15 Healthy Snacks for Kids (And Grown-Ups, Too)

15 Healthy Snacks for Kids (And Grown-Ups, Too)

Spoiler alert: While graham crackers, alphabet soup and other classics may look innocent, they often contain high fructose corn syrup, artificial coloring, or even MSG. So why not make them yourself, instead? With homemade versions, you can healthy-ify your favorite treats, sneaking in extra protein, fiber and vitamins — and save money on your grocery bill, too. So whether you’re cooking for your little ones or simply craving good old childhood favorites, we’ve rounded up 15 scrumptious recipes from some of our favorite kid-friendly food bloggers.

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 15 Healthy Snack Recipes for All Ages

 Grilled Cheese Wafflewich

1. Grilled Cheese Wafflewich
Put your waffle maker to use with this fun and tasty riff on grilled cheese. You’d never guess that there’s spinach hiding inside this sammie — plus, kids can help assemble the ingredients before the whole thing goes into the waffle iron. Photo and Recipe: Amy and Natalie / Super Healthy Kids

Whole wheat graham crackers

2. Whole Wheat Graham Crackers
Cinnamon grahams are a childhood staple, and they’re surprisingly easy to make at home. If you’re vegan or paleo, this recipe is easily adjustable — simply substitute coconut oil for the butter. Want more of a cookie texture? Don’t roll out the dough too thin before baking. Photo and Recipe: Melissa / Bless this Mess Please

Fig Newtons

3. Homemade Fig Newtons
Get figgy! Skip the unpronounceable ingredients and high fructose corn syrup in store-bought cookies and make this healthier version instead. The whole grains and natural sources of sugar (maple syrup and applesauce) in this sweet treat are much better for you than the refined sugar you’d find in less healthy versions. Photo and Recipe: Melissa / My Whole Food Life

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Chia Pretzels

4. Whole Wheat Chia Pretzels
These tasty twists don’t require a bread machine or long wait time for dough to rise, making this the perfect activity for kids who like to help in the kitchen. Plus, fiber from the chia seeds will keep you all satisfied ‘til dinnertime. Photo and Recipe: Olena / ifoodreal

Apple Sandwiches

5. Mini Apple and Peanut Butter Sandwiches
If you need some serious fuel, try this high protein, high fiber snack. Not going to eat the apple slices right away? Brush them with lemon juice to keep them from browning so your kids won’t be grossed out by off-color apples. Photo and Recipe: Perry Santanachote / Life by DailyBurn

Rainbow Pizza Recipe

6. Rainbow Pizza
ROYGBIV never looked so good! This vegetable-packed pie could serve as a snack or a lunch so colorful you could practically call it a salad. Sneak in more greens by using the recommended kale and Parmesan crust. Photo and Recipe: Angie / The Novice Gardener

Granola Bites

7. Granola Bites
Looks like a muffin, tastes like a snack bar. These petite bites are perfectly portioned for a light afternoon snack or a sweet lunchtime side. Add in chopped dried fruit, mini chocolate chips or chia if you want to boost the protein count. Photo and Recipe: Agnes / Hello Wonderful

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ABC Tomato Soup

8. ABC Tomato Soup
Nothing warms you up a cold winter day like homemade soup! Instead of reaching for a preservative-packed can, try this all-natural recipe. If you’ve got alphabet cookie cutters on hand, use them to cut out the ABC’s from cheese for a fun topping. Bonus points if your soup spells something awesome. Photo and Recipe: Gosia / Kiddie Foodies

 Rice-Cake-Fruit-Pizzas

9. Rice Cake Pizzas
These creative cakes are a cinch to pull together, plus they’re gluten-free. Get a healthy dose of probiotics and fiber from the peanut butter and yogurt spread. Then round up your troops and have a blast topping your rice cakes with fruit slices or granola. Photo and Recipe: Erin / The Law Student’s Wife

Popcorn Chicken

10. Popcorn Chicken
These crunchy nuggets will take some time to make, but the end result will leave you wanting another batch — stat. Since the bites are baked instead of fried, they’re way healthier than the greasy grub you’d get at a takeout window. Photo and Recipe: Lai / Food-4tots

 Animal-Crackers

11. Cinnamon Orange Animal Crackers
Bring the jungle to snack time! This recipe uses whole-wheat flour for healthy morsels that still walk on the wild side. If you have picky eaters, cut out the orange zest for a more traditional taste. Photo and Recipe: Natasha and Julianna / Cinema and Spice

Whole Wheat Cheez Its

12. Whole Grain DIY Cheez Its
If you or your kids go cuckoo for cheesy crackers, you’re in luck. This slimmed-down version uses whole-wheat flour instead of the enriched refined kind, plus it’s got no artificial coloring (unlike the highlighter-colored classics). Photo and Recipe: Casey Barber / Eating Rules

Chocolate Fudgesicles

13. Chocolate Fudgesicles
Step away from the supermarket freezer. These DIY pops have all-natural ingredients and none of the high fructose corn syrup of packaged treats. No raw coconut crystals on hand? Just use a different type of sweetener, like brown sugar. Photo and Recipe: Karielyn / The Healthy Family and Home

RELATED: 20 Healthy Snacks Under 200 Calories

Animal-Crackers

14. Strawberry Applesauce
Put extra apples to good use with this foolproof recipe. If you want to up the fiber content, don’t peel your apples before chopping them up. About two-thirds of an apple’s fiber comes from the peel! This sassy sauce stores well in the fridge or freezer so you can snack away later on or use it in other baked goods, like these Apple Oatmeal Cookies. Photo and Recipe: Marla Meridith / Family Fresh Cooking

Fruit Snacks

15. White Grape Homemade Fruit Snacks
There’s nothing like the delicious, squishy texture of fruit snacks. The good news? They’re ridiculously simple to make at home using just gelatin and fruit juice. If grape isn’t your favorite flavor, use cranberry, orange, or any other type of juice instead. Photo and Recipe: Rachel / Rachel Cooks

Originally posted November 2014. Updated September 2015. 

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