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  • ritawood
    ritawood commented on jkz's answer to I'm having trouble with salt:

    I have yet to find a doctor who says to drink less water. When I do, I'll ask him for his 'peer-reviewed facts'. Until then, I'll keep drinking my water and using my 3 g/0.5 t of Himalayan Pink salt every day and I'll keep recommending the same to everyone who asks what I do to look so young and stay so healthy. If you choose to do something different, that's your business.

    about 1 year ago
  • ritawood
    ritawood commented on jkz's answer to I'm having trouble with salt:

    Absolutely correct. You should never drink more water than you need. However, most people don't drink as much water as they need and as a result become dehydrated. Water intoxication only occurs at extreme intake levels such as 1-2 gallons or more per day and/or with kidney problems that prevent the normal elimination of water. Normal water intake of 1/2 oz per 1 lb of body weight per day will not result in water intoxication and will result in proper hydration and, as a result, a whole host of problems related to dehydration will disappear. This brings me right back to my very first comment that a proper balance between salt and water is essential to maintain health. You cannot talk about salt without talking about water and you cannot talk about water without talking about salt since they work in a synergistic manner in the body.

    If you drink too much water and don't use enough salt, you run a risk of health problems related to low sodium levels. If you eat too much salt and don't drink enough water, you run a risk of health problems associated with dehydration. You simply cannot talk about one without talking about the other. For proof of this, just read any physiology text. It is basic.

    The OP asked about weight gain associated with salt intake and a potential addiction. You responded with a non-answer because you don't use salt and your answer suggested that using salt is dangerous when it is essential for life-again, read any basic physiology text for that info.

    As a health professional, I cannot allow dangerous misinformation to go unchallenged. All I was suggesting to you is that drinking more water may/will have a more beneficial effect on blood pressure-and other health problems-than restricting salt intake. If you are so worried about your blood pressure, why not give it a try for a few weeks and see?

    about 1 year ago
  • ritawood
    ritawood commented on jkz's answer to I'm having trouble with salt:

    The website links to articles that are definitely peer reviewed.

    However, peer review, or the lack of it, really doesn't mean something works or doesn't work or is/isn't good science. It only means that someone else in your general field of study has looked at and read what you've written.

    I'm really curious as to what your problem is with drinking more water? That's really what this is about. Drinking more water. Is it harmless? Yes, in moderation. Is it beneficial to the body? Yes, in more ways than one. Even the trainers on the workout videos on this site recommend staying hydrated. So why demand a peer-reviewed paper on the health benefits of drinking more water? Why not use a little common sense instead?

    about 1 year ago
  • ritawood
    ritawood answered the Question: When will (not if) you support the metric system?

    Actually, I think the problem with the US refusing to use the metric system has a lot to do with politics. Changing to the metric system would require all the tool and die makers and most of the manufacturing plants still in the US to completely buy new machinery. This would probably put some of them out of business and cost a small fortune for the rest of them. So, they hire lobbyists to convince lawmakers to keep voting it down.

    about 1 year ago
  • ritawood
    ritawood commented on jkz's answer to I'm having trouble with salt:

    Lost what I wrote...
    The report states that at <3 g/day there is no effect on BP, at 3-15 g/day the effect varies from no change to hypertension with a corresponding increase in salt consumption.
    Most of the article deals with salt consumption in excess of 10 g/day and a reduction to 5 g/day. Apples and Oranges when compared to 3 g/day as was being discussed.

    about 1 year ago
  • ritawood
    ritawood commented on jkz's answer to I'm having trouble with salt:

    That should say: Himalayan Pink Salt is only 3/4 as salty as table salt.

    I just read a little deeper in the article you cite and it reports that at m not even going to comment on this report anymore.

    about 1 year ago
  • ritawood
    ritawood commented on jkz's answer to I'm having trouble with salt:

    While I don't agree with everything Dr. "Batman" writes about water I do agree with his science and research. For more information on his research including everything that has been published and why most of it is currently being rejected (it steps on the toes of pharmaceutical companies), visit: http://www.watercure.com/

    I scanned the article you linked and it is dealing with HIGH salt intake as defined in the article of being in excess of 10 g/day. 10 g/day is approximately 1- 1.5 t of salt. As you can see in my earlier post I am talking about 0.5 t or 3 g/day. A study about the effects of 3 x the amount of salt I am talking about is a BIG difference. At those levels of salt intake, it is entirely possible that human kidneys will have problems. At a normal salt intake, the kidneys have no problems since they aren't the only way salt is excreted from the body.

    Another item to remember is that all salt is not created equal. Himalayan Pink, Celtic Gray, and REAL (brand name) salt are full-spectrum salt that contain a wide range of minerals. Table salt, which I imagine was used for the study you cite (though it didn't specify) contains only sodium chloride and possibly iodine. Again, not the same thing at all. 3 g of Himalayan Pink Salt with all it's minerals is about 1/4 as salty as table salt. When my mother and I both switched over we discovered independently of each other that we needed to increase the amount of salt in our recipes by about 1/4 to 1/2 to adjust for it. So 3 g of Himalayan Pink would be equal to about 2 g of table salt in the amount of sodium chloride it contains.

    This would make the comparison laughable between the effects of 10 grams of table salt on the human body and 2 grams of table salt on the human body.

    Do you have any better papers than that?

    about 1 year ago
  • ritawood
    ritawood commented on jkz's answer to I'm having trouble with salt:

    Actually, it's not salt that gives you high blood pressure, that's a myth. The cause of high blood pressure usually attributed to salt is not drinking enough water. Salt is absolutely essential to the body's proper function.

    The simple explanation of the physiology of salt and water in the body is this:
    When the body starts to become dehydrated the water necessary for it's function (i.e. life) comes from the water contained both inside the cells and stored in the spaces between the cells. When the body becomes severely dehydrated, it begins to take water from the blood as well resulting in both a thicker, more viscid (viscous) blood as well as decreased volume. The removal of the water decreases the volume of the blood which in turn requires the blood vessels to constrict so as not to develop air pockets which can kill. The effect of thicker more viscid blood being pumped through a smaller vessel is a rise in blood pressure. The reason salt is so often associated with high blood pressure is because water inside the cells as well as water in the blood is regulated by the amount of water consumed. The water stored between the cells is regulated by salt intake. Cells cannot function without water-they will die, so the water stored between them is essential to maintain life during dehydration as there is a mechanism in the body where it can be forced into the cells-not an ideal solution. When you are severely dehydrated such as when high blood pressure results, the only means the body has of providing the water essential for the survival of your cells is to store it in the spaces between the cells. Since this is regulated by salt, your body will retain salt to enable it to store this water. Reducing salt intake in such a situation reduces your body's ability to continue to function.

    Once you understand the physiology behind the salt and water, it should become obvious that the correct solution to high blood pressure and edema is not to stop using salt, but to start drinking a proper amount of water. Water is a natural diuretic-something Hollywood has known for years and uses as a 'weight-loss solution' i.e. 'water weight'. So, although it seems backwards, drinking more water actually will reduce edema/water retention. That is because salt is always lost in urine, so if you drink more, you will urinate more and the excess salt being retained by the body will be flushed out. As the excess salt is flushed, the water being retained by it will be freed up and either used or flushed as well. This can happen because, if you are drinking the proper amount of water, the water level in both the blood and inside the cells will increase since it is regulated by how much water you drink, and there will be no need for your body to retain the salt.

    There is one caution. If you are severely dehydrated and/or have kidney problems, you should increase your water consumption gradually. This will allow your body time to adjust.

    about 1 year ago
  • ritawood

    When your schedule is static, it isn't hard to adjust, but when it rotates, like mine used to every week, I finally decided that I would schedule my life around my sleep period. "Night" was when I was sleeping; "Day" was when I was working; "breakfast" happened when I got up from sleeping; "lunch" happened sometime during the shift; "supper/dinner" happened after I got off of work; I 'exercised' mostly at work since my job involved hours of walking. Added to the problems of a rotating shift, I was working on a ship at the time, so I was also changing time zones. In the end, this worked the best for me. I actually lost a lot of weight by making a schedule and sticking to it. I gained all the weight back when I got off and quit following my schedule.

    about 1 year ago
  • ritawood
    ritawood answered the Question: I'm having trouble with salt

    There are 3 types of food that people get addicted to: Sweet, Fatty and Salty. So yes, you can definitely get addicted to salt. I have to fight it myself. One thing to keep in mind is you need to replace the salt lost through sweating and urination. If you are drinking more water, you need more salt. The best ratio of salt to water is 1/2 t salt for every 1/2 gallon (64 oz) of water you are drinking. If you are sweating a lot, you need more water and proportionally more salt. The amount of water you need on a daily basis is tied to your weight. It works out at 1/2 oz for every pound of body weight. For example if you weight 100 lbs, you need 50 oz per day. I'm sorry I don't know the conversions for metric. Water is essential to the breakdown of fat, so drinking more water will aid in the breakdown and usage of stored fat. Just don't go to an extreme. You really don't need 1-2 gallons of water every day like some people I know, unless you are constantly sweating. Just check your salt intake against the water you are drinking and adjust it if necessary.

    If your weight suddenly shot up a couple of pounds (or even 5) overnight, it is probably water retention due to salt consumption. And the solution is to back off the salt for a day or so and drink more water which will flush the salt out of your system. If your weight is just creeping up slowly, it is more likely you are "legging up" as my neighbor calls it. Basically, you are putting on muscle in place of fat and muscle weighs a lot more so your weight starts to rise slowly. Stay with the program and you will see your clothes are looser despite the weight gain and eventually, your weight will start to drop as well.

    Hope this helps.

    about 1 year ago
  • ritawood

    Could you please make a video that teaches the moves at a much slower pace for those of us who are very uncoordinated. I gave up halfway through the first video since all I was doing was tripping over my own feet.

    about 1 year ago
  • ritawood

    I just signed up and tried to do dance since it was recommended to me as a beginner. About halfway through I gave up since all I was doing was tripping over my own feet. What good is an exercise routine if you can't do the exercises? Is anyone else having or has had a similar problem? If so, what did you do?

    about 1 year ago