Recent Activity

  • Slowvelo

    I don't know much about the yoga programs on this site, but ive done a few types of yoga and never found them to really do a lot for my back. However, the motions in the kettle bell workout have really strengthened my back. Obviously I don't have the same build that you do, but with a very lightweight kettle bell, you could benefit from the movements. Maybe try a weight less than 15 pounds and see if it works the muscles you want to target. (you could trial the workout with a dumbbell in one hand and see if you like it before buying a kettle bell.)

    about 1 month ago
  • Slowvelo

    The way I get around this is by swiping to discover, then going to the search field and selecting search parameters that I know will give me the video I am looking for. I agree it's bittersweet being locked into one program, especially since there's no customization if you need to rest and injury or skip a day. Hope this works for you.

    about 1 month ago
  • Slowvelo

    Not that I have ever found, but the videos just estimate the calories you burn, so the numbers will always be the same. Take note of how many calories they say you burn when you do them, then add those numbers each time you do the workout? And take this number with a grain of salt, because it's a very rough estimate. Hope this helps!

    about 1 month ago
  • Slowvelo

    You do need vitamin d, and the best way to get it is by going outside every day and standing in the sun for half an hour. (I know it's getting wintery this time of year). You can also get it from other supplements and by eating fatty fish like tuna and salmon. Good luck!

    about 1 month ago
  • Slowvelo

    Egg protein is isolated and concentrated, and eggs have fat and cholestorol.

    about 1 month ago
  • Slowvelo

    Egg protein is isolated and concentrated, and eggs have fat and cholestorol.

    9 months ago
  • Slowvelo

    You do need vitamin d, and the best way to get it is by going outside every day and standing in the sun for half an hour. (I know it's getting wintery this time of year). You can also get it from other supplements and by eating fatty fish like tuna and salmon. Good luck!

    9 months ago
  • Slowvelo

    Not that I have ever found, but the videos just estimate the calories you burn, so the numbers will always be the same. Take note of how many calories they say you burn when you do them, then add those numbers each time you do the workout? And take this number with a grain of salt, because it's a very rough estimate. Hope this helps!

    9 months ago
  • Slowvelo

    I don't know much about the yoga programs on this site, but ive done a few types of yoga and never found them to really do a lot for my back. However, the motions in the kettle bell workout have really strengthened my back. Obviously I don't have the same build that you do, but with a very lightweight kettle bell, you could benefit from the movements. Maybe try a weight less than 15 pounds and see if it works the muscles you want to target. (you could trial the workout with a dumbbell in one hand and see if you like it before buying a kettle bell.)

    9 months ago
  • Slowvelo

    The way I get around this is by swiping to discover, then going to the search field and selecting search parameters that I know will give me the video I am looking for. I agree it's bittersweet being locked into one program, especially since there's no customization if you need to rest and injury or skip a day. Hope this works for you.

    9 months ago
  • Slowvelo
    Slowvelo answered the Question: Are grits healthy?

    I'm not a maker or eater of grits, but I understand that grits prepared with water and a little salt results in something a lot like polenta, which I think of as a reasonably healthy carbohydrate source. I'm also not doing Ignite, so I don't know where it would fall if you were following those restrictions, but you've certainly identified and removed the unhealthy aspects of traditional grits.

    about 1 year ago
  • Slowvelo
    Slowvelo commented on choam1971's answer to What is quinoa?:

    I love replacing quinoa for rice in dishes where you might serve something "on a bed of rice." It becomes fluffy and nutty at the same time, it feels light as you eat it, and it has a huge amount of protein. You should rinse dry quinoa in a sieve a few times before cooking, to remove an enzyme that isn't very digestible. As a vegetarian, it's a great way to balance a dish that would otherwise have very little protein, like stir-fried vegetables over rice. Go try!

    about 1 year ago
  • Slowvelo
    Slowvelo answered the Question: How does DB calculate calories burned?

    I'm concerned about this too; I don't see how it can be anymore than an extremely rough estimate. Maybe we can assume that there's a range of possible calories burned for each workout depending on energy expenditure, body type, level of intensity, and modifiers or breaks taken. But for a workout listed at 700 calories, this range could be huge, anywhere between 300 calories for a small beginner who takes lots of breaks and works at a low intensity, to 1000 calories for a powerful, larger person with a metabolic system already trained to process fuel quickly and efficiently, working at a high intensity and really pushing the limits. I don't see how it's possible to have a useful calorie estimate without measuring biometric indicators on each person working out, and even then, estimates would likely vary from session to session. I'm not convinced that the program's caloric estimates are useful if you're carefully counting calories and expecting accuracy within 300-400 a day, which for some people is 15% or more of their daily target. There's just too much room for error. A better way to estimate calorie consumption would be to carefully track food intake over one or two weeks, factoring in weight gain or loss, (one pound equals 3500 calories?) and dividing to find actual number of calories burned per day. This option still has the potential to be wildly erratic, but at least it's based on your actual body, and how it works in the real world. Anyone have more accurate experiences with calorie tracking and exercise?

    about 1 year ago
  • Slowvelo
    Slowvelo answered the Question: How many calories are burned doing TBT workouts?

    The workouts provide a calorie counter that periodically displays as you go, and at the end it will show a total for estimated calories burned.

    It's really important to note that this is an estimate, and there are many factors that could make it wildly inaccurate, not the least of which is the fact that each TBT workout has three levels. I'm assuming that the calorie expenditure they list is for level 2, and someone doing level 3 would burn more, while someone doing level 1 would burn less. More importantly, calories are a fixed measurement of energy expenditure, and human beings are different people, who come in different shapes and sizes. A tall person with a heavier build will burn more calories doing the same activity than a short person with a slight build, because it takes less energy for the small light person to complete the same movements.

    So... Find the calorie estimates at the top of the screen throughout TBT workouts, but take those numbers with a grain of salt!

    Good luck!

    about 1 year ago
  • Slowvelo
    Slowvelo answered the Question: How do yogi's stay so thin and lean?

    I know how hard it can be to have a look in mind that you want for yourself, but find it very difficult to get there. As a young man, I was very thin, and always wanted to gain weight and be muscular. I tried drinking shakes, counting calories, adding extra meals, but I never got the look I had in my head. Eventually I realized that I was working against a genetic profile that didn't share my bulky dream. I came to terms with keeping the general body I was given, and making it work in my favor by trying sports that are easier for lean men.

    There are so many factors that surround how you are built, but the ones you can control are calorie intake overall, quality and type of food, and how you work your muscles to shape them. As I know you already know from reading your knowledgeable comments, cardio has a large effect on fat burning and jump starting metabolism. I'm only throwing out ideas, but maybe you could look into high intensity interval training for cardio? It's tough when your muscles have a tendency to get bulky. The traditional lengthening workout is Pilates, and yoga is in the same vein. I don't believe that all yogis are lean and long, but I think that people who can easily and naturally become talented at advanced yoga have a long and lean genetic profile.

    Anytime you lift weights, as opposed to doing body weight training, you're doing strength wining rather than muscular endurance training. You want to limit the stress per rep on your muscles, and increase the quantity of reps you perform. Yoga and Pilates play on this by performing low impact moves over and over, so these might be good to try.

    You could also look at calorie intake. There are a lot of great calorie trackers out there, many that use barcode scanning from your phone and manageable lists of common foods that you eat. Ultimately, reducing your intake below the amount that you burn per day will force your body to restructure itself, but you may not burn fat right away. Generally, when you enter an aerobic state, your body burns carbohydrates first, and when they are exhausted, it burns fat. There is a heated conversation among endurance althetes (runners, triathletes, cyclists) about training your body to burn fat instead of carbohydrates from the start of your effort, but the people who do this are training many many hours per week.

    I realize I've been sort of rambling here... I know this isn't a simple answer, but maybe some points to think about, and one of them might be something you could try pretty easily.

    You can acheive any goal you want, but in order to retain that goal, the work you do needs to be sustainable, especially if you are fighting against genetics. I hope you can get where you want to be, and even more, I hope you learn the factors that have been holding you back. It's so frustrating when you expect one result for your body, and it isn't coming. Lastly, it's probably true that long and lean people are good at yoga. But every body type in the world is good at something-- a sport or activity, a skill-- that no one else can do as well. I'm not saying give up on your goals if you have a hard time finding what works, but I think it's smart to embrace your strengths.

    Good luck to you! Let us know if you find something that works for you!

    about 1 year ago

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