Life by DailyBurn » Weight Loss http://dailyburn.com/life A better you, for life. Tue, 01 Sep 2015 15:15:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.4 5 Tips for Setting a Totally Doable Weight Loss Goal http://dailyburn.com/life/health/healthy-weight-loss-goals/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/healthy-weight-loss-goals/#comments Tue, 25 Aug 2015 11:15:08 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=42787 5 Tips for Setting a Totally Doable Weight Loss Goal

[caption id="attachment_42790" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Tips for Setting Weight Loss Goals Photo: Pond5[/caption]

We’re not going to lie: Losing weight isn’t easy, and it isn’t always fun (so long, office cupcakes). But that doesn’t mean you should just toss your scale and give up before you’ve even begun. “The most important thing is to set goals that are achievable,” says Heather Mangieri, RD, CSSD, spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

That means instead of gunning for a big, scary “goal weight” that seems so far in the future you can barely imagine it, set tinier targets instead. “Thinking about your final goal can be so overwhelming you go on shut-down,” Mangieri says. “It’s all about setting small goals, and figuring out what you want to do to get there.”

RELATED: How This Man Lost 100 Pounds, One Small Change at a Time

So stop picturing what you’re going to look like a year from now (you’ll get there eventually!) — and start imagining how much better you’ll feel when you forego that side of fries for veggies instead. Here’s how to do it.

5 Ways to Set Smarter Weight Loss Goals

[caption id="attachment_42791" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Tips for Setting Weight Loss Goals Photo: Pond5[/caption]

1. Think short-term.
It may seem counterintuitive, but don’t get bogged down by the fact that you have 10, 20, 50 or even 100 pounds to lose. “When I’m working with a client, it’s about figuring out where you want to be next week, not in two years,” Mangieri says.

If you’ve got a long road ahead, create a mini goal of losing five to 10 percent of your body weight first, says Lisa Cimperman, RD, LD, and clinical dietician at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland. “Setting short-term milestones and building on them helps keep you focused on your progress, not how far you still have to go,” she adds.

RELATED: My Wedding Photos Were My Weight Loss Wake Up Call

It’s also helpful to think about not just what you want to lose, but what you want to gain — whether that’s more energy, better self-confidence or a longer life, Cimperman says. “Often, these goals are far more motivating than the number on the scale.”

2. Figure out your diet strategy.
Time to come up with a game plan for your eats. “Usually, for weight loss, there is some kind of dietary change that needs to happen,” Mangieri says. In other words, hopping on the treadmill won’t compensate for a diet full of processed foods.

RELATED: How to Detox the Healthy Way: 16 Recipes You’ll Love

The good news: You don’t need to give up carbs for good, commit to a vegan lifestyle, or swear off alcohol for months to lose weight. “I think the biggest mistake [people make] is thinking that they have to make a drastic change in their eating,” Mangieri says. “You might see a difference on the scale [by doing that], but it will be short-lived if you don’t make lifestyle changes and adopt them as part of your new life.”

“The journey is more important than the actual reaching of the goal."

Instead, Mangieri likes people to make small tweaks to address the weak spots in their diet (like drinking soda, or eating too much sugar). “Some clients… I’m giving very short goals like stop drinking juice or sugar-sweetened beverages, or replace them with water,” Mangieri says. “Other clients, if they’ve have already made a lot of changes, we might look at portion sizes. It really depends on where they are what their current eating habits.”

RELATED: What RDs Really Eat: DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan

3. Work on your fitness.
While exercise alone won’t get you to your goal weight, setting fitness goals along the way might help keep you motivated, Cimperman says. “Maybe you want to train for a 5K, or run a 10 minute mile, or improve your strength,” she says. “These things are measurable and typically involve a deadline for completion.”

Plus, they’ll help you feel more committed to leading a healthy lifestyle. “The journey is more important than the actual reaching of the goal, because it’s is the piece that teaches you the behaviors and new habits you need to maintain the goal,” Mangieri says. “We do know through research and studies that activity is a critical part of maintaining weight loss.”

4. Don’t expect to lose 10 pounds a week.
While TV shows may depict people shedding crazy amounts of weight in a week, that’s not actually reality for most folks. “We’re looking at one to two pounds a week, depending on how much weight somebody has to lose,” Mangieri says, and it could be even less than that. (Half a pound still counts!)

RELATED: The 10 Biggest Diet Mistakes, According to Experts

If you’re losing at a more drastic rate, it might feel good for a while, but you could eventually end up plateauing — or gaining it all back, Mangieri says. “[That] can set in feelings of failure and depression,” she says. “Once that mood change happens you start to see other behaviors kick in that are not helping them reach their goal.” 

5. Track your successes.
Don’t forget to take time to revel in all the hard work you’re doing — and how it’s paying off. “Use a notebook and pen or any of the many apps to track your food intake and activity,” Cimperman says. “Studies show that people who do this are more likely to stick with their plan,”

Plus, plotting your weight loss over several months, can help remind you how well you’re doing — even on an off week. “It helps people see even though I might not have lost a pound this week, or even gained a pound, overall my pattern of weight loss is looking pretty good.”

Feeling motivated? Check out these six weight loss success stories to give you that final push you need to get started.

The post 5 Tips for Setting a Totally Doable Weight Loss Goal appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
5 Tips for Setting a Totally Doable Weight Loss Goal

[caption id="attachment_42790" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Tips for Setting Weight Loss Goals Photo: Pond5[/caption] We’re not going to lie: Losing weight isn’t easy, and it isn’t always fun (so long, office cupcakes). But that doesn’t mean you should just toss your scale and give up before you’ve even begun. “The most important thing is to set goals that are achievable,” says Heather Mangieri, RD, CSSD, spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That means instead of gunning for a big, scary “goal weight” that seems so far in the future you can barely imagine it, set tinier targets instead. “Thinking about your final goal can be so overwhelming you go on shut-down,” Mangieri says. “It’s all about setting small goals, and figuring out what you want to do to get there.” RELATED: How This Man Lost 100 Pounds, One Small Change at a Time So stop picturing what you’re going to look like a year from now (you’ll get there eventually!) — and start imagining how much better you’ll feel when you forego that side of fries for veggies instead. Here’s how to do it.

5 Ways to Set Smarter Weight Loss Goals

[caption id="attachment_42791" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Tips for Setting Weight Loss Goals Photo: Pond5[/caption] 1. Think short-term. It may seem counterintuitive, but don’t get bogged down by the fact that you have 10, 20, 50 or even 100 pounds to lose. “When I’m working with a client, it’s about figuring out where you want to be next week, not in two years,” Mangieri says. If you’ve got a long road ahead, create a mini goal of losing five to 10 percent of your body weight first, says Lisa Cimperman, RD, LD, and clinical dietician at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland. “Setting short-term milestones and building on them helps keep you focused on your progress, not how far you still have to go,” she adds. RELATED: My Wedding Photos Were My Weight Loss Wake Up Call It’s also helpful to think about not just what you want to lose, but what you want to gain — whether that’s more energy, better self-confidence or a longer life, Cimperman says. “Often, these goals are far more motivating than the number on the scale.” 2. Figure out your diet strategy. Time to come up with a game plan for your eats. “Usually, for weight loss, there is some kind of dietary change that needs to happen,” Mangieri says. In other words, hopping on the treadmill won’t compensate for a diet full of processed foods. RELATED: How to Detox the Healthy Way: 16 Recipes You’ll Love The good news: You don’t need to give up carbs for good, commit to a vegan lifestyle, or swear off alcohol for months to lose weight. “I think the biggest mistake [people make] is thinking that they have to make a drastic change in their eating,” Mangieri says. “You might see a difference on the scale [by doing that], but it will be short-lived if you don’t make lifestyle changes and adopt them as part of your new life.”
“The journey is more important than the actual reaching of the goal."
Instead, Mangieri likes people to make small tweaks to address the weak spots in their diet (like drinking soda, or eating too much sugar). “Some clients… I’m giving very short goals like stop drinking juice or sugar-sweetened beverages, or replace them with water,” Mangieri says. “Other clients, if they’ve have already made a lot of changes, we might look at portion sizes. It really depends on where they are what their current eating habits.” RELATED: What RDs Really Eat: DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan 3. Work on your fitness. While exercise alone won’t get you to your goal weight, setting fitness goals along the way might help keep you motivated, Cimperman says. “Maybe you want to train for a 5K, or run a 10 minute mile, or improve your strength,” she says. “These things are measurable and typically involve a deadline for completion.” Plus, they’ll help you feel more committed to leading a healthy lifestyle. “The journey is more important than the actual reaching of the goal, because it’s is the piece that teaches you the behaviors and new habits you need to maintain the goal,” Mangieri says. “We do know through research and studies that activity is a critical part of maintaining weight loss.” 4. Don’t expect to lose 10 pounds a week. While TV shows may depict people shedding crazy amounts of weight in a week, that’s not actually reality for most folks. “We’re looking at one to two pounds a week, depending on how much weight somebody has to lose,” Mangieri says, and it could be even less than that. (Half a pound still counts!) RELATED: The 10 Biggest Diet Mistakes, According to Experts If you’re losing at a more drastic rate, it might feel good for a while, but you could eventually end up plateauing — or gaining it all back, Mangieri says. “[That] can set in feelings of failure and depression,” she says. “Once that mood change happens you start to see other behaviors kick in that are not helping them reach their goal.”  5. Track your successes. Don’t forget to take time to revel in all the hard work you’re doing — and how it’s paying off. “Use a notebook and pen or any of the many apps to track your food intake and activity,” Cimperman says. “Studies show that people who do this are more likely to stick with their plan,” Plus, plotting your weight loss over several months, can help remind you how well you’re doing — even on an off week. “It helps people see even though I might not have lost a pound this week, or even gained a pound, overall my pattern of weight loss is looking pretty good.” Feeling motivated? Check out these six weight loss success stories to give you that final push you need to get started.

The post 5 Tips for Setting a Totally Doable Weight Loss Goal appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
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Are You Addicted to Sugar? Here’s How to Break the Cycle http://dailyburn.com/life/health/sugar-addiction-detox/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/sugar-addiction-detox/#comments Mon, 24 Aug 2015 15:15:48 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=42775 Are You Addicted to Sugar? Here’s How to Break the Cycle

[caption id="attachment_42780" align="alignnone" width="620"]Are You Addicted to Sugar? Here’s How to Break the Cycle Photo: Pond5[/caption]

It’s 3 p.m., and the sugar cravings are relentless. I’ve tried satisfying them with a handful of fresh blueberries and some chocolate-covered espresso beans that I found in the back of my desk drawer. But I’m still struggling not to sabotage my withdrawal progress with a chocolate shake from In-N-Out Burger. I fantasize about the sugar hitting my bloodstream and soothing my nerves. Instead, I stand in my pantry brainstorming possible alternatives: A pinch of coconut. A spoonful of raspberry jam. A swig of maple syrup.

I’m in really bad shape.

We all know about the negative effects of sugar. (The list keeps growing: Weight gain, increased blood pressure and cholesterol levels — plus a higher risk for diabetes, cancer and heart disease.) So like many others, I’ve forced myself to get used to drinking my iced coffee black and watch out for added sugar in my pasta sauce and yogurt. But in a quest to lose 10 pounds, I’ve pledged to go cold turkey.

RELATED: Your 5-Day Detox Plan

"It’s not uncommon to find yourself feeling like a mess a day or so into a sugar detox."

Although some experts recommend scaling down your sugar fix over time, registered dietician Carole Bartolotto believes that cutting it out altogether is the best way to get through a detox. “It’s worse for some people than others,” she says. “I personally can’t do moderation. If I take one bite, it sets me up to want more. But it really helps to remember that the cravings eventually do go away.”

Despite my best efforts, a week later, during my first Sunday “cheat” day, I find myself at a party, tempted by mango-basil and strawberry-mint mojitos. And then there’s the red velvet gluten-free cupcake with cream cheese frosting that the hostess bought just for me. I give in. But the sugar urges don’t end when the party does. The next morning I have to fight off a craving for cronuts.

RELATED: The 30-Second Trick That Might Stop Your Food Cravings

Sugar, An Addiction, Really?

My overwhelming sugar cravings make sense when you consider that research shows you can actually get hooked on the sweet stuff. Scientists have found that sugar is addictive and stimulates the same pleasure centers of the brain as cocaine or heroin. Just like those hard-core drugs, getting off sugar leads to withdrawal and cravings, requiring an actual detox process to wean off. (Read How to Do A Sugar Detox Without Going Crazy here.)

It’s not uncommon to find yourself feeling like a mess a day or so into a sugar detox. Princeton researchers who fed rats sugar water discovered that they ended up bingeing on it. When the rats were deprived, their feel-good brain chemical dopamine dropped, and they suffered from anxiety and the shakes. Except for headaches, I’ve had all the classic withdrawal symptoms: the blah mood, anxiety, fatigue — and daydreams of bathing in a pool of Cinnabon frosting.

Hooked on the Taste

If you had any doubts about the ability of sugar to wreak havoc on your tastebuds, consider this study as evidence. Bartolotto asked 20 people from Kaiser Permanente’s California facilities to cut out all added sugars and artificial sweeteners for two weeks. As a result, their tolerance for that sweet taste completely changed. A whopping 95 percent of subjects reported that the foods and drinks they used to consume now tasted “too sweet.” Over half reported that the intense cravings stopped after two to three days, and 87 percent no longer felt withdrawal effects after six days.

RELATED: Is Sugar Worse Than Salt When It Comes to Your Heart?

Another advantage of detoxing: You’ll reset your palate, Bartolotto says. Not only will you require less sugar to feel satisfied (the recommended amount is six teaspoons per day for women and nine teaspoons for men), you’ll appreciate the flavors of food more, she says.

Here’s how to manage your cravings and get to the other side of your detox.

4 Ways to Fight Your Sugar Addiction

[caption id="attachment_42783" align="alignnone" width="620"]Are You Addicted to Sugar? Here’s How to Break the Cycle Photo: Pond5[/caption]

1. Sub whole fruit for sweets.
Fruit contains fructose, which is metabolized differently than gummi bears — and it’s still a satisfying treat. But be careful to restrict your intake to a few servings a day. Eating too much has been linked to increased belly fat, which increases your chance of type 2 diabetes. Also, go easy on grapes or cherries, which have high sugar content, says Bartoletto. Some patients can’t stop popping them, she says.

2. Ditch artificial sweeteners.
Although diet soda or sugar-free gum has been known to help many dieters get through a rough patch, Bartoletto advises cutting out aspartame, sucralose, saccharine — even stevia — since large amounts can make you desire sweet food. “It actually changes your palate, so you need more and more to feel satisfied,” she says. Perhaps that’s why this Purdue study found a link between increased consumption of the fake stuff and weight gain.

RELATED: Are Artificial Sweeteners Wrecking Your Diet?

3. Clean house.
That means getting rid of any sugary temptations at home and work (including that old Halloween candy). “We can't control all the environments we're in, but we want to control the ones we can,” explains Adam Gilbert, a weight loss coach who founded the program My Body Tutor. “We don't get bonus points for using hero-like willpower.”

RELATED: 6 DIY Kitchen Projects to Clean Up Your Eating Habits

4. Create a backup plan.
If sugar cravings feel uncontrollable, think proactively about what kind of distraction will help you overcome them. “Eat a piece of fruit. Go for a walk. Listen to some music. Call or text a friend. Read a fun article,” offers Gilbert. “Knowing what we're going to do ahead of time is what makes all the difference.”

5. Manage your magnesium levels.
Craving chocolate in particular? Research shows this reaction may be particularly common among people deficient in the mineral magnesium (ask your doctor to check your levels). Head off cravings by eating plenty of magnesium-rich dark leafy greens, tofu, legumes and nuts. (Check out this list.)

RELATED: Is a Magnesium Deficiency Secretly Harming Your Health?

You know what ultimately helped me? Actually eating the chocolate I was craving. Yep, I resorted to one of the oldest dieting tricks out there: Indulging in a square of super dark chocolate. By the third day, the cravings had stopped, and I enjoyed the food on my program — including a decadent fresh peach — rather than wishing for a processed sugar bomb. I also had more energy and didn’t struggle as much through my yoga class. As for my next cheat day… I resolved that it would be sugar-free.

The post Are You Addicted to Sugar? Here’s How to Break the Cycle appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
Are You Addicted to Sugar? Here’s How to Break the Cycle

[caption id="attachment_42780" align="alignnone" width="620"]Are You Addicted to Sugar? Here’s How to Break the Cycle Photo: Pond5[/caption] It’s 3 p.m., and the sugar cravings are relentless. I’ve tried satisfying them with a handful of fresh blueberries and some chocolate-covered espresso beans that I found in the back of my desk drawer. But I’m still struggling not to sabotage my withdrawal progress with a chocolate shake from In-N-Out Burger. I fantasize about the sugar hitting my bloodstream and soothing my nerves. Instead, I stand in my pantry brainstorming possible alternatives: A pinch of coconut. A spoonful of raspberry jam. A swig of maple syrup. I’m in really bad shape. We all know about the negative effects of sugar. (The list keeps growing: Weight gain, increased blood pressure and cholesterol levels — plus a higher risk for diabetes, cancer and heart disease.) So like many others, I’ve forced myself to get used to drinking my iced coffee black and watch out for added sugar in my pasta sauce and yogurt. But in a quest to lose 10 pounds, I’ve pledged to go cold turkey. RELATED: Your 5-Day Detox Plan
"It’s not uncommon to find yourself feeling like a mess a day or so into a sugar detox."
Although some experts recommend scaling down your sugar fix over time, registered dietician Carole Bartolotto believes that cutting it out altogether is the best way to get through a detox. “It’s worse for some people than others,” she says. “I personally can’t do moderation. If I take one bite, it sets me up to want more. But it really helps to remember that the cravings eventually do go away.” Despite my best efforts, a week later, during my first Sunday “cheat” day, I find myself at a party, tempted by mango-basil and strawberry-mint mojitos. And then there’s the red velvet gluten-free cupcake with cream cheese frosting that the hostess bought just for me. I give in. But the sugar urges don’t end when the party does. The next morning I have to fight off a craving for cronuts. RELATED: The 30-Second Trick That Might Stop Your Food Cravings

Sugar, An Addiction, Really?

My overwhelming sugar cravings make sense when you consider that research shows you can actually get hooked on the sweet stuff. Scientists have found that sugar is addictive and stimulates the same pleasure centers of the brain as cocaine or heroin. Just like those hard-core drugs, getting off sugar leads to withdrawal and cravings, requiring an actual detox process to wean off. (Read How to Do A Sugar Detox Without Going Crazy here.) It’s not uncommon to find yourself feeling like a mess a day or so into a sugar detox. Princeton researchers who fed rats sugar water discovered that they ended up bingeing on it. When the rats were deprived, their feel-good brain chemical dopamine dropped, and they suffered from anxiety and the shakes. Except for headaches, I’ve had all the classic withdrawal symptoms: the blah mood, anxiety, fatigue — and daydreams of bathing in a pool of Cinnabon frosting.

Hooked on the Taste

If you had any doubts about the ability of sugar to wreak havoc on your tastebuds, consider this study as evidence. Bartolotto asked 20 people from Kaiser Permanente’s California facilities to cut out all added sugars and artificial sweeteners for two weeks. As a result, their tolerance for that sweet taste completely changed. A whopping 95 percent of subjects reported that the foods and drinks they used to consume now tasted “too sweet.” Over half reported that the intense cravings stopped after two to three days, and 87 percent no longer felt withdrawal effects after six days. RELATED: Is Sugar Worse Than Salt When It Comes to Your Heart? Another advantage of detoxing: You’ll reset your palate, Bartolotto says. Not only will you require less sugar to feel satisfied (the recommended amount is six teaspoons per day for women and nine teaspoons for men), you’ll appreciate the flavors of food more, she says. Here’s how to manage your cravings and get to the other side of your detox.

4 Ways to Fight Your Sugar Addiction

[caption id="attachment_42783" align="alignnone" width="620"]Are You Addicted to Sugar? Here’s How to Break the Cycle Photo: Pond5[/caption] 1. Sub whole fruit for sweets. Fruit contains fructose, which is metabolized differently than gummi bears — and it’s still a satisfying treat. But be careful to restrict your intake to a few servings a day. Eating too much has been linked to increased belly fat, which increases your chance of type 2 diabetes. Also, go easy on grapes or cherries, which have high sugar content, says Bartoletto. Some patients can’t stop popping them, she says. 2. Ditch artificial sweeteners. Although diet soda or sugar-free gum has been known to help many dieters get through a rough patch, Bartoletto advises cutting out aspartame, sucralose, saccharine — even stevia — since large amounts can make you desire sweet food. “It actually changes your palate, so you need more and more to feel satisfied,” she says. Perhaps that’s why this Purdue study found a link between increased consumption of the fake stuff and weight gain. RELATED: Are Artificial Sweeteners Wrecking Your Diet? 3. Clean house. That means getting rid of any sugary temptations at home and work (including that old Halloween candy). “We can't control all the environments we're in, but we want to control the ones we can,” explains Adam Gilbert, a weight loss coach who founded the program My Body Tutor. “We don't get bonus points for using hero-like willpower.” RELATED: 6 DIY Kitchen Projects to Clean Up Your Eating Habits 4. Create a backup plan. If sugar cravings feel uncontrollable, think proactively about what kind of distraction will help you overcome them. “Eat a piece of fruit. Go for a walk. Listen to some music. Call or text a friend. Read a fun article,” offers Gilbert. “Knowing what we're going to do ahead of time is what makes all the difference.” 5. Manage your magnesium levels. Craving chocolate in particular? Research shows this reaction may be particularly common among people deficient in the mineral magnesium (ask your doctor to check your levels). Head off cravings by eating plenty of magnesium-rich dark leafy greens, tofu, legumes and nuts. (Check out this list.) RELATED: Is a Magnesium Deficiency Secretly Harming Your Health? You know what ultimately helped me? Actually eating the chocolate I was craving. Yep, I resorted to one of the oldest dieting tricks out there: Indulging in a square of super dark chocolate. By the third day, the cravings had stopped, and I enjoyed the food on my program — including a decadent fresh peach — rather than wishing for a processed sugar bomb. I also had more energy and didn’t struggle as much through my yoga class. As for my next cheat day… I resolved that it would be sugar-free.

The post Are You Addicted to Sugar? Here’s How to Break the Cycle appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
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The 10 Best Healthy Meals at the Airport http://dailyburn.com/life/health/best-healthy-meals-airport/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/best-healthy-meals-airport/#comments Wed, 19 Aug 2015 11:15:14 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=42588 flying-health-featured

[caption id="attachment_42656" align="alignnone" width="620"]10 Healthy Airport Meals Photo: Pond5[/caption]

So you’re in the habit of making healthy meals at home, but then you hit the airport and suddenly everything’s up in the air. There’s a veritable siren call of bad choices every time you step foot in the terminal or buckle your seatbelt on the plane. But somewhere wedged between all the fried and fatty foods, healthier meal options do exist out there. (Emoji hands to the sky.)

RELATED: 9 Scary Salads With Over 1,000 Calories (and Healthier Swaps!)

To help you travel like a pro, we asked a couple of top nutritionists to share their picks for the best all-around meals you can get at the airport. None will break your calorie bank or pack too much fat, yet all will provide you with key nutrients to keep you satiated from lift off to landing.

10 Healthy Meals at the Airport

[caption id="attachment_42592" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthy Airport Meals: Dunkin' Donuts Veggie Egg White Flatbread Photo: Courtesy of Dunkin' Donuts[/caption]

1. Dunkin’ Donuts Egg White Veggie Flatbread
The Skinny: 280 cal, 9 g fat (4.5 g sat fat), 4 g fiber, 15 g protein, 690 mg sodium

Hit the line at Dunkin’ for this breakfast, which is portably nestled in a multigrain flatbread. Ashley Harris, MS, RD, a registered dietician The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, says it’s rich in protein to help you feel satisfied throughout the day. “While the 690 milligrams of sodium may seem high, it’s an appropriate amount for a meal — and one of the lower sodium breakfast-sandwich options you’ll find out there.”

[caption id="attachment_42605" align="alignnone" width="620"]10 Healthy Meals at the Airport: Nuts and Apple Photos: Pond5Pond5[/caption]

2. Lightly Salted Nuts and Apple
The Skinny: 280 cal, 15 g fat (1.5 g sat fat), 6 g fiber, 7 g protein, 125 mg sodium

Pop open a small bag or tin of sunflower seeds, almonds or cashews (ideally about a quarter-cup portion size), then pair it with an apple for a kiosk-curated “mini meal.” “The complex carbs provide energy, while the protein helps you balance blood sugars and feel full,” Harris says. “Nuts are a great source of healthy proteins. Stick to roughly a quarter-cup to keep calories low, adding a piece of fruit for the perfect amount of energy from carbohydrates,” she says.

RELATED: The 25 Best Foodie Instagram Accounts to Follow

[caption id="attachment_42594" align="alignnone" width="620"]10 Healthy Meals at the Airport: Starbucks Blueberry Whole-Grain Oatmeal Photo: Courtesy of Starbucks[/caption]

3. Starbucks Hearty Blueberry Whole-Grain Oatmeal
The Skinny: 290 cal, 2.5 g fat (1/2 g sat fat), 5 g fiber, 5 g protein, 125 mg sodium

Head over to Starbucks if you’ve got a 6 a.m. flight straight into a big meeting. This breakfast contains steel-cut oats and fresh fruit, both sources of complex carbs that provide a slow release of energy to keep you powered up all day long. “[This breakfast] also contains almonds, which are a great source of heart-healthy fat,” Harris says. While coffee isn’t required, we recommend it — because, travel.

[caption id="attachment_42649" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthy Meals at the Airport: Mcdonalds Southwestern Grilled Chicken Salad Photo: Courtesy of McDonald's[/caption]

4. McDonalds Southwest Salad with Grilled Chicken
The Skinny: 330 cal, 11 g fat (1/2 g sat fat), 7 g fiber, 32g  protein, 890 mg sodium

When it’s looking like McD’s is one of your only choices, turn your attention to the salad menu — but don’t be swayed by the fat-laden Bacon Ranch Salad with Crispy Chicken. Lauren Popeck, RD, a dietitian at Orlando Health, says her personal favorite is the Southwest-style option, made with a mix of nutrient-dense greens. Pro tip: Hold the dressing in lieu of a squeeze of lime to save at least 100 calories and six grams fat. 

RELATED: 8 Quick and Easy Egg Sandwiches

[caption id="attachment_42654" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthy Meals Airport Larabar Milk Photo: Courtesy of Larabar (left); Pond5 (right)[/caption]

5. Larabar and Nonfat Milk
The Skinny: 340 cal, 8 g fat (1/2 g sat fat), 4 g fiber, 19 g protein, 170 mg sodium

Rushed mornings call for quick bites. First, hit up a coffee shop for a small, 12-ounce cup of milk, then grab a bar you can trust. “Look for natural bars with no added sugar, such a Larabar or Go Raw bar,” Popeck says, which are both chockfull of good-for-you nutrients. (Or, if you're really on it, make these homemade three-ingredient Larabars in advance!) The extra 14 grams of protein from the milk helps boost your bar into a more substantial snack.

[caption id="attachment_42648" align="alignnone" width="621"]Healthy Meals Airport Au Bon Pain Photos: Courtesy of Au Bon Pain[/caption]

6. Au Bon Pain Southwest Tortilla Soup and Classic Chicken Salad Sandwich
The Skinny: 350 cal, 13 g fat (3 g sat fat), 2 g fiber, 15 g protein, 1240 mg sodium

Grab lunch at ABP by starting with a small serving of the Tortilla Soup, which Popeck likes to pair with one of the chain’s half-sandwiches. (Ask for it on whole-wheat multigrain bread for bonus points.) “The half-sandwich portion contributes 230 calories, 480 mg sodium, 12 grams protein and only one gram saturated fat.” 

RELATED: Peach Homemade Greek Yogurt Recipe

[caption id="attachment_42609" align="alignnone" width="621"]Healthy Meals Airport Mcdonalds Parfait Kind Bar Photos: Courtesy of McDonald's (left); KIND (right)[/caption]

7. McDonald’s Fruit & Yogurt Parfait and KIND Bar
The Skinny:
350 cal, 17 g fat (4.5 g sat fat), 8g fiber, 10 g protein, 205 mg sodium

Believe it or not, this McDonald’s parfait isn’t a secret calorie bomb, says Harris. “[Its] made of fresh fruit and calcium-rich yogurt. And at just 150 calories, a parfait is a perfect healthy option to keep you going.” Make it a meal by grabbing yourself a KIND bar from a newsstand like Hudson News, says Harris. Try flavors like Dark Chocolate Nuts and Sea Salt or Madagascar Vanilla Almond to keep sugar in check — each measures in at under five grams per bar.

[caption id="attachment_42601" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthy Airport Meals Sabra Hummus Pretzels Photo: Courtesy of Sabra[/caption]

8. Sabra Pretzel and Hummus Pack
The Skinny: 380 cal, 20 g fat (3 g sat fat), 8 g fiber, 9 g protein, 860 mg sodium

Is this the most well-rounded meal? Definitely not. But Sabra’s Pretzel and Hummus pack provides such a great balance of carbs and healthy, plant-based protein, it can replace a meal while you’re on the road, says Harris. “It’s higher in calories and sodium than most foods I would recommend as a snack, but that’s why it’s a great ‘mini meal’ choice if you have limited options,” she explains.

RELATED: Homemade Hummus With Olives

[caption id="attachment_42596" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthy Airport Meals Starbucks Protein Bistro Box Photo: Courtesy of Starbucks[/caption]

9. Starbucks Protein Bistro Box
The Skinny: 380 cal, 19 g fat (6 g sat fat), 5 g fiber, 13 g protein, 470 mg sodium

Look away from the pastry shelf and pick up this well-balanced to-go box with a hard-boiled egg, sliced apple, a bunch of grapes, and white Cheddar cheese, served with multigrain muesli bread and peanut butter. “You get fresh fruit, whole grains, healthy fats and protein to fill you up, while keeping saturated fat, calories and sodium in check,” says Popeck. And what’s not to love about the cute bento box presentation packed with sweet, salty and savory flavors?

[caption id="attachment_42599" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthiest Airport Meals: Chilis Margarita Grill Bowl Photo: Courtesy of Chili's[/caption]

10. Chilis “Lighter Choice” Margarita Grilled Chicken
The Skinny: 580 cal, 13 g fat (2.5 g sat fat), 7 g fiber, 51 g protein, 2430 mg sodium

This one comes with delicious black beans, rice and pico de gallo — but Popeck recommends making some adjustments. You’ll get 190 calories and 31 grams protein without the sides, so start with the chicken and pico. Use the beans and rice sparingly and you’ll cut back on calories and sodium — always a challenge when you eat out. “If you choose this dish” says Popeck, “remember to balance the high sodium with plenty of fresh fruits, veggies and other naturally high-water foods as soon as you land.” (And grab a water bottle for your flight; the low humidity in the cabin is generally dehydrating.)

The post The 10 Best Healthy Meals at the Airport appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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flying-health-featured

[caption id="attachment_42656" align="alignnone" width="620"]10 Healthy Airport Meals Photo: Pond5[/caption] So you’re in the habit of making healthy meals at home, but then you hit the airport and suddenly everything’s up in the air. There’s a veritable siren call of bad choices every time you step foot in the terminal or buckle your seatbelt on the plane. But somewhere wedged between all the fried and fatty foods, healthier meal options do exist out there. (Emoji hands to the sky.) RELATED: 9 Scary Salads With Over 1,000 Calories (and Healthier Swaps!) To help you travel like a pro, we asked a couple of top nutritionists to share their picks for the best all-around meals you can get at the airport. None will break your calorie bank or pack too much fat, yet all will provide you with key nutrients to keep you satiated from lift off to landing.

10 Healthy Meals at the Airport

[caption id="attachment_42592" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthy Airport Meals: Dunkin' Donuts Veggie Egg White Flatbread Photo: Courtesy of Dunkin' Donuts[/caption] 1. Dunkin’ Donuts Egg White Veggie Flatbread The Skinny: 280 cal, 9 g fat (4.5 g sat fat), 4 g fiber, 15 g protein, 690 mg sodium Hit the line at Dunkin’ for this breakfast, which is portably nestled in a multigrain flatbread. Ashley Harris, MS, RD, a registered dietician The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, says it’s rich in protein to help you feel satisfied throughout the day. “While the 690 milligrams of sodium may seem high, it’s an appropriate amount for a meal — and one of the lower sodium breakfast-sandwich options you’ll find out there.” [caption id="attachment_42605" align="alignnone" width="620"]10 Healthy Meals at the Airport: Nuts and Apple Photos: Pond5Pond5[/caption] 2. Lightly Salted Nuts and Apple The Skinny: 280 cal, 15 g fat (1.5 g sat fat), 6 g fiber, 7 g protein, 125 mg sodium Pop open a small bag or tin of sunflower seeds, almonds or cashews (ideally about a quarter-cup portion size), then pair it with an apple for a kiosk-curated “mini meal.” “The complex carbs provide energy, while the protein helps you balance blood sugars and feel full,” Harris says. “Nuts are a great source of healthy proteins. Stick to roughly a quarter-cup to keep calories low, adding a piece of fruit for the perfect amount of energy from carbohydrates,” she says. RELATED: The 25 Best Foodie Instagram Accounts to Follow [caption id="attachment_42594" align="alignnone" width="620"]10 Healthy Meals at the Airport: Starbucks Blueberry Whole-Grain Oatmeal Photo: Courtesy of Starbucks[/caption] 3. Starbucks Hearty Blueberry Whole-Grain Oatmeal The Skinny: 290 cal, 2.5 g fat (1/2 g sat fat), 5 g fiber, 5 g protein, 125 mg sodium Head over to Starbucks if you’ve got a 6 a.m. flight straight into a big meeting. This breakfast contains steel-cut oats and fresh fruit, both sources of complex carbs that provide a slow release of energy to keep you powered up all day long. “[This breakfast] also contains almonds, which are a great source of heart-healthy fat,” Harris says. While coffee isn’t required, we recommend it — because, travel. [caption id="attachment_42649" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthy Meals at the Airport: Mcdonalds Southwestern Grilled Chicken Salad Photo: Courtesy of McDonald's[/caption] 4. McDonalds Southwest Salad with Grilled Chicken The Skinny: 330 cal, 11 g fat (1/2 g sat fat), 7 g fiber, 32g  protein, 890 mg sodium When it’s looking like McD’s is one of your only choices, turn your attention to the salad menu — but don’t be swayed by the fat-laden Bacon Ranch Salad with Crispy Chicken. Lauren Popeck, RD, a dietitian at Orlando Health, says her personal favorite is the Southwest-style option, made with a mix of nutrient-dense greens. Pro tip: Hold the dressing in lieu of a squeeze of lime to save at least 100 calories and six grams fat.  RELATED: 8 Quick and Easy Egg Sandwiches [caption id="attachment_42654" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthy Meals Airport Larabar Milk Photo: Courtesy of Larabar (left); Pond5 (right)[/caption] 5. Larabar and Nonfat Milk The Skinny: 340 cal, 8 g fat (1/2 g sat fat), 4 g fiber, 19 g protein, 170 mg sodium Rushed mornings call for quick bites. First, hit up a coffee shop for a small, 12-ounce cup of milk, then grab a bar you can trust. “Look for natural bars with no added sugar, such a Larabar or Go Raw bar,” Popeck says, which are both chockfull of good-for-you nutrients. (Or, if you're really on it, make these homemade three-ingredient Larabars in advance!) The extra 14 grams of protein from the milk helps boost your bar into a more substantial snack. [caption id="attachment_42648" align="alignnone" width="621"]Healthy Meals Airport Au Bon Pain Photos: Courtesy of Au Bon Pain[/caption] 6. Au Bon Pain Southwest Tortilla Soup and Classic Chicken Salad Sandwich The Skinny: 350 cal, 13 g fat (3 g sat fat), 2 g fiber, 15 g protein, 1240 mg sodium Grab lunch at ABP by starting with a small serving of the Tortilla Soup, which Popeck likes to pair with one of the chain’s half-sandwiches. (Ask for it on whole-wheat multigrain bread for bonus points.) “The half-sandwich portion contributes 230 calories, 480 mg sodium, 12 grams protein and only one gram saturated fat.”  RELATED: Peach Homemade Greek Yogurt Recipe [caption id="attachment_42609" align="alignnone" width="621"]Healthy Meals Airport Mcdonalds Parfait Kind Bar Photos: Courtesy of McDonald's (left); KIND (right)[/caption] 7. McDonald’s Fruit & Yogurt Parfait and KIND Bar The Skinny: 350 cal, 17 g fat (4.5 g sat fat), 8g fiber, 10 g protein, 205 mg sodium Believe it or not, this McDonald’s parfait isn’t a secret calorie bomb, says Harris. “[Its] made of fresh fruit and calcium-rich yogurt. And at just 150 calories, a parfait is a perfect healthy option to keep you going.” Make it a meal by grabbing yourself a KIND bar from a newsstand like Hudson News, says Harris. Try flavors like Dark Chocolate Nuts and Sea Salt or Madagascar Vanilla Almond to keep sugar in check — each measures in at under five grams per bar. [caption id="attachment_42601" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthy Airport Meals Sabra Hummus Pretzels Photo: Courtesy of Sabra[/caption] 8. Sabra Pretzel and Hummus Pack The Skinny: 380 cal, 20 g fat (3 g sat fat), 8 g fiber, 9 g protein, 860 mg sodium Is this the most well-rounded meal? Definitely not. But Sabra’s Pretzel and Hummus pack provides such a great balance of carbs and healthy, plant-based protein, it can replace a meal while you’re on the road, says Harris. “It’s higher in calories and sodium than most foods I would recommend as a snack, but that’s why it’s a great ‘mini meal’ choice if you have limited options,” she explains. RELATED: Homemade Hummus With Olives [caption id="attachment_42596" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthy Airport Meals Starbucks Protein Bistro Box Photo: Courtesy of Starbucks[/caption] 9. Starbucks Protein Bistro Box The Skinny: 380 cal, 19 g fat (6 g sat fat), 5 g fiber, 13 g protein, 470 mg sodium Look away from the pastry shelf and pick up this well-balanced to-go box with a hard-boiled egg, sliced apple, a bunch of grapes, and white Cheddar cheese, served with multigrain muesli bread and peanut butter. “You get fresh fruit, whole grains, healthy fats and protein to fill you up, while keeping saturated fat, calories and sodium in check,” says Popeck. And what’s not to love about the cute bento box presentation packed with sweet, salty and savory flavors? [caption id="attachment_42599" align="alignnone" width="620"]Healthiest Airport Meals: Chilis Margarita Grill Bowl Photo: Courtesy of Chili's[/caption] 10. Chilis “Lighter Choice” Margarita Grilled Chicken The Skinny: 580 cal, 13 g fat (2.5 g sat fat), 7 g fiber, 51 g protein, 2430 mg sodium This one comes with delicious black beans, rice and pico de gallo — but Popeck recommends making some adjustments. You’ll get 190 calories and 31 grams protein without the sides, so start with the chicken and pico. Use the beans and rice sparingly and you’ll cut back on calories and sodium — always a challenge when you eat out. “If you choose this dish” says Popeck, “remember to balance the high sodium with plenty of fresh fruits, veggies and other naturally high-water foods as soon as you land.” (And grab a water bottle for your flight; the low humidity in the cabin is generally dehydrating.)

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What RDs Really Eat: DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan http://dailyburn.com/life/health/meal-plan-nutritionist-nora-minno/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/meal-plan-nutritionist-nora-minno/#comments Fri, 14 Aug 2015 11:15:51 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=42329 What RDs Really Eat: DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan

What a Dietitian Eats in a Day

This story was developed in collaboration with DailyBurn Fitness/Nutrition Coach Nora Minno. To find more workouts and healthy recipes head to DailyBurn.com.

Wish you could take a peek at the real eating habits of the people around you? We looked into what DailyBurn Fitness/Nutrition Coach Nora Minno eats in a day — and let’s just say she definitely practices what she preaches.

It turns out the secret to eating super healthy isn’t crazy hard, either. For Minno, a registered dietitian, it’s all about consciously making an effort to squeeze tons of nutrients into her daily meal plan. “I want to make sure I’m getting a variety of fruits and vegetables, and most importantly, vitamins and minerals that I know will help my body function properly not only in the short term, but in the long term,” she says.

RELATED: The 10 Biggest Diet Mistakes, According to Experts

Just as important: Making sure her choices are budget friendly — not an easy feat in New York City, where $1 pizza joints abound. “If you want to spend all your money on health foods, you can, but you shouldn’t have to in order to eat well.” Buying food in bulk and prepping it early in the week helps keep her spending on track.

And guess what: Even dietitians need to pay attention to portion control. “What I did for myself and often recommend to clients is in the beginning being really strict with measuring, getting out measuring cups, knowing what a quarter cup looks like, what an ounce looks like,” Minno says. “And after just a couple weeks of doing it, you can start to eyeball it and know what your body needs.”

For some serious food inspiration, here’s what Minno eats in a typical day. Feel free to unleash your inner copycat.

What a Dietitian Eats in a Day

[caption id="attachment_42338" align="alignnone" width="620"]DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan: Matcha Berry Smoothie Photo by Nora Minno[/caption]

Breakfast: Matcha Berry Smoothie

Make it: Blend 1/2 cup frozen organic blueberries, 1/2 cup frozen organic strawberries, 1/2 banana, 8 oz. unsweetened coconut milk, 1 tablespoon ground flax seeds, 1 teaspoon matcha powder, 1 serving Fuel-6 protein powder.

Quick tip: “I was always against smoothies as a meal because I believed they wouldn’t fill me up,” Minno says. But by packing her blender full of superfoods like matcha and berries, she found a shake that’s both tasty and filling. “I chose coconut milk as a base because you can buy it unsweetened and it’s very low-calorie.

RELATED: 9 Healthy Breakfast Recipes Ready in 15 Minutes or Less

[caption id="attachment_42344" align="alignnone" width="620"]DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan: Yogurt Snack Photo by Nora Minno[/caption]

Snack: Greek Yogurt and Apple 

Quick tip: We hate to break it to you, but yogurt can be a secret sugar bomb. “I tend to choose Greek yogurt because it is higher in protein and lower in sugar,” Minno says. “Look for yogurts with less than 10 grams of sugar,” she advises.

[caption id="attachment_42346" align="alignnone" width="620"]DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan: Kale and Brussels Sprouts Salad Photo by Nora Minno[/caption]

Lunch: Kale and Brussels Sprout Salad

Make it: Combine 1 1/2 cups shredded kale and Brussels sprouts, 1/4 cup garbanzo beans, 1/4 cup quinoa, 1/4 cup multi-colored chopped peppers, 1/4 cup shaved red cabbage.

Quick tip: Portion control doesn’t have to be boring. Mix it up by blending your food groups together in a brightly colored salad. “It doesn’t have to look like a perfect plate cut into portions,” Minno says. “For me this is a balanced meal.” Plus, kale and Brussels don’t wilt as easily as some of the more watery lettuces, so you can prep a bunch and eat them for the entire week, she says.

RELATED: 7 Healthy Lunch Ideas Your Friends Will Want to Steal

[caption id="attachment_42347" align="alignnone" width="620"]DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan: Tomato Mozzarella Snack Photo by Nora Minno[/caption]

Snack: Tomato and Mozzarella

Quick tip: This simple snack is low in sugar and high in protein and vitamins — not to mention that it’s super refreshing. “The tomatoes and cheese come from a local farm in New Jersey and the basil was grown right in my back yard!” Minno says. 

[caption id="attachment_42349" align="alignnone" width="620"]DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan: Salmon Dinner Photo by Nora Minno[/caption]

Dinner: Sesame-Crusted Salmon with Health Slaw

Ingredients
For the salmon:
2 6 oz. filets of wild salmon
4 tablespoons black sesame seeds
1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 teaspoon olive oil

For the health slaw:
1/4 cup shredded white cabbage
1/4 cup shredded red cabbage
1/4 cup shredded broccoli
1/4 cup shredded carrots
1/4 cup chopped Shitake mushrooms
1 tablespoons slivered almonds
3 tablespoons Sesame Ginger Dressing (brand of your choice)
1 tablespoon lemon juice

Preparation
Preheat oven to 450°F. Line rimmed baking sheet with foil. Place filets skin side down on baking sheet. For marinade whisk together soy sauce, lemon juice, and olive oil in a small mixing bowl. Drizzle marinade over fish and let sit for at least 30 min (can be done up to 2 hours ahead of time). When fish is finished marinating, using fingers, cover top of filets in black sesame seeds. Bake in oven for 15 to 20 min or until opaque in center. While the salmon bakes, combine all health slaw ingredients (white cabbage, red cabbage, broccoli, carrots, mushrooms, almonds) in large mixing bowl. Toss with dressing and lemon juice.

Quick tip: Though she doesn’t eat any meat, Minno gets protein from fresh fish and plant-based sources. After all, she needs it to fuel her through her favorite high-intensity interval training workouts. “I used black sesame seeds for fun flavor and texture, but they also have fiber and healthy fats,” she says.

RELATED: 30-Minute Meals for Quick, Healthy Dinner Ideas

[caption id="attachment_42365" align="alignnone" width="620"]What RDs Really Eat: DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan Photo by Nora Minno[/caption]

Dessert: Cherries

Quick tip: This sweet fruit is the ideal dessert for after-dinner snackers, Minno says. “Cherries you have to work for and think about,” she says. “You have to take off the stems, work around the pits and you know how much you’ve eaten because you can see the pits in the bowl.”

The post What RDs Really Eat: DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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What RDs Really Eat: DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan

What a Dietitian Eats in a Day This story was developed in collaboration with DailyBurn Fitness/Nutrition Coach Nora Minno. To find more workouts and healthy recipes head to DailyBurn.com. Wish you could take a peek at the real eating habits of the people around you? We looked into what DailyBurn Fitness/Nutrition Coach Nora Minno eats in a day — and let’s just say she definitely practices what she preaches. It turns out the secret to eating super healthy isn’t crazy hard, either. For Minno, a registered dietitian, it’s all about consciously making an effort to squeeze tons of nutrients into her daily meal plan. “I want to make sure I’m getting a variety of fruits and vegetables, and most importantly, vitamins and minerals that I know will help my body function properly not only in the short term, but in the long term,” she says. RELATED: The 10 Biggest Diet Mistakes, According to Experts Just as important: Making sure her choices are budget friendly — not an easy feat in New York City, where $1 pizza joints abound. “If you want to spend all your money on health foods, you can, but you shouldn’t have to in order to eat well.” Buying food in bulk and prepping it early in the week helps keep her spending on track. And guess what: Even dietitians need to pay attention to portion control. “What I did for myself and often recommend to clients is in the beginning being really strict with measuring, getting out measuring cups, knowing what a quarter cup looks like, what an ounce looks like,” Minno says. “And after just a couple weeks of doing it, you can start to eyeball it and know what your body needs.” For some serious food inspiration, here’s what Minno eats in a typical day. Feel free to unleash your inner copycat.

What a Dietitian Eats in a Day

[caption id="attachment_42338" align="alignnone" width="620"]DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan: Matcha Berry Smoothie Photo by Nora Minno[/caption]

Breakfast: Matcha Berry Smoothie

Make it: Blend 1/2 cup frozen organic blueberries, 1/2 cup frozen organic strawberries, 1/2 banana, 8 oz. unsweetened coconut milk, 1 tablespoon ground flax seeds, 1 teaspoon matcha powder, 1 serving Fuel-6 protein powder. Quick tip: “I was always against smoothies as a meal because I believed they wouldn’t fill me up,” Minno says. But by packing her blender full of superfoods like matcha and berries, she found a shake that’s both tasty and filling. “I chose coconut milk as a base because you can buy it unsweetened and it’s very low-calorie. RELATED: 9 Healthy Breakfast Recipes Ready in 15 Minutes or Less [caption id="attachment_42344" align="alignnone" width="620"]DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan: Yogurt Snack Photo by Nora Minno[/caption]

Snack: Greek Yogurt and Apple 

Quick tip: We hate to break it to you, but yogurt can be a secret sugar bomb. “I tend to choose Greek yogurt because it is higher in protein and lower in sugar,” Minno says. “Look for yogurts with less than 10 grams of sugar,” she advises. [caption id="attachment_42346" align="alignnone" width="620"]DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan: Kale and Brussels Sprouts Salad Photo by Nora Minno[/caption]

Lunch: Kale and Brussels Sprout Salad

Make it: Combine 1 1/2 cups shredded kale and Brussels sprouts, 1/4 cup garbanzo beans, 1/4 cup quinoa, 1/4 cup multi-colored chopped peppers, 1/4 cup shaved red cabbage. Quick tip: Portion control doesn’t have to be boring. Mix it up by blending your food groups together in a brightly colored salad. “It doesn’t have to look like a perfect plate cut into portions,” Minno says. “For me this is a balanced meal.” Plus, kale and Brussels don’t wilt as easily as some of the more watery lettuces, so you can prep a bunch and eat them for the entire week, she says. RELATED: 7 Healthy Lunch Ideas Your Friends Will Want to Steal [caption id="attachment_42347" align="alignnone" width="620"]DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan: Tomato Mozzarella Snack Photo by Nora Minno[/caption]

Snack: Tomato and Mozzarella

Quick tip: This simple snack is low in sugar and high in protein and vitamins — not to mention that it’s super refreshing. “The tomatoes and cheese come from a local farm in New Jersey and the basil was grown right in my back yard!” Minno says.  [caption id="attachment_42349" align="alignnone" width="620"]DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan: Salmon Dinner Photo by Nora Minno[/caption]

Dinner: Sesame-Crusted Salmon with Health Slaw

Ingredients For the salmon: 2 6 oz. filets of wild salmon 4 tablespoons black sesame seeds 1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 teaspoon olive oil For the health slaw: 1/4 cup shredded white cabbage 1/4 cup shredded red cabbage 1/4 cup shredded broccoli 1/4 cup shredded carrots 1/4 cup chopped Shitake mushrooms 1 tablespoons slivered almonds 3 tablespoons Sesame Ginger Dressing (brand of your choice) 1 tablespoon lemon juice Preparation Preheat oven to 450°F. Line rimmed baking sheet with foil. Place filets skin side down on baking sheet. For marinade whisk together soy sauce, lemon juice, and olive oil in a small mixing bowl. Drizzle marinade over fish and let sit for at least 30 min (can be done up to 2 hours ahead of time). When fish is finished marinating, using fingers, cover top of filets in black sesame seeds. Bake in oven for 15 to 20 min or until opaque in center. While the salmon bakes, combine all health slaw ingredients (white cabbage, red cabbage, broccoli, carrots, mushrooms, almonds) in large mixing bowl. Toss with dressing and lemon juice. Quick tip: Though she doesn’t eat any meat, Minno gets protein from fresh fish and plant-based sources. After all, she needs it to fuel her through her favorite high-intensity interval training workouts. “I used black sesame seeds for fun flavor and texture, but they also have fiber and healthy fats,” she says. RELATED: 30-Minute Meals for Quick, Healthy Dinner Ideas [caption id="attachment_42365" align="alignnone" width="620"]What RDs Really Eat: DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan Photo by Nora Minno[/caption]

Dessert: Cherries

Quick tip: This sweet fruit is the ideal dessert for after-dinner snackers, Minno says. “Cherries you have to work for and think about,” she says. “You have to take off the stems, work around the pits and you know how much you’ve eaten because you can see the pits in the bowl.”

The post What RDs Really Eat: DailyBurn Coach Nora Minno’s Meal Plan appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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How This Mom of Five Got Stronger, Inside and Out http://dailyburn.com/life/health/weight-loss-success-stories-nancy/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/weight-loss-success-stories-nancy/#comments Wed, 12 Aug 2015 11:15:15 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=42301 DailyBurn Weight Loss Success Story

DailyBurn Weight Loss Success Stories: Nancy Berry Idoni

Get inspired by these DailyBurn success stories, which showcase real people who committed to fitness and saw results that were way beyond average.

It wasn’t until after she’d overcome an eating disorder, become a mother to five children, divorced, moved cross-country and remarried that Nancy Berry Idoni got to a happy place with her weight. But when she finally did, the feeling was great. “I just feel strong. I feel mentally strong, which is really good because the stuff I had to go through in the past, it was a lot of struggle,” Idoni, now 49 years old, says.

Growing up, Idoni remembers being the only one in her family who struggled with weight. She carried an extra 10 pounds on her frame throughout her childhood. “I remember going on trips and we’d stop and all get ice cream, and they would make me have a V8,” she says. “As I got older, and was on my own, I couldn’t wait to be away from family and just eat all the things I wasn’t allowed to eat when I was growing up.”

RELATED: My Wedding Photos Were My Weight Loss Wake Up Call

That mentality took a toll on her body. In her early 20s, the 5’5” Idoni remembers getting on the scale and feeling shocked when it read 170 pounds. Not knowing what else to do, she tried to skimp on calories — only to wind up overeating later. Eventually, this turned into a cycle of binging and purging. Though never officially diagnosed, Idoni developed what she now recognizes as bulimia and anorexia, even turning to laxatives at one point.

“I remember having to go to different stores so the employees didn’t see me buying all the boxes of Ex-Lax,” Idoni says. “…I was taking 30-something tablets a day and it wasn’t even doing anything at that point.” It wasn’t until Idoni’s then-husband caught on to her habit that she was able to wean herself off the pills and slowly start to recover.

Focusing on Family

It took becoming pregnant with her first child for Idoni to realize it was time to commit to staying healthy and leave her disordered habits behind. Though she didn’t seek medical attention, she wishes she had gotten help from professionals during her recovery. “I worked through it on my own because I didn’t know what else to do… But if [had gotten help], I probably would have been much better off,” Idoni says.

"One of her biggest challenges was learning to grocery shop to feed her family of seven."

RELATED: How Losing Weight Helped Me Regain My Confidence

During each of her pregnancies, Idoni gained about 50 pounds. Though she lost most of the weight each time, she says she was always about 20 pounds overweight. “I wasn’t really into exercising; I was too busy taking care of kids,” Idoni says. “By the time I had my fifth child, I didn’t look bad but I wasn’t where I wanted to be.” Not long after the birth of her youngest, her marriage failed, and she and her children moved from Tennessee to Idaho.

RELATED: 5 Fit Pregnancy Tips: Real Talk from Moms and Moms-to-Be

A self-proclaimed sweets-lover, Idoni says she’d snack on chocolates and candies throughout the day. She never felt she had a good grasp of proper portion sizes, and wasn’t a stranger to mindlessly munching chips and other unhealthy snacks. “I kept myself OK-looking, but I wasn’t eating what I needed to or exercising regularly,” Idoni says.

Getting Stronger with DailyBurn

A few years after the move to Idaho, Idoni met her current husband, and decided it was time to feel better about her body. She resolved to start working out, and in April 2014, she discovered DailyBurn’s free 30-day trial.

“I started with Cardio Sculpt and I liked it right away. I remember going to work and being like, ‘I’m so sore and I did all these squats!’” Idoni, a dental hygienist, says. Resolved to revamp her diet, too, Idoni started using NutriSystem in an effort to learn more about portion sizes. After a few months using the pre-packaged meals, she felt confident enough to manage her diet on her own.

RELATED: 6 Easy Tips for Clean Eating on a Small Budget

Along the way, one of her biggest challenges was learning to grocery shop to feed her family of seven without blowing her budget. “I’ve found that cooking things by scratch takes a lot of time, but you get a lot of nutrients and it’s pretty cheap, so I buy a lot of dried beans, because it can go a long way,” she says. “We also use a lot of potatoes and rice, and I try to get things on sale and buy in multiple when I can,” she says.

Learning to Love Weightlifting

“It’s always kind of my fear that if I put on weight, I’d be a failure.”

With her workouts leaving her feeling powerful every day, and her eating habits in a good place, Idoni started to lose weight — and was able to progress to harder workouts. The newest addition to her fitness routine: strength training with DailyBurn’s Live to Fail program. “I really, really loved Live to Fail — that was the first time I really ever used free weights.” As she lost more weight, she loved the muscle definition that lifting gave her. She also turned to DailyBurn’s Black Fire program with Bob Harper for tough workouts that left her feeling sweaty and strong.

RELATED: Finding Strength: How DailyBurn’s LTF Changed Me

Now 35 pounds down, Idoni is focused on building more muscle tone and conquering her second 10K race. She’s also excited to be a healthy role model for her five children — noting that it was difficult to overcome the disordered thoughts she’d long had about eating. “It’s always kind of my fear that if I put on weight, I’d be a failure but I have to get that out of my mind because it’s not about anyone else except for myself,” Idoni says.

Though it’s been a long, hard journey, Idoni says she feels better than ever. “My advice would be to take it day by day. I have to tell myself, ‘Think about whether you’re actually really hungry,’ or if it’s just an emotional thing,” Idoni says. “That’s how I deal with things, doing it day by day and trying to not be too hard on myself.”

To learn more about DailyBurn or to try a free 30-day trial yourself, head to DailyBurn.com.

Note to reader: The content in this article relates to the core service offered by DailyBurn. In the interest of editorial disclosure and integrity, the reader should know that this site is owned and operated by DailyBurn. DailyBurn users who worked out for 30 minutes or more at least five times a week for 60 to 90 days reported an average weight loss of about one pound per week.

The post How This Mom of Five Got Stronger, Inside and Out appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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DailyBurn Weight Loss Success Story

DailyBurn Weight Loss Success Stories: Nancy Berry Idoni Get inspired by these DailyBurn success stories, which showcase real people who committed to fitness and saw results that were way beyond average. It wasn’t until after she’d overcome an eating disorder, become a mother to five children, divorced, moved cross-country and remarried that Nancy Berry Idoni got to a happy place with her weight. But when she finally did, the feeling was great. “I just feel strong. I feel mentally strong, which is really good because the stuff I had to go through in the past, it was a lot of struggle,” Idoni, now 49 years old, says. Growing up, Idoni remembers being the only one in her family who struggled with weight. She carried an extra 10 pounds on her frame throughout her childhood. “I remember going on trips and we’d stop and all get ice cream, and they would make me have a V8,” she says. “As I got older, and was on my own, I couldn’t wait to be away from family and just eat all the things I wasn’t allowed to eat when I was growing up.” RELATED: My Wedding Photos Were My Weight Loss Wake Up Call That mentality took a toll on her body. In her early 20s, the 5’5” Idoni remembers getting on the scale and feeling shocked when it read 170 pounds. Not knowing what else to do, she tried to skimp on calories — only to wind up overeating later. Eventually, this turned into a cycle of binging and purging. Though never officially diagnosed, Idoni developed what she now recognizes as bulimia and anorexia, even turning to laxatives at one point. “I remember having to go to different stores so the employees didn’t see me buying all the boxes of Ex-Lax,” Idoni says. “…I was taking 30-something tablets a day and it wasn’t even doing anything at that point.” It wasn’t until Idoni’s then-husband caught on to her habit that she was able to wean herself off the pills and slowly start to recover.

Focusing on Family

It took becoming pregnant with her first child for Idoni to realize it was time to commit to staying healthy and leave her disordered habits behind. Though she didn’t seek medical attention, she wishes she had gotten help from professionals during her recovery. “I worked through it on my own because I didn’t know what else to do… But if [had gotten help], I probably would have been much better off,” Idoni says.
"One of her biggest challenges was learning to grocery shop to feed her family of seven."
RELATED: How Losing Weight Helped Me Regain My Confidence During each of her pregnancies, Idoni gained about 50 pounds. Though she lost most of the weight each time, she says she was always about 20 pounds overweight. “I wasn’t really into exercising; I was too busy taking care of kids,” Idoni says. “By the time I had my fifth child, I didn’t look bad but I wasn’t where I wanted to be.” Not long after the birth of her youngest, her marriage failed, and she and her children moved from Tennessee to Idaho. RELATED: 5 Fit Pregnancy Tips: Real Talk from Moms and Moms-to-Be A self-proclaimed sweets-lover, Idoni says she’d snack on chocolates and candies throughout the day. She never felt she had a good grasp of proper portion sizes, and wasn’t a stranger to mindlessly munching chips and other unhealthy snacks. “I kept myself OK-looking, but I wasn’t eating what I needed to or exercising regularly,” Idoni says.

Getting Stronger with DailyBurn

A few years after the move to Idaho, Idoni met her current husband, and decided it was time to feel better about her body. She resolved to start working out, and in April 2014, she discovered DailyBurn’s free 30-day trial. “I started with Cardio Sculpt and I liked it right away. I remember going to work and being like, ‘I’m so sore and I did all these squats!’” Idoni, a dental hygienist, says. Resolved to revamp her diet, too, Idoni started using NutriSystem in an effort to learn more about portion sizes. After a few months using the pre-packaged meals, she felt confident enough to manage her diet on her own. RELATED: 6 Easy Tips for Clean Eating on a Small Budget Along the way, one of her biggest challenges was learning to grocery shop to feed her family of seven without blowing her budget. “I’ve found that cooking things by scratch takes a lot of time, but you get a lot of nutrients and it’s pretty cheap, so I buy a lot of dried beans, because it can go a long way,” she says. “We also use a lot of potatoes and rice, and I try to get things on sale and buy in multiple when I can,” she says.

Learning to Love Weightlifting

“It’s always kind of my fear that if I put on weight, I’d be a failure.”
With her workouts leaving her feeling powerful every day, and her eating habits in a good place, Idoni started to lose weight — and was able to progress to harder workouts. The newest addition to her fitness routine: strength training with DailyBurn’s Live to Fail program. “I really, really loved Live to Fail — that was the first time I really ever used free weights.” As she lost more weight, she loved the muscle definition that lifting gave her. She also turned to DailyBurn’s Black Fire program with Bob Harper for tough workouts that left her feeling sweaty and strong. RELATED: Finding Strength: How DailyBurn’s LTF Changed Me Now 35 pounds down, Idoni is focused on building more muscle tone and conquering her second 10K race. She’s also excited to be a healthy role model for her five children — noting that it was difficult to overcome the disordered thoughts she’d long had about eating. “It’s always kind of my fear that if I put on weight, I’d be a failure but I have to get that out of my mind because it’s not about anyone else except for myself,” Idoni says. Though it’s been a long, hard journey, Idoni says she feels better than ever. “My advice would be to take it day by day. I have to tell myself, ‘Think about whether you’re actually really hungry,’ or if it’s just an emotional thing,” Idoni says. “That’s how I deal with things, doing it day by day and trying to not be too hard on myself.” To learn more about DailyBurn or to try a free 30-day trial yourself, head to DailyBurn.com. Note to reader: The content in this article relates to the core service offered by DailyBurn. In the interest of editorial disclosure and integrity, the reader should know that this site is owned and operated by DailyBurn. DailyBurn users who worked out for 30 minutes or more at least five times a week for 60 to 90 days reported an average weight loss of about one pound per week.

The post How This Mom of Five Got Stronger, Inside and Out appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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Must-Reads: Are Americans Finally Eating Healthier? http://dailyburn.com/life/health/news-obesity-in-america-073115/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/news-obesity-in-america-073115/#comments Fri, 31 Jul 2015 15:15:31 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=42075 Diet Cola Belly Fat

If you've been trading your usual pizza and cookies for healthier fare lately, you're not alone. For the first time in more than 40 years, Americans are eating healthier, according to new government data. Plus, find out how one woman shut down the haters who didn’t believe she lost 190 pounds. Read on for these and other headlines that caught our eye this week.

[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="620"]Americans Eating Less Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Are Americans Starting to Eat Less?

Good news, folks: Americans’ eating habits are beginning to show signs of improvement. Calorie consumption among adults is on the decline, and the average American child is now eating nine percent fewer calories than they were in 1975.

Most impressively, people are drinking 25 percent less full-calorie soda, compared to what they were downing in the late 1990s. Perhaps as a result, obesity rates have stopped rising. While one-third of Americans are still considered obese, researchers are hopeful that this is the turning point in the fight against obesity. (The New York Times)

RELATED: Can Diet Soda Lead to More Belly Fat?

[caption id="attachment_42090" align="alignnone" width="620"]Newspaper Obesity Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Read All About It: Obesity Trends

Love reading your local paper's coverage of the latest junk food fads? Those stories could be an indicator or something ominous to come. According to a study in the journal BMC Public Health, as coverage of unhealthy foods increased in the New York Times and the Times of London over the past 50 years, so did the obesity rates in those countries. There was a direct correlation between mentions of sweet snacks in the papers and the obesity rate three years later. Sounds like you're better off reading about the next hot salad trend. (Washington Post)

RELATED: 9 Low-Calorie Snacks You'll Want to Eat Every Day

This Woman’s Weight Loss Went Viral

Losing a significant amount of weight is an awesome feat — but many people who’ve shed major pounds suffer from excess skin hanging around where they don’t want it. One woman who chronicled her 190-pound weight loss on Instagram was accused of faking it because she didn’t show saggy skin in her pics. We’re so inspired by her response. (BuzzFeed)

RELATED: Must-Read Book: One Woman's 135-Pound Weight Loss Success

The Weird Thing That Might Help You Sleep

There’s nothing worse than a sleepless night. Skimping on zzz’s can lead to weight gain, compromised workouts and crankiness. (And let’s be real — it just sucks.) You’ve tried all the other sleep hacks out there, but watch this video to learn about the one trick you haven’t tried yet. (New York Magazine)

RELATED: How Much Sleep Do You Really Need?

[caption id="attachment_42081" align="alignnone" width="620"]Are You Applying Antiperspirant Wrong? Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Are You Applying Antiperspirant Wrong?

One of the side effects of your addiction to a good sweat session (besides extra laundry) might be that you’re using way more deodorant. But have you been applying it wrong all this time? Although it seems completely counterintuitive, find out why you should be putting on antiperspirant at night, not in the morning. (The Verge)

[caption id="attachment_42083" align="alignnone" width="620"]What Motivates You Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Find Your Motivation Style

Let’s face it, getting motivated to work out can be tough. But whether you’re a “carrot” person or a “stick” person, identifying what gets you moving can help you finally master your health and fitness goals. Here are a few strategies that might work for your personality. (Lifehacker)

The post Must-Reads: Are Americans Finally Eating Healthier? appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
Diet Cola Belly Fat

If you've been trading your usual pizza and cookies for healthier fare lately, you're not alone. For the first time in more than 40 years, Americans are eating healthier, according to new government data. Plus, find out how one woman shut down the haters who didn’t believe she lost 190 pounds. Read on for these and other headlines that caught our eye this week. [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="620"]Americans Eating Less Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Are Americans Starting to Eat Less?

Good news, folks: Americans’ eating habits are beginning to show signs of improvement. Calorie consumption among adults is on the decline, and the average American child is now eating nine percent fewer calories than they were in 1975. Most impressively, people are drinking 25 percent less full-calorie soda, compared to what they were downing in the late 1990s. Perhaps as a result, obesity rates have stopped rising. While one-third of Americans are still considered obese, researchers are hopeful that this is the turning point in the fight against obesity. (The New York Times) RELATED: Can Diet Soda Lead to More Belly Fat? [caption id="attachment_42090" align="alignnone" width="620"]Newspaper Obesity Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Read All About It: Obesity Trends

Love reading your local paper's coverage of the latest junk food fads? Those stories could be an indicator or something ominous to come. According to a study in the journal BMC Public Health, as coverage of unhealthy foods increased in the New York Times and the Times of London over the past 50 years, so did the obesity rates in those countries. There was a direct correlation between mentions of sweet snacks in the papers and the obesity rate three years later. Sounds like you're better off reading about the next hot salad trend. (Washington Post) RELATED: 9 Low-Calorie Snacks You'll Want to Eat Every Day

This Woman’s Weight Loss Went Viral

Losing a significant amount of weight is an awesome feat — but many people who’ve shed major pounds suffer from excess skin hanging around where they don’t want it. One woman who chronicled her 190-pound weight loss on Instagram was accused of faking it because she didn’t show saggy skin in her pics. We’re so inspired by her response. (BuzzFeed) RELATED: Must-Read Book: One Woman's 135-Pound Weight Loss Success

The Weird Thing That Might Help You Sleep

There’s nothing worse than a sleepless night. Skimping on zzz’s can lead to weight gain, compromised workouts and crankiness. (And let’s be real — it just sucks.) You’ve tried all the other sleep hacks out there, but watch this video to learn about the one trick you haven’t tried yet. (New York Magazine) RELATED: How Much Sleep Do You Really Need? [caption id="attachment_42081" align="alignnone" width="620"]Are You Applying Antiperspirant Wrong? Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Are You Applying Antiperspirant Wrong?

One of the side effects of your addiction to a good sweat session (besides extra laundry) might be that you’re using way more deodorant. But have you been applying it wrong all this time? Although it seems completely counterintuitive, find out why you should be putting on antiperspirant at night, not in the morning. (The Verge) [caption id="attachment_42083" align="alignnone" width="620"]What Motivates You Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Find Your Motivation Style

Let’s face it, getting motivated to work out can be tough. But whether you’re a “carrot” person or a “stick” person, identifying what gets you moving can help you finally master your health and fitness goals. Here are a few strategies that might work for your personality. (Lifehacker)

The post Must-Reads: Are Americans Finally Eating Healthier? appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
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Real Talk: How Often Should You Actually Weigh Yourself? http://dailyburn.com/life/health/how-often-weigh-yourself-scale/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/how-often-weigh-yourself-scale/#comments Mon, 27 Jul 2015 11:15:38 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=41683 Real Talk: How Often Should You Get on the Scale?

[caption id="attachment_41686" align="alignnone" width="620"]How Often Should You Get on the Scale? Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Stepping on the scale can be more daunting than hauling yourself out of bed to make a 6 a.m. spin class. But if you’re trying to lose weight, it’s probably worth it. "A scale should be as important as your toothbrush," says David Levitsky, PhD, a professor of nutrition and psychology at Cornell University. Which begs the question: Just how often should you weigh yourself if you’re trying to lose weight?

RELATED: 6 Weight Loss Success Stories to Motivate You Right Now

In a recent study in the journal Obesity, Levitsky and his colleagues gave scales to 162 people interested in losing weight. The entire group attended an initial meeting, where half (the “intervention group”) were given specific instructions about tracking their progress. While they could shed pounds any way they chose, this group was told to aim to lose one percent of their body weight at a time, monitoring their results by weighing in every day and charting the number on a graph.

When participants lost 10 percent of their body weight, they were told to try to sustain that for a year using the same methods. "It's pretty easy to lower your weight by one percent, but in the weight reduction business, the problem is sustaining it. Tracking it on the scale can help," says Levitsky.

RELATED: 7 Weight Loss Tips When the Scale Won't Budge

It turns out that daily weigh-ins were pretty darn effective. After one year, 29 percent of people in the intervention group maintained at least a five percent total weight loss compared to just 10 percent of the control group. After two years, participants tracking their weight were also better able to maintain that weight loss, compared to those who did not.

The Power of the Scale

So does this mean you really have to step on the scale every single day if you want to lose weight — and keep it off? Well, maybe. "When it comes to behavior change of any kind, self-monitoring is one of the most valuable tools,” says Scott Kahan, MD, director of the National Center for Weight and Wellness.

"Constant weighing can throw some people for a loop. They get freaked out when the number goes up by a pound."

There are a few potential reasons stepping onto a scale may help you shed pounds. First of all, weight gain can't just slip by unnoticed. "If you're gaining weight, you'll see it and do something," says Levitsky. Beyond that, there may be some deeper psychological reasons why a scale can be a valuable piece of your weight loss arsenal. "It acts as a form of positive or negative reinforcement,” Levitsky says. “If you see you gained weight, you'll reflect on what you may need to change, and if you lost weight, it reinforces that whatever you're doing is working.”

RELATED: 7 Ways to Stop Unhealthy Food Cravings

Furthermore, weighing yourself daily might help you resist the urge to eat mindlessly. When you see food, you're automatically inclined to take it as a cue to eat food, Levitsky says. "A recent study demonstrated that if you first step on a scale, then watch food commercials, it no longer [results in] eating,” says Levitsky. “Weighing yourself daily may give you the strength to resist when you're constantly surrounded by food cues.” 

The Downside of Daily Weigh-Ins

This may sound convincing — but the scale can also be controversial. The number you see may fluctuate for a number of reasons — like if you’re bloated, or have been eating too many salty foods, Kahan says.

RELATED: How Fast Can You Banish Bloat for Summer?

Plus, some people can't cash in on the body benefits of consistent weighing because it tanks their mood. "Everybody has different needs and tendencies. Constant weighing can throw some people for a loop. They get freaked out when the number goes up by a pound, and it ends up being counterproductive," says Kahan.

Although there are other methods you can use to track your weight, it might be worth working through your scale-phobia. "No other method of tracking weight loss is 100 percent equivalent to weighing yourself. In a lot of cases, just working through the scale anxiety with a professional helps to get past that, so you can use it in a productive way," says Kahan. Still not feeling it? Try these tips on for size. 

3 Ways to Fight Your Fear of the Scale and Still Lose Weight

[caption id="attachment_41690" align="alignnone" width="620"]How Often Should You Weigh Yourself? Photo: Pond5[/caption]

1. Pay Attention to Your Clothes, Instead
Break out your tightest pair of jeans. The way your clothes fit tends to correlate with how much weight you're losing, says Kahan. A more exact version of this would be grabbing a measuring tape and jotting down the circumference of your waist, hips, thighs and arms every week. "Keep in mind that this could also have the same effect as weighing yourself, that sometimes the number goes in the right direction, but sometimes it doesn't move as much as you'd think it would given how hard you're working," says Kahan.

RELATED: My Wedding Photos Were My Weight Loss Wake Up Call

2. Monitor Your Blood Pressure
Head over to a pharmacy to buy a blood pressure cuff you can keep on hand. "When you're working towards a physical goal, usually some measures improve before others,” says Kahan. “Maybe the scale isn't going down as much as you thought, but your blood pressure is getting better, or vice versa." Though it's not an exact marker of how much weight you're losing, monitoring your blood pressure is a helpful reminder that health goes much deeper than a shrinking waistline.

RELATED: The 5 Best Ways to Measure Body Fat Percentage

3. Tame Your Scale Anxiety
Let’s face it: You’ll probably have to step on the scale at some point. One way to quell your nerves might be to try this experiment that proves how quickly your weight can change. First, step on the scale and write down the number you see. Then go get a huge glass of water, drink it, and get on the scale again. "Your weight will likely go up between one and three pounds, just from the water. No calories, and no real weight gain. This is a good way to start to understand the scale," says Kahan. When you realize the number can rise because of arbitrary reasons, it's easier to see the scale as exactly what it is: a useful tool to track your weight — nothing more, and nothing less.

The post Real Talk: How Often Should You Actually Weigh Yourself? appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
Real Talk: How Often Should You Get on the Scale?

[caption id="attachment_41686" align="alignnone" width="620"]How Often Should You Get on the Scale? Photo: Pond5[/caption] Stepping on the scale can be more daunting than hauling yourself out of bed to make a 6 a.m. spin class. But if you’re trying to lose weight, it’s probably worth it. "A scale should be as important as your toothbrush," says David Levitsky, PhD, a professor of nutrition and psychology at Cornell University. Which begs the question: Just how often should you weigh yourself if you’re trying to lose weight? RELATED: 6 Weight Loss Success Stories to Motivate You Right Now In a recent study in the journal Obesity, Levitsky and his colleagues gave scales to 162 people interested in losing weight. The entire group attended an initial meeting, where half (the “intervention group”) were given specific instructions about tracking their progress. While they could shed pounds any way they chose, this group was told to aim to lose one percent of their body weight at a time, monitoring their results by weighing in every day and charting the number on a graph. When participants lost 10 percent of their body weight, they were told to try to sustain that for a year using the same methods. "It's pretty easy to lower your weight by one percent, but in the weight reduction business, the problem is sustaining it. Tracking it on the scale can help," says Levitsky. RELATED: 7 Weight Loss Tips When the Scale Won't Budge It turns out that daily weigh-ins were pretty darn effective. After one year, 29 percent of people in the intervention group maintained at least a five percent total weight loss compared to just 10 percent of the control group. After two years, participants tracking their weight were also better able to maintain that weight loss, compared to those who did not.

The Power of the Scale

So does this mean you really have to step on the scale every single day if you want to lose weight — and keep it off? Well, maybe. "When it comes to behavior change of any kind, self-monitoring is one of the most valuable tools,” says Scott Kahan, MD, director of the National Center for Weight and Wellness.
"Constant weighing can throw some people for a loop. They get freaked out when the number goes up by a pound."
There are a few potential reasons stepping onto a scale may help you shed pounds. First of all, weight gain can't just slip by unnoticed. "If you're gaining weight, you'll see it and do something," says Levitsky. Beyond that, there may be some deeper psychological reasons why a scale can be a valuable piece of your weight loss arsenal. "It acts as a form of positive or negative reinforcement,” Levitsky says. “If you see you gained weight, you'll reflect on what you may need to change, and if you lost weight, it reinforces that whatever you're doing is working.” RELATED: 7 Ways to Stop Unhealthy Food Cravings Furthermore, weighing yourself daily might help you resist the urge to eat mindlessly. When you see food, you're automatically inclined to take it as a cue to eat food, Levitsky says. "A recent study demonstrated that if you first step on a scale, then watch food commercials, it no longer [results in] eating,” says Levitsky. “Weighing yourself daily may give you the strength to resist when you're constantly surrounded by food cues.” 

The Downside of Daily Weigh-Ins

This may sound convincing — but the scale can also be controversial. The number you see may fluctuate for a number of reasons — like if you’re bloated, or have been eating too many salty foods, Kahan says. RELATED: How Fast Can You Banish Bloat for Summer? Plus, some people can't cash in on the body benefits of consistent weighing because it tanks their mood. "Everybody has different needs and tendencies. Constant weighing can throw some people for a loop. They get freaked out when the number goes up by a pound, and it ends up being counterproductive," says Kahan. Although there are other methods you can use to track your weight, it might be worth working through your scale-phobia. "No other method of tracking weight loss is 100 percent equivalent to weighing yourself. In a lot of cases, just working through the scale anxiety with a professional helps to get past that, so you can use it in a productive way," says Kahan. Still not feeling it? Try these tips on for size. 

3 Ways to Fight Your Fear of the Scale and Still Lose Weight

[caption id="attachment_41690" align="alignnone" width="620"]How Often Should You Weigh Yourself? Photo: Pond5[/caption] 1. Pay Attention to Your Clothes, Instead Break out your tightest pair of jeans. The way your clothes fit tends to correlate with how much weight you're losing, says Kahan. A more exact version of this would be grabbing a measuring tape and jotting down the circumference of your waist, hips, thighs and arms every week. "Keep in mind that this could also have the same effect as weighing yourself, that sometimes the number goes in the right direction, but sometimes it doesn't move as much as you'd think it would given how hard you're working," says Kahan. RELATED: My Wedding Photos Were My Weight Loss Wake Up Call 2. Monitor Your Blood Pressure Head over to a pharmacy to buy a blood pressure cuff you can keep on hand. "When you're working towards a physical goal, usually some measures improve before others,” says Kahan. “Maybe the scale isn't going down as much as you thought, but your blood pressure is getting better, or vice versa." Though it's not an exact marker of how much weight you're losing, monitoring your blood pressure is a helpful reminder that health goes much deeper than a shrinking waistline. RELATED: The 5 Best Ways to Measure Body Fat Percentage 3. Tame Your Scale Anxiety Let’s face it: You’ll probably have to step on the scale at some point. One way to quell your nerves might be to try this experiment that proves how quickly your weight can change. First, step on the scale and write down the number you see. Then go get a huge glass of water, drink it, and get on the scale again. "Your weight will likely go up between one and three pounds, just from the water. No calories, and no real weight gain. This is a good way to start to understand the scale," says Kahan. When you realize the number can rise because of arbitrary reasons, it's easier to see the scale as exactly what it is: a useful tool to track your weight — nothing more, and nothing less.

The post Real Talk: How Often Should You Actually Weigh Yourself? appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
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5 Ways to Lose Weight Without Dieting http://dailyburn.com/life/health/lose-weight-without-dieting/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/lose-weight-without-dieting/#comments Sun, 26 Jul 2015 13:15:02 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=26794 weight-loss-hacks-featured-2

[caption id="attachment_41899" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Easy Weight Loss Hacks Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Maybe your button-down shirts are starting to feel a little too snug or you're stressing out about putting on your bathing suit this weekend. Whatever your motivation, you're convinced that it's time to make a change — but the thought of overhauling your diet makes you cringe. While losing weight ultimately comes down to eating less and moving more, you don't necessarily have to deprive yourself when it comes to the diet part. Follow these five tips and the only thing you'll be missing is that muffin top.

RELATED: 6 Weight Loss Success Stories to Motivate Your Right Now

5 Weight Loss Hacks, No Dieting Required

[caption id="attachment_41904" align="alignnone" width="620"]Happiness Weight Loss Hack Photo: Pond5[/caption]

1. Cheer up.

Anyone who's ever dived into a pint of ice cream after a late night at work knows a rough day can ruin the best intentions to eat healthfully.  Now, a new study from the Journal of Consumer Psychology proves what many of us already suspected: Researchers found that people in good spirits were more apt to choose nutritious foods than those who were feeling down. "When we're in a good mood, we tend to step back and see the big picture, so it's easier to do something that's in our long-term best interest," says study co-author Meryl Gardner, Ph.D., an associate professor of marketing at the University of Delaware. "Being in a bad mood triggers a focus on what's going on right around you, which means seeking immediate gratification — so it becomes all 'hello, doughnut!'"

Can't convince yourself to see the sunny side of life at the moment? Gardner suggests gazing toward the future, and you don't necessarily have to focus on a health goal. "In the supermarket, let your mind wander and think about what the store may look like in five years,” she says. “Or, as you're considering what snack to have, think about what kind of junk foods may be the next big trend." Looking ahead might help you put those immediate wants into perspective.

[caption id="attachment_41903" align="alignnone" width="620"]Eat Slower for Weight Loss Photo: Pond5[/caption]

2. Slow your pace.

Nutrition experts have long advised against wolfing down your food, because the brain needs some time to process that "I'm full" message. If you've tried eating slowly but the contents of your plate still seem to disappear in a flash, you may need a little extra help. Enter the HAPIfork, a utensil that's equipped with an electronic sensor. It measures how long it takes you to eat a meal and lights up and vibrates whenever you're chowing down too quickly.

[caption id="attachment_41902" align="alignnone" width="620"]Eat Berries for Weight Loss Photo: Pond5[/caption]

3. Nibble on filling fruits.

While this food group is healthy, it can still give you your sugar fix. Try snacking on lingonberries, Scandinavian berries, which are similar to cranberries and just might be the next "superfruit." Recent research published in the Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism found that eating lingonberries almost completely blocked the effects of a high-fat diet by preventing weight gain and keeping blood sugar levels down. Admittedly, there is a catch: The scientists made this discovery by studying mice, so it's too early to definitively say if humans will reap the same benefits. But it is known that the berries are a healthy snack, thanks to their high content of polyphenols (a type of antioxidant). Try sprinkling a handful of frozen ones — you can order them online — into your cereal or smoothies. Or pick up some lingonberry juice at a local retailer.

RELATED: How 15-Minute Workouts Jumpstarted My Weight Loss

[caption id="attachment_41906" align="alignnone" width="620"]Text Progress to Lose Weight Photo: Pond5[/caption]

4.  Text your progress.

Keeping a food diary is a tried-and-true weight loss technique, as recording every morsel forces you to be more conscious of what you're putting into your mouth. But it can also be tedious, making it tough for people to stick with it. Replying to a quick daily text message, on the other hand, is much easier. In a study from Duke University, overweight women shed a few pounds by simply reporting (via text) some basic info, such as the number of steps they walked daily and whether or not they consumed fast food.

"Most people have difficulty sticking with detailed monitoring of how much they eat and how much they exercise," says lead author Dori Steinberg, Ph.D. "We tried to keep the tracking via text messaging simple, which is likely why it was effective." To make this work for you, ask a friend, family member or even your trainer to text you a daily question about your diet or exercise goals. "Having that accountability can be incredibly helpful," says Steinberg.

[caption id="attachment_41905" align="alignnone" width="620"]Sleep More Lose Weight Photo: Pond5[/caption]

5. Go to bed.

Numerous studies have found a connection between insufficient sleep and obesity, but a recent study from the University of Colorado, Boulder found that you could do serious damage to your waistline in just five nights. "People who had five-hour sleep opportunities per night across a simulated workweek gained nearly two pounds," says study co-author Kenneth Wright, Ph.D., director of the University's Sleep and Chronobiology Laboratory. Lack of shuteye can interfere with your metabolism and prompt you to eat more — especially mindlessly in the evening while watching TV or surfing the web. The takeaway: Make getting a good night's rest a priority. "Sleep is as important for your health as a good diet and physical activity," says Wright.

Instead of dreading the start of a diet as summer approaches, try making these healthy changes in order to lose weight without depriving yourself.

Originally posted April 2014. Updated July 2015.

The post 5 Ways to Lose Weight Without Dieting appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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weight-loss-hacks-featured-2

[caption id="attachment_41899" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Easy Weight Loss Hacks Photo: Pond5[/caption] Maybe your button-down shirts are starting to feel a little too snug or you're stressing out about putting on your bathing suit this weekend. Whatever your motivation, you're convinced that it's time to make a change — but the thought of overhauling your diet makes you cringe. While losing weight ultimately comes down to eating less and moving more, you don't necessarily have to deprive yourself when it comes to the diet part. Follow these five tips and the only thing you'll be missing is that muffin top. RELATED: 6 Weight Loss Success Stories to Motivate Your Right Now

5 Weight Loss Hacks, No Dieting Required

[caption id="attachment_41904" align="alignnone" width="620"]Happiness Weight Loss Hack Photo: Pond5[/caption]

1. Cheer up.

Anyone who's ever dived into a pint of ice cream after a late night at work knows a rough day can ruin the best intentions to eat healthfully.  Now, a new study from the Journal of Consumer Psychology proves what many of us already suspected: Researchers found that people in good spirits were more apt to choose nutritious foods than those who were feeling down. "When we're in a good mood, we tend to step back and see the big picture, so it's easier to do something that's in our long-term best interest," says study co-author Meryl Gardner, Ph.D., an associate professor of marketing at the University of Delaware. "Being in a bad mood triggers a focus on what's going on right around you, which means seeking immediate gratification — so it becomes all 'hello, doughnut!'" Can't convince yourself to see the sunny side of life at the moment? Gardner suggests gazing toward the future, and you don't necessarily have to focus on a health goal. "In the supermarket, let your mind wander and think about what the store may look like in five years,” she says. “Or, as you're considering what snack to have, think about what kind of junk foods may be the next big trend." Looking ahead might help you put those immediate wants into perspective. [caption id="attachment_41903" align="alignnone" width="620"]Eat Slower for Weight Loss Photo: Pond5[/caption]

2. Slow your pace.

Nutrition experts have long advised against wolfing down your food, because the brain needs some time to process that "I'm full" message. If you've tried eating slowly but the contents of your plate still seem to disappear in a flash, you may need a little extra help. Enter the HAPIfork, a utensil that's equipped with an electronic sensor. It measures how long it takes you to eat a meal and lights up and vibrates whenever you're chowing down too quickly. [caption id="attachment_41902" align="alignnone" width="620"]Eat Berries for Weight Loss Photo: Pond5[/caption]

3. Nibble on filling fruits.

While this food group is healthy, it can still give you your sugar fix. Try snacking on lingonberries, Scandinavian berries, which are similar to cranberries and just might be the next "superfruit." Recent research published in the Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism found that eating lingonberries almost completely blocked the effects of a high-fat diet by preventing weight gain and keeping blood sugar levels down. Admittedly, there is a catch: The scientists made this discovery by studying mice, so it's too early to definitively say if humans will reap the same benefits. But it is known that the berries are a healthy snack, thanks to their high content of polyphenols (a type of antioxidant). Try sprinkling a handful of frozen ones — you can order them online — into your cereal or smoothies. Or pick up some lingonberry juice at a local retailer. RELATED: How 15-Minute Workouts Jumpstarted My Weight Loss [caption id="attachment_41906" align="alignnone" width="620"]Text Progress to Lose Weight Photo: Pond5[/caption]

4.  Text your progress.

Keeping a food diary is a tried-and-true weight loss technique, as recording every morsel forces you to be more conscious of what you're putting into your mouth. But it can also be tedious, making it tough for people to stick with it. Replying to a quick daily text message, on the other hand, is much easier. In a study from Duke University, overweight women shed a few pounds by simply reporting (via text) some basic info, such as the number of steps they walked daily and whether or not they consumed fast food. "Most people have difficulty sticking with detailed monitoring of how much they eat and how much they exercise," says lead author Dori Steinberg, Ph.D. "We tried to keep the tracking via text messaging simple, which is likely why it was effective." To make this work for you, ask a friend, family member or even your trainer to text you a daily question about your diet or exercise goals. "Having that accountability can be incredibly helpful," says Steinberg. [caption id="attachment_41905" align="alignnone" width="620"]Sleep More Lose Weight Photo: Pond5[/caption]

5. Go to bed.

Numerous studies have found a connection between insufficient sleep and obesity, but a recent study from the University of Colorado, Boulder found that you could do serious damage to your waistline in just five nights. "People who had five-hour sleep opportunities per night across a simulated workweek gained nearly two pounds," says study co-author Kenneth Wright, Ph.D., director of the University's Sleep and Chronobiology Laboratory. Lack of shuteye can interfere with your metabolism and prompt you to eat more — especially mindlessly in the evening while watching TV or surfing the web. The takeaway: Make getting a good night's rest a priority. "Sleep is as important for your health as a good diet and physical activity," says Wright. Instead of dreading the start of a diet as summer approaches, try making these healthy changes in order to lose weight without depriving yourself. Originally posted April 2014. Updated July 2015.

The post 5 Ways to Lose Weight Without Dieting appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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The Weird Pantry Staple People Are Drinking to Lose Weight http://dailyburn.com/life/health/apple-cider-vinegar-for-weight-loss/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/apple-cider-vinegar-for-weight-loss/#comments Wed, 22 Jul 2015 11:15:37 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=41601 Should You Drink Apple Cider Vinegar for Weight Loss?

[caption id="attachment_41604" align="alignnone" width="620"]Should You Drink Apple Cider Vinegar for Weight Loss? Photo: Pond5[/caption]

If you’re looking for a magic elixir that will help you lose weight, the online forums extolling the benefits apple cider vinegar might have you sold. But before you start swigging it straight from the bottle (because, gross), does this Dr. Oz-backed tonic really have any merit?

RELATED: Is It Possible to Drink Too Much Water?

While whipping up apple cider vinegar-based salad dressing is one thing, the benefits of drinking it straight from the bottle are questionable at best. And there are real risks, too. “A lot of cleanses focus on juices or beverages, so it’s possible that apple cider vinegar is getting looped in as part of this trend,” says Lisa Cimperman, RDN, LD, a clinical dietician at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland. But unlike downing green juice, drinking too much apple cider vinegar could actually be harmful to your health.

The Sketchy Claims Surrounding Apple Cider Vinegar

Lauded as a way to improve everything from weight loss to indigestion, apple cider vinegar has even been said to help people control diabetes. “But the fact is that we don’t have the research to uphold any of these claims,” Cimperman says.

In fact, apple cider vinegar might make some health conditions worse — particularly if consumed in excess. “People tend to think more is always better but if individuals were to take in large amounts of apple cider vinegar, it could cause severe negative health consequences,” Cimperman says. “For example…[consumed] in tablet form, there have been reports of it burning an individual’s esophagus because it is highly acidic.”

Claims of “Drink this, lose weight!” generally sound too good to be true for a reason.

RELATED: Are Medicinal Mushrooms the New Kale?

That acidity might also be bad news for people suffering from acid reflux, or heartburn. “It can potentially irritate the esophagus as it’s going down, and not only that, then there’s more acid [in your stomach] to potentially reflux back out,” Cimperman says. If you’re looking for digestive relief, Cimperman recommends sticking to a diet rich in fiber and probiotics, instead.

When it comes to controlling diabetes, leave that to your doctors, please! Many people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes also have a condition called gastroparesis, which can prevent the stomach from properly emptying. This can make it more difficult to manage blood glucose. “If someone with gastroparesis were to take apple cider vinegar, it could make that condition even worse,” Cimperman says.

What About Apple Cider Vinegar for Weight Loss?

Claims of “Drink this, lose weight!” generally sound too good to be true for a reason. One recent study of 14 people showed that those who drank a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar mixed with 8 ounces of water before a meal had lower blood glucose levels. This may be because vinegar interfered with the body’s digestion of starch. “By blocking digestion of starch, that would result in a calorie reduction of your meal,” Cimperman says. “So that’s possibly where [those weight claims] came from, but it’s hard for me to say.” Other minor studies have shown similar benefits, but Cimperman says weight loss claims, “often grow out of a very small study that gets blown out of proportion.”

RELATED: How to Detox the Healthy Way: 16 Recipes You’ll Love

In other words, don’t bank on apple cider vinegar when clean eating and good old-fashioned exercise will do. If you’re set on incorporating apple cider vinegar in your diet, do it in moderation. “My advice would be to do no more than one to two teaspoons and mix it in water or some other beverage to dilute the acidity. You never want to take it just straight,” Cimperman says. Even better: Mix it with olive oil and use it to top your salads as a low-calorie alternative to your usual ranch dressing. It’ll be tastier than chugging it, that’s for sure.

The post The Weird Pantry Staple People Are Drinking to Lose Weight appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
Should You Drink Apple Cider Vinegar for Weight Loss?

[caption id="attachment_41604" align="alignnone" width="620"]Should You Drink Apple Cider Vinegar for Weight Loss? Photo: Pond5[/caption] If you’re looking for a magic elixir that will help you lose weight, the online forums extolling the benefits apple cider vinegar might have you sold. But before you start swigging it straight from the bottle (because, gross), does this Dr. Oz-backed tonic really have any merit? RELATED: Is It Possible to Drink Too Much Water? While whipping up apple cider vinegar-based salad dressing is one thing, the benefits of drinking it straight from the bottle are questionable at best. And there are real risks, too. “A lot of cleanses focus on juices or beverages, so it’s possible that apple cider vinegar is getting looped in as part of this trend,” says Lisa Cimperman, RDN, LD, a clinical dietician at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland. But unlike downing green juice, drinking too much apple cider vinegar could actually be harmful to your health.

The Sketchy Claims Surrounding Apple Cider Vinegar

Lauded as a way to improve everything from weight loss to indigestion, apple cider vinegar has even been said to help people control diabetes. “But the fact is that we don’t have the research to uphold any of these claims,” Cimperman says. In fact, apple cider vinegar might make some health conditions worse — particularly if consumed in excess. “People tend to think more is always better but if individuals were to take in large amounts of apple cider vinegar, it could cause severe negative health consequences,” Cimperman says. “For example…[consumed] in tablet form, there have been reports of it burning an individual’s esophagus because it is highly acidic.”
Claims of “Drink this, lose weight!” generally sound too good to be true for a reason.
RELATED: Are Medicinal Mushrooms the New Kale? That acidity might also be bad news for people suffering from acid reflux, or heartburn. “It can potentially irritate the esophagus as it’s going down, and not only that, then there’s more acid [in your stomach] to potentially reflux back out,” Cimperman says. If you’re looking for digestive relief, Cimperman recommends sticking to a diet rich in fiber and probiotics, instead. When it comes to controlling diabetes, leave that to your doctors, please! Many people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes also have a condition called gastroparesis, which can prevent the stomach from properly emptying. This can make it more difficult to manage blood glucose. “If someone with gastroparesis were to take apple cider vinegar, it could make that condition even worse,” Cimperman says.

What About Apple Cider Vinegar for Weight Loss?

Claims of “Drink this, lose weight!” generally sound too good to be true for a reason. One recent study of 14 people showed that those who drank a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar mixed with 8 ounces of water before a meal had lower blood glucose levels. This may be because vinegar interfered with the body’s digestion of starch. “By blocking digestion of starch, that would result in a calorie reduction of your meal,” Cimperman says. “So that’s possibly where [those weight claims] came from, but it’s hard for me to say.” Other minor studies have shown similar benefits, but Cimperman says weight loss claims, “often grow out of a very small study that gets blown out of proportion.” RELATED: How to Detox the Healthy Way: 16 Recipes You’ll Love In other words, don’t bank on apple cider vinegar when clean eating and good old-fashioned exercise will do. If you’re set on incorporating apple cider vinegar in your diet, do it in moderation. “My advice would be to do no more than one to two teaspoons and mix it in water or some other beverage to dilute the acidity. You never want to take it just straight,” Cimperman says. Even better: Mix it with olive oil and use it to top your salads as a low-calorie alternative to your usual ranch dressing. It’ll be tastier than chugging it, that’s for sure.

The post The Weird Pantry Staple People Are Drinking to Lose Weight appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
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How to Do a Sugar Detox (Without Going Crazy) http://dailyburn.com/life/health/sugar-detox-diet/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/sugar-detox-diet/#comments Tue, 21 Jul 2015 11:15:08 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=41588 How to Do a Sugar Detox (Without Going Crazy)

[caption id="attachment_41591" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Do a Sugar Detox (Without Going Crazy) Photo: Pond5[/caption]

If you eat dinner solely for the chance to chase it with dessert, we hate to break it to you, but it might be time to try a sugar detox. We’re not talking about a five-day fad cleanse, either. “The ultimate goal is to really downplay sugar in the diet and have that be a permanent lifestyle change,” says Bethany Doerfler, RD, LDN, and a clinical research dietician at Northwestern Medicine in Chicago.

RELATED: Detoxing for Beach Season? Here’s Your 5-Day Plan

Your love for sugary stuff may seem benign, but the truth is that most people are eating way more of it than they need. “Americans currently consume 22 teaspoons of sugar per day,” Doerfler says. That’s more than three times as much as what’s recommended by the American Heart Association.

Plus, research shows that not-so-innocent sweet tooth could be doing serious damage to your health, leading to weight gain, high blood pressure and cholesterol levels and an increased risk for diabetes. In fact, Dr. Joel Fuhrman, author of The End of Dieting, says eating too much sugar should be considered just as dangerous as smoking cigarettes. “A diet with sugar and high glycemic index foods promotes all the leading causes of death in America,” he says. “I don’t see value in cutting out sugar for a few days and then going back to eating it, but I do see value in cutting it out permanently.”

Why It’s Hard to Quit Sugar (But Worth It)

Sugar addiction is no joke. Once you’re hooked, cravings can be hard to resist, leading you down a slippery slope towards obesity and other health problems. “Studies are showing that in some people and animals, the brain can react to sugar very much like it can to drugs and alcohol,” Doerfler says. That’s why when you initially cut added sugars from your diet, you might feel deprived for a few days. “When your body is overloaded with waste, you feel more uncomfortable when not eating that food,” Fuhrman says. “It’s like stopping coffee.”

"Substitute processed sugars like cake, cookies and sweetened coffees for natural sugars, like fresh fruit.”

RELATED: Are You Exceeding Your Daily Sugar Intake in Just One Meal?

Your efforts to cut back on sugar will pay off though. “In the short term, people will notice their energy levels improve right away and after a short period of time they will notice cravings and fatigue diminishes,” Doerfler says.

Plus, the long-term benefits of cutting back on added sugar in your diet are impossible to ignore. One study published in the journal Circulation showed that sugar-sweetened drinks directly cause the cardiovascular disease and diabetes that kill about 184,000 people worldwide every year.

Your Sugar Detox Diet, Made Simple

There’s more than one way to do a sugar detox. “Some patients feel that taking a moderate approach doesn’t really work for them and they need to go cold turkey,” Doerfler says. “But for most people, I recommend cleaning up one meal at a time and then progressing onto the next meal the following day.”

RELATED: 12 Fast Food Drinks That Aren’t Worth the Calories

Regardless of the route you go, your number one goal should be to cut added sugars from your diet. That includes most desserts, sugar-sweetened beverages and many processed foods or snacks. In general, men should consume no more than nine teaspoons, or about 36 grams of sugar per day, while women should eat no more than six teaspoons, or about 25 grams, of added sugars per day, according to the American Heart Association. In other words, it’s time to start reading nutrition labels.

You should also be armed with a plan for when cravings hit. Expect to struggle the most in the afternoon and after dinner when you’re watching TV, Doerfler says. “Often when people are trying to avoid sugar, they go too far and try to take fruit out of their diet and there’s no reason to do that,” Doerfler says. “A better option is to substitute processed sugars like cake, cookies and sweetened coffees for natural sugars, like fresh fruit.”

RELATED: Are You Eating Too Much Fruit?

Ready to detox? Here’s a basic meal plan to get you started:

Your Sugar Detox Diet Guidelines

[caption id="attachment_36668" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Do a Sugar Detox (Without Going Crazy) Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Breakfast: Cereal or oatmeal with fruit on top
Your bowl of Honey Nut Cheerios might be a secret sugar bomb. Try picking unsweetened oatmeal, or shredded wheat cereal options, instead. “For sweetness, I like people to add their own fruit, rather than letting the cereal company add sugar,” Doerfler says.

RELATED: 9 Easy Overnight Oats Recipes

[caption id="attachment_31857" align="alignnone" width="620"]Kale Caesar Salad Photo and Recipe: Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Lunch: Grilled chicken, fish or tofu with a veggie salad
Your goal at lunch is to fuel your body and fend off that inevitable afternoon crash for as long as possible. “I think having veggies and a protein at lunch is great way to give people a midday boost,” Doerfler says.

RELATED: 7 Healthy Lunch Ideas Your Friends Will Want to Steal

[caption id="attachment_34165" align="alignnone" width="620"]Homemade Beet Hummus Recipe Photo and Recipe: Renee Blair[/caption]

3 p.m. snack: Nuts or veggies with hummus
Welcome to the danger zone. “At about 3 p.m. our circadian rhythm starts to drop and that’s a time of fatigue for everybody,” Doerfler says. “Expect that you’re going to get the munchies and have a game plan in place.” For easy, portable ideas, check out this list of low-calorie foods that will actually fill you up.

RELATED: 15 Quick and Portable High-Protein Snacks

[caption id="attachment_22478" align="alignnone" width="620"]Kale Cauliflower Pasta Photo and Recipe: Renee Blair[/caption]

Dinner: Whole-wheat pasta with chicken and vegetables
You might be avoiding sugar, but whole-wheat carbs are still totally OK. “Dinner is when I like people to add another whole-grain in — whole-wheat pasta, couscous, or sweet potatoes,” Doerfler says. One cup of cooked pasta is considered a good serving size — take your pick and fill up.

RELATED: 30-Minute Quick, Healthy Dinner Ideas

[caption id="attachment_30739" align="alignnone" width="620"]Antioxidant Fruit Salad Photo and Recipe: Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Dessert: Fresh fruit
It’s time to redefine dessert. “Fruit is probably the lowest sugar snack option available and it’s loaded with antioxidants and fiber, which helps people lose weight and feel full,” Doerfler says. If you truly can’t live without a little dark chocolate before bed (we feel you), Doerfler says you can indulge — as long as you limit your treat to a single portion size.

The post How to Do a Sugar Detox (Without Going Crazy) appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
How to Do a Sugar Detox (Without Going Crazy)

[caption id="attachment_41591" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Do a Sugar Detox (Without Going Crazy) Photo: Pond5[/caption] If you eat dinner solely for the chance to chase it with dessert, we hate to break it to you, but it might be time to try a sugar detox. We’re not talking about a five-day fad cleanse, either. “The ultimate goal is to really downplay sugar in the diet and have that be a permanent lifestyle change,” says Bethany Doerfler, RD, LDN, and a clinical research dietician at Northwestern Medicine in Chicago. RELATED: Detoxing for Beach Season? Here’s Your 5-Day Plan Your love for sugary stuff may seem benign, but the truth is that most people are eating way more of it than they need. “Americans currently consume 22 teaspoons of sugar per day,” Doerfler says. That’s more than three times as much as what’s recommended by the American Heart Association. Plus, research shows that not-so-innocent sweet tooth could be doing serious damage to your health, leading to weight gain, high blood pressure and cholesterol levels and an increased risk for diabetes. In fact, Dr. Joel Fuhrman, author of The End of Dieting, says eating too much sugar should be considered just as dangerous as smoking cigarettes. “A diet with sugar and high glycemic index foods promotes all the leading causes of death in America,” he says. “I don’t see value in cutting out sugar for a few days and then going back to eating it, but I do see value in cutting it out permanently.”

Why It’s Hard to Quit Sugar (But Worth It)

Sugar addiction is no joke. Once you’re hooked, cravings can be hard to resist, leading you down a slippery slope towards obesity and other health problems. “Studies are showing that in some people and animals, the brain can react to sugar very much like it can to drugs and alcohol,” Doerfler says. That’s why when you initially cut added sugars from your diet, you might feel deprived for a few days. “When your body is overloaded with waste, you feel more uncomfortable when not eating that food,” Fuhrman says. “It’s like stopping coffee.”
"Substitute processed sugars like cake, cookies and sweetened coffees for natural sugars, like fresh fruit.”
RELATED: Are You Exceeding Your Daily Sugar Intake in Just One Meal? Your efforts to cut back on sugar will pay off though. “In the short term, people will notice their energy levels improve right away and after a short period of time they will notice cravings and fatigue diminishes,” Doerfler says. Plus, the long-term benefits of cutting back on added sugar in your diet are impossible to ignore. One study published in the journal Circulation showed that sugar-sweetened drinks directly cause the cardiovascular disease and diabetes that kill about 184,000 people worldwide every year.

Your Sugar Detox Diet, Made Simple

There’s more than one way to do a sugar detox. “Some patients feel that taking a moderate approach doesn’t really work for them and they need to go cold turkey,” Doerfler says. “But for most people, I recommend cleaning up one meal at a time and then progressing onto the next meal the following day.” RELATED: 12 Fast Food Drinks That Aren’t Worth the Calories Regardless of the route you go, your number one goal should be to cut added sugars from your diet. That includes most desserts, sugar-sweetened beverages and many processed foods or snacks. In general, men should consume no more than nine teaspoons, or about 36 grams of sugar per day, while women should eat no more than six teaspoons, or about 25 grams, of added sugars per day, according to the American Heart Association. In other words, it’s time to start reading nutrition labels. You should also be armed with a plan for when cravings hit. Expect to struggle the most in the afternoon and after dinner when you’re watching TV, Doerfler says. “Often when people are trying to avoid sugar, they go too far and try to take fruit out of their diet and there’s no reason to do that,” Doerfler says. “A better option is to substitute processed sugars like cake, cookies and sweetened coffees for natural sugars, like fresh fruit.” RELATED: Are You Eating Too Much Fruit? Ready to detox? Here’s a basic meal plan to get you started:

Your Sugar Detox Diet Guidelines

[caption id="attachment_36668" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Do a Sugar Detox (Without Going Crazy) Photo: Pond5[/caption] Breakfast: Cereal or oatmeal with fruit on top Your bowl of Honey Nut Cheerios might be a secret sugar bomb. Try picking unsweetened oatmeal, or shredded wheat cereal options, instead. “For sweetness, I like people to add their own fruit, rather than letting the cereal company add sugar,” Doerfler says. RELATED: 9 Easy Overnight Oats Recipes [caption id="attachment_31857" align="alignnone" width="620"]Kale Caesar Salad Photo and Recipe: Perry Santanachote[/caption] Lunch: Grilled chicken, fish or tofu with a veggie salad Your goal at lunch is to fuel your body and fend off that inevitable afternoon crash for as long as possible. “I think having veggies and a protein at lunch is great way to give people a midday boost,” Doerfler says. RELATED: 7 Healthy Lunch Ideas Your Friends Will Want to Steal [caption id="attachment_34165" align="alignnone" width="620"]Homemade Beet Hummus Recipe Photo and Recipe: Renee Blair[/caption] 3 p.m. snack: Nuts or veggies with hummus Welcome to the danger zone. “At about 3 p.m. our circadian rhythm starts to drop and that’s a time of fatigue for everybody,” Doerfler says. “Expect that you’re going to get the munchies and have a game plan in place.” For easy, portable ideas, check out this list of low-calorie foods that will actually fill you up. RELATED: 15 Quick and Portable High-Protein Snacks [caption id="attachment_22478" align="alignnone" width="620"]Kale Cauliflower Pasta Photo and Recipe: Renee Blair[/caption] Dinner: Whole-wheat pasta with chicken and vegetables You might be avoiding sugar, but whole-wheat carbs are still totally OK. “Dinner is when I like people to add another whole-grain in — whole-wheat pasta, couscous, or sweet potatoes,” Doerfler says. One cup of cooked pasta is considered a good serving size — take your pick and fill up. RELATED: 30-Minute Quick, Healthy Dinner Ideas [caption id="attachment_30739" align="alignnone" width="620"]Antioxidant Fruit Salad Photo and Recipe: Perry Santanachote[/caption] Dessert: Fresh fruit It’s time to redefine dessert. “Fruit is probably the lowest sugar snack option available and it’s loaded with antioxidants and fiber, which helps people lose weight and feel full,” Doerfler says. If you truly can’t live without a little dark chocolate before bed (we feel you), Doerfler says you can indulge — as long as you limit your treat to a single portion size.

The post How to Do a Sugar Detox (Without Going Crazy) appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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The 10 Biggest Diet Mistakes, According to Experts http://dailyburn.com/life/health/diet-mistakes-weight-loss-motivation/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/diet-mistakes-weight-loss-motivation/#comments Mon, 20 Jul 2015 11:15:05 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=41540 The 10 Biggest Weight Loss Mistakes, According to Experts

[caption id="attachment_41546" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 10 Biggest Weight Loss Mistakes, According to Experts Photo: Pond5[/caption]

In theory, losing weight seems simple enough: Eat less, move more. Right? Ha! Anyone who’s ever tried to slim down knows that diet and exercise is tricky. It’s easy for even then best-laid plans to run off-course. And there’s nothing like hitting a weight loss plateau — or, worse, regaining to make you want to throw out the scale and grab a cookie.

To fend off the calorie burn blues, we asked a bunch of top trainers and nutritionists for the most common mistakes they see clients making when they first embark on a weight loss goal. If you've set out to shed pounds but aren't seeing the results you hoped for, here are some possible reasons why — plus, great advice to get you back on track.

RELATED: 6 Weight Loss Success Stories to Motivate You Right Now

10 Diet Mistakes That Are Easy to Avoid

[caption id="attachment_41548" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 10 Biggest Weight Loss Mistakes, According to Experts Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Mistake #1: Not counting all the calories.

Snack attacks happen. Just don’t try to deny them. "When I ask my clients for a daily meal log, I often get back a list of breakfast, lunch, and dinner," says DailyBurn Fitness/Nutrition coach Chris Mosier. "These people are snacking, but they aren’t adding it toward their daily caloric intake total." Most people don’t realize how much these bites can add up, he says. Not to mention the toll that beverages, like soda or booze, can take on your waistline.

RELATED: Frozen Yogurt vs. Ice Cream: Which Is Healthier?

Fix It: Use a calorie-tracking mobile app so you can log each item as you're eating it — not later. "It’s easy to go over your caloric goal when you add in the two cookies from the office party, the vending machine run during the afternoon slump, and the bedtime sweets,” Mosier says. Remind yourself before you take those extra between-meal bites: Like it or not, every calorie counts.

Mistake #2: Going crazy on your cheat day.

Splurging once a week can help satisfy cravings and, when done right, can even spike metabolism and help you burn calories more efficiently. "But the problem is that often, the cheat day becomes a massive food-eating contest," says Joey Thurman, celebrity trainer and creator of The Lifestyle Renovation. Going overboard can set you back thousands of calories and make you feel sick and bloated for days to come.

"Many people start out thinking they need to work out seven days a week, which is not always reasonable."

RELATED: When Is It OK to Cheat? The Pros and Cons of Cheat Days

Fix It: "Instead of a cheat day, have a cheat meal for each week," says Thurman. "You still can have that donut, pizza, or brownie you've been craving, and get right back on the road to clean, nutritious eating — instead of derailing all your progress and causing yourself to feel sick."

Mistake #3: Not switching up your workouts.

Turns out doing the same Cardio Sculpt workout every day might not be the best idea. "Completing the same workout over and over can be detrimental to weight loss, because our bodies adapt and become more efficient at that mode of exercise," says DailyBurn Fitness/Nutrition coach Tiffany Hill. Similarly, doing all steady-state cardio, without adding strength training or high-intensity intervals, can also sabotage your efforts, says personal trainer Mike Chang, creator of Six Pack Shortcuts. "You can spend a month on a treadmill and see very few results, and end up looking worse if you're not careful," he says. "Too much cardio can get rid of the muscle that makes you look good."

RELATED: 3 Quick HIIT Workouts for Beginners

Fix It: To ensure you're getting enough variety in your workouts, Hill recommends regularly adjusting the frequency, intensity, time, or type of workout. (You can remember that using the acronym FITT.) "Following a running program such as Couch to 5K is a good example of an exercise progression," she says. "Each week, the running phase increases gradually." To be sure you're building muscle and keeping your metabolism revved, add high-intensity intervals and weight or resistance training to your routine at least twice a week.

[caption id="attachment_41550" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 10 Biggest Weight Loss Mistakes, According to Experts Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Mistake #4: Restricting yourself too much.

Step away from the juice cleanses. "Going on a strict diet forever is simply not realistic, unless you have a lot of extra time on your hands and the willpower to never to eat out again," jokes Chang. "If you want to lose weight, you have to think about sustainability." And even if you are able to stick to a super low-calorie meal plan without falling off the wagon, your body could kick into starvation mode, expending fewer calories in an effort to preserve energy.

RELATED: Detoxing for Beach Season? Here’s Your 5-Day Plan

Fix It: Instead of worrying so much about the number of calories you're eating, focus on the quality of those calories, says Allie Whitesides, DailyBurn Fitness/Nutrition coach. "Eat food that you prepare, less packaged goods, and include a balance of protein, healthy fats, whole grains, and lots of fresh veggies and fruits." Follow these steps and you'll find yourself naturally eating a healthy number of calories, without feeling hungry or deprived.

Mistake #5: Not taking a rest day.

When starting a workout program, it’s crucial to give your body (and mind) adequate recovery days. "Many people start out thinking they need to work out seven days a week, which is not always reasonable," says Whitesides. "When they end up missing a day or two they become discouraged and often give up completely."

RELATED: 5 Foam Rolling Moves You Aren’t Doing (But Should)

Fix It: To beat burnout, schedule a day or two of rest each week, and be sure to set reasonable goals that fit your lifestyle. "Always listen to your body, and if you are too sore to work out, take an active recovery day," says Whitesides. Go for a walk with your family, take a leisurely bike ride or do some gentle yoga.

Mistake #6: Giving exercise too much credit.

You can’t out-exercise a bad diet. "When it comes to weight loss, nutrition needs to be on point in order for your physical activity efforts to shine through," says Hill. "This is especially true for people just beginning an exercise routine, because easy to moderate physical activity doesn’t burn a lot of calories." For example, walking at three miles per hour for 30 minutes burns less than 150 calories — equal to or less than most candy or snack bars.

RELATED: Should You Eat Before a Workout?

Fix It: Ditch the mindset that just because you worked out, you can eat whatever you want. But don't let a strict diet keep you from exercising, either. "It's still important because it will help with increasing your mood, boosting energy and promoting better sleep," says Hill. "Focus on these immediate gains of physical activity, and weight loss will follow suit."

Mistake #7: Focusing too much on the scale.

Many of Mosier's clients obsessively check the scale, and are then disappointed if the number isn’t moving. But many factors can play into a person's weight, he says, including body composition, hydration levels and food you’ve eaten. "Weight can fluctuate, so jumping on the scale daily doesn’t give an accurate snapshot of how you’re actually doing."

"People who eat like birds at breakfast often become hungry and overeat at lunch and dinner."

RELATED: 7 Weight Loss Tips When the Scale Won’t Budge

Fix It: Weigh yourself once a month and take measurements of your body to track changes, says Mosier. "Measurements can be taken anywhere you want to lose inches, with the most common being the waist, hips, thighs and upper arms."

Mistake #8: Not getting enough sleep.

Pay attention to zzz’s just as much as LBs. "One of the biggest mistakes I see people make is not giving enough emphasis to the unsung heroes of weight loss, like sleep and stress," says trainer and sports nutritionist Rob Sulaver, founder of Bandana Training. "If you want to create the ideal fat loss conditions for your body, you have to manage your stress levels and make sure the quantity and quality of your sleep is on point."

RELATED: The Hidden Ways Sleep Deprivation Can Lead to Weight Gain

Fix It: Before you even think about a diet and exercise plan, make sure you're getting enough shuteye. (The magic number of hours is different for everyone, but most studies suggest it's around seven — although very active people likely need more.) If you're stressed, find healthy ways to relieve tension, like regular yoga sessions, meditation, or hitting a punching bag in boxing class.

Mistake #9: Skimping on breakfast.

"People who eat like birds at breakfast often become hungry and overeat at lunch and dinner," says sports nutritionist Kate Davis, MS, RD, CSSD, LDN. While your morning meal may not be as important to weight loss as it was once believed, studies do show that eating early (especially high-protein meals) can increase dopamine levels, which may reduce cravings throughout the day.

RELATED: 9 Healthy Breakfast Recipes Ready in 15 Minutes or Less

Fix It: "Flip your thinking and make breakfast your largest meal of the day," says Davis. "Eat relatively less as the day goes on to keep yourself from becoming over-hungry." Can't swing a big breakfast on work days? A recent study found that a quick bowl of oatmeal first thing in the a.m. can help you eat 50 percent less at lunch.

Mistake #10: Gunning for six-pack abs.

"You can perform crunches until you’re blue in the face, but this doesn’t mean you’re actually burning fat from your abdominal area," says Hill. That's because the idea that you can "spot reduce" simply isn't true. In order to lose weight, you have to burn calories — and when you do, the body sheds fat all over, not just in one specific spot.

Fix It: For the biggest calorie burn, focus on exercises that increase your heart rate and target large muscle groups — like the chest, back and legs. (Hill recommends squats, deadlifts, push-ups and bent-over rows.) Incorporate high-intensity interval training into your routine, as well. "You’ll burn more calories in less time, and this type of physical activity can work for you due to the afterburn effect."

For no-equipment workouts you can do at home, head to DailyBurn.com and try it free for 30 days. 

The post The 10 Biggest Diet Mistakes, According to Experts appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
The 10 Biggest Weight Loss Mistakes, According to Experts

[caption id="attachment_41546" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 10 Biggest Weight Loss Mistakes, According to Experts Photo: Pond5[/caption] In theory, losing weight seems simple enough: Eat less, move more. Right? Ha! Anyone who’s ever tried to slim down knows that diet and exercise is tricky. It’s easy for even then best-laid plans to run off-course. And there’s nothing like hitting a weight loss plateau — or, worse, regaining to make you want to throw out the scale and grab a cookie. To fend off the calorie burn blues, we asked a bunch of top trainers and nutritionists for the most common mistakes they see clients making when they first embark on a weight loss goal. If you've set out to shed pounds but aren't seeing the results you hoped for, here are some possible reasons why — plus, great advice to get you back on track. RELATED: 6 Weight Loss Success Stories to Motivate You Right Now

10 Diet Mistakes That Are Easy to Avoid

[caption id="attachment_41548" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 10 Biggest Weight Loss Mistakes, According to Experts Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Mistake #1: Not counting all the calories.

Snack attacks happen. Just don’t try to deny them. "When I ask my clients for a daily meal log, I often get back a list of breakfast, lunch, and dinner," says DailyBurn Fitness/Nutrition coach Chris Mosier. "These people are snacking, but they aren’t adding it toward their daily caloric intake total." Most people don’t realize how much these bites can add up, he says. Not to mention the toll that beverages, like soda or booze, can take on your waistline. RELATED: Frozen Yogurt vs. Ice Cream: Which Is Healthier? Fix It: Use a calorie-tracking mobile app so you can log each item as you're eating it — not later. "It’s easy to go over your caloric goal when you add in the two cookies from the office party, the vending machine run during the afternoon slump, and the bedtime sweets,” Mosier says. Remind yourself before you take those extra between-meal bites: Like it or not, every calorie counts.

Mistake #2: Going crazy on your cheat day.

Splurging once a week can help satisfy cravings and, when done right, can even spike metabolism and help you burn calories more efficiently. "But the problem is that often, the cheat day becomes a massive food-eating contest," says Joey Thurman, celebrity trainer and creator of The Lifestyle Renovation. Going overboard can set you back thousands of calories and make you feel sick and bloated for days to come.
"Many people start out thinking they need to work out seven days a week, which is not always reasonable."
RELATED: When Is It OK to Cheat? The Pros and Cons of Cheat Days Fix It: "Instead of a cheat day, have a cheat meal for each week," says Thurman. "You still can have that donut, pizza, or brownie you've been craving, and get right back on the road to clean, nutritious eating — instead of derailing all your progress and causing yourself to feel sick."

Mistake #3: Not switching up your workouts.

Turns out doing the same Cardio Sculpt workout every day might not be the best idea. "Completing the same workout over and over can be detrimental to weight loss, because our bodies adapt and become more efficient at that mode of exercise," says DailyBurn Fitness/Nutrition coach Tiffany Hill. Similarly, doing all steady-state cardio, without adding strength training or high-intensity intervals, can also sabotage your efforts, says personal trainer Mike Chang, creator of Six Pack Shortcuts. "You can spend a month on a treadmill and see very few results, and end up looking worse if you're not careful," he says. "Too much cardio can get rid of the muscle that makes you look good." RELATED: 3 Quick HIIT Workouts for Beginners Fix It: To ensure you're getting enough variety in your workouts, Hill recommends regularly adjusting the frequency, intensity, time, or type of workout. (You can remember that using the acronym FITT.) "Following a running program such as Couch to 5K is a good example of an exercise progression," she says. "Each week, the running phase increases gradually." To be sure you're building muscle and keeping your metabolism revved, add high-intensity intervals and weight or resistance training to your routine at least twice a week. [caption id="attachment_41550" align="alignnone" width="620"]The 10 Biggest Weight Loss Mistakes, According to Experts Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Mistake #4: Restricting yourself too much.

Step away from the juice cleanses. "Going on a strict diet forever is simply not realistic, unless you have a lot of extra time on your hands and the willpower to never to eat out again," jokes Chang. "If you want to lose weight, you have to think about sustainability." And even if you are able to stick to a super low-calorie meal plan without falling off the wagon, your body could kick into starvation mode, expending fewer calories in an effort to preserve energy. RELATED: Detoxing for Beach Season? Here’s Your 5-Day Plan Fix It: Instead of worrying so much about the number of calories you're eating, focus on the quality of those calories, says Allie Whitesides, DailyBurn Fitness/Nutrition coach. "Eat food that you prepare, less packaged goods, and include a balance of protein, healthy fats, whole grains, and lots of fresh veggies and fruits." Follow these steps and you'll find yourself naturally eating a healthy number of calories, without feeling hungry or deprived.

Mistake #5: Not taking a rest day.

When starting a workout program, it’s crucial to give your body (and mind) adequate recovery days. "Many people start out thinking they need to work out seven days a week, which is not always reasonable," says Whitesides. "When they end up missing a day or two they become discouraged and often give up completely." RELATED: 5 Foam Rolling Moves You Aren’t Doing (But Should) Fix It: To beat burnout, schedule a day or two of rest each week, and be sure to set reasonable goals that fit your lifestyle. "Always listen to your body, and if you are too sore to work out, take an active recovery day," says Whitesides. Go for a walk with your family, take a leisurely bike ride or do some gentle yoga.

Mistake #6: Giving exercise too much credit.

You can’t out-exercise a bad diet. "When it comes to weight loss, nutrition needs to be on point in order for your physical activity efforts to shine through," says Hill. "This is especially true for people just beginning an exercise routine, because easy to moderate physical activity doesn’t burn a lot of calories." For example, walking at three miles per hour for 30 minutes burns less than 150 calories — equal to or less than most candy or snack bars. RELATED: Should You Eat Before a Workout? Fix It: Ditch the mindset that just because you worked out, you can eat whatever you want. But don't let a strict diet keep you from exercising, either. "It's still important because it will help with increasing your mood, boosting energy and promoting better sleep," says Hill. "Focus on these immediate gains of physical activity, and weight loss will follow suit."

Mistake #7: Focusing too much on the scale.

Many of Mosier's clients obsessively check the scale, and are then disappointed if the number isn’t moving. But many factors can play into a person's weight, he says, including body composition, hydration levels and food you’ve eaten. "Weight can fluctuate, so jumping on the scale daily doesn’t give an accurate snapshot of how you’re actually doing."
"People who eat like birds at breakfast often become hungry and overeat at lunch and dinner."
RELATED: 7 Weight Loss Tips When the Scale Won’t Budge Fix It: Weigh yourself once a month and take measurements of your body to track changes, says Mosier. "Measurements can be taken anywhere you want to lose inches, with the most common being the waist, hips, thighs and upper arms."

Mistake #8: Not getting enough sleep.

Pay attention to zzz’s just as much as LBs. "One of the biggest mistakes I see people make is not giving enough emphasis to the unsung heroes of weight loss, like sleep and stress," says trainer and sports nutritionist Rob Sulaver, founder of Bandana Training. "If you want to create the ideal fat loss conditions for your body, you have to manage your stress levels and make sure the quantity and quality of your sleep is on point." RELATED: The Hidden Ways Sleep Deprivation Can Lead to Weight Gain Fix It: Before you even think about a diet and exercise plan, make sure you're getting enough shuteye. (The magic number of hours is different for everyone, but most studies suggest it's around seven — although very active people likely need more.) If you're stressed, find healthy ways to relieve tension, like regular yoga sessions, meditation, or hitting a punching bag in boxing class.

Mistake #9: Skimping on breakfast.

"People who eat like birds at breakfast often become hungry and overeat at lunch and dinner," says sports nutritionist Kate Davis, MS, RD, CSSD, LDN. While your morning meal may not be as important to weight loss as it was once believed, studies do show that eating early (especially high-protein meals) can increase dopamine levels, which may reduce cravings throughout the day. RELATED: 9 Healthy Breakfast Recipes Ready in 15 Minutes or Less Fix It: "Flip your thinking and make breakfast your largest meal of the day," says Davis. "Eat relatively less as the day goes on to keep yourself from becoming over-hungry." Can't swing a big breakfast on work days? A recent study found that a quick bowl of oatmeal first thing in the a.m. can help you eat 50 percent less at lunch.

Mistake #10: Gunning for six-pack abs.

"You can perform crunches until you’re blue in the face, but this doesn’t mean you’re actually burning fat from your abdominal area," says Hill. That's because the idea that you can "spot reduce" simply isn't true. In order to lose weight, you have to burn calories — and when you do, the body sheds fat all over, not just in one specific spot. Fix It: For the biggest calorie burn, focus on exercises that increase your heart rate and target large muscle groups — like the chest, back and legs. (Hill recommends squats, deadlifts, push-ups and bent-over rows.) Incorporate high-intensity interval training into your routine, as well. "You’ll burn more calories in less time, and this type of physical activity can work for you due to the afterburn effect." For no-equipment workouts you can do at home, head to DailyBurn.com and try it free for 30 days. 

The post The 10 Biggest Diet Mistakes, According to Experts appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
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What the Heck Are Macros? The IIFYM Diet Made Simple http://dailyburn.com/life/health/if-it-fits-your-macros-iifym-diet/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/if-it-fits-your-macros-iifym-diet/#comments Wed, 15 Jul 2015 15:15:01 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=35649 IIFYM If It Fits Your Macros Diet

[caption id="attachment_35651" align="alignnone" width="620"]IIFYM If It Fits Your Macros Diet Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Can you get lean eating cheeseburgers? The IIFYM (If It Fits Your Macros) diet says order up. Well, sort of...

While many diets are meticulous about which foods you can and can’t eat, how much you can have, and even when you consume it, for some people, the excessive restrictions can be a recipe for failure.

Instead, the IIFYM diet aims to get away from that — focusing on the three most important energy sources needed for our bodies to function properly. We're talking about protein, carbohydrates and fat (aka macronutrients, or macros). How it works: Calculate your daily caloric needs, then split those calories into 40 percent carbohydrates, 40 percent protein and 20 percent fat, the ratio that IIFYM proponents say is the most effective for muscle growth, fat burning and consistent energy levels.

Keep in mind, there has been some debate on whether or not this diet is in fact more or less effective than “eating clean,” and if a calorie is a calorie regardless of the macro composition of the diet you’re following. However, some studies support it and numerous individuals have reported success with this diet. If you think IIFYM could work for you, here’s what you need to know.

RELATED: When Is It OK to Cheat? The Pros and Cons of Cheat Days

If It Fits Your Macros: The Overall Equation

The first step in the IIFYM plan is to figure out how much energy (i.e. calories)  your body uses in a given day. The amount of calories you burn just by virtue of breathing and performing other vital functions is known as the basal metabolic rate, or BMR. Below, use the calculators to find out a rough estimate of your caloric needs, based on the Mifflin-St. Jeor equation. Later you'll adjust this number based on your activity level.

[CP_CALCULATED_FIELDS id="6"]

[CP_CALCULATED_FIELDS id ="7"]

Next, you have to take into account how active you are. Leslie Bonci, MPH, RD, CSSD, LDN, Director of Sports Nutrition at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, points out that adding calories based on activity level is a guesstimate and not a precise science. That said, there are general ranges she recommends using for men and women:

  • Lightly Active = BMR x 1.3-1.4
  • Moderately Active = BMR x 1.5-1.6
  • Very Active = BMR x 1.7-1.8

Add in calories for your activity levels, and then divide those calories into 40 percent carbohydrates, 40 percent protein and 20 percent fat. Remember that you want every meal to fit this 40/40/20 set-up. If it fits into your macro ratio, you can feel free to eat it.

Everything from roasted chicken to pizza can be “diet-friendly” if it hits your macros. Sound too good to be true? We asked Bonci to further explain IIFYM and why it can work.

RELATED: 5 Apps to Track Macros on the Go

Personalizing the IIFYM Diet

“As a starting point, it is always a good idea to log what you’re eating, then analyze it according to a program and see what would need to change for you to eat in a 40/40/20 way,” says Bonci. This way you can tell if drastic differences will need to take place, or if you’re already close to the ratio, which is a good jumping off point.

Find yourself far from the 40/40/20 ideal? Consider a 150-pound, 5’9” male who exercises five times a week as an example.

“He might need 2,550 calories to maintain weight [based on BMR and activity level calculations above] for the amount of exercise he does,” says Bonci. Here’s how he’d break that down in order to eat according to IIFYM.

RELATED: 12 Brilliant Meal Prep Ideas to Free Up Your Time

[caption id="attachment_20053" align="alignnone" width="620"]Sweet Potato Fries Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Carbohydrate Intake

To figure out his carbohydrate needs, he’d apply the following calculation:

  • 2,550 (total calories) x .40 (percentage of calories from carbohydrates) = 1,020

A gram of carbohydrates is about four calories, so divide the calories by four and you get 255 grams of carbs. That’s how many he’d need every day.

In theory, IIFYM doesn’t care if you get those carbohydrates from sweet potatoes or ice cream. As long as it’s within your ratio, you’re good to go. In practice, you’ll likely work out harder and better with a belly full of spinach, though, rather than you will if you’re loaded up with buffalo mac and cheese.

Also, keep in mind that endurance athletes will need to adjust their carbohydrate levels accordingly. “For someone exercising five days a week I would probably recommend a daily carb intake of three grams per pound or closer to 450 grams of carbohydrates a day,” she says.

“The more activity one does, the higher the carbohydrate requirements will be. But there is something to be said for being selective,” says Bonci. “Going for whole grains and higher fiber carbs will help you get the most nutritional value.”

RELATED: The Ultimate Guide to Pre and Post-Workout Carbohydrates

[caption id="attachment_22626" align="alignnone" width="620"]Chimichurri Steak Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Protein Intake

Protein will have the same calculation as carbs:

  • 2,550 (total calories) x .40 (percentage of calories from protein) = 1,020

Again, every gram of protein is approximately four calories, so divide the protein calories by four and you get 255 grams. This can be consumed as lean turkey or chicken breast, but if you’re going to put down some double cheeseburgers, be sure to factor in the amount of fat from the red meat and the carbohydrates from the bun as well.

Bonci has some personal reservations on IIFYM’s protein recommendations. “I should note that the maximum recommended amount of daily protein intake according to the Dietary Reference Intake data from the USDA is 0.9 to one gram per pound bodyweight,” says Bonci. “This comes out to be 135 to 150 grams of protein a day for this 150-pound man, so we have the potential for a protein overload if he’s aiming for the suggested 225 grams suggested above.”

RELATED: This Is What 25 Grams of Protein Looks Like 

[caption id="attachment_26654" align="alignnone" width="620"]Avocado Salad Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Fat Intake

The calculation goes through a slight adjustment for fat:

  • 2,550 (total calories) x .20 (percentage of calories from fat) = 510 calories

Since each gram of fat equals about nine calories, that amounts to about 46 grams of fat every day, which, according to Bonci, might be low for some athletes. “Fat guidelines actually range from 10 to 35 percent of daily calories and 20 percent fat may not be appropriate or adequate for all,” she says. “If one does primarily endurance exercise, the body uses fat as an energy source, so needs are higher.”

While you are allowed to on IIFYM, eating sticks of butter wrapped in bacon for your fat intake isn’t recommended. “Focus on good fats: nuts, nut butters, seeds, seed butters, olive oil, avocados.”

The beauty of IIFYM is the flexibility — you can adjust the ratios to fit your caloric needs and you can choose from any food to fill those needs. As an athlete, you’ll likely stick with complex carbs, lean protein and healthy fats, but IIFYM won’t put you on a guilt trip for the occasional pizza dinner or fried chicken lunch.

Originally posted December 2014. Updated July 2015. 

The post What the Heck Are Macros? The IIFYM Diet Made Simple appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
IIFYM If It Fits Your Macros Diet

[caption id="attachment_35651" align="alignnone" width="620"]IIFYM If It Fits Your Macros Diet Photo: Pond5[/caption] Can you get lean eating cheeseburgers? The IIFYM (If It Fits Your Macros) diet says order up. Well, sort of... While many diets are meticulous about which foods you can and can’t eat, how much you can have, and even when you consume it, for some people, the excessive restrictions can be a recipe for failure. Instead, the IIFYM diet aims to get away from that — focusing on the three most important energy sources needed for our bodies to function properly. We're talking about protein, carbohydrates and fat (aka macronutrients, or macros). How it works: Calculate your daily caloric needs, then split those calories into 40 percent carbohydrates, 40 percent protein and 20 percent fat, the ratio that IIFYM proponents say is the most effective for muscle growth, fat burning and consistent energy levels. Keep in mind, there has been some debate on whether or not this diet is in fact more or less effective than “eating clean,” and if a calorie is a calorie regardless of the macro composition of the diet you’re following. However, some studies support it and numerous individuals have reported success with this diet. If you think IIFYM could work for you, here’s what you need to know. RELATED: When Is It OK to Cheat? The Pros and Cons of Cheat Days

If It Fits Your Macros: The Overall Equation

The first step in the IIFYM plan is to figure out how much energy (i.e. calories)  your body uses in a given day. The amount of calories you burn just by virtue of breathing and performing other vital functions is known as the basal metabolic rate, or BMR. Below, use the calculators to find out a rough estimate of your caloric needs, based on the Mifflin-St. Jeor equation. Later you'll adjust this number based on your activity level. [CP_CALCULATED_FIELDS id="6"] [CP_CALCULATED_FIELDS id ="7"] Next, you have to take into account how active you are. Leslie Bonci, MPH, RD, CSSD, LDN, Director of Sports Nutrition at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, points out that adding calories based on activity level is a guesstimate and not a precise science. That said, there are general ranges she recommends using for men and women:
  • Lightly Active = BMR x 1.3-1.4
  • Moderately Active = BMR x 1.5-1.6
  • Very Active = BMR x 1.7-1.8
Add in calories for your activity levels, and then divide those calories into 40 percent carbohydrates, 40 percent protein and 20 percent fat. Remember that you want every meal to fit this 40/40/20 set-up. If it fits into your macro ratio, you can feel free to eat it. Everything from roasted chicken to pizza can be “diet-friendly” if it hits your macros. Sound too good to be true? We asked Bonci to further explain IIFYM and why it can work. RELATED: 5 Apps to Track Macros on the Go

Personalizing the IIFYM Diet

“As a starting point, it is always a good idea to log what you’re eating, then analyze it according to a program and see what would need to change for you to eat in a 40/40/20 way,” says Bonci. This way you can tell if drastic differences will need to take place, or if you’re already close to the ratio, which is a good jumping off point. Find yourself far from the 40/40/20 ideal? Consider a 150-pound, 5’9” male who exercises five times a week as an example. “He might need 2,550 calories to maintain weight [based on BMR and activity level calculations above] for the amount of exercise he does,” says Bonci. Here’s how he’d break that down in order to eat according to IIFYM. RELATED: 12 Brilliant Meal Prep Ideas to Free Up Your Time [caption id="attachment_20053" align="alignnone" width="620"]Sweet Potato Fries Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Carbohydrate Intake

To figure out his carbohydrate needs, he’d apply the following calculation:
  • 2,550 (total calories) x .40 (percentage of calories from carbohydrates) = 1,020
A gram of carbohydrates is about four calories, so divide the calories by four and you get 255 grams of carbs. That’s how many he’d need every day. In theory, IIFYM doesn’t care if you get those carbohydrates from sweet potatoes or ice cream. As long as it’s within your ratio, you’re good to go. In practice, you’ll likely work out harder and better with a belly full of spinach, though, rather than you will if you’re loaded up with buffalo mac and cheese. Also, keep in mind that endurance athletes will need to adjust their carbohydrate levels accordingly. “For someone exercising five days a week I would probably recommend a daily carb intake of three grams per pound or closer to 450 grams of carbohydrates a day,” she says. “The more activity one does, the higher the carbohydrate requirements will be. But there is something to be said for being selective,” says Bonci. “Going for whole grains and higher fiber carbs will help you get the most nutritional value.” RELATED: The Ultimate Guide to Pre and Post-Workout Carbohydrates [caption id="attachment_22626" align="alignnone" width="620"]Chimichurri Steak Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Protein Intake

Protein will have the same calculation as carbs:
  • 2,550 (total calories) x .40 (percentage of calories from protein) = 1,020
Again, every gram of protein is approximately four calories, so divide the protein calories by four and you get 255 grams. This can be consumed as lean turkey or chicken breast, but if you’re going to put down some double cheeseburgers, be sure to factor in the amount of fat from the red meat and the carbohydrates from the bun as well. Bonci has some personal reservations on IIFYM’s protein recommendations. “I should note that the maximum recommended amount of daily protein intake according to the Dietary Reference Intake data from the USDA is 0.9 to one gram per pound bodyweight,” says Bonci. “This comes out to be 135 to 150 grams of protein a day for this 150-pound man, so we have the potential for a protein overload if he’s aiming for the suggested 225 grams suggested above.” RELATED: This Is What 25 Grams of Protein Looks Like  [caption id="attachment_26654" align="alignnone" width="620"]Avocado Salad Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Fat Intake

The calculation goes through a slight adjustment for fat:
  • 2,550 (total calories) x .20 (percentage of calories from fat) = 510 calories
Since each gram of fat equals about nine calories, that amounts to about 46 grams of fat every day, which, according to Bonci, might be low for some athletes. “Fat guidelines actually range from 10 to 35 percent of daily calories and 20 percent fat may not be appropriate or adequate for all,” she says. “If one does primarily endurance exercise, the body uses fat as an energy source, so needs are higher.” While you are allowed to on IIFYM, eating sticks of butter wrapped in bacon for your fat intake isn’t recommended. “Focus on good fats: nuts, nut butters, seeds, seed butters, olive oil, avocados.” The beauty of IIFYM is the flexibility — you can adjust the ratios to fit your caloric needs and you can choose from any food to fill those needs. As an athlete, you’ll likely stick with complex carbs, lean protein and healthy fats, but IIFYM won’t put you on a guilt trip for the occasional pizza dinner or fried chicken lunch. Originally posted December 2014. Updated July 2015. 

The post What the Heck Are Macros? The IIFYM Diet Made Simple appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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5 Ways to Eat Healthy When Your Family Doesn’t http://dailyburn.com/life/health/diet-healthy-family-meals/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/diet-healthy-family-meals/#comments Tue, 07 Jul 2015 11:15:30 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=41199 5 Ways to Eat Healthy When Your Family Doesn’t

[caption id="attachment_41204" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Ways to Eat Healthy When Your Family Doesn’t Want to Diet Photo: Pond5[/caption]

You’re ready to whip your diet into shape and start eating healthy. You can just see your future — you’ll be more energetic, happier and healthier. The only snag in your plan: Your family. Maybe it’s your partner who isn’t ready to give up the ice cream and chips or your kids who think veggies are the world’s grossest foods.

RELATED: 6 Weight Loss Success Stories to Motivate You Right Now

It’s a plight that registered dietitian and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics spokesperson Sarah Krieger hears too often. “Having your family on board is important to helping you reach your goals,” she says. The good news is that it is possible get your household on track. And if they still refuse? Well, then we’ll show you how to do it solo.

How to Get Your Family to Eat Healthy

When your entire family has your back, health habits are just easier. In one preliminary study, dieters who participated in exercise and nutrition activities with two to seven friends or family members lost more weight and trimmed more belly fat, compared to those who were simply given information about how to lose weight. Do it with your family and you’ve got a built-in cheerleading system that makes getting healthy way more fun.

"Be a role model. Start living your healthy lifestyle and don’t talk about it or push the issue.”

RELATED: 7 Weight Loss Tips When the Scale Won’t Budge

Of course, changing how everyone eats can be a challenge to say the least. “Bring up your goals in conversation with your family or partner at a neutral time — not meal time,” says Krieger. Rather than saying things like, “You’re making me eat this way” or, “I don’t understand why you want to eat this crap,” say “I can’t do this alone” or “I need your help.” That can open up a conversation about how to build a healthier home without making your loved ones feel like they’re under attack.

What to Do When Your Family Can’t Quit Junk Food

If you’re in a salad state of mind, but your partner is still on the “Let’s go out and order all…the…food” train, he or she may unintentionally sabotage your efforts. But if the chips and ice cream still lurking in your pantry are driving you insane, just make like Elsa and let it go.

RELATED: 9 Bloggers Who Changed Their Lives One Post at a Time

Instead of getting stressed or frustrated, tell your partner or kids that you want to eat healthy for you, and that they don’t have to participate. “We tell people that if you’re ready but your house isn’t, then be a role model. Start living your healthy lifestyle and don’t talk about it or push the issue,” says Krieger. Even if they’re reluctant at first, they’ll often start to follow as they watch you — and see how great you feel.

So if your partner or kids want to keep the cheese curls and nuggets around, let them. “It’s not fair to say, ‘You have to get that food out because I can’t handle it,’” says Krieger. One practical way to deal: Keep the tempting foods relatively hidden — store them in the cupboard, not on the countertop or front-row in the fridge. Read on for more tips on how to stick to your diet, no matter what your family does.

[caption id="attachment_41205" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Ways to Eat Healthy When Your Family Doesn’t Want to Diet Photo: Pond5[/caption]

5 Tips for Eating Healthy Family Meals

1. Make meal prep a family activity. If your kids are just learning about the joys of fruits and veggies, or feel ‘meh’ about anything that doesn't look like a slice of pizza, involve them in meal planning and prep. One person in your family can pick the meal for one night, and the other the next night, recommends Krieger.

RELATED: 12 Brilliant Meal Prep Ideas to Free Up Your Time

2. Avoid the “H word.” To expand your family’s taste buds, pick out a new nutritious meal to try once or twice per week. “But don’t call it healthy,” says Krieger. The h-bomb can scare people away. Instead, describe tonight’s dinner as a delicious chicken stir-fry or a yummy meat pasta (that just happens to be made with zucchini noodles).

3. Go slow. “So many people want to make tons of changes at the same time, but these high expectations burn families out really quick,” says Krieger, who offers healthy eating classes. “In my nine-week class, we make one simple change per week,” she adds. Maybe one week you swap sugary cereals for lower sugar options. Or you take two weeks to slowly phase out sodas and sweet teas. Enact a complete overhaul and there will be rebellion.

RELATED: 30-Minute Meals for Quick, Healthy Dinner Ideas

4. Recruit a new crew. If your partner or family won’t join you, hook up with a different community. Online dieters who got more social support from others who logged on too lost more weight (at least 8 percent of their body weight) than those who were going it solo, according to a Northwestern University study.

5. Don’t give up. Not every meal will go perfectly. Your kids might tell you that whole-wheat bread tastes gross compared to white, or you might whip up a new low-cal recipe that’s just not a winner. Still, keep going — you and your entire family will benefit in the long run. Eating at least three meals per week as a family is associated with kids who eat more nutritious diets and are at a healthier weight, according to research from the University of Illinois. Give it time — and your loved ones will follow. “As long as you’re eating nutritious foods every day, you’re winning,” says Krieger.

The post 5 Ways to Eat Healthy When Your Family Doesn’t appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
5 Ways to Eat Healthy When Your Family Doesn’t

[caption id="attachment_41204" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Ways to Eat Healthy When Your Family Doesn’t Want to Diet Photo: Pond5[/caption] You’re ready to whip your diet into shape and start eating healthy. You can just see your future — you’ll be more energetic, happier and healthier. The only snag in your plan: Your family. Maybe it’s your partner who isn’t ready to give up the ice cream and chips or your kids who think veggies are the world’s grossest foods. RELATED: 6 Weight Loss Success Stories to Motivate You Right Now It’s a plight that registered dietitian and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics spokesperson Sarah Krieger hears too often. “Having your family on board is important to helping you reach your goals,” she says. The good news is that it is possible get your household on track. And if they still refuse? Well, then we’ll show you how to do it solo.

How to Get Your Family to Eat Healthy

When your entire family has your back, health habits are just easier. In one preliminary study, dieters who participated in exercise and nutrition activities with two to seven friends or family members lost more weight and trimmed more belly fat, compared to those who were simply given information about how to lose weight. Do it with your family and you’ve got a built-in cheerleading system that makes getting healthy way more fun.
"Be a role model. Start living your healthy lifestyle and don’t talk about it or push the issue.”
RELATED: 7 Weight Loss Tips When the Scale Won’t Budge Of course, changing how everyone eats can be a challenge to say the least. “Bring up your goals in conversation with your family or partner at a neutral time — not meal time,” says Krieger. Rather than saying things like, “You’re making me eat this way” or, “I don’t understand why you want to eat this crap,” say “I can’t do this alone” or “I need your help.” That can open up a conversation about how to build a healthier home without making your loved ones feel like they’re under attack.

What to Do When Your Family Can’t Quit Junk Food

If you’re in a salad state of mind, but your partner is still on the “Let’s go out and order all…the…food” train, he or she may unintentionally sabotage your efforts. But if the chips and ice cream still lurking in your pantry are driving you insane, just make like Elsa and let it go. RELATED: 9 Bloggers Who Changed Their Lives One Post at a Time Instead of getting stressed or frustrated, tell your partner or kids that you want to eat healthy for you, and that they don’t have to participate. “We tell people that if you’re ready but your house isn’t, then be a role model. Start living your healthy lifestyle and don’t talk about it or push the issue,” says Krieger. Even if they’re reluctant at first, they’ll often start to follow as they watch you — and see how great you feel. So if your partner or kids want to keep the cheese curls and nuggets around, let them. “It’s not fair to say, ‘You have to get that food out because I can’t handle it,’” says Krieger. One practical way to deal: Keep the tempting foods relatively hidden — store them in the cupboard, not on the countertop or front-row in the fridge. Read on for more tips on how to stick to your diet, no matter what your family does. [caption id="attachment_41205" align="alignnone" width="620"]5 Ways to Eat Healthy When Your Family Doesn’t Want to Diet Photo: Pond5[/caption]

5 Tips for Eating Healthy Family Meals

1. Make meal prep a family activity. If your kids are just learning about the joys of fruits and veggies, or feel ‘meh’ about anything that doesn't look like a slice of pizza, involve them in meal planning and prep. One person in your family can pick the meal for one night, and the other the next night, recommends Krieger. RELATED: 12 Brilliant Meal Prep Ideas to Free Up Your Time 2. Avoid the “H word.” To expand your family’s taste buds, pick out a new nutritious meal to try once or twice per week. “But don’t call it healthy,” says Krieger. The h-bomb can scare people away. Instead, describe tonight’s dinner as a delicious chicken stir-fry or a yummy meat pasta (that just happens to be made with zucchini noodles). 3. Go slow. “So many people want to make tons of changes at the same time, but these high expectations burn families out really quick,” says Krieger, who offers healthy eating classes. “In my nine-week class, we make one simple change per week,” she adds. Maybe one week you swap sugary cereals for lower sugar options. Or you take two weeks to slowly phase out sodas and sweet teas. Enact a complete overhaul and there will be rebellion. RELATED: 30-Minute Meals for Quick, Healthy Dinner Ideas 4. Recruit a new crew. If your partner or family won’t join you, hook up with a different community. Online dieters who got more social support from others who logged on too lost more weight (at least 8 percent of their body weight) than those who were going it solo, according to a Northwestern University study. 5. Don’t give up. Not every meal will go perfectly. Your kids might tell you that whole-wheat bread tastes gross compared to white, or you might whip up a new low-cal recipe that’s just not a winner. Still, keep going — you and your entire family will benefit in the long run. Eating at least three meals per week as a family is associated with kids who eat more nutritious diets and are at a healthier weight, according to research from the University of Illinois. Give it time — and your loved ones will follow. “As long as you’re eating nutritious foods every day, you’re winning,” says Krieger.

The post 5 Ways to Eat Healthy When Your Family Doesn’t appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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The Ultimate Guide to Pre and Post-Workout Carbohydrates http://dailyburn.com/life/health/carbohydrates-pre-post-workout-carbs/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/carbohydrates-pre-post-workout-carbs/#comments Mon, 06 Jul 2015 11:15:16 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=41191 The Ultimate Guide to Pre and Post-Workout Carbohydrates

[caption id="attachment_41196" align="alignnone" width="620"]The Ultimate Guide to Pre and Post-Workout Carbohydrates Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Can’t imagine a world without carbs? Whether it’s the Ketogenic, Dukan or LCHF diet, sometimes it seems like everyone is jumping on the low-carb bandwagon. But if you’re dedicated to seeing gains at the gym, upping your running mileage or HIITing it hard, cutting carbs might be the last thing you want to do. “Nothing makes me want to bang my head into the wall more than when I hear people promoting low-carb diets for performance,” says strength coach Tony Gentilcore, C.S.C.S., co-founder of Cressey Sports Performance. “Carbs are what fuels that performance, and what allows you to really burn calories and build muscle.”

RELATED: 3 HIIT Workouts to Take to the Beach

That’s because carbohydrates — whether they’re floating around in your blood as glucose or stored in your muscles and liver as glycogen — are your body’s favorite fuel for high-intensity exercise, says Susan Kleiner, Ph.D., R.D., author of Power Eating and a sports nutrition consultant to top NFL, NBA, and Olympic athletes.

Here’s why carbs are your friend, not your enemy.

Why Low-Carb Diets Hurt Performance

Ready to crush some treadmill sprints? Well, willpower alone won’t get you there. The secret sauce that will take your workouts to the next level is, you guessed it, carbs. When you train really hard, above 70 percent of your VO2 max (a measure of the peak amount of oxygen your body can take in and use in a minute), about 80 percent of your energy comes from glucose and glycogen, Kleiner says. This doesn’t just apply to marathoners, either. A recent study published in Sports Medicine showed that carbs boost not only marathon performance, but high-intensity interval training as well.

When your brain is deprived of bagels and other good stuff, it flips into self-protective mode and restricts the amount of carbohydrates your muscles can use. After all, your brain wants to make sure it gets all of the carbs it needs, too. About 90 percent of its energy comes from carbs. The result: Your workouts plummet. Plus, since you’re so low on energy, they still feel grueling. “Without carbs, you perceive that you’re training at a high level, but your actual energy level output is low,” Kleiner says. Your performance and results go nowhere fast.

RELATED: What Happens to Your Body When You Skip the Gym

And quite frankly, low-carb diets can make athletes feel like crap. “The low-carb diet craze has been a boon to my practice,” Kleiner says. “People come into my office in droves trying to figure out what’s wrong with them. They say their performance is going down. They say they are training harder but getting softer.”

[caption id="attachment_41197" align="alignnone" width="620"]The Ultimate Guide to Pre and Post-Workout Carbohydrates Photo: Pond5[/caption]

How to Fuel Your Workouts with Carbs

Not everybody needs to carbo-load like they’re Meb Keflezighi. The amount of carbohydrates you need depends on how hard you’re exercising. If you’re going for a light jog, you don’t need a ton of carbs. But if you’re running long distances, performing weight lifting workouts or even doing a 20-minute HIIT session, you’re going to need some carbs in the tank, Kleiner says.

Your formula for success: Most active people should eat about two grams of carbs per pound of body weight every day, whether they’re vying for improved performance or weight-loss, she says. After all, to burn the most calories and fat during your workout, you need to run faster, lift heavier, and jump higher than you did before.

That being said, not all carbs are created equal. Throughout the day, aim to consume carbs with a low glycemic index (GI); they’ll provide sustained energy rather than spiking your blood sugar. Choose whole food sources of carbohydrates, like fruits, non-starchy vegetables, and whole grains, Gentilcore says. Your picks should be rich in fiber, and it’s always smart to pair them with lean protein and healthy fats.

RELATED: 6 Easy Tips for Clean Eating on a Small Budget

90 Minutes Before Your Workout

About 90 minutes before a tough workout, it’s time to fuel up. At minimum, you need to eat one gram of carbs per kilogram of your body weight per hour of planned exercise, Kleiner says. So, if you weigh 68 kg (that’s 150 pounds), multiply that by how much time you’re spending working out that day. Hitting the gym for an hour and a half? You’d need a total of 102 grams of carbs.

If You’ve Only Got a Half-Hour…

When you’re looking for a quick fix of fuel, forget about whole grains. Reach for white bread, pretzels, white potatoes without the skins or bagels — you know, the refined carbs you typically try to avoid, Gentilcore says. “The more refined, the faster it will empty from stomach,” Kleiner says. Opt for carbs that are high GI, meaning they will significantly raise your blood sugar, and also quickly empty from your stomach into your bloodstream. After all, you can’t use that potato for energy until you’ve digested it — and running with a full stomach just sucks, she says.

RELATED: Carb Loading for Runners: How to Prep for Race Day

Now is also the time to bust out your sports nutrition drinks, blocks and gels. They can spike your blood sugar quickly, and without putting a lot of stuff in your stomach. Take them about 30 minutes before hitting the gym and periodically throughout hour-plus endurance workouts. And, in case you were wondering, when you spike your blood sugar heading into exercise, your body doesn’t store the sugar as fat. It gets used as pure, calorie-burning, muscle-building energy, Kleiner says. Score.

What to Eat After a Workout (Hint: More Carbs)

You dominated your workout and you’re feeling like a sweaty beast (in the best way possible). Now what? Well, you need even more carbs — paired with protein, of course, Gentilcore says. Apart from helping your body restock its glycogen stores so you aren’t energy-drained for the rest of the day, carbs can help you build muscle. According to research in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, insulin, which your body releases when you eat carbs, helps protein build muscle more effectively.

RELATED: How to Choose the Best Protein Powder for You

Embrace your inner kid and grab low-fat chocolate milk, Gentilcore recommends. Like commercial recovery beverages, it boasts a 4:1 carbohydrate-to-protein ratio, which is ideal for muscle recovery. In fact, research from Central Washington University shows that drinking it immediately after exercising and again two hours later is optimum for muscle synthesis. Likewise, Gentilcore advises scheduling your next meal — armed with non-starchy, fiber-rich carbs — to fall within an hour or two after you finish up a workout. Dig in, you deserve it.

The post The Ultimate Guide to Pre and Post-Workout Carbohydrates appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
The Ultimate Guide to Pre and Post-Workout Carbohydrates

[caption id="attachment_41196" align="alignnone" width="620"]The Ultimate Guide to Pre and Post-Workout Carbohydrates Photo: Pond5[/caption] Can’t imagine a world without carbs? Whether it’s the Ketogenic, Dukan or LCHF diet, sometimes it seems like everyone is jumping on the low-carb bandwagon. But if you’re dedicated to seeing gains at the gym, upping your running mileage or HIITing it hard, cutting carbs might be the last thing you want to do. “Nothing makes me want to bang my head into the wall more than when I hear people promoting low-carb diets for performance,” says strength coach Tony Gentilcore, C.S.C.S., co-founder of Cressey Sports Performance. “Carbs are what fuels that performance, and what allows you to really burn calories and build muscle.” RELATED: 3 HIIT Workouts to Take to the Beach That’s because carbohydrates — whether they’re floating around in your blood as glucose or stored in your muscles and liver as glycogen — are your body’s favorite fuel for high-intensity exercise, says Susan Kleiner, Ph.D., R.D., author of Power Eating and a sports nutrition consultant to top NFL, NBA, and Olympic athletes. Here’s why carbs are your friend, not your enemy.

Why Low-Carb Diets Hurt Performance

Ready to crush some treadmill sprints? Well, willpower alone won’t get you there. The secret sauce that will take your workouts to the next level is, you guessed it, carbs. When you train really hard, above 70 percent of your VO2 max (a measure of the peak amount of oxygen your body can take in and use in a minute), about 80 percent of your energy comes from glucose and glycogen, Kleiner says. This doesn’t just apply to marathoners, either. A recent study published in Sports Medicine showed that carbs boost not only marathon performance, but high-intensity interval training as well. When your brain is deprived of bagels and other good stuff, it flips into self-protective mode and restricts the amount of carbohydrates your muscles can use. After all, your brain wants to make sure it gets all of the carbs it needs, too. About 90 percent of its energy comes from carbs. The result: Your workouts plummet. Plus, since you’re so low on energy, they still feel grueling. “Without carbs, you perceive that you’re training at a high level, but your actual energy level output is low,” Kleiner says. Your performance and results go nowhere fast. RELATED: What Happens to Your Body When You Skip the Gym And quite frankly, low-carb diets can make athletes feel like crap. “The low-carb diet craze has been a boon to my practice,” Kleiner says. “People come into my office in droves trying to figure out what’s wrong with them. They say their performance is going down. They say they are training harder but getting softer.” [caption id="attachment_41197" align="alignnone" width="620"]The Ultimate Guide to Pre and Post-Workout Carbohydrates Photo: Pond5[/caption]

How to Fuel Your Workouts with Carbs

Not everybody needs to carbo-load like they’re Meb Keflezighi. The amount of carbohydrates you need depends on how hard you’re exercising. If you’re going for a light jog, you don’t need a ton of carbs. But if you’re running long distances, performing weight lifting workouts or even doing a 20-minute HIIT session, you’re going to need some carbs in the tank, Kleiner says. Your formula for success: Most active people should eat about two grams of carbs per pound of body weight every day, whether they’re vying for improved performance or weight-loss, she says. After all, to burn the most calories and fat during your workout, you need to run faster, lift heavier, and jump higher than you did before. That being said, not all carbs are created equal. Throughout the day, aim to consume carbs with a low glycemic index (GI); they’ll provide sustained energy rather than spiking your blood sugar. Choose whole food sources of carbohydrates, like fruits, non-starchy vegetables, and whole grains, Gentilcore says. Your picks should be rich in fiber, and it’s always smart to pair them with lean protein and healthy fats. RELATED: 6 Easy Tips for Clean Eating on a Small Budget 90 Minutes Before Your Workout About 90 minutes before a tough workout, it’s time to fuel up. At minimum, you need to eat one gram of carbs per kilogram of your body weight per hour of planned exercise, Kleiner says. So, if you weigh 68 kg (that’s 150 pounds), multiply that by how much time you’re spending working out that day. Hitting the gym for an hour and a half? You’d need a total of 102 grams of carbs. If You’ve Only Got a Half-Hour… When you’re looking for a quick fix of fuel, forget about whole grains. Reach for white bread, pretzels, white potatoes without the skins or bagels — you know, the refined carbs you typically try to avoid, Gentilcore says. “The more refined, the faster it will empty from stomach,” Kleiner says. Opt for carbs that are high GI, meaning they will significantly raise your blood sugar, and also quickly empty from your stomach into your bloodstream. After all, you can’t use that potato for energy until you’ve digested it — and running with a full stomach just sucks, she says. RELATED: Carb Loading for Runners: How to Prep for Race Day Now is also the time to bust out your sports nutrition drinks, blocks and gels. They can spike your blood sugar quickly, and without putting a lot of stuff in your stomach. Take them about 30 minutes before hitting the gym and periodically throughout hour-plus endurance workouts. And, in case you were wondering, when you spike your blood sugar heading into exercise, your body doesn’t store the sugar as fat. It gets used as pure, calorie-burning, muscle-building energy, Kleiner says. Score.

What to Eat After a Workout (Hint: More Carbs)

You dominated your workout and you’re feeling like a sweaty beast (in the best way possible). Now what? Well, you need even more carbs — paired with protein, of course, Gentilcore says. Apart from helping your body restock its glycogen stores so you aren’t energy-drained for the rest of the day, carbs can help you build muscle. According to research in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, insulin, which your body releases when you eat carbs, helps protein build muscle more effectively. RELATED: How to Choose the Best Protein Powder for You Embrace your inner kid and grab low-fat chocolate milk, Gentilcore recommends. Like commercial recovery beverages, it boasts a 4:1 carbohydrate-to-protein ratio, which is ideal for muscle recovery. In fact, research from Central Washington University shows that drinking it immediately after exercising and again two hours later is optimum for muscle synthesis. Likewise, Gentilcore advises scheduling your next meal — armed with non-starchy, fiber-rich carbs — to fall within an hour or two after you finish up a workout. Dig in, you deserve it.

The post The Ultimate Guide to Pre and Post-Workout Carbohydrates appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
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5 Ways to Conquer Binge Eating — And When to Seek Help http://dailyburn.com/life/health/binge-eating-disorder/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/binge-eating-disorder/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 11:15:57 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=41061 What You Need to Know About Binge Eating Disorder

[caption id="attachment_41064" align="alignnone" width="620"]What You Need to Know About Binge Eating Disorder Photo: Pond5[/caption]

When Anne-Sophie Reinhardt was trying to lose weight, she’d start the day with black coffee and maybe a slice of toast. But by lunchtime, she’d be so ravenous she’d stuff herself with a huge meal of meat and pasta. That’s when the day would spiral out of control. Next came Nutella-slathered bread and entire bags of jellybeans while watching back-to-back episodes of Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Some days, she’d feast on pizza and fries — occasionally, an entire cake. Then panic would set in, and she’d hit the family treadmill, trying to make a dent in daily calorie totals that could top 10,000. Within six months, Reinhart, then 17 years old, had added 50 pounds to her 5’1” frame and reached her heaviest weight of 150.

RELATED: 5 Ways to Stop Stress Eating From Taking Over Your Brain

“I had a hole in my belly I couldn’t fill,” explains Reinhardt, now 27. “I would fight myself not to get more food, but the urge to overeat would always win out. I wouldn’t even get any enjoyment out of it because I was so busy beating myself up. ‘Why again?’ I’d say. ‘You have to be better tomorrow. This is going to be the last time.’”

What Is Binge Eating Disorder?

Reinhardt was eventually treated for binge eating disorder (BED) which, unlike anorexia and bulimia nervosa, hasn’t received a lot of attention over the years. In 2013, the syndrome, which is estimated to affect five million women and three million men in the U.S., was finally included as a distinct entry in the American Psychiatric Association’s most recent Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. The disorder is characterized by repeatedly eating large amounts of food — and being unable to stop when full. People who binge will often eat when they are not hungry and consume their food quickly, often to the point of being uncomfortable.

RELATED: Orthorexia: When Healthy Eating Becomes an Obsession

The main difference between bingeing and bulimia is that binge eaters do not purge later to prevent weight gain, which is a common side effect of the disorder. One study found that among people entering a weight loss program, about 30 percent suffered from binge eating disorder.

“Satisfy your cravings in moderation so they don’t come back to haunt you.”

Bingers typically eat alone and feel disgusted or embarrassed by their behavior. “A person without the disorder can say, ‘Well, that was just a bad night,’ and shake it off, but the person with binge eating disorder would feel shame and depression,” explains Stacey Rosenfeld, PhD, a Miami-based psychologist and author of Does Every Woman Have an Eating Disorder? Challenging Our Nation's Fixation with Food and Weight. “Also, when you overindulge with other people, you don’t have such severe physical discomfort. Bingers might not be aware of fullness signals. Or they choose discomfort as a way to punish themselves.”

Psychologists are hesitant to define quantities or types of food associated with BED, although Rosenfeld says it’s typically high-fat, high-calorie fare. You just have to binge at least once a week for three months to qualify for the diagnosis. “They key is you’re doing it on a regular basis and feel out of control,” she says. In other words, occasionally overdoing it at summer barbecues probably doesn’t count.

[caption id="attachment_41066" align="alignnone" width="620"]What You Need to Know About Binge Eating Disorder Photo: Pond5[/caption]

How to Stop Binge Eating

If you think you might suffer from binge eating disorder, talk to your doctor to find out how to get help. But even if you don’t fit the criteria, many of us occasionally push our limits and eat way more than our bodies need. Here’s how to prevent an excessive eating episode:

1. Get off the diet roller coaster.
If you severely restrict what you can eat, you’re more likely to overdo it on those forbidden foods later. “It’s a diet-binge cycle,” explains Rosenfeld. “Patients feel deprived and hungry, and the pendulum swings in the other direction.” Case in point: Reinhardt once lost nearly 10 pounds eating kale soup for two weeks straight. Then she returned to her bingeing behavior and gained back the weight. Find a program that includes regular meals and snacks, along with occasional treats so you’ll always feel satiated.

RELATED: When Is It OK to Cheat? The Pros and Cons of Cheat Days

2. Feed your cravings.
Feeling on the verge of chocolate obsession? Eat a gooey truffle or scoop of ice cream before your desire balloons into a brownie-nut-fudge calorie bomb. “Satisfy your cravings in moderation so they don’t come back to haunt you,” says Rosenfeld. “Food is a pleasure. There’s nothing wrong with that. Treat yourself well.”

3. Know your triggers.
Food is often used to numb out uncomfortable feelings, so become aware of which situations (or people!) make you want to overeat. “Try to identify them in advance so you can find other ways of ways of coping,” says Rosenfeld. For example, if you know that getting angry with your husband makes you want to hit a greasy drive-thru, you can go for a walk or call friends next time you're frustrated.

4. Try meditation.
If you’re using food to escape your feelings, regular meditation may help you feel more present in your body and learn to manage uncomfortable emotions. One review of 14 studies on the effect of mindfulness meditation concluded it helped control the disorder, although it didn’t always result in weight loss.

RELATED: 7 Ways to Carve Out Time to Meditate

5. Seek treatment.
Don’t hesitate to get help. Cognitive-behavioral therapy, which helps people manage negative thoughts and behaviors, may help deter binges, according to the American Psychological Association. Talk to your doctor about which treatments might be best for you.

In her early 20s, Reinhardt managed to stop binge eating — but then she went to the other extreme. She ate so little she dropped 65 pounds from her 5’1” frame, leaving her at only 80 pounds. Three months in a residential treatment center helped her heal. So did reading actress Portia di Rossi’s eating disorder memoir Unbearable Lightness: A Story of Loss and Gain, she says. “It was the first time I realized I wasn’t alone.” Now Reinhardt works as a body image coach and believes that helping others keeps her focused on her recovery. She also swears by chronicling her feelings in a journal and engaging in exercises that make her feel more connected to her body. “You’re always going to have days when you struggle,” she says. “So be kind to yourself and find others who understand what you’re going through.”

The post 5 Ways to Conquer Binge Eating — And When to Seek Help appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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What You Need to Know About Binge Eating Disorder

[caption id="attachment_41064" align="alignnone" width="620"]What You Need to Know About Binge Eating Disorder Photo: Pond5[/caption] When Anne-Sophie Reinhardt was trying to lose weight, she’d start the day with black coffee and maybe a slice of toast. But by lunchtime, she’d be so ravenous she’d stuff herself with a huge meal of meat and pasta. That’s when the day would spiral out of control. Next came Nutella-slathered bread and entire bags of jellybeans while watching back-to-back episodes of Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Some days, she’d feast on pizza and fries — occasionally, an entire cake. Then panic would set in, and she’d hit the family treadmill, trying to make a dent in daily calorie totals that could top 10,000. Within six months, Reinhart, then 17 years old, had added 50 pounds to her 5’1” frame and reached her heaviest weight of 150. RELATED: 5 Ways to Stop Stress Eating From Taking Over Your Brain “I had a hole in my belly I couldn’t fill,” explains Reinhardt, now 27. “I would fight myself not to get more food, but the urge to overeat would always win out. I wouldn’t even get any enjoyment out of it because I was so busy beating myself up. ‘Why again?’ I’d say. ‘You have to be better tomorrow. This is going to be the last time.’”

What Is Binge Eating Disorder?

Reinhardt was eventually treated for binge eating disorder (BED) which, unlike anorexia and bulimia nervosa, hasn’t received a lot of attention over the years. In 2013, the syndrome, which is estimated to affect five million women and three million men in the U.S., was finally included as a distinct entry in the American Psychiatric Association’s most recent Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. The disorder is characterized by repeatedly eating large amounts of food — and being unable to stop when full. People who binge will often eat when they are not hungry and consume their food quickly, often to the point of being uncomfortable. RELATED: Orthorexia: When Healthy Eating Becomes an Obsession The main difference between bingeing and bulimia is that binge eaters do not purge later to prevent weight gain, which is a common side effect of the disorder. One study found that among people entering a weight loss program, about 30 percent suffered from binge eating disorder.
“Satisfy your cravings in moderation so they don’t come back to haunt you.”
Bingers typically eat alone and feel disgusted or embarrassed by their behavior. “A person without the disorder can say, ‘Well, that was just a bad night,’ and shake it off, but the person with binge eating disorder would feel shame and depression,” explains Stacey Rosenfeld, PhD, a Miami-based psychologist and author of Does Every Woman Have an Eating Disorder? Challenging Our Nation's Fixation with Food and Weight. “Also, when you overindulge with other people, you don’t have such severe physical discomfort. Bingers might not be aware of fullness signals. Or they choose discomfort as a way to punish themselves.” Psychologists are hesitant to define quantities or types of food associated with BED, although Rosenfeld says it’s typically high-fat, high-calorie fare. You just have to binge at least once a week for three months to qualify for the diagnosis. “They key is you’re doing it on a regular basis and feel out of control,” she says. In other words, occasionally overdoing it at summer barbecues probably doesn’t count. [caption id="attachment_41066" align="alignnone" width="620"]What You Need to Know About Binge Eating Disorder Photo: Pond5[/caption]

How to Stop Binge Eating

If you think you might suffer from binge eating disorder, talk to your doctor to find out how to get help. But even if you don’t fit the criteria, many of us occasionally push our limits and eat way more than our bodies need. Here’s how to prevent an excessive eating episode: 1. Get off the diet roller coaster. If you severely restrict what you can eat, you’re more likely to overdo it on those forbidden foods later. “It’s a diet-binge cycle,” explains Rosenfeld. “Patients feel deprived and hungry, and the pendulum swings in the other direction.” Case in point: Reinhardt once lost nearly 10 pounds eating kale soup for two weeks straight. Then she returned to her bingeing behavior and gained back the weight. Find a program that includes regular meals and snacks, along with occasional treats so you’ll always feel satiated. RELATED: When Is It OK to Cheat? The Pros and Cons of Cheat Days 2. Feed your cravings. Feeling on the verge of chocolate obsession? Eat a gooey truffle or scoop of ice cream before your desire balloons into a brownie-nut-fudge calorie bomb. “Satisfy your cravings in moderation so they don’t come back to haunt you,” says Rosenfeld. “Food is a pleasure. There’s nothing wrong with that. Treat yourself well.” 3. Know your triggers. Food is often used to numb out uncomfortable feelings, so become aware of which situations (or people!) make you want to overeat. “Try to identify them in advance so you can find other ways of ways of coping,” says Rosenfeld. For example, if you know that getting angry with your husband makes you want to hit a greasy drive-thru, you can go for a walk or call friends next time you're frustrated. 4. Try meditation. If you’re using food to escape your feelings, regular meditation may help you feel more present in your body and learn to manage uncomfortable emotions. One review of 14 studies on the effect of mindfulness meditation concluded it helped control the disorder, although it didn’t always result in weight loss. RELATED: 7 Ways to Carve Out Time to Meditate 5. Seek treatment. Don’t hesitate to get help. Cognitive-behavioral therapy, which helps people manage negative thoughts and behaviors, may help deter binges, according to the American Psychological Association. Talk to your doctor about which treatments might be best for you. In her early 20s, Reinhardt managed to stop binge eating — but then she went to the other extreme. She ate so little she dropped 65 pounds from her 5’1” frame, leaving her at only 80 pounds. Three months in a residential treatment center helped her heal. So did reading actress Portia di Rossi’s eating disorder memoir Unbearable Lightness: A Story of Loss and Gain, she says. “It was the first time I realized I wasn’t alone.” Now Reinhardt works as a body image coach and believes that helping others keeps her focused on her recovery. She also swears by chronicling her feelings in a journal and engaging in exercises that make her feel more connected to her body. “You’re always going to have days when you struggle,” she says. “So be kind to yourself and find others who understand what you’re going through.”

The post 5 Ways to Conquer Binge Eating — And When to Seek Help appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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Carb Cycling: A Daily Meal Plan to Get Started http://dailyburn.com/life/health/carb-cycling-meal-plan/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/carb-cycling-meal-plan/#comments Tue, 30 Jun 2015 15:15:28 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=25990 Carb Cycling, A Daily Meal Plan to Get Started_2

[caption id="attachment_41092" align="alignnone" width="620"]Carb Cycling, A Daily Meal Plan to Get Started Photo: Pond5[/caption]

You know a no-carb diet isn’t up your alley, but you don’t exactly want to fill up on a pre-race pasta feast every night either. No matter your health and fitness aspirations, carb cycling might be a good middle ground. Although its roots are in the world of bodybuilding, trainers are turning to the nutrition strategy to help clients achieve their goals — whether they’re trying to slim down or build muscle — or both.

“Eating healthy carbs on certain days keeps your metabolism revved up, and sticking to mostly protein and vegetables on days in between keeps insulin low enough that you can burn fat without losing muscle,” explains Shelby Starnes, a competitive bodybuilder and carb cycling expert. “It’s a routine that anyone can modify for their individual goals.” If you’re intrigued but don’t know how to start, read on for tips about how to put together a weekly carb cycling menu.

RELATED: Carb Cycling for Weight Loss: Does It Work?

Find the Right Formula

The classic carb cycling schedule alternates between high- and low-carb days, six times a week, saving the seventh day for reward meals. Depending on your health and fitness objectives, however, you might want to alter your setup for the week. For instance, to lose weight, you might aim for five low-carb days interspersed with two high-carb days, suggests Starnes. On the other hand, if gaining weight and adding muscle is your goal, think about including four or even five high-carb days. “Just make sure not to put all your high-carb days back-to-back,” Starnes says. “You should space them evenly throughout the week.” No matter your plan, be prepared to closely monitor your progress and consider adjusting your schedule to see what brings the best results for you.

Choose Your Fuel

So should you just munch on meat during your low-carb days and pig out on pasta the rest of the week? Not exactly. Jessica Crandall, R.D.N, a dietician and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, recommends getting the majority of your calories on high-carb days from complex carbohydrates, such as whole grains, legumes and fruits (or a high-quality protein shake if you're in a pinch). “They’ll keep you energized throughout the day while still promoting weight loss,” she says. To power through low-carb days, try to get your protein from chicken, fish, lean beef, eggs or tofu and complement it with non-starchy veggies — basically anything besides potatoes, corn and peas is fair game. As a general rule, says Starnes, do the majority of your shopping around the perimeter of the grocery store; you’ll load up on fresh staples and sidestep preservative-packed processed foods.

RELATED: 25 Three-Ingredient Smoothie Recipes

Snack on Track

Many trainers suggest taking a “cheat day” and allowing yourself to eat what you like, but make sure that approach isn’t setting you back. “To sustain a diet, a weekly reward day is not the best option,” says Crandall. “If you’re in the mindset to indulge after depriving yourself, you could end up eating 5,000 calories in one day when you only need 1,400 — and that will derail any progress you’ve made.” But don’t be discouraged; there is a little wiggle room for treats in a carb cycling plan. “If having an occasional bagel or bowl of sugary cereal helps you comply with your meal plan, work that into a high-carb day,” says Starnes. “Just scale back the other meals a bit that day.”

RELATED: When Is It OK to Cheat? The Pros and Cons of Cheat Days

Make a Carb Cycling Meal Plan

Once you’ve stocked your fridge and pantry with healthy grains, proteins and produce, coming up with a daily menu is key for achieving the best results. As a general rule, though it will vary from person to person, Crandall says that women should take in around 1,200 calories and men around 1,500 on low-carb days, with slightly more on high-carb days. Starnes recommends calculating the correct portions of each macronutrient by getting a certain number of grams per pound of body weight.

[CP_CALCULATED_FIELDS id="12"]

[CP_CALCULATED_FIELDS id="13"]
For both low- and high-carb days, be sure to eat breakfast as soon as possible when you wake up, then consume the rest of your calories across another four to six small meals throughout the day, advises Starnes. Here’s how you might schedule your meals:

Low-Carb Day Meal Plan

Carb Cycling Meal Plan, Low-Carb Day

A typical low-carb day:

7 a.m: two scrambled eggs with 1/2 red bell pepper
10 a.m: protein shake with berries
1 p.m: 3 ounces grilled chicken with 1 cup asparagus
4 p.m: 1/3 cup oatmeal with 10 almonds
7 p.m: 3 ounces steak with 2 cups steamed broccoli and cauliflower

High-Carb Day Meal Plan

Carb Cycling Meal Plan High-Carb Day

A typical high-carb day:

7 a.m: 1/2 cup oatmeal with walnuts and berries
10 a.m: apple with 2 tablespoons peanut or almond butter
1 p.m: half turkey sandwich on whole-wheat bread
4 p.m: 1 cup three-bean salad with 1 cup quinoa
7 p.m: 3 ounces grilled chicken with 1 cup whole-wheat pasta and pesto

Keep in mind that you can to still enjoy your favorite foods — just in moderation. “The goal is to slowly change your eating habits to include a variety of healthy foods,” says Crandall. That’s the kind of formula you can stick to for continued success.

The calculators within this article use the equations below for a rough estimation of your daily needs.

Men

High-carb day
2–3 grams of carbs (x your body weight)
1–1.25 grams of protein (x your body weight)
As little fat as possible

Low-carb day
0.5–1.5 grams of carbs (x your bodyweight)
1.25–1.5 grams of protein (x your bodyweight)
0.15–0.35 grams of fat (x your bodyweight)

Women

High-carb day
About 1 gram of carbs (x your bodyweight)
0.75 grams of protein (x your bodyweight)
As little fat as possible

Low-carb day
0.2–0.5 grams of carbs (x your bodyweight)
About 1 gram of protein (x your bodyweight)
0.1–0.2 grams of fat (x your bodyweight)

Originally posted March 2014. Updated June 2015. 

The post Carb Cycling: A Daily Meal Plan to Get Started appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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Carb Cycling, A Daily Meal Plan to Get Started_2

[caption id="attachment_41092" align="alignnone" width="620"]Carb Cycling, A Daily Meal Plan to Get Started Photo: Pond5[/caption] You know a no-carb diet isn’t up your alley, but you don’t exactly want to fill up on a pre-race pasta feast every night either. No matter your health and fitness aspirations, carb cycling might be a good middle ground. Although its roots are in the world of bodybuilding, trainers are turning to the nutrition strategy to help clients achieve their goals — whether they’re trying to slim down or build muscle — or both. “Eating healthy carbs on certain days keeps your metabolism revved up, and sticking to mostly protein and vegetables on days in between keeps insulin low enough that you can burn fat without losing muscle,” explains Shelby Starnes, a competitive bodybuilder and carb cycling expert. “It’s a routine that anyone can modify for their individual goals.” If you’re intrigued but don’t know how to start, read on for tips about how to put together a weekly carb cycling menu. RELATED: Carb Cycling for Weight Loss: Does It Work?

Find the Right Formula

The classic carb cycling schedule alternates between high- and low-carb days, six times a week, saving the seventh day for reward meals. Depending on your health and fitness objectives, however, you might want to alter your setup for the week. For instance, to lose weight, you might aim for five low-carb days interspersed with two high-carb days, suggests Starnes. On the other hand, if gaining weight and adding muscle is your goal, think about including four or even five high-carb days. “Just make sure not to put all your high-carb days back-to-back,” Starnes says. “You should space them evenly throughout the week.” No matter your plan, be prepared to closely monitor your progress and consider adjusting your schedule to see what brings the best results for you.

Choose Your Fuel

So should you just munch on meat during your low-carb days and pig out on pasta the rest of the week? Not exactly. Jessica Crandall, R.D.N, a dietician and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, recommends getting the majority of your calories on high-carb days from complex carbohydrates, such as whole grains, legumes and fruits (or a high-quality protein shake if you're in a pinch). “They’ll keep you energized throughout the day while still promoting weight loss,” she says. To power through low-carb days, try to get your protein from chicken, fish, lean beef, eggs or tofu and complement it with non-starchy veggies — basically anything besides potatoes, corn and peas is fair game. As a general rule, says Starnes, do the majority of your shopping around the perimeter of the grocery store; you’ll load up on fresh staples and sidestep preservative-packed processed foods. RELATED: 25 Three-Ingredient Smoothie Recipes

Snack on Track

Many trainers suggest taking a “cheat day” and allowing yourself to eat what you like, but make sure that approach isn’t setting you back. “To sustain a diet, a weekly reward day is not the best option,” says Crandall. “If you’re in the mindset to indulge after depriving yourself, you could end up eating 5,000 calories in one day when you only need 1,400 — and that will derail any progress you’ve made.” But don’t be discouraged; there is a little wiggle room for treats in a carb cycling plan. “If having an occasional bagel or bowl of sugary cereal helps you comply with your meal plan, work that into a high-carb day,” says Starnes. “Just scale back the other meals a bit that day.” RELATED: When Is It OK to Cheat? The Pros and Cons of Cheat Days

Make a Carb Cycling Meal Plan

Once you’ve stocked your fridge and pantry with healthy grains, proteins and produce, coming up with a daily menu is key for achieving the best results. As a general rule, though it will vary from person to person, Crandall says that women should take in around 1,200 calories and men around 1,500 on low-carb days, with slightly more on high-carb days. Starnes recommends calculating the correct portions of each macronutrient by getting a certain number of grams per pound of body weight. [CP_CALCULATED_FIELDS id="12"] [CP_CALCULATED_FIELDS id="13"] For both low- and high-carb days, be sure to eat breakfast as soon as possible when you wake up, then consume the rest of your calories across another four to six small meals throughout the day, advises Starnes. Here’s how you might schedule your meals:

Low-Carb Day Meal Plan

Carb Cycling Meal Plan, Low-Carb Day A typical low-carb day: 7 a.m: two scrambled eggs with 1/2 red bell pepper 10 a.m: protein shake with berries 1 p.m: 3 ounces grilled chicken with 1 cup asparagus 4 p.m: 1/3 cup oatmeal with 10 almonds 7 p.m: 3 ounces steak with 2 cups steamed broccoli and cauliflower

High-Carb Day Meal Plan

Carb Cycling Meal Plan High-Carb Day

A typical high-carb day:

7 a.m: 1/2 cup oatmeal with walnuts and berries 10 a.m: apple with 2 tablespoons peanut or almond butter 1 p.m: half turkey sandwich on whole-wheat bread 4 p.m: 1 cup three-bean salad with 1 cup quinoa 7 p.m: 3 ounces grilled chicken with 1 cup whole-wheat pasta and pesto

Keep in mind that you can to still enjoy your favorite foods — just in moderation. “The goal is to slowly change your eating habits to include a variety of healthy foods,” says Crandall. That’s the kind of formula you can stick to for continued success. The calculators within this article use the equations below for a rough estimation of your daily needs.

Men

High-carb day 2–3 grams of carbs (x your body weight) 1–1.25 grams of protein (x your body weight) As little fat as possible Low-carb day 0.5–1.5 grams of carbs (x your bodyweight) 1.25–1.5 grams of protein (x your bodyweight) 0.15–0.35 grams of fat (x your bodyweight)

Women

High-carb day About 1 gram of carbs (x your bodyweight) 0.75 grams of protein (x your bodyweight) As little fat as possible Low-carb day 0.2–0.5 grams of carbs (x your bodyweight) About 1 gram of protein (x your bodyweight) 0.1–0.2 grams of fat (x your bodyweight) Originally posted March 2014. Updated June 2015. 

The post Carb Cycling: A Daily Meal Plan to Get Started appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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How Fast Can You Banish Bloat for Summer? http://dailyburn.com/life/health/shape-up-beach-body/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/shape-up-beach-body/#comments Wed, 17 Jun 2015 15:15:47 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=40601 How Fast Can You Safely Shape Up for Summer?

[caption id="attachment_40613" align="alignnone" width="620"]Summer Beach Body Photo: Pond5[/caption]

We’ve all felt that familiar panic when pulling on a pair of slightly-too-small shorts while packing for next weekend’s beach trip. Or been drawn in by the urgent desire to head to the gym for hours each day, in a last-ditch attempt to sculpt sexy swimsuit muscles. (Just one…more…plank!) But how quickly can you really shed last-minute bloat — or pack on new muscle — without putting your health at risk?

RELATED: Detoxing for Beach Season? Here’s Your 5-Day Plan

Before you put your workouts on turbo-drive, consider this advice from nutritionist Georgie Fear, R.D., and strength coach Holly Perkins, C.S.C.S., founder of Women's Strength Nation.

How Quickly Can You De-Bloat?

We won’t kid you: Major weight loss is going to take a lot of time and effort. But if you’re simply looking to shed a few pounds, or deflate your body after a few too many salty takeout orders, that’s more doable. “De-bloating can be seen remarkably fast. Hormones, binge eating, and excessive salt intake in sensitive individuals can all lead to considerable weight swings both up and down,” says Fear, author of Lean Habits for Lifelong Weight Loss.

If you’re trying to eliminate ‘water weight,’ clean eating can produce faster results than you’d imagine. “After just one to three days of sound nutrition with whole foods, low intake of sugars and alcohol, and plenty of fruits and vegetables, people can already look and feel less puffy and bloated,” she says.

"If you normally work out moderately for 40 minutes, your max increase will be a moderate workout for 60 minutes."

RELATED: 11 Delicious Green Smoothie Recipes

However, if you have some body fat to lose along with that water weight, you’re going to need to be a bit more patient. “I recommend most people aim to lose on average one-half to one pound a week,” Fear says. Lose more than that — whether through extreme dieting, incessant exercising, or both — and you not only risk feeling like crap. You may also up your odds of developing a sluggish metabolism, losing muscle mass, and putting back on any weight as soon as your “must be slim by” date passes.

Follow a slow-and-steady pace and, in 10 days to a couple of weeks, you should be able to notice a clear difference in your physique, according to Fear. You will feel slimmer and your clothes will fit looser. To lose one-half to one pound a week, one strategy is to aim to take in 500 less calories than you burn every day, she says. (Everyone’s caloric needs will be different, so consult with a doctor or nutritionist before starting a weight loss program.)

RELATED: 5 Ways to Avoid the Portion Distortion That’s Wrecking Your Diet

To cut your calorie intake, focus on simple swaps: Eat more fiber-rich veggies, choose water over calorie-packed soda, alcohol and juice, and definitely keep those deep-fried Oreos to a minimum, she says. To burn more calories, opt for high-intensity interval training workouts, Perkins, author of Lift to Get Lean, advises. While strength training is vital to burning fat over the long-term, when you’re on a tight deadline, intense cardio is optimal for torching calories.

How much and how hard you work out should depend on how intensely you’ve been exercising during the last several months. “The body can only tolerate a 20 percent increase in time and intensity per workout,” Perkins says. “This is hard to quantify, but think of it this way: If you normally work out moderately for 40 minutes, your max increase will be a moderate workout for 60 minutes, or a hard workout for 40 minutes.” You can't go from regular workouts to crazy, intense, long workouts without risking damaged muscles, carb cravings, crankiness and potential overtraining.

RELATED: The 30-Second Trick That Might Stop Your Food Cravings 

[caption id="attachment_40617" align="alignnone" width="620"]How Fast Can You Safely Shape Up for Summer? Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Looking to Tone Up, ASAP?

If you’re already at your ideal weight — but you’ve skipped workouts left and right — you’re going to need a good month to actually sculpt more muscles. “In the first four to six weeks of a brand-new strength-training program, any improvement in strength is 100 percent due to neuromuscular adaptations,” Perkins says. Your muscles become better able to communicate with your brain and fire when needed, but it isn’t until after those first four to six weeks that a new strength-training program really starts to add muscle to your physique.

RELATED: Strength Training for Beginners: Reps, Sets and Weights

“The only thing you can do is work hard, ensure proper recovery, and wait out the days,” Perkins says. To bounce back faster after each session, eat 30 to 40 grams of carbohydrates immediately after your weight-lifting workouts, followed 10 minutes later by 20 to 30 grams of protein, she recommends. (Here’s what 25 grams of protein looks like.)

“It takes hard work, time, and patience,” Perkins says. So, when you do reach your fitness goals, stick with your routine. It’ll make next spring so much easier.

The post How Fast Can You Banish Bloat for Summer? appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
How Fast Can You Safely Shape Up for Summer?

[caption id="attachment_40613" align="alignnone" width="620"]Summer Beach Body Photo: Pond5[/caption] We’ve all felt that familiar panic when pulling on a pair of slightly-too-small shorts while packing for next weekend’s beach trip. Or been drawn in by the urgent desire to head to the gym for hours each day, in a last-ditch attempt to sculpt sexy swimsuit muscles. (Just one…more…plank!) But how quickly can you really shed last-minute bloat — or pack on new muscle — without putting your health at risk? RELATED: Detoxing for Beach Season? Here’s Your 5-Day Plan Before you put your workouts on turbo-drive, consider this advice from nutritionist Georgie Fear, R.D., and strength coach Holly Perkins, C.S.C.S., founder of Women's Strength Nation.

How Quickly Can You De-Bloat?

We won’t kid you: Major weight loss is going to take a lot of time and effort. But if you’re simply looking to shed a few pounds, or deflate your body after a few too many salty takeout orders, that’s more doable. “De-bloating can be seen remarkably fast. Hormones, binge eating, and excessive salt intake in sensitive individuals can all lead to considerable weight swings both up and down,” says Fear, author of Lean Habits for Lifelong Weight Loss. If you’re trying to eliminate ‘water weight,’ clean eating can produce faster results than you’d imagine. “After just one to three days of sound nutrition with whole foods, low intake of sugars and alcohol, and plenty of fruits and vegetables, people can already look and feel less puffy and bloated,” she says.
"If you normally work out moderately for 40 minutes, your max increase will be a moderate workout for 60 minutes."
RELATED: 11 Delicious Green Smoothie Recipes However, if you have some body fat to lose along with that water weight, you’re going to need to be a bit more patient. “I recommend most people aim to lose on average one-half to one pound a week,” Fear says. Lose more than that — whether through extreme dieting, incessant exercising, or both — and you not only risk feeling like crap. You may also up your odds of developing a sluggish metabolism, losing muscle mass, and putting back on any weight as soon as your “must be slim by” date passes. Follow a slow-and-steady pace and, in 10 days to a couple of weeks, you should be able to notice a clear difference in your physique, according to Fear. You will feel slimmer and your clothes will fit looser. To lose one-half to one pound a week, one strategy is to aim to take in 500 less calories than you burn every day, she says. (Everyone’s caloric needs will be different, so consult with a doctor or nutritionist before starting a weight loss program.) RELATED: 5 Ways to Avoid the Portion Distortion That’s Wrecking Your Diet To cut your calorie intake, focus on simple swaps: Eat more fiber-rich veggies, choose water over calorie-packed soda, alcohol and juice, and definitely keep those deep-fried Oreos to a minimum, she says. To burn more calories, opt for high-intensity interval training workouts, Perkins, author of Lift to Get Lean, advises. While strength training is vital to burning fat over the long-term, when you’re on a tight deadline, intense cardio is optimal for torching calories. How much and how hard you work out should depend on how intensely you’ve been exercising during the last several months. “The body can only tolerate a 20 percent increase in time and intensity per workout,” Perkins says. “This is hard to quantify, but think of it this way: If you normally work out moderately for 40 minutes, your max increase will be a moderate workout for 60 minutes, or a hard workout for 40 minutes.” You can't go from regular workouts to crazy, intense, long workouts without risking damaged muscles, carb cravings, crankiness and potential overtraining. RELATED: The 30-Second Trick That Might Stop Your Food Cravings  [caption id="attachment_40617" align="alignnone" width="620"]How Fast Can You Safely Shape Up for Summer? Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Looking to Tone Up, ASAP?

If you’re already at your ideal weight — but you’ve skipped workouts left and right — you’re going to need a good month to actually sculpt more muscles. “In the first four to six weeks of a brand-new strength-training program, any improvement in strength is 100 percent due to neuromuscular adaptations,” Perkins says. Your muscles become better able to communicate with your brain and fire when needed, but it isn’t until after those first four to six weeks that a new strength-training program really starts to add muscle to your physique. RELATED: Strength Training for Beginners: Reps, Sets and Weights “The only thing you can do is work hard, ensure proper recovery, and wait out the days,” Perkins says. To bounce back faster after each session, eat 30 to 40 grams of carbohydrates immediately after your weight-lifting workouts, followed 10 minutes later by 20 to 30 grams of protein, she recommends. (Here’s what 25 grams of protein looks like.) “It takes hard work, time, and patience,” Perkins says. So, when you do reach your fitness goals, stick with your routine. It’ll make next spring so much easier.

The post How Fast Can You Banish Bloat for Summer? appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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The Pegan Diet: Should You Try This Paleo-Vegan Hybrid? http://dailyburn.com/life/health/pegan-diet-paleo-vegan/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/pegan-diet-paleo-vegan/#comments Wed, 10 Jun 2015 11:15:13 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=40573 The Pegan Diet: Should You Try This Paleo-Vegan Hybrid?

[caption id="attachment_40576" align="alignnone" width="620"]The Pegan Diet: A Paleo-Vegan Hybrid Photo: Pond5[/caption]

If you thought meat-loving paleo folks couldn’t have less in common with vegans, it may be hard to believe the latest trend catching the eye of nutritionists and high profile doctors nationwide. Yes, the pegan diet (paleo plus vegan) has arrived. The idea: By taking the best of popular paleo and vegan plans, you get a surprisingly sustainable way of eating. (Even renowned wellness expert Dr. Mark Hyman recently declared himself a pegan.)

“By combining the principles of these two diets and reducing their specific dietary restrictions, you get a diet that’s better balanced in regards to macronutrients, and easier to follow than a strictly paleo or vegan diet,” says Caroline Cederquist MD, creator of bistroMD and author of The MD Factor.

“A better description is probably a very clean, modified paleo diet.”

RELATED: 20 Delicious Paleo Recipes for Every Meal of the Day

Kristin Kirkpatrick, a registered dietician at The Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, says, “Some of the problems with paleo and vegan diets are that they are difficult to follow.” For instance, people trying to go paleo tend to miss their grains, while vegans often have a hard time getting enough protein. “This approach is very sustainable for the average person,” Kirkpatrick says.

Pondering going pegan? Here’s what you need to know about this two-in-one eating plan.

How to Eat Pegan

The pegan diet focuses primarily on fruits and vegetables — specifically, filling 75 percent of your diet with plants, and rounding out the other 25 percent with animal protein and high-quality fats. “The pegan diet is a somewhat odd combination because the foundation of vegan diets is a belief of not consuming any animal products,” says nutritionist and chef Beth Saltz, MPH, RD. “A better description is probably a very clean, modified paleo diet.” Though the rules of the pegan diet are still evolving, these are the basic dos and don’ts of eating pegan as recommended by Dr. Hyman:

Pegan DOs:

Fruits and Vegetables: Both vegan and paleo diets place an emphasis on plant-based foods, since they’re a tremendous source of the vitamins and minerals that our bodies need to remain healthy. They should make up 75 percent of your diet. (Check out these 9 Healthy Dinner Recipes for Meatless Monday.)

Meat: Taking a clue from paleo, protein should come from grass-fed and antibiotic-free animals — in other words, organic. Animal protein like chicken, beef, fish and eggs should only make up approximately 25 percent of your diet.

High-Quality Fats: Olive, coconut and avocado oils, in addition to avocados, nuts and other sources of omega-3 fats, are staples of the paleo diet and tend to be a part of good vegan diets, too. However, you’ll want to steer clear of peanuts, which are a legume, and limit the amount of saturated fats found in grass-fed or sustainably raised animals.

Healthy Grains: Vegans often rely on grains for energizing B vitamins. Reach for gluten-free, whole grains, such as quinoa, when you’re on a pegan plan.

Lentils: A nutritional powerhouse and great source of meatless protein, small beans like lentils are allowed in limited portions. Other beans or legumes like pinto and peanuts should be avoided.

Pegan DON’Ts

Dairy: Shunned by vegan and paleo dieters alike, dairy has no place in the pegan eating plan, since many people have a hard time digesting it.

Soy: This vegan diet staple is a no-no in the pegan and paleo camps. Why? Research links the bean to disrupting hormones and it also tends to be genetically modified.

Sugar: As with most healthy diets, sugar should be viewed as a treat and used sparingly. Too much of the sweet stuff has been linked to obesity and disease so cutting back will do your body good.

RELATED: Are You Exceeding Your Daily Sugar Intake in Just One Meal?

[caption id="attachment_18009" align="alignnone" width="620"]The Pegan Diet: Should You Try This Paleo-Vegan Hybrid? Photo by Renee Blair[/caption]

The Pros and Cons of Going Pegan

By encouraging people to stick with plant-based foods and limit sugar, there’s no doubt that the pegan diet is good for your health. Sticking to this hybrid plan has the potential to provide benefits such as lower cholesterol and a decreased risk of diabetes, Dr. Cederquist says.

Yet, if weight loss is your main goal, you might want to seek out a plan featuring more protein, Cederquist says. “The nutritional balance I have found to be most effective for weight loss is a reduced calorie diet with 35 to 40 percent of the calories coming from protein.” She points out that protein is essential in helping to maintain lean muscle mass, which is instrumental in helping to burn excess calories and fat. “Without enough protein, your body will lose muscle mass and in turn be less effective at losing weight,” Dr. Cederquist says.

RELATED: Is a Vegan Diet the Best Way to Lose Weight?

That being said, peganism is a very viable way to eat. “Basically, it sounds very healthy and eliminates a lot of problem foods,” Saltz says. The only tenement of peganism she disagrees with is the idea of limiting beans. “Beans are extremely healthy one-ingredient foods, high in fiber and an inexpensive protein source,” Saltz, who teaches healthy cooking classes in Los Angeles, says. “My advice is go full steam ahead if you want to try the pegan diet, but do not exclude beans.”

[caption id="attachment_40577" align="alignnone" width="620"]The Pegan Diet: Should You Try This Paleo-Vegan Hybrid? Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Your Pegan Meal Plan

Ready to give the pegan diet a go? Saltz designed the sample meal plan below to guide you in creating your own meals, if peganism is something you want to try. Bon appetit!

RELATED: The Flexitarian Diet: Less Meat, Better Health?

DAY 1

Breakfast: Salad with veggies tossed with oil and vinegar, topped with a poached or hard-boiled egg
Lunch: Lentil soup and a side of fruit
Snack: Celery or apple with almond butter
Dinner: Stir-fry with chicken
Dessert: Mixed berries

DAY 2

Breakfast: Chia pudding made with nut milk topped with almonds and berries
Lunch: Big spinach salad topped with salmon
Snack: Hard-boiled egg and carrots
Dinner: Sweet potato, zucchini noodles and meatballs
Dessert: Banana with almond butter

DAY 3

Breakfast: Smoothie made with spinach, avocado, blueberries and nut milk
Lunch: Veggie chili
Snack: Carrots with hummus
Dinner: Burger wrapped in Swiss chard, with sides of quinoa and steamed broccoli
Dessert: Chia pudding

DAY 4

Breakfast: Frittata with veggies
Lunch: Salmon with sides of steamed spinach and quinoa
Snack: Homemade trail mix with dried mango, dried bananas, walnuts, almonds and raisins
Dinner: Roasted spaghetti squash with Bolognese sauce
Dessert: Smoothie made with coconut water, mixed berries and banana

DAY 5

Breakfast: Sweet potato hash with two eggs
Lunch: Veggie salad topped with a large scoop of tuna salad
Snack: Smoothie with almond butter, banana, cherries, nut milk and cacao
Dinner: Fajita lettuce wraps with sides of baked potato, broccoli and black beans
Dessert: Mixed berries with mint

The post The Pegan Diet: Should You Try This Paleo-Vegan Hybrid? appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
The Pegan Diet: Should You Try This Paleo-Vegan Hybrid?

[caption id="attachment_40576" align="alignnone" width="620"]The Pegan Diet: A Paleo-Vegan Hybrid Photo: Pond5[/caption] If you thought meat-loving paleo folks couldn’t have less in common with vegans, it may be hard to believe the latest trend catching the eye of nutritionists and high profile doctors nationwide. Yes, the pegan diet (paleo plus vegan) has arrived. The idea: By taking the best of popular paleo and vegan plans, you get a surprisingly sustainable way of eating. (Even renowned wellness expert Dr. Mark Hyman recently declared himself a pegan.) “By combining the principles of these two diets and reducing their specific dietary restrictions, you get a diet that’s better balanced in regards to macronutrients, and easier to follow than a strictly paleo or vegan diet,” says Caroline Cederquist MD, creator of bistroMD and author of The MD Factor.
“A better description is probably a very clean, modified paleo diet.”
RELATED: 20 Delicious Paleo Recipes for Every Meal of the Day Kristin Kirkpatrick, a registered dietician at The Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, says, “Some of the problems with paleo and vegan diets are that they are difficult to follow.” For instance, people trying to go paleo tend to miss their grains, while vegans often have a hard time getting enough protein. “This approach is very sustainable for the average person,” Kirkpatrick says. Pondering going pegan? Here’s what you need to know about this two-in-one eating plan.

How to Eat Pegan

The pegan diet focuses primarily on fruits and vegetables — specifically, filling 75 percent of your diet with plants, and rounding out the other 25 percent with animal protein and high-quality fats. “The pegan diet is a somewhat odd combination because the foundation of vegan diets is a belief of not consuming any animal products,” says nutritionist and chef Beth Saltz, MPH, RD. “A better description is probably a very clean, modified paleo diet.” Though the rules of the pegan diet are still evolving, these are the basic dos and don’ts of eating pegan as recommended by Dr. Hyman:

Pegan DOs:

Fruits and Vegetables: Both vegan and paleo diets place an emphasis on plant-based foods, since they’re a tremendous source of the vitamins and minerals that our bodies need to remain healthy. They should make up 75 percent of your diet. (Check out these 9 Healthy Dinner Recipes for Meatless Monday.) Meat: Taking a clue from paleo, protein should come from grass-fed and antibiotic-free animals — in other words, organic. Animal protein like chicken, beef, fish and eggs should only make up approximately 25 percent of your diet. High-Quality Fats: Olive, coconut and avocado oils, in addition to avocados, nuts and other sources of omega-3 fats, are staples of the paleo diet and tend to be a part of good vegan diets, too. However, you’ll want to steer clear of peanuts, which are a legume, and limit the amount of saturated fats found in grass-fed or sustainably raised animals. Healthy Grains: Vegans often rely on grains for energizing B vitamins. Reach for gluten-free, whole grains, such as quinoa, when you’re on a pegan plan. Lentils: A nutritional powerhouse and great source of meatless protein, small beans like lentils are allowed in limited portions. Other beans or legumes like pinto and peanuts should be avoided.

Pegan DON’Ts

Dairy: Shunned by vegan and paleo dieters alike, dairy has no place in the pegan eating plan, since many people have a hard time digesting it. Soy: This vegan diet staple is a no-no in the pegan and paleo camps. Why? Research links the bean to disrupting hormones and it also tends to be genetically modified. Sugar: As with most healthy diets, sugar should be viewed as a treat and used sparingly. Too much of the sweet stuff has been linked to obesity and disease so cutting back will do your body good. RELATED: Are You Exceeding Your Daily Sugar Intake in Just One Meal? [caption id="attachment_18009" align="alignnone" width="620"]The Pegan Diet: Should You Try This Paleo-Vegan Hybrid? Photo by Renee Blair[/caption]

The Pros and Cons of Going Pegan

By encouraging people to stick with plant-based foods and limit sugar, there’s no doubt that the pegan diet is good for your health. Sticking to this hybrid plan has the potential to provide benefits such as lower cholesterol and a decreased risk of diabetes, Dr. Cederquist says. Yet, if weight loss is your main goal, you might want to seek out a plan featuring more protein, Cederquist says. “The nutritional balance I have found to be most effective for weight loss is a reduced calorie diet with 35 to 40 percent of the calories coming from protein.” She points out that protein is essential in helping to maintain lean muscle mass, which is instrumental in helping to burn excess calories and fat. “Without enough protein, your body will lose muscle mass and in turn be less effective at losing weight,” Dr. Cederquist says. RELATED: Is a Vegan Diet the Best Way to Lose Weight? That being said, peganism is a very viable way to eat. “Basically, it sounds very healthy and eliminates a lot of problem foods,” Saltz says. The only tenement of peganism she disagrees with is the idea of limiting beans. “Beans are extremely healthy one-ingredient foods, high in fiber and an inexpensive protein source,” Saltz, who teaches healthy cooking classes in Los Angeles, says. “My advice is go full steam ahead if you want to try the pegan diet, but do not exclude beans.” [caption id="attachment_40577" align="alignnone" width="620"]The Pegan Diet: Should You Try This Paleo-Vegan Hybrid? Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Your Pegan Meal Plan

Ready to give the pegan diet a go? Saltz designed the sample meal plan below to guide you in creating your own meals, if peganism is something you want to try. Bon appetit! RELATED: The Flexitarian Diet: Less Meat, Better Health? DAY 1 Breakfast: Salad with veggies tossed with oil and vinegar, topped with a poached or hard-boiled egg Lunch: Lentil soup and a side of fruit Snack: Celery or apple with almond butter Dinner: Stir-fry with chicken Dessert: Mixed berries DAY 2 Breakfast: Chia pudding made with nut milk topped with almonds and berries Lunch: Big spinach salad topped with salmon Snack: Hard-boiled egg and carrots Dinner: Sweet potato, zucchini noodles and meatballs Dessert: Banana with almond butter DAY 3 Breakfast: Smoothie made with spinach, avocado, blueberries and nut milk Lunch: Veggie chili Snack: Carrots with hummus Dinner: Burger wrapped in Swiss chard, with sides of quinoa and steamed broccoli Dessert: Chia pudding DAY 4 Breakfast: Frittata with veggies Lunch: Salmon with sides of steamed spinach and quinoa Snack: Homemade trail mix with dried mango, dried bananas, walnuts, almonds and raisins Dinner: Roasted spaghetti squash with Bolognese sauce Dessert: Smoothie made with coconut water, mixed berries and banana DAY 5 Breakfast: Sweet potato hash with two eggs Lunch: Veggie salad topped with a large scoop of tuna salad Snack: Smoothie with almond butter, banana, cherries, nut milk and cacao Dinner: Fajita lettuce wraps with sides of baked potato, broccoli and black beans Dessert: Mixed berries with mint

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How to Calculate Your BMI (And Does It Matter?) http://dailyburn.com/life/health/how-to-calculate-bmi/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/how-to-calculate-bmi/#comments Tue, 02 Jun 2015 11:15:57 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=40377 How to Calculate Your BMI (And Does It Matter?)

[caption id="attachment_40466" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Calculate Your BMI (And Does It Matter?) Photo: Pond5[/caption]

You’ve heard it countless times: Maintaining a healthy weight equals fewer medical problems. But simply monitoring the scale may not be enough. That’s where body mass index (BMI), a measure of a person’s body fat based on their height and weight, comes to play. “BMI is a good way to assess if a patient’s weight is healthy or unhealthy,” says Jessica Crandall, RD, certified diabetes educator and national spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

While your BMI doesn’t give a comprehensive evaluation of your health, it does excel as an easy-to-calculate method that can give you a basic look at your overall weight issues. But there’s a lot of weight to this debate — here’s why.

RELATED: How to Calculate Your BMR (And Why It Matters)

BMI: The Full Story

To accurately measure your BMI, all it takes is a simple equation: Divide a person’s weight in pounds by the square of their height in inches, and multiply it by 703. At its core, it’s simple: The higher your weight, the higher your BMI number — and the higher your risk of obesity-related diseases, says Nicolette Pace, RDN, President and Founder of NutriSource Inc., Medical Nutrition and Weight Loss Center. Doctors, researchers, even insurance providers use the formula as a primary measure of health. And it’s a simple and inexpensive screening tool that people can check from the comfort of home.

[CP_CALCULATED_FIELDS id="11"]

 

RELATED: Why Regaining Weight Is So Common and How to Deal

A BMI number places people in categories — underweight (<18.5), normal (18.5-24.9), overweight (25.0-29.9) and obese (>30). Over the past 20 years, BMI categories have seen major changes. In 1998, the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lowered the threshold for the ‘overweight’ category to 25 from 27.8, to match World Health Organization guidelines. When the changes were made in 1998, 29 million Americans previously considered to be “healthy” were immediately labeled “overweight.”

[caption id="attachment_40461" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Calculate Your BMI (And Does It Matter?) Photo: Pond5[/caption]

The Great Weight Debate

While doctors often use the equation to identify potential weight problems in patients, BMI is only telling part of the story. The method falters by not taking muscle mass, cholesterol, blood sugar, blood pressure or waist circumference into consideration. Experts say waist circumference, specifically, is a major element being ignored. A higher ratio of fat around your waist compared to your hips puts people at a greater risk for heart disease and type 2 diabetes. “Waist circumference, while not better than testing BMI, is another parameter that’s needed to interpret health risk,” says Pace.

Another big problem: muscle. “BMI is less accurate for individuals with more muscle since it doesn’t take into account muscle versus fat; it just considers total body weight,” Crandall says. “For bodybuilders or individuals who have extremely high muscle mass, it may not be a good [method], like it is for the average athlete or fit person.” That’s because those with more muscle are carrying around extra weight, Crandall adds. Yet, “For most people that are ‘fit,’ they’ll still fall into the correct BMI category that their body represents,” Crandall says.

RELATED: The 8 Biggest Myths About Weightlifting — Debunked

There are also emotional reasons why funneling people into strict categories of ‘overweight’ or ‘underweight’ may not be a good idea. “BMI labels are objectionable and help to keep the obesity stigma alive, many times interfering with treatments, fostering negative body image and unrealistic standards,” says Pace. She recommends looking at waist circumference, frame size, body fat percentage, weight history and any acute or chronic changes in addition to just BMI.

The Big Picture: Beyond BMI

Most experts agree that BMI is a weighty matter — and it’s far from perfect. But, while BMI only scratches the surface when it comes to highlighting the potential health risks of being under or overweight, it doesn’t hurt to use it as a base overview of your health. “BMI is mostly a useful indicator to relay diagnostic information,” says Pace. “But I try to get my patients to look at the bigger picture and get to the underlying causes of their weight problems and health conditions.”

Looking beyond the scale at muscle mass, level of exercise and waist circumference can help give a more comprehensive look at how fit or healthy you truly are. Take advantage of the BMI calculator for a quick at-home peek at your weight — and then dig deeper with a doctor to make sure you’re on the right path for your body. “BMI is a useful tool and point of reference when used in conjunction with other monitoring tools,” says Crandall. “Everyone’s body is different so it’s not perfect, but it does serve as a good, general way to categorize and monitor patients.”

The post How to Calculate Your BMI (And Does It Matter?) appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

]]>
How to Calculate Your BMI (And Does It Matter?)

[caption id="attachment_40466" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Calculate Your BMI (And Does It Matter?) Photo: Pond5[/caption] You’ve heard it countless times: Maintaining a healthy weight equals fewer medical problems. But simply monitoring the scale may not be enough. That’s where body mass index (BMI), a measure of a person’s body fat based on their height and weight, comes to play. “BMI is a good way to assess if a patient’s weight is healthy or unhealthy,” says Jessica Crandall, RD, certified diabetes educator and national spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. While your BMI doesn’t give a comprehensive evaluation of your health, it does excel as an easy-to-calculate method that can give you a basic look at your overall weight issues. But there’s a lot of weight to this debate — here’s why. RELATED: How to Calculate Your BMR (And Why It Matters)

BMI: The Full Story

To accurately measure your BMI, all it takes is a simple equation: Divide a person’s weight in pounds by the square of their height in inches, and multiply it by 703. At its core, it’s simple: The higher your weight, the higher your BMI number — and the higher your risk of obesity-related diseases, says Nicolette Pace, RDN, President and Founder of NutriSource Inc., Medical Nutrition and Weight Loss Center. Doctors, researchers, even insurance providers use the formula as a primary measure of health. And it’s a simple and inexpensive screening tool that people can check from the comfort of home. [CP_CALCULATED_FIELDS id="11"]   RELATED: Why Regaining Weight Is So Common and How to Deal A BMI number places people in categories — underweight (<18.5), normal (18.5-24.9), overweight (25.0-29.9) and obese (>30). Over the past 20 years, BMI categories have seen major changes. In 1998, the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lowered the threshold for the ‘overweight’ category to 25 from 27.8, to match World Health Organization guidelines. When the changes were made in 1998, 29 million Americans previously considered to be “healthy” were immediately labeled “overweight.” [caption id="attachment_40461" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Calculate Your BMI (And Does It Matter?) Photo: Pond5[/caption]

The Great Weight Debate

While doctors often use the equation to identify potential weight problems in patients, BMI is only telling part of the story. The method falters by not taking muscle mass, cholesterol, blood sugar, blood pressure or waist circumference into consideration. Experts say waist circumference, specifically, is a major element being ignored. A higher ratio of fat around your waist compared to your hips puts people at a greater risk for heart disease and type 2 diabetes. “Waist circumference, while not better than testing BMI, is another parameter that’s needed to interpret health risk,” says Pace. Another big problem: muscle. “BMI is less accurate for individuals with more muscle since it doesn’t take into account muscle versus fat; it just considers total body weight,” Crandall says. “For bodybuilders or individuals who have extremely high muscle mass, it may not be a good [method], like it is for the average athlete or fit person.” That’s because those with more muscle are carrying around extra weight, Crandall adds. Yet, “For most people that are ‘fit,’ they’ll still fall into the correct BMI category that their body represents,” Crandall says. RELATED: The 8 Biggest Myths About Weightlifting — Debunked There are also emotional reasons why funneling people into strict categories of ‘overweight’ or ‘underweight’ may not be a good idea. “BMI labels are objectionable and help to keep the obesity stigma alive, many times interfering with treatments, fostering negative body image and unrealistic standards,” says Pace. She recommends looking at waist circumference, frame size, body fat percentage, weight history and any acute or chronic changes in addition to just BMI.

The Big Picture: Beyond BMI

Most experts agree that BMI is a weighty matter — and it’s far from perfect. But, while BMI only scratches the surface when it comes to highlighting the potential health risks of being under or overweight, it doesn’t hurt to use it as a base overview of your health. “BMI is mostly a useful indicator to relay diagnostic information,” says Pace. “But I try to get my patients to look at the bigger picture and get to the underlying causes of their weight problems and health conditions.” Looking beyond the scale at muscle mass, level of exercise and waist circumference can help give a more comprehensive look at how fit or healthy you truly are. Take advantage of the BMI calculator for a quick at-home peek at your weight — and then dig deeper with a doctor to make sure you’re on the right path for your body. “BMI is a useful tool and point of reference when used in conjunction with other monitoring tools,” says Crandall. “Everyone’s body is different so it’s not perfect, but it does serve as a good, general way to categorize and monitor patients.”

The post How to Calculate Your BMI (And Does It Matter?) appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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Detoxing for Beach Season? Here’s Your 5-Day Plan http://dailyburn.com/life/health/how-to-detox-your-body-5-day-plan/ http://dailyburn.com/life/health/how-to-detox-your-body-5-day-plan/#comments Thu, 21 May 2015 11:15:40 +0000 http://dailyburn.com/life/?p=40140 How to Detox Your Body for Beach Season

How to Detox Your Body for Beach Season

This plan was developed in collaboration with DailyBurn Fitness/Nutrition Coach Nora Minno. To find more workouts and healthy recipes head to DailyBurn.com.

Summer can be full of temptations, from poolside cocktails to barbecues and ice cream trucks. It’s the ultimate dilemma: You want to look good on the beach, while not spending sunny days watching your waistline. That’s why we’ve built a five-day detox plan that will let you cut back during the week so you can indulge a little more on Saturday and Sunday.

RELATED: 6 Weight Loss Success Stories to Motivate You Right Now

Don’t expect this to be a deprivation-inducing juice cleanse. “Building healthy eating habits in your daily life is the most important thing, no detox is one quick fix,” says DailyBurn Fitness/Nutrition Coach Nora Minno, RD and certified personal trainer.

Instead, you’ll focus on fitting in five workouts a week (weekends are your rest days), and eating meals comprised of whole, clean foods. You should aim to cut out processed foods altogether, and seriously limit your consumption of added sugar and dairy, Minno advises. “Sugar is going to raise your blood sugar and [could cause] you excess calorie intake leading to weight gain,” Minno says. “…As much as you can, cut those out and give your body time to reset.”

RELATED: Are You Exceeding Your Daily Sugar Intake in Just One Meal?

But will you really see any difference in just five days? “[You’ll] usually notice more energy, because a lot of these [clean] foods are easier to digest and use for fuel,” Minno says. “You’ll feel energized and you may notice some weight loss…and the skin usually clears up, too.”

Though it will vary from person to person, aim to consume around 1,500 calories per day, including three meals and one snack. You can figure out your specific calorie goals using this handy calculator. Then, adjust your serving sizes of the meals below to fit your individual needs.

When it comes to workouts, HIIT (high-intensity interval training) is your new best friend. “Aim for high intensity at least two times a week, then strength training in between,” Minno says. On weekends, don’t forget to work in some active recovery sessions (we bet these yin yoga moves would be even more relaxing on the beach).

Here’s how to get started — you’ll thank us by Saturday.

How to Detox Your Body

Detox Day 1:  

[caption id="attachment_39171" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Pear Green Protein Smoothie Recipe Photo: DailyBurn[/caption]

Breakfast: Matcha Pear Green Protein Smoothie (299 cals per serving)
With higher levels of antioxidants than standard green tea, matcha is the darling of the health world right now. In addition to offering up a hit of caffeine, matcha may have special detoxifying properties due to its high levels of chlorophyll. Combined with protein powder, vitamin-rich spinach and fiber-packed pear, this smoothie is a nutrient-packed way to start your day.

RELATED: 14 Must-Try Matcha Recipes You’ll Drool Over

[caption id="attachment_39077" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Lentil Salad Recipe Photo by Renee Blair[/caption]

Lunch: Vegan Lentil Salad Recipe (296 cals per serving)
You know why we love lentils? They take only about 20 minutes to whip up, and are packed with protein, fiber and iron. Top them off with a slew of your favorite veggies (asparagus, peas, carrots, snap peas and zucchini are featured here) for a heartier take on a classic salad. 

[caption id="attachment_25533" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Zucchini Noodles and Meatballs Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Dinner: Zucchini Noodles and Meatballs Recipe (107 cals per serving)
Zoodles are a detoxer’s best friend. You get all the joy of slurping up noodles, with none of the bloat-inducing gluten or carbs. Lean turkey meatballs offer up plenty of protein, with less fat than your grandma’s recipe.

[caption id="attachment_30739" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Antioxidant Fruit Salad Photo: Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Snack: Antioxidant Fruit Salad with Bee Pollen (296 cals per serving)
Fruit salad never looked so good. Berries, nectarines, plums and cherries fill your bowl, for a naturally sweet treat. Skip the vanilla-honey topping, or halve it if you’re trying to cut back on sugar.

RELATED: 9 Delicious Fruit Salads to Make This Summer

[caption id="attachment_37079" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: 30 Minute Beginner HIIT Workout Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Workout: The 30-Minute No-Equipment HIIT Workout
We guarantee this HIIT workout will be a challenge, regardless of your fitness level. By alternating periods of all-out effort with short breaks, you’ll create an afterburn effect that will help you torch more fat and calories than a standard aerobic workout. HIIT, for the win. 

Detox Day 2:

[caption id="attachment_26493" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Mango Blueberry Smoothie Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Breakfast: Mango Blueberry Protein Smoothie Recipe (344 cals per serving)
This smoothie stars some of your favorite summer fruits. Mangos are full of fiber, vitamins and antioxidants, while blueberries are packed with nutrients that can help fight disease. Chia seeds add a boost of omega-3 fatty acids and even more fiber to your glass.

RELATED: 14 Creative Chia Seed Recipes 

[caption id="attachment_36720" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Turkey Chili Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Lunch: Turkey Chili with White Beans Recipe (320 cals per serving)
Chili’s not just for winter. This light recipe is filling without weighing you down, thanks to the protein and dietary fiber found in white beans. Combined with lean ground turkey, you’ll spoon up 33 grams of filling protein per serving.

[caption id="attachment_38455" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Fish Pouches with Bok Choy and Rice Photo by DailyBurn[/caption]

Dinner: Baked Fish Recipe with Bok Choy and Brown Rice (402 cals per serving)
It’s hard to find a dinner this hearty for less than 500 calories. Halibut is a solid source of inflammation-fighting omega-3 fatty acids — and cooking it using this foil pouch method makes the whole meal easy to pull together, too.

[caption id="attachment_38707" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Super Green Spring Soup Recipe Photo by Renee Blair[/caption]

Snack: Spring Green Detox Soup Recipe (156 cals per serving)
If you love green smoothies but want to change things up, this brightly hued soup will please your palate (and your senses). Full of kale, chard and broccoli florets, this mix of greens will help facilitate your body’s natural cleansing and detoxifying process. Whip up a batch and snack on this super low-cal soup all week long.

RELATED: 5 Healthier Ways to Detox (That Aren’t Juice Cleanses)

Arm Workout: Weighted Tricep Dips with Leg Lift
Workout: The 30-Minute Arm Sculpting Workout
We’ve got two words to motivate you through this workout: Sleeveless season. Do three to four sets of each move for a thorough 30-minute workout that will help tighten and tone your arms and give you the confidence to ditch that sweater.

Detox Day 3:  

[caption id="attachment_37504" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Raspberry Chia Protein Smoothie Recipe Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Breakfast: Raspberry Chia Protein Smoothie Recipe (300 cals per serving)
There’s a reason chia seeds are all the rage right now (hello, chia pudding). They’re full of fiber, good for digestion and help stabilize blood sugar (which can lead to fewer cravings). Combined with chocolate protein powder, frozen raspberries and cinnamon, this protein-rich mix is positively delicious. 

[caption id="attachment_30632" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Bulghur Greek Salad Recipe Photo by Renee Blair[/caption]

Lunch: Bulgur Greek Salad Recipe (182 cals per serving)
Pretend you’re cruising the Greek isles while eating this Mediterranean-inspired bulgur, tomato and cucumber salad. With just 182 calories per serving, you can eat a big bowl of it without exceeding your calorie goals. So dig in if your stomach’s growling! (Hold the feta if you’re avoiding dairy during your detox.)

[caption id="attachment_30522" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Pork Tenderloin Recipe Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Dinner: Grilled Pork Tenderloin with Mango-Habanero Salsa Recipe (394 cals per serving)
Bacon may not be cleanse-friendly, but tenderloin sure is with 75 percent of its calories coming from protein. Top your cut with this summery salsa that’s hot enough to encourage you to chug a few extra glasses of water with your meal.

RELATED: 20 Kitchen Gadgets to Make Healthy Eating Easy

[caption id="attachment_38176" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Mini Peanut Butter and Apple Sandwich Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Snack: Mini Peanut Butter and Apple Sandwich Recipe (200 cals per serving)
This kiddie-inspired snack is a totally legit way for grown-ups to get a boost of protein and fiber midday. Nosh on two of these granola, peanut butter, raisin and apple sammies for just 200 calories.


Workout: The Fat-Burning Plyometrics Workout
No time to work out? These five moves from DailyBurn trainer Anja Garcia will work your entire body, pump up your heart rate and help you burn calories fast, thanks to the explosive movements required. The combo of squats, burpees, push-ups, skaters and knee drives will have you sweating in less than five minutes. 

Detox Day 4:

[caption id="attachment_22549" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Black Forest Protein Shake Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Breakfast: Black Forest Protein Shake Recipe (330 cals per serving)
If you thought eating black forest anything was out of bounds during a detox, think again. This chocolate protein powder, banana and cherry shake is just sweet enough to satisfy any sugar cravings, while still being totally guilt-free.

[caption id="attachment_18790" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Kale and Quinoa Superfood Salad Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Lunch: Kale and Quinoa Superfood Salad (402 cals per serving)
We don’t throw the term ‘superfood’ around lightly, but this salad is full of nutritional all-stars like quinoa, edamame, kale, tomatoes, mango, avocado and walnuts. While there’s no animal protein in the mix, edamame and quinoa are solid plant-based sources. The light lemony dressing is the icing on the cake, so to speak.

RELATED: What 25 Grams of Protein Looks Like

[caption id="attachment_29921" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Grilled Pesto Salmon Skewers Photo by Emily Miller [/caption]

Dinner: Grilled Pesto Salmon Kebabs Recipe (175 cals per skewer)
Fire up your grill for these killer pesto-coated kebabs. If you’re not a fan of salmon, substitute swordfish or shrimp, instead. Bonus: You can use the leftover pesto to top your salads for the rest of the week. 

[caption id="attachment_23114" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Spicy Chickpeas Photo by Emily Miller[/caption]

Snack: Spicy Baked Chickpeas Recipe (153 cals per serving)
Next time you’re dying for some chips, cook up a batch of these crunchy chickpeas, instead. Full of fiber and protein, they’re topped with a zesty mix of paprika, garlic powder, cayenne and chili. The flavor will wow you way more than a standard bag of Lay’s.

DailyBurn Pilates Single Leg Teaser

Workout: The Core-Sculpting Pilates Workout
Work your abs (yes, they’re there!) with these simple Pilates moves. The key: Keeping your stomach muscles tight and scooped in as you progress through each exercise. Don’t forget to breathe!

Detox Day 5:

[caption id="attachment_34171" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: PB&J Smoothie Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Breakfast: Peanut Butter and Jelly Protein Smoothie Recipe (317 cals per serving)
If you love PB&J, why not turn the lunchtime favorite into a filling breakfast? Featuring a tablespoon of peanut butter and tons of fresh raspberries, you’ll get your fix, minus the sammie’s added sugars and carbs. Vanilla protein powder helps up the protein count to 29 grams per serving (meaning you’ll definitely stay full until lunch).

[caption id="attachment_27441" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Spring Cleanse Salad Photo by Renee Blair[/caption]

Lunch: Cleansing Spring Salad Recipe (185 cals per serving)
It’s a veggie-palooza! This brightly-colored dish packs in beets, carrots, cucumbers, avocado and tons of greens. With only 185 calories per two-cup servings, you can supersize this salad if you need to fill up.

[caption id="attachment_32901" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Balsamic Chicken and Greens Photo: Perry Santanachote[/caption]

Dinner: Balsamic Chicken Recipe with Barley and Chard (373 cals per serving)
This one-pot meal keeps things simple towards the end of your cleanse. The boneless, skinless chicken thighs are low in fat, while barley, tomato and dark, leafy greens ensure your plate is packed with vitamins, minerals and fiber.

RELATED: 16 Healthy Chicken Recipes That Don’t Suck

[caption id="attachment_34165" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Homemade Beet Hummus Recipe Photo by Renee Blair[/caption]

Snack: Homemade Beet Hummus Recipe (145 cals per serving)
The phytochemicals in beets act as antioxidants within the body, giving this hummus an extra good-for-you twist. Prep a plate full of veggies to snack on if you need to cure a case of the munchies.

[caption id="attachment_33301" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: The Ultimate MetCon Workout Photo: Pond5[/caption]

Workout: The Ultimate 20-Minute Metcon Workout
This workout is your last push before a weekend full of fun, so make it count. Metabolic conditioning (aka metcon) is a high-intensity, calorie-blasting workout that alternates periods of all-out effort with short interludes of rest. Get ready to push yourself to the limit — the beach awaits! 

Note to reader: The content in this article relates to the core service offered by DailyBurn. In the interest of editorial disclosure and integrity, the reader should know that this site is owned and operated by DailyBurn. 

The post Detoxing for Beach Season? Here’s Your 5-Day Plan appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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How to Detox Your Body for Beach Season

How to Detox Your Body for Beach Season This plan was developed in collaboration with DailyBurn Fitness/Nutrition Coach Nora Minno. To find more workouts and healthy recipes head to DailyBurn.com. Summer can be full of temptations, from poolside cocktails to barbecues and ice cream trucks. It’s the ultimate dilemma: You want to look good on the beach, while not spending sunny days watching your waistline. That’s why we’ve built a five-day detox plan that will let you cut back during the week so you can indulge a little more on Saturday and Sunday. RELATED: 6 Weight Loss Success Stories to Motivate You Right Now Don’t expect this to be a deprivation-inducing juice cleanse. “Building healthy eating habits in your daily life is the most important thing, no detox is one quick fix,” says DailyBurn Fitness/Nutrition Coach Nora Minno, RD and certified personal trainer. Instead, you’ll focus on fitting in five workouts a week (weekends are your rest days), and eating meals comprised of whole, clean foods. You should aim to cut out processed foods altogether, and seriously limit your consumption of added sugar and dairy, Minno advises. “Sugar is going to raise your blood sugar and [could cause] you excess calorie intake leading to weight gain,” Minno says. “…As much as you can, cut those out and give your body time to reset.” RELATED: Are You Exceeding Your Daily Sugar Intake in Just One Meal? But will you really see any difference in just five days? “[You’ll] usually notice more energy, because a lot of these [clean] foods are easier to digest and use for fuel,” Minno says. “You’ll feel energized and you may notice some weight loss…and the skin usually clears up, too.” Though it will vary from person to person, aim to consume around 1,500 calories per day, including three meals and one snack. You can figure out your specific calorie goals using this handy calculator. Then, adjust your serving sizes of the meals below to fit your individual needs. When it comes to workouts, HIIT (high-intensity interval training) is your new best friend. “Aim for high intensity at least two times a week, then strength training in between,” Minno says. On weekends, don’t forget to work in some active recovery sessions (we bet these yin yoga moves would be even more relaxing on the beach). Here’s how to get started — you’ll thank us by Saturday.

How to Detox Your Body

Detox Day 1:  

[caption id="attachment_39171" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Pear Green Protein Smoothie Recipe Photo: DailyBurn[/caption] Breakfast: Matcha Pear Green Protein Smoothie (299 cals per serving) With higher levels of antioxidants than standard green tea, matcha is the darling of the health world right now. In addition to offering up a hit of caffeine, matcha may have special detoxifying properties due to its high levels of chlorophyll. Combined with protein powder, vitamin-rich spinach and fiber-packed pear, this smoothie is a nutrient-packed way to start your day. RELATED: 14 Must-Try Matcha Recipes You’ll Drool Over [caption id="attachment_39077" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Lentil Salad Recipe Photo by Renee Blair[/caption] Lunch: Vegan Lentil Salad Recipe (296 cals per serving) You know why we love lentils? They take only about 20 minutes to whip up, and are packed with protein, fiber and iron. Top them off with a slew of your favorite veggies (asparagus, peas, carrots, snap peas and zucchini are featured here) for a heartier take on a classic salad.  [caption id="attachment_25533" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Zucchini Noodles and Meatballs Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption] Dinner: Zucchini Noodles and Meatballs Recipe (107 cals per serving) Zoodles are a detoxer’s best friend. You get all the joy of slurping up noodles, with none of the bloat-inducing gluten or carbs. Lean turkey meatballs offer up plenty of protein, with less fat than your grandma’s recipe. [caption id="attachment_30739" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Antioxidant Fruit Salad Photo: Perry Santanachote[/caption] Snack: Antioxidant Fruit Salad with Bee Pollen (296 cals per serving) Fruit salad never looked so good. Berries, nectarines, plums and cherries fill your bowl, for a naturally sweet treat. Skip the vanilla-honey topping, or halve it if you’re trying to cut back on sugar. RELATED: 9 Delicious Fruit Salads to Make This Summer [caption id="attachment_37079" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: 30 Minute Beginner HIIT Workout Photo: Pond5[/caption] Workout: The 30-Minute No-Equipment HIIT Workout We guarantee this HIIT workout will be a challenge, regardless of your fitness level. By alternating periods of all-out effort with short breaks, you’ll create an afterburn effect that will help you torch more fat and calories than a standard aerobic workout. HIIT, for the win. 

Detox Day 2:

[caption id="attachment_26493" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Mango Blueberry Smoothie Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption] Breakfast: Mango Blueberry Protein Smoothie Recipe (344 cals per serving) This smoothie stars some of your favorite summer fruits. Mangos are full of fiber, vitamins and antioxidants, while blueberries are packed with nutrients that can help fight disease. Chia seeds add a boost of omega-3 fatty acids and even more fiber to your glass. RELATED: 14 Creative Chia Seed Recipes  [caption id="attachment_36720" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Turkey Chili Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption] Lunch: Turkey Chili with White Beans Recipe (320 cals per serving) Chili’s not just for winter. This light recipe is filling without weighing you down, thanks to the protein and dietary fiber found in white beans. Combined with lean ground turkey, you’ll spoon up 33 grams of filling protein per serving. [caption id="attachment_38455" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Fish Pouches with Bok Choy and Rice Photo by DailyBurn[/caption] Dinner: Baked Fish Recipe with Bok Choy and Brown Rice (402 cals per serving) It’s hard to find a dinner this hearty for less than 500 calories. Halibut is a solid source of inflammation-fighting omega-3 fatty acids — and cooking it using this foil pouch method makes the whole meal easy to pull together, too. [caption id="attachment_38707" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Super Green Spring Soup Recipe Photo by Renee Blair[/caption] Snack: Spring Green Detox Soup Recipe (156 cals per serving) If you love green smoothies but want to change things up, this brightly hued soup will please your palate (and your senses). Full of kale, chard and broccoli florets, this mix of greens will help facilitate your body’s natural cleansing and detoxifying process. Whip up a batch and snack on this super low-cal soup all week long. RELATED: 5 Healthier Ways to Detox (That Aren’t Juice Cleanses) Arm Workout: Weighted Tricep Dips with Leg Lift Workout: The 30-Minute Arm Sculpting Workout We’ve got two words to motivate you through this workout: Sleeveless season. Do three to four sets of each move for a thorough 30-minute workout that will help tighten and tone your arms and give you the confidence to ditch that sweater.

Detox Day 3:  

[caption id="attachment_37504" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Raspberry Chia Protein Smoothie Recipe Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption] Breakfast: Raspberry Chia Protein Smoothie Recipe (300 cals per serving) There’s a reason chia seeds are all the rage right now (hello, chia pudding). They’re full of fiber, good for digestion and help stabilize blood sugar (which can lead to fewer cravings). Combined with chocolate protein powder, frozen raspberries and cinnamon, this protein-rich mix is positively delicious.  [caption id="attachment_30632" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Bulghur Greek Salad Recipe Photo by Renee Blair[/caption] Lunch: Bulgur Greek Salad Recipe (182 cals per serving) Pretend you’re cruising the Greek isles while eating this Mediterranean-inspired bulgur, tomato and cucumber salad. With just 182 calories per serving, you can eat a big bowl of it without exceeding your calorie goals. So dig in if your stomach’s growling! (Hold the feta if you’re avoiding dairy during your detox.) [caption id="attachment_30522" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Pork Tenderloin Recipe Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption] Dinner: Grilled Pork Tenderloin with Mango-Habanero Salsa Recipe (394 cals per serving) Bacon may not be cleanse-friendly, but tenderloin sure is with 75 percent of its calories coming from protein. Top your cut with this summery salsa that’s hot enough to encourage you to chug a few extra glasses of water with your meal. RELATED: 20 Kitchen Gadgets to Make Healthy Eating Easy [caption id="attachment_38176" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Mini Peanut Butter and Apple Sandwich Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption] Snack: Mini Peanut Butter and Apple Sandwich Recipe (200 cals per serving) This kiddie-inspired snack is a totally legit way for grown-ups to get a boost of protein and fiber midday. Nosh on two of these granola, peanut butter, raisin and apple sammies for just 200 calories. Workout: The Fat-Burning Plyometrics Workout No time to work out? These five moves from DailyBurn trainer Anja Garcia will work your entire body, pump up your heart rate and help you burn calories fast, thanks to the explosive movements required. The combo of squats, burpees, push-ups, skaters and knee drives will have you sweating in less than five minutes. 

Detox Day 4:

[caption id="attachment_22549" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Black Forest Protein Shake Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption] Breakfast: Black Forest Protein Shake Recipe (330 cals per serving) If you thought eating black forest anything was out of bounds during a detox, think again. This chocolate protein powder, banana and cherry shake is just sweet enough to satisfy any sugar cravings, while still being totally guilt-free. [caption id="attachment_18790" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Kale and Quinoa Superfood Salad Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption] Lunch: Kale and Quinoa Superfood Salad (402 cals per serving) We don’t throw the term ‘superfood’ around lightly, but this salad is full of nutritional all-stars like quinoa, edamame, kale, tomatoes, mango, avocado and walnuts. While there’s no animal protein in the mix, edamame and quinoa are solid plant-based sources. The light lemony dressing is the icing on the cake, so to speak. RELATED: What 25 Grams of Protein Looks Like [caption id="attachment_29921" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Grilled Pesto Salmon Skewers Photo by Emily Miller [/caption] Dinner: Grilled Pesto Salmon Kebabs Recipe (175 cals per skewer) Fire up your grill for these killer pesto-coated kebabs. If you’re not a fan of salmon, substitute swordfish or shrimp, instead. Bonus: You can use the leftover pesto to top your salads for the rest of the week.  [caption id="attachment_23114" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Spicy Chickpeas Photo by Emily Miller[/caption] Snack: Spicy Baked Chickpeas Recipe (153 cals per serving) Next time you’re dying for some chips, cook up a batch of these crunchy chickpeas, instead. Full of fiber and protein, they’re topped with a zesty mix of paprika, garlic powder, cayenne and chili. The flavor will wow you way more than a standard bag of Lay’s. DailyBurn Pilates Single Leg Teaser Workout: The Core-Sculpting Pilates Workout Work your abs (yes, they’re there!) with these simple Pilates moves. The key: Keeping your stomach muscles tight and scooped in as you progress through each exercise. Don’t forget to breathe!

Detox Day 5:

[caption id="attachment_34171" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: PB&J Smoothie Photo by Perry Santanachote[/caption] Breakfast: Peanut Butter and Jelly Protein Smoothie Recipe (317 cals per serving) If you love PB&J, why not turn the lunchtime favorite into a filling breakfast? Featuring a tablespoon of peanut butter and tons of fresh raspberries, you’ll get your fix, minus the sammie’s added sugars and carbs. Vanilla protein powder helps up the protein count to 29 grams per serving (meaning you’ll definitely stay full until lunch). [caption id="attachment_27441" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Spring Cleanse Salad Photo by Renee Blair[/caption] Lunch: Cleansing Spring Salad Recipe (185 cals per serving) It’s a veggie-palooza! This brightly-colored dish packs in beets, carrots, cucumbers, avocado and tons of greens. With only 185 calories per two-cup servings, you can supersize this salad if you need to fill up. [caption id="attachment_32901" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Balsamic Chicken and Greens Photo: Perry Santanachote[/caption] Dinner: Balsamic Chicken Recipe with Barley and Chard (373 cals per serving) This one-pot meal keeps things simple towards the end of your cleanse. The boneless, skinless chicken thighs are low in fat, while barley, tomato and dark, leafy greens ensure your plate is packed with vitamins, minerals and fiber. RELATED: 16 Healthy Chicken Recipes That Don’t Suck [caption id="attachment_34165" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: Homemade Beet Hummus Recipe Photo by Renee Blair[/caption] Snack: Homemade Beet Hummus Recipe (145 cals per serving) The phytochemicals in beets act as antioxidants within the body, giving this hummus an extra good-for-you twist. Prep a plate full of veggies to snack on if you need to cure a case of the munchies. [caption id="attachment_33301" align="alignnone" width="620"]How to Detox Your Body: The Ultimate MetCon Workout Photo: Pond5[/caption] Workout: The Ultimate 20-Minute Metcon Workout This workout is your last push before a weekend full of fun, so make it count. Metabolic conditioning (aka metcon) is a high-intensity, calorie-blasting workout that alternates periods of all-out effort with short interludes of rest. Get ready to push yourself to the limit — the beach awaits!  Note to reader: The content in this article relates to the core service offered by DailyBurn. In the interest of editorial disclosure and integrity, the reader should know that this site is owned and operated by DailyBurn. 

The post Detoxing for Beach Season? Here’s Your 5-Day Plan appeared first on Life by DailyBurn.

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