice)

These recipes bring up another topic of concern — gender differences. Workout supplements are often viewed as a male-dominated industry, but protein powders are also effective for women. St. Pierre points out, however, that women have different nutritional needs than men. In general, they need less protein per pound of bodyweight (primarily due to differences in body composition). For that reason, St. Pierre initially recommends for females to use one scoop instead of two. However, he's quick to admit that the “cut in half” lesson isn’t the definitive solution. "It’s not that women need exactly half as much as men...Ultimately, it’s just giving you a framework to start something. You can adjust it from there based on your needs," says St. Pierre. RELATED: What 25 Grams of Protein Actually Looks Like Gender differences aside, if these shakes are so nutrient-dense, why shouldn't you just blend up a shaker bottle for each meal and ditch cooking (and dirty dishes) for good? St. Pierre cautions that although the shakes are great, they still aren't the same as whole food. "There is more nutrients inherent to whole foods then there ever will be in a powder," he says. You can also sometimes lose nutritional value drinking your nutrients and vitamins instead of eating them. For that reason, he recommends supplementing with no more than two shakes in one day (even that is pushing it). The key is to use shakes in a pinch and rely on whole food sources for the rest of your meals. [caption id="attachment_41747" align="alignnone" width="620"]Chocolate Protein Powder Photo: Pond5[/caption]

2. Post-Workout

With the advent of the post-workout window — a thin slice of time to intake nutrients after a workout for the biggest benefit — protein shakes and shaker bottles became a necessity for a gym trip. If you didn't slug a shake before you walked out the door, the notion went, you were compromising recovery time and crippling the benefits you could reap from your workout. Protein supplementation post-workout has been shown to be beneficial, particularly in helping individuals recover after a tough session and potentially increase muscle and strength gain. However, the post-exercise window may have been a bit overblown. St. Pierre acknowledges that post-workout nutrition is important but not as much as you may have previously thought. "Basically, it’s not a bad thing to have a shake right after you work out, but you don’t have to,” he explains. “Don’t drive yourself crazy thinking that you’ve wasted a workout because you didn’t have a shake right after working out.” RELATED: 15 Unexpected Protein Powder Recipes So, how should post-workout shakes fit into your nutrition? It's really up to personal preference. Previously, protein shakes were thought to digest faster in the stomach than whole foods providing muscle-building nutrients to the recovering muscles quicker. St. Pierre explains that new research indicates this isn’t the case. Now, he advises clients use whatever is most convenient. "If you want to have a shake, that’s cool. If you want to make a whole food meal, that’s more than OK, too. Either approach is valid, so it’s personal preference," says the coach. Stomach sensitivity may also play a role as well. Some individuals have a harder time taking in whole food directly after a workout. In those cases, a shake would be a proper substitution to get in a quick dose of protein. Protein powders have seemingly become a necessity for an active lifestyle right alongside high-tech fitness trackers and cutting-edge footwear. Although protein shakes may be a convenient way to take in calories, it doesn't mean that they’re always the best option. Whole food sources are still your best bet for getting vital nutrients. The takeaway is to build your diet with a base of solid food and use protein powder as a — you guessed it — supplement when it’s healthy and convenient. Originally posted July 2014. Updated July 2015. 

The post The Beginner’s Guide to Using Protein Powder appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
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The Weird Pantry Staple People Are Drinking to Lose Weight http://dailyburn.com/life/health/apple-cider-vinegar-for-weight-loss/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/apple-cider-vinegar-for-weight-loss/#comments Wed, 22 Jul 2015 11:15:37 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=41601 Should You Drink Apple Cider Vinegar for Weight Loss?

[caption id="attachment_41604" align="alignnone" width="620"]Should You Drink Apple Cider Vinegar for Weight Loss? Photo: Pond5[/caption]

If you’re looking for a magic elixir that will help you lose weight, the online forums extolling the benefits apple cider vinegar might have you sold. But before you start swigging it straight from the bottle (because, gross), does this Dr. Oz-backed tonic really have any merit?

RELATED: Is It Possible to Drink Too Much Water?

While whipping up apple cider vinegar-based salad dressing is one thing, the benefits of drinking it straight from the bottle are questionable at best. And there are real risks, too. “A lot of cleanses focus on juices or beverages, so it’s possible that apple cider vinegar is getting looped in as part of this trend,” says Lisa Cimperman, RDN, LD, a clinical dietician at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland. But unlike downing green juice, drinking too much apple cider vinegar could actually be harmful to your health.

The Sketchy Claims Surrounding Apple Cider Vinegar

Lauded as a way to improve everything from weight loss to indigestion, apple cider vinegar has even been said to help people control diabetes. “But the fact is that we don’t have the research to uphold any of these claims,” Cimperman says.

In fact, apple cider vinegar might make some health conditions worse — particularly if consumed in excess. “People tend to think more is always better but if individuals were to take in large amounts of apple cider vinegar, it could cause severe negative health consequences,” Cimperman says. “For example…[consumed] in tablet form, there have been reports of it burning an individual’s esophagus because it is highly acidic.”

Claims of “Drink this, lose weight!” generally sound too good to be true for a reason.

RELATED: Are Medicinal Mushrooms the New Kale?

That acidity might also be bad news for people suffering from acid reflux, or heartburn. “It can potentially irritate the esophagus as it’s going down, and not only that, then there’s more acid [in your stomach] to potentially reflux back out,” Cimperman says. If you’re looking for digestive relief, Cimperman recommends sticking to a diet rich in fiber and probiotics, instead.

When it comes to controlling diabetes, leave that to your doctors, please! Many people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes also have a condition called gastroparesis, which can prevent the stomach from properly emptying. This can make it more difficult to manage blood glucose. “If someone with gastroparesis were to take apple cider vinegar, it could make that condition even worse,” Cimperman says.

What About Apple Cider Vinegar for Weight Loss?

Claims of “Drink this, lose weight!” generally sound too good to be true for a reason. One recent study of 14 people showed that those who drank a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar mixed with 8 ounces of water before a meal had lower blood glucose levels. This may be because vinegar interfered with the body’s digestion of starch. “By blocking digestion of starch, that would result in a calorie reduction of your meal,” Cimperman says. “So that’s possibly where [those weight claims] came from, but it’s hard for me to say.” Other minor studies have shown similar benefits, but Cimperman says weight loss claims, “often grow out of a very small study that gets blown out of proportion.”

RELATED: How to Detox the Healthy Way: 16 Recipes You’ll Love

In other words, don’t bank on apple cider vinegar when clean eating and good old-fashioned exercise will do. If you’re set on incorporating apple cider vinegar in your diet, do it in moderation. “My advice would be to do no more than one to two teaspoons and mix it in water or some other beverage to dilute the acidity. You never want to take it just straight,” Cimperman says. Even better: Mix it with olive oil and use it to top your salads as a low-calorie alternative to your usual ranch dressing. It’ll be tastier than chugging it, that’s for sure.

The post The Weird Pantry Staple People Are Drinking to Lose Weight appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
Should You Drink Apple Cider Vinegar for Weight Loss?

[caption id="attachment_41604" align="alignnone" width="620"]Should You Drink Apple Cider Vinegar for Weight Loss? Photo: Pond5[/caption] If you’re looking for a magic elixir that will help you lose weight, the online forums extolling the benefits apple cider vinegar might have you sold. But before you start swigging it straight from the bottle (because, gross), does this Dr. Oz-backed tonic really have any merit? RELATED: Is It Possible to Drink Too Much Water? While whipping up apple cider vinegar-based salad dressing is one thing, the benefits of drinking it straight from the bottle are questionable at best. And there are real risks, too. “A lot of cleanses focus on juices or beverages, so it’s possible that apple cider vinegar is getting looped in as part of this trend,” says Lisa Cimperman, RDN, LD, a clinical dietician at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland. But unlike downing green juice, drinking too much apple cider vinegar could actually be harmful to your health.

The Sketchy Claims Surrounding Apple Cider Vinegar

Lauded as a way to improve everything from weight loss to indigestion, apple cider vinegar has even been said to help people control diabetes. “But the fact is that we don’t have the research to uphold any of these claims,” Cimperman says. In fact, apple cider vinegar might make some health conditions worse — particularly if consumed in excess. “People tend to think more is always better but if individuals were to take in large amounts of apple cider vinegar, it could cause severe negative health consequences,” Cimperman says. “For example…[consumed] in tablet form, there have been reports of it burning an individual’s esophagus because it is highly acidic.”
Claims of “Drink this, lose weight!” generally sound too good to be true for a reason.
RELATED: Are Medicinal Mushrooms the New Kale? That acidity might also be bad news for people suffering from acid reflux, or heartburn. “It can potentially irritate the esophagus as it’s going down, and not only that, then there’s more acid [in your stomach] to potentially reflux back out,” Cimperman says. If you’re looking for digestive relief, Cimperman recommends sticking to a diet rich in fiber and probiotics, instead. When it comes to controlling diabetes, leave that to your doctors, please! Many people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes also have a condition called gastroparesis, which can prevent the stomach from properly emptying. This can make it more difficult to manage blood glucose. “If someone with gastroparesis were to take apple cider vinegar, it could make that condition even worse,” Cimperman says.

What About Apple Cider Vinegar for Weight Loss?

Claims of “Drink this, lose weight!” generally sound too good to be true for a reason. One recent study of 14 people showed that those who drank a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar mixed with 8 ounces of water before a meal had lower blood glucose levels. This may be because vinegar interfered with the body’s digestion of starch. “By blocking digestion of starch, that would result in a calorie reduction of your meal,” Cimperman says. “So that’s possibly where [those weight claims] came from, but it’s hard for me to say.” Other minor studies have shown similar benefits, but Cimperman says weight loss claims, “often grow out of a very small study that gets blown out of proportion.” RELATED: How to Detox the Healthy Way: 16 Recipes You’ll Love In other words, don’t bank on apple cider vinegar when clean eating and good old-fashioned exercise will do. If you’re set on incorporating apple cider vinegar in your diet, do it in moderation. “My advice would be to do no more than one to two teaspoons and mix it in water or some other beverage to dilute the acidity. You never want to take it just straight,” Cimperman says. Even better: Mix it with olive oil and use it to top your salads as a low-calorie alternative to your usual ranch dressing. It’ll be tastier than chugging it, that’s for sure.

The post The Weird Pantry Staple People Are Drinking to Lose Weight appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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How to Do a Sugar Detox (Without Going Crazy) http://dailyburn.com/life/health/sugar-detox-diet/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/sugar-detox-diet/#comments Tue, 21 Jul 2015 11:15:08 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=41588 How to Do a Sugar Detox (Without Going Crazy)

[caption id="attachment_41591" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Do a Sugar Detox (Without Going Crazy) Photo: Pond5[/caption]

If you eat dinner solely for the chance to chase it with dessert, we hate to break it to you, but it might be time to try a sugar detox. We’re not talking about a five-day fad cleanse, either. “The ultimate goal is to really downplay sugar in the diet and have that be a permanent lifestyle change,” says Bethany Doerfler, RD, LDN, and a clinical research dietician at Northwestern Medicine in Chicago.

RELATED: Detoxing for Beach Season? Here’s Your 5-Day Plan

Your love for sugary stuff may seem benign, but the truth is that most people are eating way more of it than they need. “Americans currently consume 22 teaspoons of sugar per day,” Doerfler says. That’s more than three times as much as what’s recommended by the American Heart Association.

Plus, research shows that not-so-innocent sweet tooth could be doing serious damage to your health, leading to weight gain, high blood pressure and cholesterol levels and an increased risk for diabetes. In fact, Dr. Joel Fuhrman, author of The End of Dieting, says eating too much sugar should be considered just as dangerous as smoking cigarettes. “A diet with sugar and high glycemic index foods promotes all the leading causes of death in America,” he says. “I don’t see value in cutting out sugar for a few days and then going back to eating it, but I do see value in cutting it out permanently.”

Why It’s Hard to Quit Sugar (But Worth It)

Sugar addiction is no joke. Once you’re hooked, cravings can be hard to resist, leading you down a slippery slope towards obesity and other health problems. “Studies are showing that in some people and animals, the brain can react to sugar very much like it can to drugs and alcohol,” Doerfler says. That’s why when you initially cut added sugars from your diet, you might feel deprived for a few days. “When your body is overloaded with waste, you feel more uncomfortable when not eating that food,” Fuhrman says. “It’s like stopping coffee.”

"Substitute processed sugars like cake, cookies and sweetened coffees for natural sugars, like fresh fruit.”

RELATED: Are You Exceeding Your Daily Sugar Intake in Just One Meal?

Your efforts to cut back on sugar will pay off though. “In the short term, people will notice their energy levels improve right away and after a short period of time they will notice cravings and fatigue diminishes,” Doerfler says.

Plus, the long-term benefits of cutting back on added sugar in your diet are impossible to ignore. One study published in the journal Circulation showed that sugar-sweetened drinks directly cause the cardiovascular disease and diabetes that kill about 184,000 people worldwide every year.

Your Sugar Detox Diet, Made Simple

There’s more than one way to do a sugar detox. “Some patients feel that taking a moderate approach doesn’t really work for them and they need to go cold turkey,” Doerfler says. “But for most people, I recommend cleaning up one meal at a time and then progressing onto the next meal the following day.”

RELATED: 12 Fast Food Drinks That Aren’t Worth the Calories

Regardless of the route you go, your number one goal should be to cut added sugars from your diet. That includes most desserts, sugar-sweetened beverages and many processed foods or snacks. In general, men should consume no more than nine teaspoons, or about 36 grams of sugar per day, while women should eat no more than six teaspoons, or about 25 grams, of added sugars per day, according to the American Heart Association. In other words, it’s time to start reading nutrition labels.

You should also be armed with a plan for when cravings hit. Expect to struggle the most in the afternoon and after dinner when you’re watching TV, Doerfler says. “Often when people are trying to avoid sugar, they go too far and try to take fruit out of their diet and there’s no reason to do that,” Doerfler says. “A better option is to substitute processed sugars like cake, cookies and sweetened coffees for natural sugars, like fresh fruit.”

RELATED: Are You Eating Too Much Fruit?

Ready to detox? Here’s a basic meal plan to get you started:

Your Sugar Detox Diet Guidelines

[caption id="attachment_36668" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Do a Sugar Detox (Without Going Crazy) Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Breakfast: Cereal or oatmeal with fruit on top
Your bowl of Honey Nut Cheerios might be a secret sugar bomb. Try picking unsweetened oatmeal, or shredded wheat cereal options, instead. “For sweetness, I like people to add their own fruit, rather than letting the cereal company add sugar,” Doerfler says.

RELATED: 9 Easy Overnight Oats Recipes

[caption id="attachment_31857" align="alignnone" width="620"]Kale Caesar Salad Photo and Recipe: Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Lunch: Grilled chicken, fish or tofu with a veggie salad
Your goal at lunch is to fuel your body and fend off that inevitable afternoon crash for as long as possible. “I think having veggies and a protein at lunch is great way to give people a midday boost,” Doerfler says.

RELATED: 7 Healthy Lunch Ideas Your Friends Will Want to Steal

[caption id="attachment_34165" align="alignnone" width="620"]Homemade Beet Hummus Recipe Photo and Recipe: Renee Blair[/caption]

3 p.m. snack: Nuts or veggies with hummus
Welcome to the danger zone. “At about 3 p.m. our circadian rhythm starts to drop and that’s a time of fatigue for everybody,” Doerfler says. “Expect that you’re going to get the munchies and have a game plan in place.” For easy, portable ideas, check out this list of low-calorie foods that will actually fill you up.

RELATED: 15 Quick and Portable High-Protein Snacks

[caption id="attachment_22478" align="alignnone" width="620"]Kale Cauliflower Pasta Photo and Recipe: Renee Blair[/caption]

Dinner: Whole-wheat pasta with chicken and vegetables
You might be avoiding sugar, but whole-wheat carbs are still totally OK. “Dinner is when I like people to add another whole-grain in — whole-wheat pasta, couscous, or sweet potatoes,” Doerfler says. One cup of cooked pasta is considered a good serving size — take your pick and fill up.

RELATED: 30-Minute Quick, Healthy Dinner Ideas

[caption id="attachment_30739" align="alignnone" width="620"]Antioxidant Fruit Salad Photo and Recipe: Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Dessert: Fresh fruit
It’s time to redefine dessert. “Fruit is probably the lowest sugar snack option available and it’s loaded with antioxidants and fiber, which helps people lose weight and feel full,” Doerfler says. If you truly can’t live without a little dark chocolate before bed (we feel you), Doerfler says you can indulge — as long as you limit your treat to a single portion size.

The post How to Do a Sugar Detox (Without Going Crazy) appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
How to Do a Sugar Detox (Without Going Crazy)

[caption id="attachment_41591" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Do a Sugar Detox (Without Going Crazy) Photo: Pond5[/caption] If you eat dinner solely for the chance to chase it with dessert, we hate to break it to you, but it might be time to try a sugar detox. We’re not talking about a five-day fad cleanse, either. “The ultimate goal is to really downplay sugar in the diet and have that be a permanent lifestyle change,” says Bethany Doerfler, RD, LDN, and a clinical research dietician at Northwestern Medicine in Chicago. RELATED: Detoxing for Beach Season? Here’s Your 5-Day Plan Your love for sugary stuff may seem benign, but the truth is that most people are eating way more of it than they need. “Americans currently consume 22 teaspoons of sugar per day,” Doerfler says. That’s more than three times as much as what’s recommended by the American Heart Association. Plus, research shows that not-so-innocent sweet tooth could be doing serious damage to your health, leading to weight gain, high blood pressure and cholesterol levels and an increased risk for diabetes. In fact, Dr. Joel Fuhrman, author of The End of Dieting, says eating too much sugar should be considered just as dangerous as smoking cigarettes. “A diet with sugar and high glycemic index foods promotes all the leading causes of death in America,” he says. “I don’t see value in cutting out sugar for a few days and then going back to eating it, but I do see value in cutting it out permanently.”

Why It’s Hard to Quit Sugar (But Worth It)

Sugar addiction is no joke. Once you’re hooked, cravings can be hard to resist, leading you down a slippery slope towards obesity and other health problems. “Studies are showing that in some people and animals, the brain can react to sugar very much like it can to drugs and alcohol,” Doerfler says. That’s why when you initially cut added sugars from your diet, you might feel deprived for a few days. “When your body is overloaded with waste, you feel more uncomfortable when not eating that food,” Fuhrman says. “It’s like stopping coffee.”
"Substitute processed sugars like cake, cookies and sweetened coffees for natural sugars, like fresh fruit.”
RELATED: Are You Exceeding Your Daily Sugar Intake in Just One Meal? Your efforts to cut back on sugar will pay off though. “In the short term, people will notice their energy levels improve right away and after a short period of time they will notice cravings and fatigue diminishes,” Doerfler says. Plus, the long-term benefits of cutting back on added sugar in your diet are impossible to ignore. One study published in the journal Circulation showed that sugar-sweetened drinks directly cause the cardiovascular disease and diabetes that kill about 184,000 people worldwide every year.

Your Sugar Detox Diet, Made Simple

There’s more than one way to do a sugar detox. “Some patients feel that taking a moderate approach doesn’t really work for them and they need to go cold turkey,” Doerfler says. “But for most people, I recommend cleaning up one meal at a time and then progressing onto the next meal the following day.” RELATED: 12 Fast Food Drinks That Aren’t Worth the Calories Regardless of the route you go, your number one goal should be to cut added sugars from your diet. That includes most desserts, sugar-sweetened beverages and many processed foods or snacks. In general, men should consume no more than nine teaspoons, or about 36 grams of sugar per day, while women should eat no more than six teaspoons, or about 25 grams, of added sugars per day, according to the American Heart Association. In other words, it’s time to start reading nutrition labels. You should also be armed with a plan for when cravings hit. Expect to struggle the most in the afternoon and after dinner when you’re watching TV, Doerfler says. “Often when people are trying to avoid sugar, they go too far and try to take fruit out of their diet and there’s no reason to do that,” Doerfler says. “A better option is to substitute processed sugars like cake, cookies and sweetened coffees for natural sugars, like fresh fruit.” RELATED: Are You Eating Too Much Fruit? Ready to detox? Here’s a basic meal plan to get you started:

Your Sugar Detox Diet Guidelines

[caption id="attachment_36668" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Do a Sugar Detox (Without Going Crazy) Photo: Pond5[/caption] Breakfast: Cereal or oatmeal with fruit on top Your bowl of Honey Nut Cheerios might be a secret sugar bomb. Try picking unsweetened oatmeal, or shredded wheat cereal options, instead. “For sweetness, I like people to add their own fruit, rather than letting the cereal company add sugar,” Doerfler says. RELATED: 9 Easy Overnight Oats Recipes [caption id="attachment_31857" align="alignnone" width="620"]Kale Caesar Salad Photo and Recipe: Perry Santanachote[/caption] Lunch: Grilled chicken, fish or tofu with a veggie salad Your goal at lunch is to fuel your body and fend off that inevitable afternoon crash for as long as possible. “I think having veggies and a protein at lunch is great way to give people a midday boost,” Doerfler says. RELATED: 7 Healthy Lunch Ideas Your Friends Will Want to Steal [caption id="attachment_34165" align="alignnone" width="620"]Homemade Beet Hummus Recipe Photo and Recipe: Renee Blair[/caption] 3 p.m. snack: Nuts or veggies with hummus Welcome to the danger zone. “At about 3 p.m. our circadian rhythm starts to drop and that’s a time of fatigue for everybody,” Doerfler says. “Expect that you’re going to get the munchies and have a game plan in place.” For easy, portable ideas, check out this list of low-calorie foods that will actually fill you up. RELATED: 15 Quick and Portable High-Protein Snacks [caption id="attachment_22478" align="alignnone" width="620"]Kale Cauliflower Pasta Photo and Recipe: Renee Blair[/caption] Dinner: Whole-wheat pasta with chicken and vegetables You might be avoiding sugar, but whole-wheat carbs are still totally OK. “Dinner is when I like people to add another whole-grain in — whole-wheat pasta, couscous, or sweet potatoes,” Doerfler says. One cup of cooked pasta is considered a good serving size — take your pick and fill up. RELATED: 30-Minute Quick, Healthy Dinner Ideas [caption id="attachment_30739" align="alignnone" width="620"]Antioxidant Fruit Salad Photo and Recipe: Perry Santanachote[/caption] Dessert: Fresh fruit It’s time to redefine dessert. “Fruit is probably the lowest sugar snack option available and it’s loaded with antioxidants and fiber, which helps people lose weight and feel full,” Doerfler says. If you truly can’t live without a little dark chocolate before bed (we feel you), Doerfler says you can indulge — as long as you limit your treat to a single portion size.

The post How to Do a Sugar Detox (Without Going Crazy) appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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The 10 Biggest Diet Mistakes, According to Experts http://dailyburn.com/life/health/diet-mistakes-weight-loss-motivation/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/diet-mistakes-weight-loss-motivation/#comments Mon, 20 Jul 2015 11:15:05 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=41540 The 10 Biggest Weight Loss Mistakes, According to Experts

[caption id="attachment_41546" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 10 Biggest Weight Loss Mistakes, According to Experts Photo: Pond5[/caption]

In theory, losing weight seems simple enough: Eat less, move more. Right? Ha! Anyone who’s ever tried to slim down knows that diet and exercise is tricky. It’s easy for even then best-laid plans to run off-course. And there’s nothing like hitting a weight loss plateau — or, worse, regaining to make you want to throw out the scale and grab a cookie.

To fend off the calorie burn blues, we asked a bunch of top trainers and nutritionists for the most common mistakes they see clients making when they first embark on a weight loss goal. If you've set out to shed pounds but aren't seeing the results you hoped for, here are some possible reasons why — plus, great advice to get you back on track.

RELATED: 6 Weight Loss Success Stories to Motivate You Right Now

10 Diet Mistakes That Are Easy to Avoid

[caption id="attachment_41548" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 10 Biggest Weight Loss Mistakes, According to Experts Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Mistake #1: Not counting all the calories.

Snack attacks happen. Just don’t try to deny them. "When I ask my clients for a daily meal log, I often get back a list of breakfast, lunch, and dinner," says DailyBurn Fitness/Nutrition coach Chris Mosier. "These people are snacking, but they aren’t adding it toward their daily caloric intake total." Most people don’t realize how much these bites can add up, he says. Not to mention the toll that beverages, like soda or booze, can take on your waistline.

RELATED: Frozen Yogurt vs. Ice Cream: Which Is Healthier?

Fix It: Use a calorie-tracking mobile app so you can log each item as you're eating it — not later. "It’s easy to go over your caloric goal when you add in the two cookies from the office party, the vending machine run during the afternoon slump, and the bedtime sweets,” Mosier says. Remind yourself before you take those extra between-meal bites: Like it or not, every calorie counts.

Mistake #2: Going crazy on your cheat day.

Splurging once a week can help satisfy cravings and, when done right, can even spike metabolism and help you burn calories more efficiently. "But the problem is that often, the cheat day becomes a massive food-eating contest," says Joey Thurman, celebrity trainer and creator of The Lifestyle Renovation. Going overboard can set you back thousands of calories and make you feel sick and bloated for days to come.

"Many people start out thinking they need to work out seven days a week, which is not always reasonable."

RELATED: When Is It OK to Cheat? The Pros and Cons of Cheat Days

Fix It: "Instead of a cheat day, have a cheat meal for each week," says Thurman. "You still can have that donut, pizza, or brownie you've been craving, and get right back on the road to clean, nutritious eating — instead of derailing all your progress and causing yourself to feel sick."

Mistake #3: Not switching up your workouts.

Turns out doing the same Cardio Sculpt workout every day might not be the best idea. "Completing the same workout over and over can be detrimental to weight loss, because our bodies adapt and become more efficient at that mode of exercise," says DailyBurn Fitness/Nutrition coach Tiffany Hill. Similarly, doing all steady-state cardio, without adding strength training or high-intensity intervals, can also sabotage your efforts, says personal trainer Mike Chang, creator of Six Pack Shortcuts. "You can spend a month on a treadmill and see very few results, and end up looking worse if you're not careful," he says. "Too much cardio can get rid of the muscle that makes you look good."

RELATED: 3 Quick HIIT Workouts for Beginners

Fix It: To ensure you're getting enough variety in your workouts, Hill recommends regularly adjusting the frequency, intensity, time, or type of workout. (You can remember that using the acronym FITT.) "Following a running program such as Couch to 5K is a good example of an exercise progression," she says. "Each week, the running phase increases gradually." To be sure you're building muscle and keeping your metabolism revved, add high-intensity intervals and weight or resistance training to your routine at least twice a week.

[caption id="attachment_41550" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 10 Biggest Weight Loss Mistakes, According to Experts Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Mistake #4: Restricting yourself too much.

Step away from the juice cleanses. "Going on a strict diet forever is simply not realistic, unless you have a lot of extra time on your hands and the willpower to never to eat out again," jokes Chang. "If you want to lose weight, you have to think about sustainability." And even if you are able to stick to a super low-calorie meal plan without falling off the wagon, your body could kick into starvation mode, expending fewer calories in an effort to preserve energy.

RELATED: Detoxing for Beach Season? Here’s Your 5-Day Plan

Fix It: Instead of worrying so much about the number of calories you're eating, focus on the quality of those calories, says Allie Whitesides, DailyBurn Fitness/Nutrition coach. "Eat food that you prepare, less packaged goods, and include a balance of protein, healthy fats, whole grains, and lots of fresh veggies and fruits." Follow these steps and you'll find yourself naturally eating a healthy number of calories, without feeling hungry or deprived.

Mistake #5: Not taking a rest day.

When starting a workout program, it’s crucial to give your body (and mind) adequate recovery days. "Many people start out thinking they need to work out seven days a week, which is not always reasonable," says Whitesides. "When they end up missing a day or two they become discouraged and often give up completely."

RELATED: 5 Foam Rolling Moves You Aren’t Doing (But Should)

Fix It: To beat burnout, schedule a day or two of rest each week, and be sure to set reasonable goals that fit your lifestyle. "Always listen to your body, and if you are too sore to work out, take an active recovery day," says Whitesides. Go for a walk with your family, take a leisurely bike ride or do some gentle yoga.

Mistake #6: Giving exercise too much credit.

You can’t out-exercise a bad diet. "When it comes to weight loss, nutrition needs to be on point in order for your physical activity efforts to shine through," says Hill. "This is especially true for people just beginning an exercise routine, because easy to moderate physical activity doesn’t burn a lot of calories." For example, walking at three miles per hour for 30 minutes burns less than 150 calories — equal to or less than most candy or snack bars.

RELATED: Should You Eat Before a Workout?

Fix It: Ditch the mindset that just because you worked out, you can eat whatever you want. But don't let a strict diet keep you from exercising, either. "It's still important because it will help with increasing your mood, boosting energy and promoting better sleep," says Hill. "Focus on these immediate gains of physical activity, and weight loss will follow suit."

Mistake #7: Focusing too much on the scale.

Many of Mosier's clients obsessively check the scale, and are then disappointed if the number isn’t moving. But many factors can play into a person's weight, he says, including body composition, hydration levels and food you’ve eaten. "Weight can fluctuate, so jumping on the scale daily doesn’t give an accurate snapshot of how you’re actually doing."

"People who eat like birds at breakfast often become hungry and overeat at lunch and dinner."

RELATED: 7 Weight Loss Tips When the Scale Won’t Budge

Fix It: Weigh yourself once a month and take measurements of your body to track changes, says Mosier. "Measurements can be taken anywhere you want to lose inches, with the most common being the waist, hips, thighs and upper arms."

Mistake #8: Not getting enough sleep.

Pay attention to zzz’s just as much as LBs. "One of the biggest mistakes I see people make is not giving enough emphasis to the unsung heroes of weight loss, like sleep and stress," says trainer and sports nutritionist Rob Sulaver, founder of Bandana Training. "If you want to create the ideal fat loss conditions for your body, you have to manage your stress levels and make sure the quantity and quality of your sleep is on point."

RELATED: The Hidden Ways Sleep Deprivation Can Lead to Weight Gain

Fix It: Before you even think about a diet and exercise plan, make sure you're getting enough shuteye. (The magic number of hours is different for everyone, but most studies suggest it's around seven — although very active people likely need more.) If you're stressed, find healthy ways to relieve tension, like regular yoga sessions, meditation, or hitting a punching bag in boxing class.

Mistake #9: Skimping on breakfast.

"People who eat like birds at breakfast often become hungry and overeat at lunch and dinner," says sports nutritionist Kate Davis, MS, RD, CSSD, LDN. While your morning meal may not be as important to weight loss as it was once believed, studies do show that eating early (especially high-protein meals) can increase dopamine levels, which may reduce cravings throughout the day.

RELATED: 9 Healthy Breakfast Recipes Ready in 15 Minutes or Less

Fix It: "Flip your thinking and make breakfast your largest meal of the day," says Davis. "Eat relatively less as the day goes on to keep yourself from becoming over-hungry." Can't swing a big breakfast on work days? A recent study found that a quick bowl of oatmeal first thing in the a.m. can help you eat 50 percent less at lunch.

Mistake #10: Gunning for six-pack abs.

"You can perform crunches until you’re blue in the face, but this doesn’t mean you’re actually burning fat from your abdominal area," says Hill. That's because the idea that you can "spot reduce" simply isn't true. In order to lose weight, you have to burn calories — and when you do, the body sheds fat all over, not just in one specific spot.

Fix It: For the biggest calorie burn, focus on exercises that increase your heart rate and target large muscle groups — like the chest, back and legs. (Hill recommends squats, deadlifts, push-ups and bent-over rows.) Incorporate high-intensity interval training into your routine, as well. "You’ll burn more calories in less time, and this type of physical activity can work for you due to the afterburn effect."

For no-equipment workouts you can do at home, head to DailyBurn.com and try it free for 30 days. 

The post The 10 Biggest Diet Mistakes, According to Experts appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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The 10 Biggest Weight Loss Mistakes, According to Experts

[caption id="attachment_41546" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 10 Biggest Weight Loss Mistakes, According to Experts Photo: Pond5[/caption] In theory, losing weight seems simple enough: Eat less, move more. Right? Ha! Anyone who’s ever tried to slim down knows that diet and exercise is tricky. It’s easy for even then best-laid plans to run off-course. And there’s nothing like hitting a weight loss plateau — or, worse, regaining to make you want to throw out the scale and grab a cookie. To fend off the calorie burn blues, we asked a bunch of top trainers and nutritionists for the most common mistakes they see clients making when they first embark on a weight loss goal. If you've set out to shed pounds but aren't seeing the results you hoped for, here are some possible reasons why — plus, great advice to get you back on track. RELATED: 6 Weight Loss Success Stories to Motivate You Right Now

10 Diet Mistakes That Are Easy to Avoid

[caption id="attachment_41548" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 10 Biggest Weight Loss Mistakes, According to Experts Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Mistake #1: Not counting all the calories.

Snack attacks happen. Just don’t try to deny them. "When I ask my clients for a daily meal log, I often get back a list of breakfast, lunch, and dinner," says DailyBurn Fitness/Nutrition coach Chris Mosier. "These people are snacking, but they aren’t adding it toward their daily caloric intake total." Most people don’t realize how much these bites can add up, he says. Not to mention the toll that beverages, like soda or booze, can take on your waistline. RELATED: Frozen Yogurt vs. Ice Cream: Which Is Healthier? Fix It: Use a calorie-tracking mobile app so you can log each item as you're eating it — not later. "It’s easy to go over your caloric goal when you add in the two cookies from the office party, the vending machine run during the afternoon slump, and the bedtime sweets,” Mosier says. Remind yourself before you take those extra between-meal bites: Like it or not, every calorie counts.

Mistake #2: Going crazy on your cheat day.

Splurging once a week can help satisfy cravings and, when done right, can even spike metabolism and help you burn calories more efficiently. "But the problem is that often, the cheat day becomes a massive food-eating contest," says Joey Thurman, celebrity trainer and creator of The Lifestyle Renovation. Going overboard can set you back thousands of calories and make you feel sick and bloated for days to come.
"Many people start out thinking they need to work out seven days a week, which is not always reasonable."
RELATED: When Is It OK to Cheat? The Pros and Cons of Cheat Days Fix It: "Instead of a cheat day, have a cheat meal for each week," says Thurman. "You still can have that donut, pizza, or brownie you've been craving, and get right back on the road to clean, nutritious eating — instead of derailing all your progress and causing yourself to feel sick."

Mistake #3: Not switching up your workouts.

Turns out doing the same Cardio Sculpt workout every day might not be the best idea. "Completing the same workout over and over can be detrimental to weight loss, because our bodies adapt and become more efficient at that mode of exercise," says DailyBurn Fitness/Nutrition coach Tiffany Hill. Similarly, doing all steady-state cardio, without adding strength training or high-intensity intervals, can also sabotage your efforts, says personal trainer Mike Chang, creator of Six Pack Shortcuts. "You can spend a month on a treadmill and see very few results, and end up looking worse if you're not careful," he says. "Too much cardio can get rid of the muscle that makes you look good." RELATED: 3 Quick HIIT Workouts for Beginners Fix It: To ensure you're getting enough variety in your workouts, Hill recommends regularly adjusting the frequency, intensity, time, or type of workout. (You can remember that using the acronym FITT.) "Following a running program such as Couch to 5K is a good example of an exercise progression," she says. "Each week, the running phase increases gradually." To be sure you're building muscle and keeping your metabolism revved, add high-intensity intervals and weight or resistance training to your routine at least twice a week. [caption id="attachment_41550" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 10 Biggest Weight Loss Mistakes, According to Experts Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Mistake #4: Restricting yourself too much.

Step away from the juice cleanses. "Going on a strict diet forever is simply not realistic, unless you have a lot of extra time on your hands and the willpower to never to eat out again," jokes Chang. "If you want to lose weight, you have to think about sustainability." And even if you are able to stick to a super low-calorie meal plan without falling off the wagon, your body could kick into starvation mode, expending fewer calories in an effort to preserve energy. RELATED: Detoxing for Beach Season? Here’s Your 5-Day Plan Fix It: Instead of worrying so much about the number of calories you're eating, focus on the quality of those calories, says Allie Whitesides, DailyBurn Fitness/Nutrition coach. "Eat food that you prepare, less packaged goods, and include a balance of protein, healthy fats, whole grains, and lots of fresh veggies and fruits." Follow these steps and you'll find yourself naturally eating a healthy number of calories, without feeling hungry or deprived.

Mistake #5: Not taking a rest day.

When starting a workout program, it’s crucial to give your body (and mind) adequate recovery days. "Many people start out thinking they need to work out seven days a week, which is not always reasonable," says Whitesides. "When they end up missing a day or two they become discouraged and often give up completely." RELATED: 5 Foam Rolling Moves You Aren’t Doing (But Should) Fix It: To beat burnout, schedule a day or two of rest each week, and be sure to set reasonable goals that fit your lifestyle. "Always listen to your body, and if you are too sore to work out, take an active recovery day," says Whitesides. Go for a walk with your family, take a leisurely bike ride or do some gentle yoga.

Mistake #6: Giving exercise too much credit.

You can’t out-exercise a bad diet. "When it comes to weight loss, nutrition needs to be on point in order for your physical activity efforts to shine through," says Hill. "This is especially true for people just beginning an exercise routine, because easy to moderate physical activity doesn’t burn a lot of calories." For example, walking at three miles per hour for 30 minutes burns less than 150 calories — equal to or less than most candy or snack bars. RELATED: Should You Eat Before a Workout? Fix It: Ditch the mindset that just because you worked out, you can eat whatever you want. But don't let a strict diet keep you from exercising, either. "It's still important because it will help with increasing your mood, boosting energy and promoting better sleep," says Hill. "Focus on these immediate gains of physical activity, and weight loss will follow suit."

Mistake #7: Focusing too much on the scale.

Many of Mosier's clients obsessively check the scale, and are then disappointed if the number isn’t moving. But many factors can play into a person's weight, he says, including body composition, hydration levels and food you’ve eaten. "Weight can fluctuate, so jumping on the scale daily doesn’t give an accurate snapshot of how you’re actually doing."
"People who eat like birds at breakfast often become hungry and overeat at lunch and dinner."
RELATED: 7 Weight Loss Tips When the Scale Won’t Budge Fix It: Weigh yourself once a month and take measurements of your body to track changes, says Mosier. "Measurements can be taken anywhere you want to lose inches, with the most common being the waist, hips, thighs and upper arms."

Mistake #8: Not getting enough sleep.

Pay attention to zzz’s just as much as LBs. "One of the biggest mistakes I see people make is not giving enough emphasis to the unsung heroes of weight loss, like sleep and stress," says trainer and sports nutritionist Rob Sulaver, founder of Bandana Training. "If you want to create the ideal fat loss conditions for your body, you have to manage your stress levels and make sure the quantity and quality of your sleep is on point." RELATED: The Hidden Ways Sleep Deprivation Can Lead to Weight Gain Fix It: Before you even think about a diet and exercise plan, make sure you're getting enough shuteye. (The magic number of hours is different for everyone, but most studies suggest it's around seven — although very active people likely need more.) If you're stressed, find healthy ways to relieve tension, like regular yoga sessions, meditation, or hitting a punching bag in boxing class.

Mistake #9: Skimping on breakfast.

"People who eat like birds at breakfast often become hungry and overeat at lunch and dinner," says sports nutritionist Kate Davis, MS, RD, CSSD, LDN. While your morning meal may not be as important to weight loss as it was once believed, studies do show that eating early (especially high-protein meals) can increase dopamine levels, which may reduce cravings throughout the day. RELATED: 9 Healthy Breakfast Recipes Ready in 15 Minutes or Less Fix It: "Flip your thinking and make breakfast your largest meal of the day," says Davis. "Eat relatively less as the day goes on to keep yourself from becoming over-hungry." Can't swing a big breakfast on work days? A recent study found that a quick bowl of oatmeal first thing in the a.m. can help you eat 50 percent less at lunch.

Mistake #10: Gunning for six-pack abs.

"You can perform crunches until you’re blue in the face, but this doesn’t mean you’re actually burning fat from your abdominal area," says Hill. That's because the idea that you can "spot reduce" simply isn't true. In order to lose weight, you have to burn calories — and when you do, the body sheds fat all over, not just in one specific spot. Fix It: For the biggest calorie burn, focus on exercises that increase your heart rate and target large muscle groups — like the chest, back and legs. (Hill recommends squats, deadlifts, push-ups and bent-over rows.) Incorporate high-intensity interval training into your routine, as well. "You’ll burn more calories in less time, and this type of physical activity can work for you due to the afterburn effect." For no-equipment workouts you can do at home, head to DailyBurn.com and try it free for 30 days. 

The post The 10 Biggest Diet Mistakes, According to Experts appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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Cooking for One? 9 Tricks to Kill It in the Kitchen http://dailyburn.com/life/health/cooking-for-one-healthy-tips/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/cooking-for-one-healthy-tips/#comments Sun, 19 Jul 2015 13:15:08 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=41653 Cooking for One? 9 Ways to Kill It In the Kitchen

[caption id="attachment_41672" align="alignnone" width="620"]Cooking for One? 9 Ways to Kill It In the Kitchen Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Real talk: Cooking for yourself can be tough. Especially when ordering takeout seems more appealing than tackling the slew of challenges associated with maintaining a kitchen for one. Make too much food and you’ll be forced to throw out icky tupperwares of leftovers. Buy too few groceries and you’ll be scrounging for snacks or prepackaged meal. Not to mention, a lack of dinner company might mean you’ll be chowing down in front of the TV, or scrolling through your Twitter feed instead of actually savoring your meal.

RELATED: How to Eat Healthy for Less Than $4 a Day

But dining alone doesn’t have to mean slurping lo mein straight from the box — there are real benefits to rolling solo. You’ll be able to cook what you want, when you want, says Marci Clow, R.D., Senior Nutritionist at Rainbow Light Nutritional Systems. (Hello, pancakes for dinner!) And opting to whip up something at home instead of ordering in is good for your budget and your health goals. Luckily, you don’t need to be a top chef or a leftover lover to enjoy healthy and delicious meals seven days a week. These nine hacks will help you manage your kitchen and make the most of your single-serve eats.

9 Tips for When You’re Cooking for One

1. Browse bulk bins at the store.
Those transparent cases of nuts, seeds and rice aren’t just for granola-loving hippies. Clow recommends hitting up the bulk bins for staple products, which will be cheaper than packaged varieties. You can find rice, grains, dried fruits, flours and premade trail mixes. By using the food scale, you’ll be able to buy the exact amount of quinoa you’ll need for fiesta stuffed poblano peppers. No excess grains, no sweat!

RELATED: 6 DIY Kitchen Hacks to Get Healthier, Stat

2. Set up a food swap.
Not into leftovers? Find a group of friends or coworkers and have everyone exchange their surplus meals after making a large recipe, says Clow. Everyone cooks once and gets to enjoy something new for lunch or dinner instead of chowing down on the same mushroom risotto for a whole week.

3. Outsource willpower to your freezer.
Healthy recipe creator and FitFoodieFinds blogger Lee Hersh makes a lot of food in her home, but she resists the temptation to inhale an entire tin of muffins by freezing any extra baked goods. “If they’re not on the counter, you won’t think about them,” she says. She also keeps healthy snacks like energy balls in the freezer so she doesn’t crave a bite every time she walks through her kitchen.

RELATED: 13 Healthy Freezer Meals to Prep Now and Eat Later

4. Order in — the healthy way.
Fueled with dread every time you have to decide what to throw in your grocery cart each week? Take decision-making out of the equation with subscription delivery services that ship ingredients for healthy dinners right to your doorstep. Choose from these seven tasty options if you desire extra convenience.

5. Portion meats before marinating.
It can be tough to purchase meat in single-serving sizes. Hersh recommends putting a chicken breast or two (or your desired serving size) into Ziploc bags with your marinade of choice, write a label on the bag, then pop it in the freezer. “That way, you’re only defrosting what you need,” when you’re ready to start cooking, she says. You’ll have a flavorful single-serve dish ready when you need it. 

RELATED: 12 Brilliant Meal Prep Ideas to Free Up Your Time

6. Keep your kitchen stocked with these staples.
Being prepared for anything is the first step in your recipe for healthier eating. Enter: Foolproof meals you can whip up easily when you come home exhausted after a hard day’s work. Clow suggests stocking up on “quick fix” items that can be easily assembled, like eggs, baked potato (ready in minutes if cooked in the microwave), canned tuna and chili. See the graphic below for more ideas.

Cooking for One: Grocery List

[caption id="attachment_41671" align="alignnone" width="620"]Cooking for One? 9 Ways to Kill It In the Kitchen Photo: Pond5[/caption]

RELATED: 30-Minute Meals for Quick, Healthy Dinner Ideas

7. Cook in bulk, and pencil in prep time.
A little prep can go a long way. “On Sunday or Saturday, I lay out my recipe strategy,” says Hersh. She’ll dedicate a few hours to making a batch of grains and protein, and she’ll also cook recipes that create three or four servings. During the week, she’ll eat the extra portions and use the protein in large salads, where she can dump extra produce that’s close to going bad in her fridge.

8. Look for visual cues before tossing produce.
Got some spinach but not sure if it’s past its prime? If you see darkened leaves and bits of slime, remove those and only use the fresher-looking leaves, says Clow. You’ll minimize waste, which wills save you some money. Plus, you’ll be able to make more vegetable-packed entrees by adding spinach or kale to eggs, quesadillas or in foil fish packets.

9. Freeze ripe fruit.
Don’t give up on that almost-too-ripe bag of peaches on your counter. If you see fruit getting a little too soft, cut it up and pop the slices in your freezer, says Hersh. They’ll add great texture — and nutrients — to your next protein smoothie. Keep in mind, frozen fruit should last over eight months in the freezer, but you’ll want to toss it if it’s becomes covered with ice and has a frostbitten look.

The post Cooking for One? 9 Tricks to Kill It in the Kitchen appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
Cooking for One? 9 Ways to Kill It In the Kitchen

[caption id="attachment_41672" align="alignnone" width="620"]Cooking for One? 9 Ways to Kill It In the Kitchen Photo: Pond5[/caption] Real talk: Cooking for yourself can be tough. Especially when ordering takeout seems more appealing than tackling the slew of challenges associated with maintaining a kitchen for one. Make too much food and you’ll be forced to throw out icky tupperwares of leftovers. Buy too few groceries and you’ll be scrounging for snacks or prepackaged meal. Not to mention, a lack of dinner company might mean you’ll be chowing down in front of the TV, or scrolling through your Twitter feed instead of actually savoring your meal. RELATED: How to Eat Healthy for Less Than $4 a Day But dining alone doesn’t have to mean slurping lo mein straight from the box — there are real benefits to rolling solo. You’ll be able to cook what you want, when you want, says Marci Clow, R.D., Senior Nutritionist at Rainbow Light Nutritional Systems. (Hello, pancakes for dinner!) And opting to whip up something at home instead of ordering in is good for your budget and your health goals. Luckily, you don’t need to be a top chef or a leftover lover to enjoy healthy and delicious meals seven days a week. These nine hacks will help you manage your kitchen and make the most of your single-serve eats.

9 Tips for When You’re Cooking for One

1. Browse bulk bins at the store. Those transparent cases of nuts, seeds and rice aren’t just for granola-loving hippies. Clow recommends hitting up the bulk bins for staple products, which will be cheaper than packaged varieties. You can find rice, grains, dried fruits, flours and premade trail mixes. By using the food scale, you’ll be able to buy the exact amount of quinoa you’ll need for fiesta stuffed poblano peppers. No excess grains, no sweat! RELATED: 6 DIY Kitchen Hacks to Get Healthier, Stat 2. Set up a food swap. Not into leftovers? Find a group of friends or coworkers and have everyone exchange their surplus meals after making a large recipe, says Clow. Everyone cooks once and gets to enjoy something new for lunch or dinner instead of chowing down on the same mushroom risotto for a whole week. 3. Outsource willpower to your freezer. Healthy recipe creator and FitFoodieFinds blogger Lee Hersh makes a lot of food in her home, but she resists the temptation to inhale an entire tin of muffins by freezing any extra baked goods. “If they’re not on the counter, you won’t think about them,” she says. She also keeps healthy snacks like energy balls in the freezer so she doesn’t crave a bite every time she walks through her kitchen. RELATED: 13 Healthy Freezer Meals to Prep Now and Eat Later 4. Order in — the healthy way. Fueled with dread every time you have to decide what to throw in your grocery cart each week? Take decision-making out of the equation with subscription delivery services that ship ingredients for healthy dinners right to your doorstep. Choose from these seven tasty options if you desire extra convenience. 5. Portion meats before marinating. It can be tough to purchase meat in single-serving sizes. Hersh recommends putting a chicken breast or two (or your desired serving size) into Ziploc bags with your marinade of choice, write a label on the bag, then pop it in the freezer. “That way, you’re only defrosting what you need,” when you’re ready to start cooking, she says. You’ll have a flavorful single-serve dish ready when you need it.  RELATED: 12 Brilliant Meal Prep Ideas to Free Up Your Time 6. Keep your kitchen stocked with these staples. Being prepared for anything is the first step in your recipe for healthier eating. Enter: Foolproof meals you can whip up easily when you come home exhausted after a hard day’s work. Clow suggests stocking up on “quick fix” items that can be easily assembled, like eggs, baked potato (ready in minutes if cooked in the microwave), canned tuna and chili. See the graphic below for more ideas.

Cooking for One: Grocery List

[caption id="attachment_41671" align="alignnone" width="620"]Cooking for One? 9 Ways to Kill It In the Kitchen Photo: Pond5[/caption] RELATED: 30-Minute Meals for Quick, Healthy Dinner Ideas 7. Cook in bulk, and pencil in prep time. A little prep can go a long way. “On Sunday or Saturday, I lay out my recipe strategy,” says Hersh. She’ll dedicate a few hours to making a batch of grains and protein, and she’ll also cook recipes that create three or four servings. During the week, she’ll eat the extra portions and use the protein in large salads, where she can dump extra produce that’s close to going bad in her fridge. 8. Look for visual cues before tossing produce. Got some spinach but not sure if it’s past its prime? If you see darkened leaves and bits of slime, remove those and only use the fresher-looking leaves, says Clow. You’ll minimize waste, which wills save you some money. Plus, you’ll be able to make more vegetable-packed entrees by adding spinach or kale to eggs, quesadillas or in foil fish packets. 9. Freeze ripe fruit. Don’t give up on that almost-too-ripe bag of peaches on your counter. If you see fruit getting a little too soft, cut it up and pop the slices in your freezer, says Hersh. They’ll add great texture — and nutrients — to your next protein smoothie. Keep in mind, frozen fruit should last over eight months in the freezer, but you’ll want to toss it if it’s becomes covered with ice and has a frostbitten look.

The post Cooking for One? 9 Tricks to Kill It in the Kitchen appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
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What the Heck Are Macros? The IIFYM Diet Made Simple http://dailyburn.com/life/health/if-it-fits-your-macros-iifym-diet/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/if-it-fits-your-macros-iifym-diet/#comments Wed, 15 Jul 2015 15:15:01 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=35649 IIFYM If It Fits Your Macros Diet

[caption id="attachment_35651" align="alignnone" width="620"]IIFYM If It Fits Your Macros Diet Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Can you get lean eating cheeseburgers? The IIFYM (If It Fits Your Macros) diet says order up. Well, sort of...

While many diets are meticulous about which foods you can and can’t eat, how much you can have, and even when you consume it, for some people, the excessive restrictions can be a recipe for failure.

Instead, the IIFYM diet aims to get away from that — focusing on the three most important energy sources needed for our bodies to function properly. We're talking about protein, carbohydrates and fat (aka macronutrients, or macros). How it works: Calculate your daily caloric needs, then split those calories into 40 percent carbohydrates, 40 percent protein and 20 percent fat, the ratio that IIFYM proponents say is the most effective for muscle growth, fat burning and consistent energy levels.

Keep in mind, there has been some debate on whether or not this diet is in fact more or less effective than “eating clean,” and if a calorie is a calorie regardless of the macro composition of the diet you’re following. However, some studies support it and numerous individuals have reported success with this diet. If you think IIFYM could work for you, here’s what you need to know.

RELATED: When Is It OK to Cheat? The Pros and Cons of Cheat Days

If It Fits Your Macros: The Overall Equation

The first step in the IIFYM plan is to figure out how much energy (i.e. calories)  your body uses in a given day. The amount of calories you burn just by virtue of breathing and performing other vital functions is known as the basal metabolic rate, or BMR. Below, use the calculators to find out a rough estimate of your caloric needs, based on the Mifflin-St. Jeor equation. Later you'll adjust this number based on your activity level.

[CP_CALCULATED_FIELDS id="6"]

[CP_CALCULATED_FIELDS id ="7"]

Next, you have to take into account how active you are. Leslie Bonci, MPH, RD, CSSD, LDN, Director of Sports Nutrition at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, points out that adding calories based on activity level is a guesstimate and not a precise science. That said, there are general ranges she recommends using for men and women:

  • Lightly Active = BMR x 1.3-1.4
  • Moderately Active = BMR x 1.5-1.6
  • Very Active = BMR x 1.7-1.8

Add in calories for your activity levels, and then divide those calories into 40 percent carbohydrates, 40 percent protein and 20 percent fat. Remember that you want every meal to fit this 40/40/20 set-up. If it fits into your macro ratio, you can feel free to eat it.

Everything from roasted chicken to pizza can be “diet-friendly” if it hits your macros. Sound too good to be true? We asked Bonci to further explain IIFYM and why it can work.

RELATED: 5 Apps to Track Macros on the Go

Personalizing the IIFYM Diet

“As a starting point, it is always a good idea to log what you’re eating, then analyze it according to a program and see what would need to change for you to eat in a 40/40/20 way,” says Bonci. This way you can tell if drastic differences will need to take place, or if you’re already close to the ratio, which is a good jumping off point.

Find yourself far from the 40/40/20 ideal? Consider a 150-pound, 5’9” male who exercises five times a week as an example.

“He might need 2,550 calories to maintain weight [based on BMR and activity level calculations above] for the amount of exercise he does,” says Bonci. Here’s how he’d break that down in order to eat according to IIFYM.

RELATED: 12 Brilliant Meal Prep Ideas to Free Up Your Time

[caption id="attachment_20053" align="alignnone" width="620"]Sweet Potato Fries Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Carbohydrate Intake

To figure out his carbohydrate needs, he’d apply the following calculation:

  • 2,550 (total calories) x .40 (percentage of calories from carbohydrates) = 1,020

A gram of carbohydrates is about four calories, so divide the calories by four and you get 255 grams of carbs. That’s how many he’d need every day.

In theory, IIFYM doesn’t care if you get those carbohydrates from sweet potatoes or ice cream. As long as it’s within your ratio, you’re good to go. In practice, you’ll likely work out harder and better with a belly full of spinach, though, rather than you will if you’re loaded up with buffalo mac and cheese.

Also, keep in mind that endurance athletes will need to adjust their carbohydrate levels accordingly. “For someone exercising five days a week I would probably recommend a daily carb intake of three grams per pound or closer to 450 grams of carbohydrates a day,” she says.

“The more activity one does, the higher the carbohydrate requirements will be. But there is something to be said for being selective,” says Bonci. “Going for whole grains and higher fiber carbs will help you get the most nutritional value.”

RELATED: The Ultimate Guide to Pre and Post-Workout Carbohydrates

[caption id="attachment_22626" align="alignnone" width="620"]Chimichurri Steak Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Protein Intake

Protein will have the same calculation as carbs:

  • 2,550 (total calories) x .40 (percentage of calories from protein) = 1,020

Again, every gram of protein is approximately four calories, so divide the protein calories by four and you get 255 grams. This can be consumed as lean turkey or chicken breast, but if you’re going to put down some double cheeseburgers, be sure to factor in the amount of fat from the red meat and the carbohydrates from the bun as well.

Bonci has some personal reservations on IIFYM’s protein recommendations. “I should note that the maximum recommended amount of daily protein intake according to the Dietary Reference Intake data from the USDA is 0.9 to one gram per pound bodyweight,” says Bonci. “This comes out to be 135 to 150 grams of protein a day for this 150-pound man, so we have the potential for a protein overload if he’s aiming for the suggested 225 grams suggested above.”

RELATED: This Is What 25 Grams of Protein Looks Like 

[caption id="attachment_26654" align="alignnone" width="620"]Avocado Salad Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Fat Intake

The calculation goes through a slight adjustment for fat:

  • 2,550 (total calories) x .20 (percentage of calories from fat) = 510 calories

Since each gram of fat equals about nine calories, that amounts to about 46 grams of fat every day, which, according to Bonci, might be low for some athletes. “Fat guidelines actually range from 10 to 35 percent of daily calories and 20 percent fat may not be appropriate or adequate for all,” she says. “If one does primarily endurance exercise, the body uses fat as an energy source, so needs are higher.”

While you are allowed to on IIFYM, eating sticks of butter wrapped in bacon for your fat intake isn’t recommended. “Focus on good fats: nuts, nut butters, seeds, seed butters, olive oil, avocados.”

The beauty of IIFYM is the flexibility — you can adjust the ratios to fit your caloric needs and you can choose from any food to fill those needs. As an athlete, you’ll likely stick with complex carbs, lean protein and healthy fats, but IIFYM won’t put you on a guilt trip for the occasional pizza dinner or fried chicken lunch.

Originally posted December 2014. Updated July 2015. 

The post What the Heck Are Macros? The IIFYM Diet Made Simple appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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IIFYM If It Fits Your Macros Diet

[caption id="attachment_35651" align="alignnone" width="620"]IIFYM If It Fits Your Macros Diet Photo: Pond5[/caption] Can you get lean eating cheeseburgers? The IIFYM (If It Fits Your Macros) diet says order up. Well, sort of... While many diets are meticulous about which foods you can and can’t eat, how much you can have, and even when you consume it, for some people, the excessive restrictions can be a recipe for failure. Instead, the IIFYM diet aims to get away from that — focusing on the three most important energy sources needed for our bodies to function properly. We're talking about protein, carbohydrates and fat (aka macronutrients, or macros). How it works: Calculate your daily caloric needs, then split those calories into 40 percent carbohydrates, 40 percent protein and 20 percent fat, the ratio that IIFYM proponents say is the most effective for muscle growth, fat burning and consistent energy levels. Keep in mind, there has been some debate on whether or not this diet is in fact more or less effective than “eating clean,” and if a calorie is a calorie regardless of the macro composition of the diet you’re following. However, some studies support it and numerous individuals have reported success with this diet. If you think IIFYM could work for you, here’s what you need to know. RELATED: When Is It OK to Cheat? The Pros and Cons of Cheat Days

If It Fits Your Macros: The Overall Equation

The first step in the IIFYM plan is to figure out how much energy (i.e. calories)  your body uses in a given day. The amount of calories you burn just by virtue of breathing and performing other vital functions is known as the basal metabolic rate, or BMR. Below, use the calculators to find out a rough estimate of your caloric needs, based on the Mifflin-St. Jeor equation. Later you'll adjust this number based on your activity level. [CP_CALCULATED_FIELDS id="6"] [CP_CALCULATED_FIELDS id ="7"] Next, you have to take into account how active you are. Leslie Bonci, MPH, RD, CSSD, LDN, Director of Sports Nutrition at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, points out that adding calories based on activity level is a guesstimate and not a precise science. That said, there are general ranges she recommends using for men and women:
  • Lightly Active = BMR x 1.3-1.4
  • Moderately Active = BMR x 1.5-1.6
  • Very Active = BMR x 1.7-1.8
Add in calories for your activity levels, and then divide those calories into 40 percent carbohydrates, 40 percent protein and 20 percent fat. Remember that you want every meal to fit this 40/40/20 set-up. If it fits into your macro ratio, you can feel free to eat it. Everything from roasted chicken to pizza can be “diet-friendly” if it hits your macros. Sound too good to be true? We asked Bonci to further explain IIFYM and why it can work. RELATED: 5 Apps to Track Macros on the Go

Personalizing the IIFYM Diet

“As a starting point, it is always a good idea to log what you’re eating, then analyze it according to a program and see what would need to change for you to eat in a 40/40/20 way,” says Bonci. This way you can tell if drastic differences will need to take place, or if you’re already close to the ratio, which is a good jumping off point. Find yourself far from the 40/40/20 ideal? Consider a 150-pound, 5’9” male who exercises five times a week as an example. “He might need 2,550 calories to maintain weight [based on BMR and activity level calculations above] for the amount of exercise he does,” says Bonci. Here’s how he’d break that down in order to eat according to IIFYM. RELATED: 12 Brilliant Meal Prep Ideas to Free Up Your Time [caption id="attachment_20053" align="alignnone" width="620"]Sweet Potato Fries Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Carbohydrate Intake

To figure out his carbohydrate needs, he’d apply the following calculation:
  • 2,550 (total calories) x .40 (percentage of calories from carbohydrates) = 1,020
A gram of carbohydrates is about four calories, so divide the calories by four and you get 255 grams of carbs. That’s how many he’d need every day. In theory, IIFYM doesn’t care if you get those carbohydrates from sweet potatoes or ice cream. As long as it’s within your ratio, you’re good to go. In practice, you’ll likely work out harder and better with a belly full of spinach, though, rather than you will if you’re loaded up with buffalo mac and cheese. Also, keep in mind that endurance athletes will need to adjust their carbohydrate levels accordingly. “For someone exercising five days a week I would probably recommend a daily carb intake of three grams per pound or closer to 450 grams of carbohydrates a day,” she says. “The more activity one does, the higher the carbohydrate requirements will be. But there is something to be said for being selective,” says Bonci. “Going for whole grains and higher fiber carbs will help you get the most nutritional value.” RELATED: The Ultimate Guide to Pre and Post-Workout Carbohydrates [caption id="attachment_22626" align="alignnone" width="620"]Chimichurri Steak Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Protein Intake

Protein will have the same calculation as carbs:
  • 2,550 (total calories) x .40 (percentage of calories from protein) = 1,020
Again, every gram of protein is approximately four calories, so divide the protein calories by four and you get 255 grams. This can be consumed as lean turkey or chicken breast, but if you’re going to put down some double cheeseburgers, be sure to factor in the amount of fat from the red meat and the carbohydrates from the bun as well. Bonci has some personal reservations on IIFYM’s protein recommendations. “I should note that the maximum recommended amount of daily protein intake according to the Dietary Reference Intake data from the USDA is 0.9 to one gram per pound bodyweight,” says Bonci. “This comes out to be 135 to 150 grams of protein a day for this 150-pound man, so we have the potential for a protein overload if he’s aiming for the suggested 225 grams suggested above.” RELATED: This Is What 25 Grams of Protein Looks Like  [caption id="attachment_26654" align="alignnone" width="620"]Avocado Salad Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Fat Intake

The calculation goes through a slight adjustment for fat:
  • 2,550 (total calories) x .20 (percentage of calories from fat) = 510 calories
Since each gram of fat equals about nine calories, that amounts to about 46 grams of fat every day, which, according to Bonci, might be low for some athletes. “Fat guidelines actually range from 10 to 35 percent of daily calories and 20 percent fat may not be appropriate or adequate for all,” she says. “If one does primarily endurance exercise, the body uses fat as an energy source, so needs are higher.” While you are allowed to on IIFYM, eating sticks of butter wrapped in bacon for your fat intake isn’t recommended. “Focus on good fats: nuts, nut butters, seeds, seed butters, olive oil, avocados.” The beauty of IIFYM is the flexibility — you can adjust the ratios to fit your caloric needs and you can choose from any food to fill those needs. As an athlete, you’ll likely stick with complex carbs, lean protein and healthy fats, but IIFYM won’t put you on a guilt trip for the occasional pizza dinner or fried chicken lunch. Originally posted December 2014. Updated July 2015. 

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Frozen Yogurt vs. Ice Cream: Which Is Healthier? http://dailyburn.com/life/health/frozen-yogurt-vs-ice-cream-healthier/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/frozen-yogurt-vs-ice-cream-healthier/#comments Tue, 14 Jul 2015 11:15:11 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=41447 Frozen Yogurt vs. Ice Cream: Which Is Healthier?

[caption id="attachment_41445" align="alignnone" width="620"]Is Ice Cream Healthy? Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Few things hit the spot like a creamy cone on a hot summer day. But should you go for a double scoop of mint chip — or the more virtuous-sounding fro-yo? Market research shows that frozen yogurt sales have risen an average of 21 percent each year since 2008, while the number of yogurt shops has doubled within the last seven years. And if you think frozen yogurt is healthier, you’re not alone. According to a survey conducted by Menchies, a frozen yogurt chain, roughly 95 percent of Americans believe the softer stuff is better for them than ice cream. 

RELATED: 15 Healthier Homemade Ice Cream Recipes

Dig into the nutrition facts, though, and the swirl of smooth and creamy self-serve dessert isn’t always the superior option. Here’s the scoop on why you may want to reconsider your next 16-flavor “16 Handles” bender.

The Cold Truth: Frozen Yogurt Vs. Ice Cream

“People don’t realize that frozen yogurt often has more sugar than ice cream.”

Fro-yo might remind you of your favorite probiotic-rich morning Chobani — but not all “yogurts” are created equal. The freezing process used to make your dessert may kill some of the healthy gut bacteria found in regular yogurt. To compensate, some manufacturers of fro-yo (and standard yogurt, too) add extra probiotics after production.

“Look for the ‘Live and Active Cultures’ seal” when browsing the dessert aisle, says Alissa Rumsey, R.D., a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. This seal, created by the National Yogurt Association, confirms that a product has 100 million cultures per gram, which, among other health benefits, can help lactose intolerant people digest milk-based products. Chains like Pinkberry and RedMango and prepackaged pints from Haagen-Dazs and Cold Stone Creamery all carry the seal.

RELATED: 15 Healthy Recipes for No-Bake Desserts

But probiotics alone don’t make fro-yo a health food. “People don’t realize that it often has more sugar than ice cream,” says Dana Kofsky, a California-based nutritionist. Per each half-cup serving, frozen yogurt contains roughly 17 grams of sugar. Meanwhile, ice cream only has about 14 grams of the sweet stuff for the same serving size. “In order to get rid of the tart taste, [fro-yo companies often] add sugar,” says Kofky.

However, ice cream boasts more fat (there are roughly seven grams per serving in the frozen dessert compared to four grams in fro-yo, according to the USDA). This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, though. Fat can slow the body’s digestion of sugar, meaning you’ll feel more satisfied and won’t experience a blood sugar spike like you might with a swirl of sweetened yogurt, says Rumsey. She notes that many fro-yo brands also add sugar substitutes that could cause digestive issues like bloating or cramping.

RELATED: Are Artificial Sweeteners Wrecking Your Diet?

Portion control can also be common problem with frozen yogurt, says Rumsey. “People trick themselves into thinking they can eat more,” she says. “The smallest cup still tends to be pretty big. You’ll get something that’s 300 to 400 calories-worth.” (In comparison, a half-cup serving of vanilla ice cream is roughly 140 calories.) And if you’re making it rain toppings on your Pinkberry cup, you’ll likely add on another few hundred calories. Rumsey recommends sticking to one or two spoonfuls of nuts or fruit if you want a little crunch.

[caption id="attachment_41446" align="alignnone" width="620"]Frozen Yogurt Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Frozen Dessert Dos and Don’ts

Whether you love ice cream or fro-yo, there’s no wrong choice as long as you keep your serving sizes in check. According to Kofsky and Rumsey, your portion should be a half a cup, which will be roughly the size of a baseball or your closed fist.

“Eat it slowly. Savor it,” says Kofsky. Your best bet is to choose a dessert that will actually satisfy your taste buds, so you won’t be tempted to double down on the scoops or swirls, or scrounge for more food later on. Both experts recommend seeking out reputable products that have real ingredients, and not a laundry list of preservatives or thickening agents.

For a DIY dessert fix, Kofsky suggests making your own ice cream by blending up frozen bananas, cocoa powder, milk and almond butter. You won’t even need an ice cream machine to whip up this healthy mint chocolate chip protein ice cream recipe.

The next time you need to get your fix, simply swirl (or scoop) responsibly!

The post Frozen Yogurt vs. Ice Cream: Which Is Healthier? appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
Frozen Yogurt vs. Ice Cream: Which Is Healthier?

[caption id="attachment_41445" align="alignnone" width="620"]Is Ice Cream Healthy? Photo: Pond5[/caption] Few things hit the spot like a creamy cone on a hot summer day. But should you go for a double scoop of mint chip — or the more virtuous-sounding fro-yo? Market research shows that frozen yogurt sales have risen an average of 21 percent each year since 2008, while the number of yogurt shops has doubled within the last seven years. And if you think frozen yogurt is healthier, you’re not alone. According to a survey conducted by Menchies, a frozen yogurt chain, roughly 95 percent of Americans believe the softer stuff is better for them than ice cream.  RELATED: 15 Healthier Homemade Ice Cream Recipes Dig into the nutrition facts, though, and the swirl of smooth and creamy self-serve dessert isn’t always the superior option. Here’s the scoop on why you may want to reconsider your next 16-flavor “16 Handles” bender.

The Cold Truth: Frozen Yogurt Vs. Ice Cream

“People don’t realize that frozen yogurt often has more sugar than ice cream.”
Fro-yo might remind you of your favorite probiotic-rich morning Chobani — but not all “yogurts” are created equal. The freezing process used to make your dessert may kill some of the healthy gut bacteria found in regular yogurt. To compensate, some manufacturers of fro-yo (and standard yogurt, too) add extra probiotics after production. “Look for the ‘Live and Active Cultures’ seal” when browsing the dessert aisle, says Alissa Rumsey, R.D., a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. This seal, created by the National Yogurt Association, confirms that a product has 100 million cultures per gram, which, among other health benefits, can help lactose intolerant people digest milk-based products. Chains like Pinkberry and RedMango and prepackaged pints from Haagen-Dazs and Cold Stone Creamery all carry the seal. RELATED: 15 Healthy Recipes for No-Bake Desserts But probiotics alone don’t make fro-yo a health food. “People don’t realize that it often has more sugar than ice cream,” says Dana Kofsky, a California-based nutritionist. Per each half-cup serving, frozen yogurt contains roughly 17 grams of sugar. Meanwhile, ice cream only has about 14 grams of the sweet stuff for the same serving size. “In order to get rid of the tart taste, [fro-yo companies often] add sugar,” says Kofky. However, ice cream boasts more fat (there are roughly seven grams per serving in the frozen dessert compared to four grams in fro-yo, according to the USDA). This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, though. Fat can slow the body’s digestion of sugar, meaning you’ll feel more satisfied and won’t experience a blood sugar spike like you might with a swirl of sweetened yogurt, says Rumsey. She notes that many fro-yo brands also add sugar substitutes that could cause digestive issues like bloating or cramping. RELATED: Are Artificial Sweeteners Wrecking Your Diet? Portion control can also be common problem with frozen yogurt, says Rumsey. “People trick themselves into thinking they can eat more,” she says. “The smallest cup still tends to be pretty big. You’ll get something that’s 300 to 400 calories-worth.” (In comparison, a half-cup serving of vanilla ice cream is roughly 140 calories.) And if you’re making it rain toppings on your Pinkberry cup, you’ll likely add on another few hundred calories. Rumsey recommends sticking to one or two spoonfuls of nuts or fruit if you want a little crunch. [caption id="attachment_41446" align="alignnone" width="620"]Frozen Yogurt Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Frozen Dessert Dos and Don’ts

Whether you love ice cream or fro-yo, there’s no wrong choice as long as you keep your serving sizes in check. According to Kofsky and Rumsey, your portion should be a half a cup, which will be roughly the size of a baseball or your closed fist. “Eat it slowly. Savor it,” says Kofsky. Your best bet is to choose a dessert that will actually satisfy your taste buds, so you won’t be tempted to double down on the scoops or swirls, or scrounge for more food later on. Both experts recommend seeking out reputable products that have real ingredients, and not a laundry list of preservatives or thickening agents. For a DIY dessert fix, Kofsky suggests making your own ice cream by blending up frozen bananas, cocoa powder, milk and almond butter. You won’t even need an ice cream machine to whip up this healthy mint chocolate chip protein ice cream recipe. The next time you need to get your fix, simply swirl (or scoop) responsibly!

The post Frozen Yogurt vs. Ice Cream: Which Is Healthier? appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
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