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PUSH: The First Fitness Tracker to Measure Strength and Power

Push Strength Squat

Photo: PUSH

“PUSH will identify exactly how many reps you completed, and just how fast and how powerfully you performed each one.”

By now you’ve probably tried a Jawbone, Fitbit or FuelBand, and chances are it has broken, been lost in the wash, or has started to bore you. The fitness tracking bubble might very well be bursting, but the people behind PUSH aren’t exactly concerned. Why? They’ve created a next-level armband that’s putting a new premium on strength. 

“We’re not looking for the guy who is trying to take more steps throughout the day; we’re interested in the athletes who are trying to lift more weight and reach other strength-related goals,” says CEO and co-founder Rami Alhamad. “It’s a very different market. Our true DNA is sport technology — not wearables.”

Developed by a team of leading sports scientists and algorithm engineers, PUSH prides itself on being the first fitness tracker to measure velocity, force and power — the three most important metrics in strength training, Alhamad says. Like other trackers, PUSH utilizes an accelerometer (to measure acceleration forces) and gyroscope (to measure orientation), plus plenty of advanced algorithms to collect and analyze data from your lifts. However, while most wearables sample data at a rate of 10 times per second, PUSH does it at 150 times per second in order to produce more accurate feedback, such as velocity of reps (e.g. how much speed is under the bar during a 275-pound push press) and peak power output (how much explosiveness you have behind that 365-pound squat). 

And it’s this data, collected from two years’ worth of rigorous testing, that is quite literally pushing the technology forward. The device’s list of beta-testers reads like a who’s who of pro-level ballers. From the Detroit Lions and Philadelphia Flyers to big-name strength coaches like Eric Cressey and Joe Dowdell, PUSH has been on the arms of some of the most able bodies in sports and fitness.

PUSH: Strength in Numbers

“Slow speeds and sluggish performance will let you know it might be time to do fewer reps, or simply move on.” 

So how does it work exactly? After plugging in your weight, height, gender and goal (strength, power, speed, endurance or hypertrophy), users choose “free mode” (if you’re working out solo) or “routine mode” (if you have a coach who’s prescribing the workout for you). Then, strap on the water- and impact-resistant device just below the elbow, and press the start button to sync the band with the accompanying smartphone app. When it lights up green, that means it’s synced to your iPhone or Android using Bluetooth technology, and you’re good to go.

Whether you’ve selected squats, cleans, box jumps, or any of the other functional, pre-programmed exercises, PUSH will identify exactly how many reps you completed, and just how fast and how powerfully you performed each one. Maybe you hit peak power by the end of your set or breezed through without any signs of struggle. PUSH might recommend you add 10 (or more) pounds, using its built-in, scientifically validated metrics.

And when it’s just not your day, expect PUSH to tell you so. Slow speeds and sluggish performance will let you know it might be time to do fewer reps, or simply move on.  

Push Strength App

What the Device Doesn’t Do

“We’re interested in the athletes who are trying to lift more weight and reach other strength-related goals.”

Anxious to get your hands on the band fit for the pros? Keep in mind this isn’t the tool for beginner lifters (unless you’re working with a trainer who is closely monitoring your technique). The truth is, no tracker is sophisticated enough to give an accurate read on form — at least not yet. But, for those who have mastered the basics, but aren’t seeing big enough gains or are starting to plateau, there’s big potential, Alhamad says.  

“This is the device that can give you the feedback you need so you’re not wasting your time at the gym,” he adds. “It isn’t going to make any assumptions. It’s going to see exactly what you’re doing and assess you based on that to help you figure out where to go next.”

Pushing Ahead

While the strength-focused tracker has already earned a few big wins (successfully moving from a crowd-funded campaign to market, for one), they’re not sitting back just yet. Next up for the development team is heart-rate integration, broadening their library of exercises, and providing accurate one-rep max assessments. Users can also expect to see workout programs from well-known trainers available within the app, and possible integration with other fitness platforms in the months ahead. 

Starting on August 1, preorders will ship to PUSH’s 2,000-plus earliest adopters. The only question remains: How quickly can they produce in numbers? 

For more information or to purchase the PUSH tracker for the discounted price of $149, head to pushstrength.com by August 7. Orders placed after that date will be available for the regular price of $189.

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