Recent Activity

  • JayneT7

    I can't speak for the Powers that Be at Daily Burn, but I can tell you that there are plenty of natural alkalising protein alternatives that are not fortified if that is the way you must go.

    For example you could make your smoothies in the normal way and add a teaspoon of a green powder like Spirulina. Nearly 80% of the calories from Spirulina come from protein and it also contains many other vits and mins to boot. If you don't like the taste experiment with other green powders and vary the dosage if you are supplementing with other vits and mins. Combination green powders (those with a blend of greens) normally taste great. There are a lot of naturally occurring protein sources available. Avocado has good protein, so do nuts and seeds and believe it or not, 40% of the calories from raw broccoli come from protein.

    I had food and chemical intolerances whilst recovering from an illness. I got into the habit of reading ingredients not just to check what I couldn't eat on the list, but to see what I could have so that I could make my own. This worked not just for food products, but for my own cosmetics and skin care too. Whilst making my own felt irritating at first, I came to enjoy being creative, learning how to take care of my body and eventually having the freedom of not having to rely on a set product or brand. Whilst my friends stressed that they had run out of their protein powders I could rustle something up from the fridge. I had iron difficulties during that time and through learning about nutrition I didn't just adjust my iron intake but also adjusted my 'iron inhibitors' and 'iron enhancers' (like vit c).

    If protein is your primary concern, if you aren't aware of this little calculation you might find it useful. I use it to work out what percentage of my calories are coming from what food group.

    1. Look at the grams of fat/protein/carbs in a food's nutrition breakdown and the amount of calories it contains.
    2. To work out the percentage of the calories that come from fat, multiply the fat grams by 9, then divide that figure by the amount of calories in the food and multiply by 100.
    3. For protein percentages multiply the protein grams by 4, divide that by the amount of calories and then multiply by 100
    4. For carb percentages multiply the carb grams by 4, divide that figure by the amount of calories and then multiply by 100

    Self nutrition data (http://nutritiondata.self.com/) is a website I found only recently that seems to have every nutrition breakdown you can think of.

    Hope that helps :)

    about 1 month ago
  • JayneT7
    JayneT7 answered the Question: I need a replacement for avacado in ignite recipes

    It seems there are 3 issues here: 1. will the recipe miss it and (knowing the constituents of avocado) 2. how can I replace the good source of protein and 3. where can I get my good fats.

    Not knowing the recipes specifically I can't help on that but I can tell you there are other great sources of vegan protein. Greens are a prime example, fresh or in powdered form and a good spirulina powder will up your protein content. Spirulina is also rich in many other vitamins and minerals. You can add a teaspoon to a smoothie. In terms of good fats you will still get a lot from seeds and nuts and oils. If you choose a good quality seed oil (Udos for example) you will still be getting a lot of good essential fatty acids.

    Hope that helps :)

    about 1 month ago
  • JayneT7

    To be honest your body could be telling you to stop for a reason. There's a big difference between being sluggish due to upping your training regime/being out of shape and being totally knackered because in addition to starting a training regime you could also be working hard in your job, perhaps haven't slept well, maybe aren't fully hydrated and have also changed your diet. Before you yell, 'More!' at your body it's worth considering the reasons why. You aren't hunting for excuses, but looking for ways to ease the obstacles so you can reach your goals.

    We are conditioned that pain is gain and to push through, but there are often better rewards in taking it slowly, listening to your body and rewarding yourself for what you can do, rather than focusing on what you can't do (or at least can't do yet). Stu Mittleman is famed for running across America. He started running late in life and in his book 'Slow Burn' he says, "The more gradual the change the more likely it will last. Comfort is the key to sustainable growth."

    If you are just sluggish, but inspired, then the fatigue will disappear a few workouts in. The key word there is 'inspired'. The mind has to be a willing participant and if it's not train it as you would your body until it is. Talk to yourself in the present tense and word it in the positive. "I am doing well." "Everyday I am getting closer to my goals." "I see myself as I want to be." "I am recognise and appreciate my progress." "I can do this. I am doing this! I can keep going!!!" If you say 'I don't want to stop' all your body will hear is 'I want to stop!!!!'

    So to sum up, talk positively and proudly to yourself, take breaks as you need them, hydrate and breathe. If this doesn't work the consider other reasons that you might be tired as your workout is part of your life and your performance gets affected by all elements of it, good and bad.

    Hope that helps :)

    about 1 month ago
  • JayneT7

    Hey all,

    I don't really want to lose much weight. My goals are to tone up and fire up my energy. When I was last in good shape I weighed what I weigh now, give or take 5lbs, but was probably one-two dress sizes slimmer with my measurements being substantially different. I would therefore prefer to focus on tracking my progress in body measurements rather than weight loss because as my fat gets converted to muscle I will slim down, but my weight may not change too much.

    I'm already noticing that I've lost half an inch on my waist and would like to log future changes. Is there any way I can do this on Daily Burn?

    Thanks in advance everyone :)

    about 1 month ago
  • JayneT7

    I can't say whether it's ;allowed' or not but I can tell you that if you find a good brand (read the labels) it's a really versatile and yummy ingredient. Aside from hummus I mix it with bananas (either blend it or just drizzle it on top of sliced bananas), apples, drop a spoonful in smoothies, mix it with roasted vegetables (and blend that to create a dip) and use it in salad dressings.

    about 1 month ago
  • JayneT7

    I'd have a look at yoga. Repeat the early classes until you get strong and maybe focus on restorative yoga and breathing practices. Believe it or not you can actually tone your abs with very focused breathing in a very gentle way, even just lying down, especially when combined with gentle muscle movements. I haven't seen them on here yet but as you advance there are 'bandhas' in yoga which are muscle and breath locks designed to get pelvic floors into uber shape.

    about 1 month ago
  • JayneT7

    Answer this question (please read answers below before posting)...

    about 1 month ago
  • JayneT7

    Perhaps some basic yoga (easy class, short duration) with modifications and using props such as blocks and blankets to support your knee. Whilst there are easy classes on this site there are not a lot of modifications so I would advise finding a class that suits your comfort, learning the name of the pose and then looking online for any modifications. Better still, supplement your classes on here by attending a remedial yoga class and after a while, modifying your poses will come instinctively to you and your body. Hope that helps :)

    about 1 month ago
  • JayneT7

    Thanks for the link, but I just clicked on it and it says the page doesn't exist. I have also checked for my achievements in the Notifications tab but it's totally blank. I've been with Daily Burn for nearly a year so there should be plenty there. Have Daily Burn dropped achievements?

    12 months ago
  • JayneT7

    It works! Thank you :)

    about 1 year ago
  • JayneT7

    I can't speak for the Powers that Be at Daily Burn, but I can tell you that there are plenty of natural alkalising protein alternatives that are not fortified if that is the way you must go.

    For example you could make your smoothies in the normal way and add a teaspoon of a green powder like Spirulina. Nearly 80% of the calories from Spirulina come from protein and it also contains many other vits and mins to boot. If you don't like the taste experiment with other green powders and vary the dosage if you are supplementing with other vits and mins. Combination green powders (those with a blend of greens) normally taste great. There are a lot of naturally occurring protein sources available. Avocado has good protein, so do nuts and seeds and believe it or not, 40% of the calories from raw broccoli come from protein.

    I had food and chemical intolerances whilst recovering from an illness. I got into the habit of reading ingredients not just to check what I couldn't eat on the list, but to see what I could have so that I could make my own. This worked not just for food products, but for my own cosmetics and skin care too. Whilst making my own felt irritating at first, I came to enjoy being creative, learning how to take care of my body and eventually having the freedom of not having to rely on a set product or brand. Whilst my friends stressed that they had run out of their protein powders I could rustle something up from the fridge. I had iron difficulties during that time and through learning about nutrition I didn't just adjust my iron intake but also adjusted my 'iron inhibitors' and 'iron enhancers' (like vit c).

    If protein is your primary concern, if you aren't aware of this little calculation you might find it useful. I use it to work out what percentage of my calories are coming from what food group.

    1. Look at the grams of fat/protein/carbs in a food's nutrition breakdown and the amount of calories it contains.
    2. To work out the percentage of the calories that come from fat, multiply the fat grams by 9, then divide that figure by the amount of calories in the food and multiply by 100.
    3. For protein percentages multiply the protein grams by 4, divide that by the amount of calories and then multiply by 100
    4. For carb percentages multiply the carb grams by 4, divide that figure by the amount of calories and then multiply by 100

    Self nutrition data (http://nutritiondata.self.com/) is a website I found only recently that seems to have every nutrition breakdown you can think of.

    Hope that helps :)

    over 1 year ago
  • JayneT7
    JayneT7 commented on JayneT7's answer to I need a replacement for avacado in ignite recipes:

    Welcome Juju :)

    over 1 year ago
  • JayneT7
    JayneT7 answered the Question: I need a replacement for avacado in ignite recipes

    It seems there are 3 issues here: 1. will the recipe miss it and (knowing the constituents of avocado) 2. how can I replace the good source of protein and 3. where can I get my good fats.

    Not knowing the recipes specifically I can't help on that but I can tell you there are other great sources of vegan protein. Greens are a prime example, fresh or in powdered form and a good spirulina powder will up your protein content. Spirulina is also rich in many other vitamins and minerals. You can add a teaspoon to a smoothie. In terms of good fats you will still get a lot from seeds and nuts and oils. If you choose a good quality seed oil (Udos for example) you will still be getting a lot of good essential fatty acids.

    Hope that helps :)

    over 1 year ago
  • JayneT7

    To be honest your body could be telling you to stop for a reason. There's a big difference between being sluggish due to upping your training regime/being out of shape and being totally knackered because in addition to starting a training regime you could also be working hard in your job, perhaps haven't slept well, maybe aren't fully hydrated and have also changed your diet. Before you yell, 'More!' at your body it's worth considering the reasons why. You aren't hunting for excuses, but looking for ways to ease the obstacles so you can reach your goals.

    We are conditioned that pain is gain and to push through, but there are often better rewards in taking it slowly, listening to your body and rewarding yourself for what you can do, rather than focusing on what you can't do (or at least can't do yet). Stu Mittleman is famed for running across America. He started running late in life and in his book 'Slow Burn' he says, "The more gradual the change the more likely it will last. Comfort is the key to sustainable growth."

    If you are just sluggish, but inspired, then the fatigue will disappear a few workouts in. The key word there is 'inspired'. The mind has to be a willing participant and if it's not train it as you would your body until it is. Talk to yourself in the present tense and word it in the positive. "I am doing well." "Everyday I am getting closer to my goals." "I see myself as I want to be." "I am recognise and appreciate my progress." "I can do this. I am doing this! I can keep going!!!" If you say 'I don't want to stop' all your body will hear is 'I want to stop!!!!'

    So to sum up, talk positively and proudly to yourself, take breaks as you need them, hydrate and breathe. If this doesn't work the consider other reasons that you might be tired as your workout is part of your life and your performance gets affected by all elements of it, good and bad.

    Hope that helps :)

    over 1 year ago
  • JayneT7

    I've tried posting this a few times. Hopefully this time it will be sent!

    It's not so much the protein you ingest as the protein you absorb. Plant based proteins can be easier for the body to break down and absorb than animal based ones, especially if the gut still has a lot of build up from a life time of gluten. It's a common misconception that the body needs a lot of protein, and also that this is mostly available from animal products. If I remember correctly even Arnold Schwarzenegger said something once about broccoli being 50% protein (protein according to calories) and how he only had a few grams of protein a day.

    Superfoods are great if you are worried in the early stages of transition. For example spirulina is one of the most protein rich food sources known to man which is why nutritionists suggest a shot of that, or similar green powders, before a meal to encourage weight loss because protein does wonders to help you feel full. Equally green powders and superfoods help alkalise your body and thus shed fat faster. You don't have to take pills. You can add them to shakes and plain water if you find yummy green powders. Animal products add acid to the body and can upset the delicate ph balance if not eaten in balance with other ingredients (aka lots of veg). To add insult to injury in much the same way your car needs oil to protect it from corrosion, our bodies hold fat to protect it from too much acid. So alkalising - eating our veg - actually gives us more protein than we realise.

    Whilst I know this isn't the path you are going down, because of the similarities with the protein issue, my advice would be to research vegan diets and alkaline diets. If you really want a healthy dollop of inspiration just type 'vegan athletes' into Google or even Facebook. There are tons of them ranging from ultra runners to body builders to Olympians.

    Good luck!

    over 1 year ago

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