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Roasted Salmon with Cucumber-Dill Yogurt

Salmon gets a lot of credit for its high levels of omega-3 fatty acid (and rightfully so), but this tasty fish is also an excellent source of vitamin D, vitamin B-12 and lean protein. New studies have also found that wild salmon contains bioactive peptides, which are protein molecules that provide special support for joint cartilage, insulin effectiveness and control of inflammation in the digestive tract. This is definitely one superfood to have handy. Prepare it with our yogurt sauce for a quick, protein-packed meal.

Salmon with Cucumber-Dill Yogurt Sauce

Photo by Perry Santanachote

Serves 4

Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 15 minutes

The Skinny

Per 6-ounce serving:

  • 272 cal
  • 12 g fat (2 g sat)
  • 4 g carbs
  • 674 mg sodium
  • 35.5 g protein

Ingredients

1/2 Persian cucumber
1/4 cup low-fat sour cream
1/4 cup low-fat plain Greek yogurt (we used Chobani)
2 teaspoons fresh dill, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced and divided
1 tablespoons fresh lemon juice, divided
1.5 pounds salmon fillets, skin on
salt and pepper to taste

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 350° F.
  2. Shred the cucumber, excluding the seeded part, and use paper towels to squeeze out and discard excess water.
  3. In a small bowl, stir together the cucumber, sour cream, yogurt, dill, half the garlic, half the lemon juice, salt and pepper. Set aside.
  4. Line a baking pan with foil. Rinse the salmon and pat dry. Place it skin side down on the pan. Sprinkle with remaining garlic, lemon juice and salt and pepper to taste.
  5. Bake until barely opaque in the center, about 10-15 minutes.
  6. Serve with the yogurt sauce.

Food for Thought

Consider going wild with your dinner — your health will thank you. Alaskan wild-caught salmon ranks lowest in terms of toxicity and highest in omega-3 fatty acids and protein. Not only are farm-raised fish at high risk for PCB and antibiotic contamination, but they lack many of the benefits derived from the consumption of wild salmon, such as the bioactive peptides.

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